Keyword: ancient

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  • Hillary Clinton says businesses don’t create jobs.

    10/28/2014 5:53:57 AM PDT · by TangledUpInBlue · 38 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 10/27 | Linda Feldman
    Hillary Rodham Clinton’s recent comment about trickledown economics has launched a war of spin. First, here’s what the likely 2016 presidential candidate said at a campaign event last Friday for Martha Coakley, the Massachusetts Democratic gubernatorial candidate: “Don’t let anybody tell you that it’s corporations and businesses that create jobs,” former Secretary of State Clinton said in Boston. “You know that old theory, trickledown economics. That has been tried, that has failed. It has failed rather spectacularly. One of the things my husband says when people say, ‘What did you bring to Washington?’ He says, ‘I brought arithmetic.’
  • In 1100 AD, The People knew that the death tax was oppressive

    02/06/2014 4:34:40 PM PST · by ProgressingAmerica · 2 replies
    I want to introduce you to a magnificent document that far too few people have read. But before I introduce it to you, I need to remind you of something written in Federalist #84, that English history is American history. Hamilton specifically sites several(major) English documents that are important pre-cursors to the US Constitution. The earliest of said documents in that chain is the magnificent 1100 Charter of Liberties. Hamilton cites Magna Carta as the earliest, but the M.C. is really reliant upon the 1100 Charter as a precedent. In this Charter of Liberties, you will see, among other things,...
  • The Ancient Ghost City of Ani

    01/27/2014 7:04:49 AM PST · by C19fan · 16 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | January 24, 2014 | Alan Taylor
    Situated on the eastern border of Turkey, across the Akhurian River from Armenia, lies the empty, crumbling site of the once-great metropolis of Ani, known as "the city of a thousand and one churches." Founded more than 1,600 years ago, Ani was situated on several trade routes, and grew to become a walled city of more than 100,000 residents by the 11th century.
  • How smart was ancient man? (28 min video)

    01/16/2014 10:37:41 AM PST · by fishtank · 38 replies
    Creation.com ^ | 3-03 (but highlighted 1-16-2014) | n/a
    DESCRIPTION A consequence of evolutionary thinking is that ancient people were intellectually inferior to moderns. On the other hand, the bible records that people began with high intelligence and had great capabilities. This week we look at evidence for the biblical record. The Creation Magazine LIVE! TV program is a ministry of Creation Ministries International. With offices in seven countries and more PhD scientists than any Christian organization this program features cutting edge science that supports the Bible delivered in a non-technical, visually-rich, discussion-based format.
  • Ancient Spider Rock Art Sparks Archaeological Mystery

    12/21/2013 8:34:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    LiveScience ^ | December 20, 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists have discovered a panel containing the only known example of spider rock art in Egypt and, it appears, the entire Old World. The rock panel, now in two pieces, was found on the west wall of a shallow sandstone wadi, or valley, in the Kharga Oasis, located in Egypt's western desert about 108 miles (175 kilometers) west of Luxor. Facing east, and illuminated by the morning sun, the panel is a "very unusual" find, said Egyptologist Salima Ikram, a professor at the American University in Cairo who co-directs the North Kharga Oasis Survey Project. The identification of the creatures...
  • Ancient DNA Links Native Americans to Europe

    11/07/2013 8:52:57 AM PST · by ek_hornbeck · 45 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 11/5/13 | Michael Balter
    SANTA FE—Where did the first Americans come from? Most researchers agree that Paleoamericans moved across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia sometime before 15,000 years ago, suggesting roots in East Asia. But just where the source populations arose has long been a mystery. Now comes a surprising twist, from the complete nuclear genome of a Siberian boy who died 24,000 years ago—the oldest complete genome of a modern human sequenced to date. His DNA shows close ties to those of today's Native Americans. Yet he apparently descended not from East Asians, but from people who had lived in Europe or...
  • Ancient city of Iasos rises out of the ashes

    09/30/2013 6:11:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Tuesday, September 13 2011 | Dogan News Agency
    Archaeologists working on Iasos on Turkey’s Aegean coast have recently discovered that the ancient city was buried under a mountain of ash caused by the explosion of Mt. Thera on Santorini 3,600 years ago. Excavation works have also revealed a sewage system that was in place in the 4,000-year-old city and tunnels to the city’s theater... Spanu said columns that were found one meter underground provided vital information about the history of the city. “Following the explosion of the volcano Thera, which also caused the destruction of the Minoan civilization on the islands of Crete and Santorini, the ancient city...
  • Cursed? Time-Lapsed Video Shows Ancient Egyptian Statue Apparently Moving on Its Own!

