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Keyword: ancientnavigation

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  • Syphilis widespread in Central Europe even before Columbus' voyage to America

    11/23/2015 9:54:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Journal of Biological and Clinical Anthropology via Health Canal ^ | November 19, 2015 | Johanna Sophia Gaul, Karl Grossschmidt, Christian Gusenbauer and Fabian Kanz
    In 1495, a "new" disease spread throughout Europe: syphilis. Christopher Columbus was said to have brought this sexually transmitted disease back from his voyage to America. At least, that has been the accepted theory up until now. Using morphological and structural evidence, researchers from the Department of Forensic Medicine and the Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology (bone laboratory) at MedUni Vienna have now identified several cases of congenital syphilis dating back to as early as 1320 AD in skeletons from excavations at the cathedral square of St. Polten, Austria... Congenital syphilis, which is passed from a pregnant mother to...
  • Who Were the First Americans?

    01/13/2002 7:51:38 AM PST · by sarcasm · 10 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | September 2000 | Sasha Nemecek
    Images: Pamela Patrick MAMMOTH HUNTER OR FISH CATCHER? Archaeologists had concluded that the first inhabitants of the New World were fur-clad big-game hunters who swept across the Bering land bridge in pursuit of their prey. But recent evidence suggests that the first settlers may have been just as likely to hunt small game, catch fish or gather plants as they moved through more temperate environments. The leaf-shaped spearpoint I'm holding is surprisingly dainty--for a deadly weapon. I let my mind wander, trying to imagine life some 14,700 years ago in the marshes of southern Chile, where this relic was ...
  • Ancient People Followed 'Kelp Highway' To America, Researcher Says

    02/20/2006 3:32:34 PM PST · by blam · 32 replies · 1,095+ views
    Live Science ^ | 2-19-2006 | Bjorn Carey
    Ancient People Followed 'Kelp Highway' to America, Researcher Says Bjorn Carey LiveScience Staff Writer Sun Feb 19, 9:00 PM ET ST. LOUIS—Ancient humans from Asia may have entered the Americas following an ocean highway made of dense kelp. The new finding lends strength to the "coastal migration theory," whereby early maritime populations boated from one island to another, hunting the bountiful amounts of sea creatures that live in kelp forests. This research was presented here Sunday at the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science by anthropologist Jon Erlandson of the University of Oregon. Today, a nearly continuous "kelp...
  • Anthropologist advances 'kelp highway' theory for Coast settlement

    05/31/2009 12:09:51 AM PDT · by BGHater · 17 replies · 898+ views
    Vancouver Sun ^ | 28 May 2009 | Larry Pynn
    Migrating peoples were sophisticated in sea harvesting, Jon Erlandson says The Pacific Coast of the Americas was settled starting about 15,000 years ago during the last glacial retreat by seafaring peoples following a "kelp highway" rich in marine resources, a noted professor of anthropology theorized Wednesday. Jon Erlandson, director of the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon, suggested that especially productive "sweet spots," such as the estuaries of B.C.'s Fraser and Stikine rivers, served as corridors by which people settled the Interior of the province. Erlandson said in an interview these migrating peoples were already...
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 29 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...
  • The Seaweed Trail: Peopling the Americas

    10/17/2011 1:55:09 PM PDT · by Renfield · 12 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 10-12-2011 | Keith Davis
    Mapmakers once thought the earth was flat. Astronomers used to believe the sun circled the earth. As late as the 1990s, archaeologists were convinced that the original American settlers crossed a land bridge from Asia into Alaska, found daylight between the glaciers, and gradually followed it south. According to what had been orthodox thinking, that happened about 12,000 years ago. “Suppose it were true,” says Jack Rossen, associate professor and chair of the Department of anthropology. “Suppose you could find a corridor through a mile-high wall of ice and follow it for a thousand miles. What would you eat? Popsicles?”...
  • First Americans Thrived On Seaweed

