Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $53,072
60%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 60%!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: ancientnavigation

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Debunking The "Vikings Weren’t Victims Of Climate" Myth [Greenland and Historical Realities]

    01/20/2016 6:14:55 PM PST · by zeestephen · 21 replies
    Watts Up With That? ^ | 19 January 2016 | F.J. Shepherd
    Some people have claimed that Greenland was no warmer 1,000 years ago than it is today...In this essay, I will examine some of the historical facts concerning Greenland starting 1,000 years ago and will then attempt to demonstrate how much warmer Greenland had to be in order to accommodate the history that transpired in this region.
  • So why did 'Columbus sail the ocean blue' in 1492?

    08/04/2019 8:37:07 AM PDT · by rktman · 77 replies
    wnd.com ^ | 8/4/2019 | Bill Federer
    “There are but 155 years left … at which time … the world will come to an end,” wrote Christopher Columbus in his book “Libro de Las Profecias,” composed in 1502 between his third and fourth voyages. Columbus continued: “… The sign which convinces me that our Lord is hastening the end of the world is the preaching of the Gospel recently in so many lands.” Though his predictions were off, Columbus’ writings revealed his motivation for setting sail on his first voyage Aug. 3, 1492, with the Nina, Pinta and the Santa Maria. He sought to find a sea...
  • In a rich corner of antiquity: gold, wine, plenty of luxury [Colchis, the Vani]

    12/29/2007 6:17:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 73+ views
    Register-Guard ^ | December 27, 2007 | Blake Gopnik, Washington Post
    Since Colchis was famous in antiquity for gold and precious metal -- it's where the Greek hero Jason went to grab the legendary Golden Fleece -- you'd be wearing gold-spangled robes while pouring and drinking your famous Colchian wine from gold or silver vessels. You'd also be so rich you could afford to bury your wine service with you... A fascinating exhibition, "Wine, Worship & Sacrifice: The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani" at the Smithsonian's Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., through Feb. 24, gives a thrilling image of the plenty that nobility enjoyed in that far corner of the ancient...
  • Science To Test (Jason) Argonaut Myth

    02/09/2005 11:40:18 AM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 1,333+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 2-9-2005
    Science to test Argonaut myth Gold jewelry found last year in an unplundered Mycenaean royal tomb on the outskirts of Volos will be tested for links with one of the most enduring ancient Greek myths, the Argonauts’ expedition, an archaeologist said yesterday. The 14th century BC treasure — gold beads from necklaces and jewelry made of gold and semiprecious stones — was found with vases and other offerings in four pits inside the tholos tomb, a beehive-like subterranean structure usually associated with Late Bronze Age royal burials. According to local antiquities director Vassiliki Adrimi-Sismani, the Culture Ministry has approved tests,...
  • Did the Ancient Egyptians sail as far as the Black Sea? Adventurers will use a boat [tr]

    07/31/2019 5:59:19 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 31, 2019 | Ian Randall
    A boat made of reeds will be put to the test by a team of intrepid adventurers when they embark on the 800 mile journey from the Black Sea to Crete in August. The voyage aboard the vessel — the 'Abora IV' — is hoped will prove that the ancient Egyptians could have made similar trips in reed boats thousands of years ago. The 46 feet-long (14 metre) boat will be crewed by a team of two dozen researchers and volunteers, from eight different countries. Setting out from the Bulgarian port of Varna, on the Black Sea, the voyagers will...
  • Southeast Asia was crowded with archaic human groups long before we turned up

    07/28/2019 9:41:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    Phys.org ^ | July 15, 2019 | Joăo Teixeira, The Conversation
    In new research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, we detail how during this remarkable journey the ancestors of modern humans met and genetically mixed with a number of archaic human groups, including Neandertals and Denisovans, and several others for which we currently have no name. The traces of these interactions are still preserved in our genomes. For example, all modern non-African populations contain about 2 percent Neandertal ancestry. This strong universal signal shows that the original Neandertal mixing event must have happened just after the small founding population left Africa. We can even use the Neandertal...
  • Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland?