    06/24/2013 2:11:16 PM PDT · by Ben Mugged · 29 replies
    The Blaze ^ | Jun. 24, 2013 | Liz Klimas
    Curators at the U.K.’s Manchester Museum were a bit perturbed when they noticed an ancient Egyptian statue changing position over time without any employees claiming to have moved it. So, they set up a camera to capture what might be happening. What they saw was just as unnerving. When viewing the footage taken over a week in time-lapse, they saw the statue of Neb-Sanu, which is only 11 inches tall, turning around on its own.
  • Mayan pyramid bulldozed: Ancient pyramid flattened by construction crew

    05/15/2013 10:27:49 AM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 41 replies
    http://www.examiner.com ^ | May 14 2013 | Jay Petrillo
    Officials in Belize say a construction company has destroyed one of the country's largest Mayan pyramids, reports. Head of the Belizean Institute of Archaeology Jaime Awe said the Noh Mul temple was leveled by a road-building company seeking gravel for road filler.
  • School forces all girls to lesbian kiss (Boys get lessons in how to spot 'sluts')

    04/24/2013 11:02:14 PM PDT · by Perseverando · 75 replies
    WND ^ | Arpil 24, 2013 | Chelsea Schilling
    Outraged parents say a New York middle school instructed young female students to ask one another for a lesbian kiss – and boys learned how to spot young sluts – in an anti-bullying presentation on gender identity and sexual orientation, according to Fox News’ Todd Starnes. According to Starnes’ Report, the children attended a special April 11 health class taught by college students at Linden Avenue Middle School in Red Hook, N.Y. Parents say they were not notified of the presentation. The students were introduced to terms such as “pansexual” and “genderqueer.” Some of the young female students said they...
  • Pluto's 'Gate to Hell' uncovered in Turkey

    04/02/2013 1:36:33 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 35 replies
    www.iTech Post.com ^ | April , 2013 | Pierre Dumont
    Italian archaeologists have uncovered Pluto's Gate, the so-called "gate to hell," in southwestern Turkey. In Greco-Roman mythology the cave was considered the portal to the underworld. It was found in the ancient ruins of Hierapolis, now called Pamukkale, and was described by Cicero and the Greek geographer Strabo in their writings. According to Strabo, the opening was filled with deadly vapors. "This space is full of vapor so misty and dense that one can scarcely see the ground. Any animal that passes inside meets instant death," Strabo wrote. "I threw in sparrows and they immediately breathed their last and fell...
  • Joe Biden: White House still pushing assault weapons ban

    03/21/2013 7:44:44 AM PDT · by EXCH54FE · 8 replies
    Washington Times ^ | Mar. 20, 2013 | David Sherfinski
    Vice President Joseph R. Biden said Wednesday that the White House is still pushing for a so-called assault weapons ban to pass Congress, even though the measure is on life support after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said this week it will not be part of a base bill Democrats plan to introduce next month. Mr. Biden, who has been President Obama’s point man on the issue since December’s shooting rampage in Connecticut, said the ban that took effect in 1994 and lapsed in 2004 was declared dead several times, and that he was told then it couldn’t possibly pass....
  • Clever Bird Goes Fishing

    03/20/2013 7:19:22 AM PDT · by Doogle · 7 replies
    YT ^ | 4/24/12 | MrBeemBom
    .....clever bird uses bread to fish, guess he ran out of salmon eggs.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBuPiC3ArL8
  • The Oldest Map With The Word 'America' On It Was Just Found Between Two Geometry Books