    05/08/2008 2:07:20 PM PDT · by blam · 34 replies · 76+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 5-8-2008 | Jeff Hecht
    First Americans thrived on seaweed 19:00 08 May 2008 NewScientist.com news service Jeff Hecht How times have changed. Instead of large amounts of meat and spuds, some of the first Americans enjoyed healthy doses of seaweed. The evidence comes from 27 litres of material collected from the Monte Verde site in southern Chile, widely accepted as the oldest settlement in the Americas. Nine species of seaweed, carbon dated at 13,980 to 14,220 years old, played a major role in a diet that included land plants and animals. Tom Dillehay of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, argues that the seaweeds were...
  • Homo Erectus Crosses The Open Ocean

    05/15/2009 7:53:17 AM PDT · by BGHater · 23 replies · 2,373+ views
    Environmental Graffiti ^ | 06 May 2009 | Environmental Graffiti
    Imagine a group of Homo erectus, the earliest members of our family genus, living near a coastline on an Indonesia island and well aware of a lush island that is visible only a few miles offshore. One day while on the coast, a herd of elephants emerges from the nearby forest and crosses the beach. They enter the ocean and swim successfully to the offshore island. Could this be the experience that triggers a creative process in our ancestors who are watching nearby? Does their imagination and thinking include not only a desire to reach that island, but ideas about...
  • Ancient Trading Raft Sails Anew [ Thor Heyerdahl did it first ]

    05/15/2009 7:08:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies · 1,718+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 13, 2009 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    For the first time in nearly 500 years, a full-size balsa-wood raft just like those used in pre-Columbian Pacific trade took to the water on Sunday, May 10. Only this time, instead of the Pacific coast between Mexico and Chile where such rafts carried goods between the great civilizations of the Andes and Mesoamerica as long as a millennium ago, the replica raft was floated in the Charles River basin. The faithful reproduction of the ancient sailing craft, built from eight balsa logs brought from Ecuador for the project, was created in less than six weeks by 30 students in...
  • Clues to Prehistoric Human Exploration Found in Sweet Potato Genome

    01/21/2013 8:39:59 PM PST · by Theoria · 25 replies
    Science ^ | 21 Jan 2013 | Lizzie Wade
    Europeans raced across oceans and continents during the Age of Exploration in search of territory and riches. But when they reached the South Pacific, they found they had been beaten there by a more humble traveler: the sweet potato. Now, a new study suggests that the plant's genetics may be the key to unraveling another great age of exploration, one that predated European expansion by several hundred years and remains an anthropological enigma. Humans domesticated the sweet potato in the Peruvian highlands about 8000 years ago, and previous generations of scholars believed that Spanish and Portuguese explorers introduced the crop...
  • Volcanic Soils Offer New Clues About The Emergence Of Powerful Chiefdoms In Hawaii

    06/11/2004 4:26:36 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 263+ views
    Eureka Alert/Stanford University ^ | 6-11-2004 | Mark Shwartz
    Contact: Mark Shwartz mshwartz@stanford.edu 650-723-9296 Stanford University Volcanic soils yield new clues about the emergence of powerful chiefdoms in Hawaii When the first Europeans arrived in the Hawaiian Islands in 1778, they found a thriving, complex society organized into chiefdoms whose economies were based primarily on farming. On the islands of Kauai, O'ahu and Molokai, the principal crop was taro – a starchy plant grown in irrigated wetlands where the supply of water was usually abundant. But on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii, the main staple was the sweet potato – a more labor-intensive crop planted in relatively...
  • Did the First Americans Come From, Er, Australia?

    09/06/2004 8:04:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 1,189+ views
    Reuters ^ | Mon Sep 6, 2004 09:24 AM ET | staff
    Silvia Gonzalez from John Moores University in Liverpool said skeletal evidence pointed strongly to this unpalatable truth and hinted that recovered DNA would corroborate it... She said there was very strong evidence that the first migration came from Australia via Japan and Polynesia and down the Pacific Coast of America. Skulls of a people with distinctively long and narrow heads discovered in Mexico and California predated by several thousand years the more rounded features of the skulls of native Americans. One particularly well preserved skull of a long-face woman had been carbon dated to 12,700 years ago, whereas the...
  • Archaeologists Find Evidence Of Origin Of Pacific Islanders