    07/28/2019 1:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 15, 2019 | Owen Jarus
    Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L'Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period... In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of "ecofacts" -- environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans -- that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland -- Simplocaria metallica,...
  • The road to Scandinavia's bronze age: Trade routes, metal provenance, and mixing

    07/25/2019 12:24:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Wednesday, July 24, 2019 | PLOS
    The geographic origins of the metals in Scandinavian mixed-metal artifacts reveal a crucial dependency on British and continental European trading sources during the beginnings of the Nordic Bronze Age.. 2000-1700BC marks the earliest Nordic Bronze Age, when the use and availability of metal--specifically tin and copper, which when alloyed together creates bronze--increased drastically in Scandinavia... isotope and trace-element analyses on 210 Bronze Age artifact samples, predominantly axeheads, originally collected in Denmark and representing almost 50% of all known existing Danish metal objects from this period... reveal the trading networks established to import raw metals as well as crafted weapons into...
  • Vintage Skulls

    02/22/2003 9:06:38 AM PST · by blam · 140 replies · 4,437+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | March/April 2003 | Colleen P. Popson
    VINTAGE SKULLS Researcher Silvia Gonzalez examines a 13,000-year-old skull. (Liverpool John Moores University) The oldest human remains found in the Americas were recently "discovered" in the storeroom of Mexico's National Museum of Anthropology. Found in central Mexico in 1959, the five skulls were radiocarbon dated by a team of researchers from the United Kingdom and Mexico and found to be 13,000 years old. They pre-date the Clovis culture by a couple thousand years, adding to the growing evidence against the Clovis-first model for the first peopling of the Americas. Of additional significance is the shape of the skulls, which are...
  • Calico: A 200,000-year Old Site In The Americas?

    12/17/2001 2:22:22 PM PST · by blam · 163 replies · 13,626+ views
    ASA On Line ^ | unknown
    Calico: A 200,000-year old site in the Americas? New World archaeological sites inferred to be even slightly older than the 11.5 ka Clovis complexes have been controversial; so claims for a 200 ka site in North America have heretofore been treated with substantial disdain. But the acceptance of Monte Verde and Diring may soon change that. The classic "ancient site" in the New World is "Calico," located in the Central Mojave Desert of California (Shlemon and Budinger, 1990). Two issues have dogged acceptance of Calico by mainstream archaeologists: (1) the authenticity of the artifacts; are they truly the product of ...
  • Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!

    06/21/2012 2:16:17 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 16, 2012 | Guest Post By: Rodney Chilton
    Posted on June 16, 2012 by Anthony Watts WUWT readers may recall this recent story: New evidence of Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact The story below provides much more detail about the Younger Dryas event and the split that has developed in the scientific community over the cause. I’ve added this graph below from NCDC to give readers a sense of time and magnitude of the event. – Anthony The Younger Dryas cold interval as viewed from central Greenland. From:Quaternary Science Reviews Volume 19, Issues 1-5, 1 January 2000, Richard B. AlleyGuest Post By: Rodney Chilton www.bcclimate.com A consideration of many...
  • America 'discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe'

    02/28/2012 7:44:29 PM PST · by Theoria · 51 replies · 5+ views
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | 28 Feb 2012 | David Keys
    New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World. A remarkable series of several dozen European-style stone tools, dating back between 19,000 and 26,000 years, have been discovered at six locations along the US east coast. Three of the sites are on the Delmarva Peninsular in Maryland, discovered by archaeologist Dr Darrin Lowery of the University of Delaware. One is in Pennsylvania and another in Virginia. A sixth was discovered by scallop-dredging fishermen on the seabed 60...
  • Americas Settled 15,000 Years Ago, Study Says

    03/13/2008 2:12:58 PM PDT · by blam · 50 replies · 1,270+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 3-13-2008 | Stefan Lovgren
    Americas Settled 15,000 Years Ago, Study Says Stefan Lovgren for National Geographic NewsMarch 13, 2008 A consensus is emerging in the highly contentious debate over the colonization of the Americas, according to a study that says the bulk of the region wasn't settled until as late as 15,000 years ago. Researchers analyzed both archaeological and genetic evidence from several dozen sites throughout the Americas and eastern Asia for the paper. "In the past archaeologists haven't paid too much attention to molecular genetic evidence," said lead author Ted Goebel, an archaeologist at Texas A&M University in College Station. "We have brought...
  • Does Skull Prove That The First Americans Came From Europe?