    07/03/2012 6:23:06 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies
    The Oldest Map With The Word 'America' On It Was Just Found Between Two Geometry Books The Daily Telegraph Jul. 3, 2012, 7:44 PM A version of a 500-year-old world map that was the first to mention the name "America" has been discovered in a German university library. Experts did not even know about the existence of a fifth copy of the map by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller until it showed up a few days ago, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich said. The discovery is much smaller and thought to have been made after the 1507 original version, which Germany...
  • Vatican Reports Discovery of Ancient Documents (Origen)

    06/12/2012 4:08:10 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    ABC News ^ | June 12, 2012
    The Vatican newspaper reported Tuesday that 29 previously unpublished homilies said to be the work of one of the most important and prolific early church fathers have been discovered in a German library. The 3rd Century theologian Origen of Alexandria is considered to have played a critical role in the development of Christian thought. Pope Benedict XVI, himself a theologian, dedicated two of his 2007 weekly church teaching sessions to the importance of Origen's life and work. Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano said that despite Origen's importance, few of his original texts remain in part because he was condemned by the...
  • Arctic melt releasing ancient methane

    05/20/2012 10:31:04 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 42 replies
    BBC News ^ | 5/20/12 | Richard Black
    Scientists have identified thousands of sites in the Arctic where methane that has been stored for many millennia is bubbling into the atmosphere. The methane has been trapped by ice, but is able to escape as the ice melts. Writing in the journal Nature Geoscience, the researchers say this ancient gas could have a significant impact on climate change. Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after CO2 and levels are rising after a few years of stability. There are many sources of the gas around the world, some natural and some man-made, such as landfill waste disposal sites...
  • If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It: Ancient Computers in Use Today

    02/20/2012 7:27:49 AM PST · by ShadowAce · 64 replies
    PC World ^ | 19 February 2012 | Benj Edwards
    It’s easy to wax nostalgic about old technology--to remember fondly our first Apple IIe or marvel at the old mainframes that ran on punched cards. But no one in their right mind would use those outdated, underpowered dinosaurs to run a contemporary business, let alone a modern weapons system, right?Wrong!While much of the tech world views a two-year-old smartphone as hopelessly obsolete, large swaths of our transportation and military infrastructure, some modern businesses, and even a few computer programmers rely daily on technology that hasn’t been updated for decades.If you’ve recently bought a MetroCard for the New York City Subway...
  • Visit To Jewish Holy Sites in PA Controlled Awarta

    01/18/2012 12:36:00 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 4 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 18/1/12
    Rabbi Shmuel Rabinovitch, the official rabbi of the Western Wall in Jerusalem visited the tombs of Eleazar and Itamar in Awarta on Wednesday. The graves of many Biblical figures are located in Awarta such as Eleazar and Itamar who are the sons of Aaron the High Priest as well as Pinchas, and the 70 Elders. Rabbi Rabinovitch reported finding the tombs vandalized and desecrated. Rabbi Rabinovitch's visit was conducted under the auspices of Civil Administration head Brigadier General Motti Almoz and other IDF personnel. The rabbi called upon the proper authorities to renovate the sites. Awarta is today an Arab...
  • Flooding of ancient Salton Sea linked to San Andreas earthquakes

    06/27/2011 8:31:32 PM PDT · by decimon · 20 replies
    University of California - San Diego ^ | June 26, 2011 | Unknown
    Study finds that faults beneath the Salton Sea ruptured during Colorado River floods and may have triggered large earthquakes on the southern San Andreas FaultSouthern California's Salton Sea, once a large natural lake fed by the Colorado River, may play an important role in the earthquake cycle of the southern San Andreas Fault and may have triggered large earthquakes in the past. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Nevada, Reno, discovered new faults in the Salton Sea near the southern end of the San Andreas Fault. By examining...
  • Did God have a wife? Scholar says that he did

    03/18/2011 5:31:09 PM PDT · by OldDeckHand · 83 replies
    MSNBC.com ^ | 03/18/2011 | Jennifer Viegas
    Word of 'Asherah' was nearly edited out of the Bible, researcher concludes God had a wife, Asherah, whom the Book of Kings suggests was worshipped alongside Yahweh in his temple in Israel, according to an Oxford scholar. In 1967, Raphael Patai was the first historian to mention that the ancient Israelites worshipped both Yahweh and Asherah. The theory has gained new prominence because of the research of Francesca Stavrakopoulou, who began her work at Oxford and is now a senior lecturer in the department of Theology and Religion at the University of Exeter. Information presented in Stavrakopoulou's books, lectures and...
  • Has a University of Hartford Professor Found the Lost City of Atlantis?[Spain]