    03/31/2008 1:56:50 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,238+ views
    VOA News ^ | 3-31-2008 | Heidi Chang
    Archaeologists Find Evidence of Origin of Pacific Islanders By Heidi Chang Honolulu, Hawaii 31 March 2008 The origin of Pacific Islanders has been a mystery for years. Now archaeologists believe they have the answer. As Heidi Chang reports, they found it in China. The excavation of the Zishan site (Zhejiang Province) in 1996, where many artifacts from the Hemudu culture have been found China had a sea-faring civilization as long as 7000 years ago. Archaeologist Tianlong Jiao says, one day, these mariners sailed their canoes into the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, and stayed. He points out, "Most scientists, archaeologists,...
  • Move over Christopher Columbus, Admiral Zheng He is here

    03/11/2005 8:19:24 AM PST · by MikeEdwards · 38 replies · 1,266+ views
    CFP ^ | March 11, 2005 | Judi McLeod
    That’s the day when the United Nations will begin trying to convince the world that Christopher Columbus did not discover North America, a Chinese-Muslim explorer discovered us a half century before C.C. No, this is not science fiction. It is today’s cover story in Canada Free Press. That the Canadian government has been selling off our natural resources, including the Alberta tar sands to the Chinese government ought to be worry enough for any with the sovereignty of our nation in mind. Now we have a yet to be identified "respected Canadian architect" headed to the United Nations to tell...
  • Marco Polo discovered America 200 years before Colombus, according to map

    08/09/2007 3:28:45 AM PDT · by HAL9000 · 92 replies · 5,820+ views
    AFP via translation ^ | August 9, 2007
    Possible discovered of America by Marco Polo before Colomb: account in VSD 'America - its West coast - would have been discovered by Marco Polo some 200 years before Christophe Colomb, according to a chart of the Library of the Congress in Washington examined since 1943 by the FBI and whose history is told in published review VSD Wednesday. This document, brought to the Library in 1933 by Marcian Rossi, an American naturalized citizen originating in Italy, “represents a boat beside a chart showing part of India, China, Japan, the Eastern Indies and North America”, indicates the report/ratio of...
  • Deep history of coconuts decoded (Colonization of the Americas?)

    06/24/2011 2:06:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | June 24, 2011 | Diana Lutz
    Written in coconut DNA are two origins of cultivation, several ancient trade routes, and the history of the colonization of the AmericasThe coconut (the fruit of the palm Cocos nucifera) is the Swiss Army knife of the plant kingdom; in one neat package it provides a high-calorie food, potable water, fiber that can be spun into rope, and a hard shell that can be turned into charcoal. What’s more, until it is needed for some other purpose it serves as a handy flotation device. No wonder people from ancient Austronesians to Captain Bligh pitched a few coconuts aboard before setting...
  • Man Launches Ice Cream Stick Viking Ship

    08/16/2005 1:46:16 PM PDT · by headsonpikes · 35 replies · 1,260+ views
    Newsday.com ^ | August 16, 2005 | Toby Sterling
    A former Hollywood stunt man now living in the Netherlands launched his greatest project to date Tuesday: a 45-foot replica Viking ship made of millions of wooden ice cream sticks and more than a ton of glue. Rob McDonald named the ship the "Mjollnir" after the hammer of the mythic Norse god of thunder, Thor. After the 13 ton boat was lifted into the water by crane, "Captain Rob," as he is known, stood calmly on the stern as a team of volunteers rowed the apparently sturdy vessel ... "I have a dream to show children they can do anything,"...
  • Terracotta Warriors Inspired by Ancient Greek Art

    12/14/2013 5:36:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 10 December 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Nickel's evidence includes newly translated ancient records that tell a fantastic tale of giant statues that "appeared" in the far west, inspiring the first emperor of China to duplicate them in front of his palace. This story offers evidence of early contact between China and the West, contacts that Nickel says inspired the First Emperor (which is what Qin Shi Huangdi called himself) to not only duplicate the 12 giant statues but to build the massive Terracotta Army along with other life-size sculptures. Before the First Emperor's time, life-size sculptures were not built in China, and Nickel argues the idea...
  • Scientists: Glass dish unearthed in Nara came from Roman Empire