    11/24/2007 11:28:47 AM PST · by blam · 90 replies · 930+ views
    UTexas.edu ^ | 12-03-2002 | Steve Conner
    Does skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe? By Steve Connor Science Editor 03 December 2002 Scientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and...
  • Constructing The Solutrean Solution

    08/28/2007 11:34:31 AM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 1,063+ views
    Clovis In The Southeast.Net (Smithsonian) ^ | 8-28-2007 | Dennis Stanford - Bruce Bradley
    Constructing the Solutrean Solution Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley Smithsonian Institution University of Exeter At the 1999 Clovis and Beyond Conference held in Santa Fe, we presented a hypothesis, now known as the "Solutrean Solution", to explain the origin of Clovis technology. The hypothesis is based on the fact that there is little commonality between Clovis and Northeast Asian technologies on the one hand, while on the other, there are many technological traits shared between Clovis and the Solutrean culture of Paleolithic Europe. In the past, scholars have rejected the idea of a historical connection between the two cultures because...
  • Experts doubt Clovis people were first in Americas

    02/23/2007 9:34:17 AM PST · by george76 · 100 replies · 1,975+ views
    yahoo...Reuters ^ | Feb 22 | Will Dunham
    The Clovis people, known for their distinctive spear points, likely were not the first humans in the Americas, according to research placing their presence as more recent than previously believed. Using advanced radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers writing in the journal Science on Thursday said the Clovis people, hunters of large Ice Age animals like mammoths and mastodons, dated from about 13,100 to 12,900 years ago. That would make the Clovis culture, known from artifacts discovered at various sites including the town of Clovis, New Mexico, both younger and shorter-lived than previously thought. Previous estimates had dated the culture to about...
  • Penon Woman

    12/17/2006 4:21:22 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 1,763+ views
    Penon WomanPenon WomanScientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and Oxford's Research Laboratory of Archaeology have dated the skull to about 13,000 years old, making it...
  • Archaeologist says Va. bolsters claim on how people got to America [ Solutrean ]

    05/10/2006 10:09:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 598+ views
    Richmond Times-Dispatch ^ | May 11, 2006 | A.J. Hostetler
    The Smithsonian archaeologist pursuing the contentious claim that ancient Europeans fleeing the Ice Age settled in America says artifacts unearthed in the Chesapeake Bay region support his theory. Smithsonian Institution curator of archaeology Dennis Stanford argues that about 18,000 years ago, Solutrean hunters from the coasts of France, Spain and Portugal followed seals and other marine mammals for their fur, food and fuel across a partially frozen north Atlantic Ocean to the New World... "Pre-Clovis is a fact in North and South America," archaeologist Michael Collins of the University of Texas at Austin said this year at a symposium on...
  • Stone Age Columbus

    12/15/2005 7:19:43 AM PST · by ASA Vet · 24 replies · 1,914+ views
    BBC ^ | Dec 15, 2005 | BBC programme summary
    Who were the first people in North America? From where did they come? How did they arrive? The prehistory of the Americas has been widely studied. Over 70 years a consensus became so established that dissenters felt uneasy challenging it. Yet in 2001, genetics, anthropology and a few shards of flint combined to overturn the accepted facts and to push back one of the greatest technological changes that the Americas have ever seen by over five millennia. The accepted version of the first Americans starts with a flint spearhead unearthed at Clovis, New Mexico, in 1933. Dated by the mammoth...
  • The Solutrean Solution--Did Some Ancient Americans Come from Europe?

    09/24/2004 7:31:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 2,961+ views
    Clovis and Beyond ^ | 1999 | Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley
    Years of research in eastern Asia and Alaska have produced little evidence of any historical or technological connection between the Asian Paleolithic (Stone Age) and Clovis peoples. Also, the southeastern United States has produced more Clovis sites than the West, and a few radiocarbon dates suggest some of them may predate those in the western states. If correct, that hardly fits the notion that Clovis technology originated in northeast Asia or Alaska. Over the years, various scholars have noted similarities between Clovis projectile points and "Solutrean" points, the product of a Paleolithic culture on the north coast of Spain between...