    03/08/2011 5:59:42 PM PST · by Palter · 21 replies
    WesthartFord Patch ^ | 08 Mar 2011 | Susan Schoenberger
    Dr. Richard Freund to be featured in a National Geographic Channel film; public invited to preview on Wednesday. Spend a little time with Dr. Richard Freund of the University of Hartford, and you might be convinced that the lost city of Atlantis is buried deep within a swamp in southern Spain. Freund, who directs the university's Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies, worked with a team of Spanish, American and Canadian scientists to examine a muddy swamp in Spain that was first noted as a possible location for Atlantis by a German scientist looking at satellite photos in 2003. Freund's 2009...
  • Ancient 8-Foot Sea Scorpions Probably Were Pussycats

    01/03/2011 10:07:49 AM PST · by Silentgypsy · 29 replies
    Live Science ^ | 12/30/2010 | Charles Q. Choi
    Ancient sea scorpions included the largest and arguably most frightening bug-like creatures known to have lived on Earth, but despite their fearsome claws, these giants might actually have been creampuffs, scientists think.
  • Ancient humans, dubbed 'Denisovans', interbred with us

    12/22/2010 6:26:50 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 56 replies · 6+ views
    BBC ^ | 12/22/10 | Pallab Ghosh
    Scientists say an entirely separate type of human identified from bones in Siberia co-existed and interbred with our own species.The ancient humans have been dubbed "Denisovans" after the caves in Siberia where their remains were found. There is also evidence that this population was widespread in Eurasia. A study in Nature journal shows that Denisovans co-existed with Neanderthals and interbred with our species - perhaps around 50,000 years ago. An international group of researchers sequenced a complete genome from one of the ancient hominins (human-like creatures), based on nuclear DNA extracted from a finger bone.
  • Muslim group suggests travellers pat themselves down at airport

    12/01/2010 8:08:36 PM PST · by Lorianne · 17 replies
    Spero News/ CAIR ^ | 25 November 2010
    The following is a new release distributed by the Council on American-Islamic Relations. The advocacy group has issued previous travel advisories directed especially to Muslims in the United States and others concernd about security practices imposed by the Transportation Security Administration at airports throughout the country. Full text follows: The Secondary Screening Process After the primary screening process, you might be selected for additional secondary screening for alarm resolution, anomaly resolution, at random, or because of bulky clothing. * If you are selected for secondary screening because of an alarm or an anomaly in an AIT, you may receive an...
  • Ancient Virus Found Hiding Out in Finch Genome

    10/02/2010 11:21:25 AM PDT · by neverdem · 25 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceNOW ^ | 28 September 2010 | Cassandra Willyard
    Enlarge Image Buried gem. Researchers have uncovered "fossil virus" inside the zebra finch genome. Credit: Peripitus/Wikimedia The hepatitis B virus and its ilk have been around for a long, long time. A newly uncovered "viral fossil" buried deep in the genome of the zebra finch indicates that the hepatitis B family of viruses—known as hepadnaviruses—originated at least 19 million years ago. Together with recent findings on other viruses, the work suggests that all viruses may be much older than thought. No one knows exactly where or when viruses originated. They don't leave fossils, so scientists have begun scouring the...
  • Ancient tools intrigue author

    08/18/2010 1:27:31 PM PDT · by rosettasister · 41 replies
    Commercial-News ^ | August 15, 2010 | MARY WICOFF
    The ancient Egyptian toolboxes didn’t have precise, sophisticated measuring instruments like we have today … or did they? Christopher Dunn examines that question in his new book, “Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt: Advanced Engineering in the Temples of the Pharaohs.” Dunn has made nine trips to Egypt since 1986, and each time he’s amazed at the precision of the columns, tunnels and statues. He brushes aside conventional thinking, and suggests the ancient Egyptians used highly refined tools and mega-machines. “There’s more going on here than meets the eye,” he said. A manufacturing engineer by trade, Dunn works as human resources...
  • Ancient DNA identifies donkey ancestors, people who domesticated them