    11/15/2014 4:26:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    The Asahi Shimbun ^ | November 13, 2014 | Kazuto Tsukamoto
    -A glass dish unearthed from a burial mound here is the first of its kind confirmed to have come to Japan from the Roman Empire, a research team said... The dish and bowl were retrieved together from the No. 126 tumulus of the Niizawa Senzuka cluster of ancient graves, a national historic site. The No. 126 tumulus dates back to the late fifth century... According to the team’s analysis, the chemical composition of the clear dark blue dish is almost identical to glasswork unearthed in the area of the Roman Empire (27 B.C.-A.D. 395). Measuring 14.1 to 14.5 centimeters in...
  • Abacus: Mystery Of The Bead -- The Bead Unbaffled

    10/21/2010 5:58:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    webhome.idirect.com ^ | prior to 2010 | Totton Heffelfinger & Gary Flom
    Abacus is a Latin word meaning sand tray. The word originates with the Arabic "abq", which means dust or fine sand. In Greek this would become abax or abakon which means table or tablet... Probably, the first device was the counting board. This appeared at various times in several places around the world. The earliest counting boards consisted of a tray made of sun dried clay or wood. A thin layer of sand would be spread evenly on the surface, and symbols would be drawn in the sand with a stick or ones finger. To start anew, one would simply...
  • Roman-Style Column Bolsters Han Dynasty Tomb

    04/08/2007 6:41:47 PM PDT · by blam · 36 replies · 1,272+ views
    Peoples Daily ^ | 4-9-2007
    Roman-style column bolsters Han Dynasty tomb Archeologists excavate near a Roman-style column in a newly found Han Dynasty tomb (202 BC - 220 AD) in Xiao County, east China's Anhui Province, April 3, 2007. (newsphoto) Nearby villagers look on at the stone entrance of a newly found Han Dynasty tomb (202 BC - 220 AD) in Xiao County, east China's Anhui Province, April 3, 2007. (newsphoto) An archeologists cleans carved stones in a newly found Han Dynasty tomb (202 BC - 220 AD) in Xiao County, east China's Anhui Province, April 3, 2007. (newsphoto)
  • Romans May Have Learned From Chinese Great Wall: Archaeologists

    12/20/2005 9:59:10 AM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 1,640+ views
    Romans may have learned from Chinese Great Wall: archaeologists The construction of the Roman Limes was quite possibly influenced by the concept of the Great Wall in China, though the two great buildings of the world are far away from each other, said archaeologists and historians. Although there is no evidence that the two constructions had any direct connections, indirect influence from the Great Wall on the Roman Limes is certain, said Visy Zsolt, a professor with the Department of Ancient History and Archaeology of the University of Pecs in Hungary. Visy made the remarks in an interview with Xinhua...
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • Rafters recover baffling stone tablet [Delaware River, PA]

    10/17/2015 8:10:25 AM PDT · by ETL · 67 replies
    TimesHerald-Record ^ | Oct 15, 2015 | Pat DeMono, For the Gazette
    On a rafting trip in early September, Christine Hutton, her husband, Richard, and a dozen of his corporate colleagues paddled to a flat, outcropped rock just a few miles from their push-off point at Jerry’s Three River Campground in Pond Eddy. The trip had been sluggish; the Delaware was at its lowest level in some 50 years, they’d been told. The group, in its triumvirate of rafts, stopped to have lunch. “One of our associates stepped out to a rock in the middle of the river, and picked up what looked like a stone tablet,” recalled Christine Hutton. It was...
  • Tree distribution supports 'out of Taiwan' hypothesis

    10/15/2015 12:24:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Taipei Behavior, er, Dealer, er, Times! Taipei Times! ^ | Thursday, October 15, 2015 | Chen Wei-han
    An international team led by National Taiwan University forestry professor Chung Kuo-fang... analyzed the chloroplast DNA sequences of 604 paper mulberry samples collected from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Pacific islands, and found that a specific haplotype, cp-17, which originated in Taiwan, is predominant across the region. It is assumed that paper mulberry, a common East Asian tree used for making paper, was transported across the Pacific by Austronesian people, who used the tree to make bark cloth, Chung said... Paper mulberry is a dioecious species, meaning that the male and female reproductive organs are found on separate plants. Most...
  • Remains of Conquistador Convoy Found in Mexico

    10/09/2015 1:45:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 108 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Friday, October 09, 2015 | unattributed
    In 1520, a Spanish-led supply convoy that may have consisted of as many as 550 people, including Cubans of African and Indian descent, women, and Indian allies of the Spaniards, was captured and taken to a town inhabited by the Aztec-allied Texcocanos, or Acolhuas. The town is now known as Zultepec-Tecoaque, an archaeological site east of Mexico City. Excavations have uncovered carved clay figurines of the invaders that the Texcocanos had symbolically decapitated. Human and animal bones with cut marks have also been found, indicating that the members of the convoy and their horses were actually sacrificed and eaten. The...
  • Was Christopher Columbus in Greenland 15 years before he discovered America?

    06/12/2015 3:01:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Christopher Columbus wrote that he sailed in February 1477 to an island a hundred miles beyond Tile (Iceland). This trip, which would have led him to Greenland according to the distance he mentioned, was questioned many times in the 20th century. Arguments against accepting his claim have been that ice and snow would not have allowed him to make an expedition to the North in winter, and that the details he had given about the size of the tides (26 braccia) were far too overstated to be taken seriously. Taking into consideration new research concerning the change of climate at...
  • Hidden secrets of 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

    06/12/2015 10:43:35 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 65 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-12-2015 | Mike Cummings
    Henricus Martellus, a German cartographer working in Florence in the late 15th century, produced a highly detailed map of the known world. According to experts, there is strong evidence that Christopher Columbus studied this map and that it influenced his thinking before his fateful voyage. Martellus' map arrived at Yale in 1962, the gift of an anonymous donor. Scholars at the time hailed the map's importance and argued that it could provide a missing link to the cartographic record at the dawn of the Age of Discovery. However, five centuries of fading and scuffing had rendered much of the map's...
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerðir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • Study: Vikings May Have Taken a Native American to Iceland

    11/26/2010 10:24:36 AM PST · by pillut48 · 92 replies
    Yahoo News/Time ^ | Fri Nov 26, 4:25 am ET | LISA ABEND
    Pity poor Leif Ericsson. The Viking explorer may well have been the first European to reach the Americas, but it is a certain Genoan sailor who gets all the glory. Thanks to evidence that has until now consisted only of bare archeological remains and a bunch of Icelandic legends, Ericsson has long been treated as a footnote in American history: no holiday, no state capitals named after him, no little ditty to remind you of the date of his voyage. But a group of Icelandic and Spanish scientists studying one mysterious genetic sequence - and one woman who's been dead...
  • Ptolemy's Geography, America and Columbus: Ancient Greeks and why maybe America was discovered

    09/25/2009 12:32:08 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 22 replies · 1,238+ views
    mlahanas.de ^ | Michael Lahanas
    Ptolemy's Geography, America and Columbus: Ancient Greeks and why maybe America was discovered Michael Lahanas Aristotle: “there is a continuity between the parts about the pillars of Hercules and the parts about India, and that in this way the ocean is one.” [As] for the rest of the distance around the inhabited earth which has not been visited by us up to the present time (because of the fact that the navigators who sailed in opposite directions never met), it is not of very great extent, if we reckon from the parallel distances that have been traversed by us... For...
  • Pre-Columbian Map of North America Could Be Authentic--Or not

    07/23/2009 4:35:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 1,214+ views
    Scientific American ^ | July 22, 2009 | Brendan Borrell
    A Danish art conservator claims that the controversial Vinland Map of America, published prior to Christopher Columbus's landfall, may not be a forgery after all. "We have so far found no reason to believe that the Vinland Map is the result of a modern forgery," says Renè Larsen of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Reuters first publicized his results last week but provided none of the skepticism being voiced by veterans in the field. The map mysteriously emerged in a Geneva bookshop in 1957 depicting a "new" and "fertile" land to the west that Viking explorer Leif Eriksson...
  • Archaeological sensation in Oestfold [ Inca remains from 11th c Norway? ]

    06/26/2007 11:34:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies · 1,285+ views
    Norway Post ^ | Tuesday, June 26, 2007 | Rolleiv Solholm (NRK)
    Norwegian arhaeologists are puzzled by a find which indicates an Inca Indian died and was buried in the Oestfold city of Sarpsborg 1000 years ago. The remains of two elderly men and a baby were discovered during work in a garden, and one of the skulls indicates that the man was an Inca Indian. There is a genetic flaw in the neck, which is believed to be limited to the Incas in Peru, says archaeologist Mona Beate Buckholm. The Norway Post suggests that maybe the Vikings travelled even more widely than hitherto believed? Why could not the Viking settlers in...
  • Leif Erikson Day, October 9, 2004