    07/28/2010 11:21:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 18 replies · 5+ views
    University of Florida ^ | July 28, 2010 | Unknown
    Genetic investigators say the partnership between people and the ancestors of today's donkeys was sealed not by monarchs trying to establish kingdoms, but by mobile, pastoral people who had to recruit animals to help them survive the harsh Saharan landscape in northern Africa more than 5,000 years ago. The findings, reported today by an international research team in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, paint a surprising picture of what small, isolated groups of people were able to accomplish when confronted with unpredictable storms and expanding desert. "It says those early people were quite innovative, more so than many people...
  • World's oldest doodle found on rock

    07/17/2010 11:49:26 PM PDT · by shibumi · 38 replies
    Telegraph.co.uk ^ | July 17, 2010 | Staff
    Scientists have discovered what is believed to be one of the world's oldest doodles - an ancient scrawl carved onto a rock by a caveman 4,500 years ago. Cambridge University experts believe the crudely etched circles are the Neolithic version of a modern office worker's scribbles on a post-it note. The 6.6in (17cm) chunk of sandstone was discovered by an amateur archaeologist from the bottom of a deep quarry in Over, Cambs., during a university fun day.
  • Roman gladiator cemetery found in England

    06/08/2010 5:33:01 AM PDT · by Lobsterback · 18 replies · 51+ views
    CNN.com ^ | June 8, 2010 | the CNN Wire Staff
    London, England (CNN) -- Heads hacked off, a bite from a lion, tiger or bear, massive muscles on massive men -- all clues that an ancient cemetery uncovered in northern England is the final resting place of gladiators, scientists have announced after seven years of investigations....
  • Greek Style Architecture Found In The Ancient Achaemenid City

    06/25/2008 5:43:33 PM PDT · by blam · 8 replies · 168+ views
    Greek Style Architecture Found in the Ancient Achaemenid City Achaemenid city of Istakhr in Fars Province Tehran , 25 June 2008: Archaeologists have used geological surveys in the south of Iran to reveal rectangular formations inspired by Greek architecture dating to the Sassanid era. Archeologists have said that the structures located in Fars Province are part of the urban planning of the ancient Achaemenid city of Istakhr during the Sassanid period (226-651 CE). The design is loaned from Hippodamus style of urban planning during a series of armed conflicts with Persias great rival to the west, the Roman Empire, said...
  • 'Ancient IKEA building' discovered by Italian archaeologists

    04/22/2010 8:02:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 604+ views
    Times Online ^ | April 22, 2010 | Richard Owen, Rome
    Massimo Osanna, head of archaeology at Basilica University, said that the team working at Torre Satriano near Potenza in what was once Magna Graecia had unearthed a sloping roof with red and black decorations, with "masculine" and "feminine" components inscribed with detailed directions on how they slotted together. Professor Christopher Smith, director of the British School at Rome, said that the discovery was "the clearest example yet found of mason's marks of the time. It looks as if someone was instructing others how to mass-produce components and put them together in this way"" he told The Times. Professor Osanna suggested...
  • Ancient Roam [ s/b "Ancient Rome" and c/b "Ancient Roman Statue Used as Garden Gnome"]

    01/18/2010 11:54:42 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 465+ views
    Croatian Times ^ | Thursday, January 14, 2010 | Austrian Times
    A priceless ancient Roman statue has been discovered being used to decorate a flower bed in a housing estate. The headless sculpture of an emperor is believed to have been stolen some time in the 1930s and then used during the construction of a posh private square in Naples, Italy. It is thought to date back to the 2nd century BC and may once have stood in the grand gardens of a local palace. Police have now restored the statue to the city's archaeological museum after a race against time to beat the Mafia to the treasure. "We knew...
  • Geology Picture of the Week, Jan. 10-16, 2010: Dolly Sods