    10/10/2004 3:14:20 PM PDT · by U.S. Resident · 42 replies · 2,817+ views
    The White House ^ | October 7, 2004 | By the President of the United States of America
    Leif Erikson Day, 2004 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation More than 1,000 years ago, Leif Erikson led his crew on a journey across the Atlantic, becoming the first European known to have set foot on North American soil. Every October, we honor this courageous Viking explorer, his historic voyage, and the rich heritage of Nordic Americans. Immigrants from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden and their descendants have made great contributions to our Nation in the fields of business, politics, the arts, education, agriculture, and other areas. Nordic Americans have also made a significant...
  • The Egg Island theory (Where Did Columbus Make Landfall?)

    09/19/2004 12:21:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies · 2,462+ views
    Amerion Internet Services ^ | last updated: Fri, 5 Sep 2003 | Keith A. Pickering
    Egg island is a flyspeck of land (0.2 square miles) at the end of a string of small islands extenting west from the northern end of Eleuthera Island in the Bahamas. Along with its near neighbor Royal Island, Egg was proposed as the landfall in 1981 by Arne B. Molander, a retired civil engineer. Molander has been a tireless advocate for his theory since, although his efforts so far have failed to convince anyone that the idea has merit.
  • Israelites Were In America Before Columbus

    04/16/2002 4:19:58 PM PDT · by blam · 51 replies · 1,635+ views
    Ensign Message ^ | Pastor Alan Campbell
    ISRAELITES WERE IN AMERICA BEFORE COLUMBUS! By Pastor Alan Campbell 1992 marked the 500th Anniversary of Columbus' voyage of discovery from Spain to what was then known as the New World in 1492. No doubt there were those who who exploited the celebration of this event to emphasize the Hispanic as opposed to the Anglo-Saxon element in American Culture and society. However it is becoming an increasingly well known and documented fact, that not only were there North Europeans on the American continent long before the voyage of Columbus, but also that Phoenicians/ Israelites sailed from the Middle East through...
  • Stonemason James Vieira of Ashfield studies 'mound builders,' ancient stonework

    11/29/2012 1:04:15 PM PST · by Theoria · 17 replies
    MassLive ^ | 05 Sept 2012 | Cori Urban
    Many New England communities have within them dirt-covered stone “mounds,” dug into the earth and meticulously lined and covered with stones; some of the stones that cover the tops weigh tons. Some would say they are the remnants of root cellars, but an Ashfield man who for 15 years has studied the ancient stonework thinks otherwise. James E. Vieira, a stonemason, writer and Northeast Antiquities Research Association member, believes there is ample evidence that Ancient America was a melting pot of races from other lands, noting that other parts of the country have ancient stone ruins. He says the mound...
  • Marine Archaeologists Excavate Greek Antikythera Shipwreck

    09/26/2015 2:47:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | September 25, 2015
    The shipwreck dates to circa 65 B.C., and was discovered by Greek sponge fishermen in 1900 off the southwestern Aegean island of Antikythera. They salvaged 36 marble statues of mythological heroes and gods; a life-sized bronze statue of an athlete; pieces of several more bronze sculptures; scores of luxury items; and skeletal remains of crew and passengers. The wreck also relinquished fragments of the world’s first computer: the Antikythera Mechanism, a geared mechanical device that encoded the movements of the planets and stars and predicted eclipses... The project is the first-ever systematic excavation of this shipwreck, relying on the precise...
  • Philistines introduced sycamore, cumin and opium poppy into Israel during the Iron Age

    09/01/2015 2:15:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Science Daily ^ | August 28, 2015 | Bar-Ilan University
    The team compiled a database of plant remains extracted from Bronze and Iron Ages sites in the southern Levant, both Philistine and non-Philistine... The species they brought are all cultivars that had not been seen in Israel previously... edible parts of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) which originates in western Europe; the sycamore tree (Ficus sycomorus), whose fruits are known to be cultivated in the eastern Mediterranean, especially Egypt, and whose presence in Israel as a locally grown tree is first attested to in the Iron Age by the presence of its fruit; and finally, cumin (Cuminum cyminum), a spice...
  • Pottery, beads retrace close links between India and Bali

    08/03/2015 10:34:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Znews ^ | Thursday, July 30, 2015 | IANS
    Remnants of ancient Indian pottery, beads and even Indian DNA found in human bones point to thriving trade and social contacts between India and Bali dating back to more than 2,000 years. Besides trade, Indian merchants brought with them their language -- Sanskrit -- and the influence of Hinduism and Buddhism... The major Indian port of connect with Bali in Indonesia and other places in Southeast Asia was Arikamedu, a thriving port located seven kilometres from Puducherry from where archaeologists have unearthed Roman artefacts too. The influence of Sanskrit and the ideology of Hinduism and Buddhism which the Indian traders...
  • Danish Archaeologists In Search Of Vikings In Iran

    01/23/2005 3:35:39 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,017+ views
    Payvand ^ | 1-20-2005
    1/20/05Danish Archaeologists in Search of Vikings in Iran Tehran, Jan. 20 (Iranian Cultural Heritage News Agency) – Researchers from the Copenhagen Museum in Denmark have traveled to the coasts of the Caspian Sea, northern Iran, in search of clues of relationships between Iranians and Vikings. A few years ago, a researcher from the Copenhagen Museum, Nadia Haupt, discovered more than one thousand coins and relics that did not belong to the Danish or other Scandinavian cultures, and therefore set to find out more about the historical roots of the Danish civilization. The ancient items that took the attention of experts...
  • Bison Bones Bolster Idea Ice Age Seafarers First To Americas

    03/24/2008 2:14:57 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 765+ views
    The NationalPost ^ | 3-24-2008 | Randy Boswell - Can West News Service
    Bison bones bolster idea Ice Age seafarers first to Americas Randy Boswell, Canwest News Service Published: Monday, March 24, 2008 Head of a bison, part of a series of ancient bison bones found on Vancouver Island and nearby Orcas Island in Washington state. A series of discoveries of ancient bison bones on Vancouver Island and nearby Orcas Island in Washington state is fuelling excitement among researchers that the Pacific coast offered a food-rich ecosystem for Ice Age hunters some 14,000 years ago -- much earlier than the prevailing scientific theory pegs the arrival of humans to the New World. Fourteen...
  • 1000-year-old coins found in Northern Territory may rewrite Australian history

    05/20/2013 1:31:34 PM PDT · by Theoria · 23 replies
    News.com.au ^ | 20 May 2013 | BARBARA BARKHAUSEN
    REMEMBER when you were taught that Australia was discovered by James Cook in 1770 who promptly declared it "terra nullius" and claimed it for the British throne? Turns out that could be completely and utterly wrong. Five copper coins and a nearly 70-year-old map with an "X" might lead to a discovery that could rewrite Australia's history. Australian scientist Ian McIntosh, currently Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University in the US, is planning an expedition in July that has stirred up the archaeological community. The scientist wants to revisit the location where five coins were found in the Northern Territory...
  • African Coins Found In Australia: 1,000-Year-Old Discovery May Rewrite Country's History

    05/22/2013 8:07:24 AM PDT · by Renfield · 23 replies
    International Business Times ^ | 5-20-2013 | Zoe Mintz
    Australians may need to rewrite their history textbooks. A new archaeological expedition may prove that the continent may have been discovered earlier than previously thought. Ian McIntosh, professor of anthropology at Indiana University, says he plans on visiting the location where five African coins were found in Australia’s Northern Territory in 1944 that have proven to be 1,000 years old, AAP reports. “Multiple theses have been put forward by noted scholars, and the major goal is to piece together more of the puzzle. Is a shipwreck involved? Are there more coins? All options are on the table, but only the...
  • Well-preserved ancient Roman ship found in waters off Sardinia coast