    01/15/2010 8:17:18 PM PST · by cogitator · 6 replies · 707+ views
    Various
    Tried to come up with something different, so I went with something local over in West Virginia. I've been here a couple of times. Nice hiking. In the fall, some of the brush turns this incredible shade of red. Click 'em all for 2x bigger. Bear Rocks Elakala Falls (not far from Blackwater Falls)
  • Inscription indicates Kingdom of Israel existed in the 10th century BCE

    01/08/2010 7:19:08 AM PST · by bogusname · 30 replies · 1,004+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | Jan 8, 2010 | SHALHEVET ZOHAR
    A breakthrough in the research of the Hebrew scriptures has shed new light on the period in which the Bible was written, testifying to Hebrew writing abilities as early as the 10th century BCE, the University of Haifa announced on Thursday. Prof. Gershon Galil of the Department of Biblical Studies at the University of Haifa recently deciphered an inscription dating from the 10th century BCE, and showed that it was a Hebrew inscription, making it the earliest known Hebrew writing. The significance of this breakthrough relates to the fact that at least some of the biblical scriptures were composed hundreds...
  • Ancient Mayans Likely Had Fountains and Toilets

    12/23/2009 6:54:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies · 1,500+ views
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, December 23, 2009 | Charles Q. Choi
    The ancient Mayans may have had enough engineering know-how to master running water, creating fountains and even toilets by controlling water pressure, scientists now suggest... Scientists investigated the Mayan center at Palenque in Chiapas, Mexico. At its height, this major site, inhabited from roughly 100 to 800 AD, had some 1,500 structures -- residences, palaces, and temples -- holding some 6,000 inhabitants under a series of powerful rulers. The center at Palenque also had what was arguably the most unique and intricate system of water management known anywhere in the Maya lowlands. These involved elaborate subterranean aqueducts to deal with...
  • Ancient Volcano's Devastating Effects Confirmed (Toba eruption and the following Ice Age)

    12/04/2009 3:08:19 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 30 replies · 1,018+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 12/4/09 | LiveScience Staff
    A massive volcanic eruption that occurred in the distant past killed off much of central India's forests and may have pushed humans to the brink of extinction, according to a new study that adds evidence to a controversial topic. The Toba eruption, which took place on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia about 73,000 years ago, released an estimated 800 cubic kilometers of ash into the atmosphere that blanketed the skies and blocked out sunlight for six years. In the aftermath, global temperatures dropped by as much as 16 degrees centigrade (28 degrees Fahrenheit) and life on Earth plunged deeper...
  • Israel displays coins from ancient Jewish revolt

    11/11/2009 1:51:52 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies · 839+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 11/11/09 | Michael Barajas - ap
    JERUSALEM – Israel displayed for the first time Wednesday a collection of rare coins charred and burned from the Roman destruction of the Jewish Temple nearly 2,000 years ago. About 70 coins were found in an excavation at the foot of a key Jerusalem holy site. They give a rare glimpse into the period of the Jewish revolt that eventually led to the destruction of the Second Jewish Temple in A.D. 70, said Hava Katz, curator of the exhibition. The Jews rebelled against the Roman Empire and took over Jerusalem in A.D. 66. After laying siege to Jerusalem, the Romans...
  • Soldiers help preserve Iraq's ancient history

    11/09/2009 3:54:39 PM PST · by SandRat · 3 replies · 404+ views
    Multi-National Force - Iraq ^ | Sgt. Jon Soles, USA
    >Nouri Obeyd Kathem (left), an archaeologist with the Iraqi Ministry of Antiquities and Tourism, explains the Sobbar Abu Habba site to Maj. Charles Morrison (center) and Capt. Ross Boyce with the 120th Combined Arms Battalion, Nov. 4. Photo by Sgt. Jon Soles, Multi-National Division – Baghdad. BAGHDAD — What may look like large, weathered mounds of dirt on rural farmland near Mahmudiyah are actually artifact-filled ruins of an ancient civilization. Soldiers of the North Carolina National Guard's 120th Combined Arms Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team here surveyed the sites recently with officials from the Government of Iraq's Ministry of...
  • Footprints found under ancient mosaic

    10/14/2009 10:39:12 AM PDT · by Jet Jaguar · 12 replies · 647+ views
    JPost ^ | October 14, 2009 | By JAMIE ROMM
    While they may not have been the markings of a pair of Naot sandals, Israel Antiquities Authority conservators discovered footprints over 1,700 years-old, under the Lod Mosaic and at least one print resembling a modern sandal. Head of the Israel Antiquities AuthorityArt Conservation Branch Jacques Neguer said that when removing a section of a mosaic it is customary to clean its bedding, and study the material from which it is made and the construction stages and during that process, they found the footprints under the mosaic. "We look for drawings and sketches that the artists made in the plaster and...
  • Ancient Artisans' Footprints Discovered Beneath Lod Mosaic

    10/14/2009 8:54:53 PM PDT · by bogusname · 12 replies · 616+ views
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 10/14/09 | Hana Levi Julian
    The ancient footprints of the artisans who built a stunning 1,700-year-old mosaic floor in Lod were discovered recently, when conservators from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) were in the process of detaching the huge work of art from the ground. As the conservation experts worked on the plaster bedding to be done before detaching the mosaic, they were surprised to notice there were ancient foot and sandal prints beneath it. Clearly, the builders that had worked on the floor sometimes wore their sandals, and sometimes worked in their bare feet...
  • Ancient Rome's Real Population Revealed

    10/07/2009 5:08:10 AM PDT · by decimon · 32 replies · 1,483+ views
    Live Science ^ | Oct 5, 2009 | Andrea Thompson
    The first century B.C. was one of the most culturally rich in the history of the Roman Empire - the age of Cicero, Caesar and Virgil. But as much as historians know about the great figures of this period of Ancient Rome, they know very little about some basic facts, such as the population size of the late Roman Empire. Now, a group of historians has used caches of buried coins to provide an answer to this question. During the Republican period of Rome (about the fifth to the first centuries B.C), adult male citizens of Rome could be taxed...
  • Ancient ale: Prehistoric yeast takes beer drinkers back millions of year

    09/25/2009 12:49:00 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 28 replies · 1,367+ views
    chicagotribune.com ^ | Sep 24, 2009‎ | Suzanne Bohan
    Ancient ale Prehistoric yeast takes beer drinkers back millions of yearsBy Suzanne Bohan Contra Costa Times Sep 24, 2009‎ GUERNEVILLE, Calif. - Inside a stainless-steel tank at a brew pub here overlooking the redwood-rimmed Russian River, a 45-million-year-old yeast proves its mettle. And the remarkably resilient prehistoric microbe hasn't just garnered a devoted pack of Fossil Fuels Beer fans, it's also providing palpable proof of the tenacity of life on this planet. When the Australian-born owner of Stumptown Brewery, Peter Hackett, first learned of the ancient yeast, he doubted this long-extinct strain would ferment anything drinkable. It took the urging...
  • Ancient 'smell of death' revealed

    09/10/2009 2:52:39 AM PDT · by Natufian · 27 replies · 1,407+ views
    BBC ^ | 09/10/2009 | Matt Walker
    When animals die, their corpses exude a particular "stench of death" which repels their living relatives, scientists have discovered. Corpses of animals as distantly related as insects and crustaceans all produce the same stench, caused by a blend of simple fatty acids. The smell helps living animals avoid others that have succumbed to disease or places where predators lurk.
  • 'Massive' ancient wall uncovered in Jerusalem

    09/05/2009 7:36:06 AM PDT · by Not gonna take it anymore · 29 replies · 1,600+ views
    CNN ^ | updated 3:10 p.m. EDT, Fri September 4, 2009 | No author listed
    JERUSALEM (CNN) -- An archaeological dig in Jerusalem has turned up a 3,700-year-old wall that is the largest and oldest of its kind found in the region, experts say. The wall is built of enormous boulders, confounding archaeologists as to how ancient peoples built it. Standing 8 meters (26 feet) high, the wall of huge cut stones is a marvel to archaeologists. "To build straight walls up 8 meters ... I don't know how to do it today without mechanical equipment," said the excavation's director, Ronny Reich. "I don't think that any engineer today without electrical power [could] do it."...
  • beacons