    06/24/2015 8:48:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | June 23, 2015 | Nick Squires
    A remarkably well-preserved ancient Roman ship has been discovered on the seabed off the coast of Sardinia. The 2,000-year-old wreck was found at a depth of 150ft by a specialised diving unit of the Italian police, working in collaboration with archaeologists, in the strait that separates Sardinia from Corsica. The ship was carrying a load of terracotta tiles, which are also in a good state of preservation. The roof tiles, believed to have been produced in or around Rome, were packed into the hold of the vessel, which is 60ft long and 23ft wide. They were probably going to be...
  • Viking ring is "treasure" and will be valued at British Museum[UK]

    08/04/2008 9:54:08 AM PDT · by BGHater · 8 replies · 152+ views
    Bridlington Free Press ^ | 31 July 2008 | Alexa Copeland
    TREASURE dating back to the time of the Vikings has been found in a Bridlington field. The Viking finger ring has a silver content of 98% which, combined with its age, meets the criteria for it to be officially classed as treasure. The ring, found by Paul Rennoldson, has been sent to the British Museum in London where it will be valued. Alan Worth, chairman of the Bridlington Metal Detecting Society, said finding any items dating back to the Viking age was very rare. "The Vikings were around in about 700AD which is an incredibly long time ago," said Mr...
  • The Kensington Runestone; verified as proof of Scandinavians in Minnesota in 1362

    07/22/2002 2:22:42 PM PDT · by vannrox · 35 replies · 3,045+ views
    Ripsaw News ^ | FR post 07-21-02 | By Jim Richardson and Allen Richardson
    Subject: The Kensington Runestone; verified as proof of Scandinavians inMinnesota in 1362 <http://www.ripsawnews.com/2001.08.15/cover.jpg> Verified at LastThe Strange and Terrible Storyof the Kensington RunestoneBy Jim Richardson andAllen Richardson The comfortable scientific and scholarly worlds of history, archeology,runology and Scandinavian linguistics have all been rocked by recentdevelopments surrounding a single stone in west centralMinnesota. The Kensington Runestone, thought for over 100 years to be a hoax, nowstands verified as a genuine artifact commemorating the deaths of 10medireview Scandinavians in Minnesota in the year 1362. A recent piece of linguistic scholarship by Dr. Richard Nielsen has hit thescene, which seems to demonstrate conclusively...
  • Builder Found Vikings Washed Up At Pub

    09/09/2007 3:20:35 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,834+ views
    Timesonline ^ | 9-10-2007 | Jack Malvern
    September 10, 2007 Builder found Vikings washed up at pubJack Malvern Archaeologists believe they have found the only intact Viking boat in Britain beneath the patio of a Merseyside pub. The 10th-century vessel was discovered in the 1930s by builders excavating the basement of the Railway Inn on the Wirral peninsula, but they covered it up because they feared an archaeological dig would disrupt their work. The boat would have been forgotten had one of the builders not reported his discovery to his son, who passed the information on to academics at Nottingham University. Stephen Harding, of the university’s archaeology...
  • Irish Viking Trade Centre Unearthed

    05/07/2008 6:48:40 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 168+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-7-2008
    Irish Viking trade centre unearthed Almost 6,000 artefacts and a Viking chieftain's grave have been discovered One of the Vikings' most important trading centres has been discovered in Ireland. The settlement at Woodstown in County Waterford is estimated to be about 1,200 years old. It was discovered during archaeological excavations for a road by-pass for Waterford city, which was founded by the Vikings. The Irish government said the settlement was one of the most important early Viking age trading centres discovered in the country. Its working group, which includes archaeologists from Ireland's museum and monuments service, said it was of...
  • 'Pillaging' Vikings unmasked as eco warriors

    12/03/2009 7:58:22 AM PST · by BGHater · 24 replies · 865+ views
    Yorkshire Post ^ | 02 Dec 2009 | Paul Jeeves
    THEIR reputation for raping and pillaging may not have set them out as the ideal role-models for an environmentally-friendly way of life. But it seems that lessons could perhaps be learnt from the Vikings after the intriguing discovery in Yorkshire of what is believed to be a metal recycling centre dating back to the 11th century. Historians and metal detector enthusiasts have made the find which is being heralded as evidence of how the Norse invaders recycled their fearsome array of weapons. Hundreds of pieces of metal including arrowheads, shards of swords and axe heads have been unearthed as part...