    08/28/2009 7:06:53 PM PDT · by franksolich · 11 replies · 1,342+ views
    conservativecave ^ | August 28, 2009 | franksolich
    I just got done reading a book about England during the Dark Ages. By the way, there exists startling similarities between Ethelred the Unready ("unready" in this sense meaning "uncounseled") and Pa Kettle in the White House; in fact, one can predict Pa Kettle's foreign policy strategy by reading of Ethelred's. Anyway. There is much mention of military communications during this period (say, circa 500-1066 A.D.), which was facilitated by lighting beacons. Apparently it took a rider on a fast horse four days to get from the North of England to London, but with the use of beacons, messages could...
  • Preserving the Ancient City of Babylon

    07/04/2009 10:13:12 AM PDT · by SandRat · 2 replies · 573+ views
    Multi-National Force - Iraq ^ | Capt. Stephen Short, USA
    A hilltop view of the ancient city of Babylon, where King Nebuchadnezzar II, whose life spanned 630-562 B.C., built his hanging gardens, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. Photo by Maj. Mike Feeney, 172nd Infantry Brigade. HILLAH — Soldiers of the 172nd Infantry Brigade are enabling documentarians, historians and preservationists as they work to ensure ancient Iraqi history is preserved and documented in Babil province. The Soldiers provide these experts transportation and security as they conduct site surveys of Babylon, an ancient city near the modern city of HillahThe Babil Provincial Reconstruction Team hosted the World Monuments Fund...
  • Origins of Time, The Ancients, and Future Civilizations.

    05/25/2009 11:32:54 AM PDT · by jxb7076 · 14 replies · 546+ views
    hubpages ^ | 5/25/09 | JXB7076
    Time is a component of a measuring system used to sequence events, to compare the durations of events and the intervals between them, and to quantify the motions of objects. Time has been a major subject of religion, philosophy, and science, but defining time in a non-controversial manner applicable to all fields of study has consistently eluded the greatest scholars. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time) At the point in history when Homo sapiens became socially aware, time was considered to be cyclical, or a matter of day and night. The seasons were a matter of birth and death, and calendars were based on...
  • Myanmar finds more evidences on Bronze Age, Iron Age

    03/09/2009 7:14:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 1,193+ views
    ChinaView / Xinhua ^ | Monday, March 9, 2009 | Deng Shasha (editor)
    Recent excavations have found more evidences on both Bronze Age and Iron Age in Thazi township, central Mandalay division, Myanmar, proving that the country passed through both Bronze Age and Iron Age in the ancient time. The Archaeology, Natural Museum and Libraries Department under the Ministry of Culture, in cooperation with the CNRC of France, excavated the areas around Ywagongyi village in the township for 20 days from Jan. 10 to 30, finding out the site where 44 bodies were buried along with two small bundles of bronze sheets, two iron objects, 14 stone beads of different colors, a fine...
  • Kepler, SETI and Ancient Probes

    03/05/2009 6:03:25 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 35 replies · 895+ views
    « We’ve already speculated here that if the Kepler mission finds few Earth-like planets in the course of its investigations, the belief that life is rare will grow. But let’s be optimists and speculate on the reverse: What if Kepler pulls in dozens, even hundreds, of Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of their respective stars? In that case, the effort to push on to study the atmospheres of such planets would receive a major boost, aiding the drive to launch a terrestrial planet hunter with serious spectroscopic capabilities some time in the next decade.Budget problems? Let’s fold Darwin...
  • Ancient Marble Figurine of a Roman Boxer Found in City Of David

    01/27/2009 9:53:04 AM PST · by Nachum · 7 replies · 754+ views
    Arutz 7 ^ | 1-27-09 | Hana Levi Julian
    (IsraelNN.com) Archaeologists have discovered an 1,800-year-old marble figurine of what is believed to be the head of a Roman boxer. The bust was found during excavations in the area of the Givati car park in the City of David, across the street from the Dung Gate leading to the Western Wall (Kotel). The figurine, which depicts the head of a man with a short, curly beard, is carved from pale yellow marble and might indicate the raw material came from Asia Minor, according to excavation directors Dr. Doron Ben-Ami and Yana Tchekhanovets. "The high level of finish on the figurine...