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Keyword: ancientnavigation

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  • Wearable submarine to hunt for 2000-year-old computer

    06/06/2014 10:06:22 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    newscientist.com ^ | 04 June 2014 by | Mark Harris
    Like an underwater Iron Man, a diver will fly around the wreck of an ancient Greek ship later this year, looking to shed light on the Antikythera mechanism THE world's most advanced robotic diving suit is getting ready to help search for one of the world's oldest computers. Called Exosuit, the suit has a rigid metal humanoid form with Iron Man-like thrusters that enable divers to operate safely down to depths of 300 metres (see photo). Though designed for diving in the bowels of New York City's water treatment plants, earlier this month it underwent its first trials in seawater...
  • Human settlements far older than suspected discovered in South America.

    04/21/2002 5:41:59 PM PDT · by vannrox · 20 replies · 2,367+ views
    DISCOVER Vol. 23 No. 5 (May 2002) ^ | (May 2002) | By John Dorfman
    DISCOVER Vol. 23 No. 5 (May 2002)Table of Contents The Amazon Trail Anna Roosevelt's ventures into the jungles of South America have turned up traces of human settlements far older than archaeologists ever suspected By John Dorfman Photography by Jennifer Tzar Archaeologists visiting remote sites in Brazil must rely on the skills of local pilots to locate—and land on—small airstrips in the rain forest. "The pilots here are very good," says Roosevelt, a veteran Amazon explorer, because the mining industry depends on them. "When I have a goal," says Anna Curtenius Roosevelt, her voice emphasizing the word, "everything else is...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Punic Vessels in Balearic Islands

    05/05/2014 2:03:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, May 01, 2014 | unattributed
    The discovery was first made by students in 2013 while investigating underwater shipwreck remains near the ancient port of Sanitja on the island of Menorca... ancient Punic amphorae, more than 150 of them, lying in situ, still at rest where a seagoing vessel identified with the site known as the Binisafuller wreck gave up its cargo... Archaeologists date the amphorae to between 325-275 BC. It makes the shipwreck the oldest documented one in Menorca. It is a significant discovery because the remains of the port of Sanitja have been most often associated with the adjacent Roman period city of Sanisera....
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • Did Ancient Drifters 'Discover' British Columbia?

    04/25/2012 4:58:58 PM PDT · by Theoria · 27 replies
    The Tyee ^ | 03 April 2012 | Daniel Wood
    Legends and bits of evidence tell a story of Asians arriving here long, long ago. Part one of two. "Even pale ink is better than memory." -- Chinese proverbAs the tide creeps over the sand flats of Pachena Bay south of Bamfield, it brings ashore the flotsam of the Pacific that -- on occasion -- hints at extraordinary travels and a mystery of historic proportions. Amid the kelp, in decades past, hundreds of green-glass fishing floats would arrive intact on the Vancouver Island coast, having ridden the powerful Japanese Current in year-long transits from Asia. But on rare occasions, entire...
  • South Indians in Roman Egypt?

    04/07/2010 7:37:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 574+ views
    Frontline, from the publishers of The Hindu ^ | Volume 27, Issue 8, April 10-23, 2010 | R. Krishnakumar
    One way to understand the implications of the archaeological discoveries at Pattanam is to delve into the amazing wealth of data from the excavations at the lost Ptolemic-Roman port city of Berenike, on Egypt's Red Sea coast. During the Ptolemic-Roman period (third century B.C. to sixth century A.D), Berenike served as a key transit port between ancient Egypt and Rome on one side and the Red Sea-Indian Ocean regions, including South Arabia, East Africa, India and Sri Lanka, on the other. This ancient port city was well-connected by roads from the Nile that passed through the Eastern Desert of Egypt...
  • Desert castle restorations unearth clues to missing historical link

    06/25/2009 3:24:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 619+ views
    Jordan Times ^ | Friday, June 26th, 2009 | Taylor Luck
    Qasr Al Hallabat, one of the Kingdom's so-called desert castles, a series of fortresses built by the Romans around the 2nd century to cement their presence in the Levant, is much more than the average castle, according to archaeologist and Spanish aid specialist Ignacio Arce. Arce, who has been working at the site since 2002, said the castle provides a missing link between the end of the Roman Empire's influence in the region and the Umayyad civilisation, a 100-year gap that has previously been left unaddressed... Arce was puzzled when he found evidence of restoration work on the mosaics within...
  • Phoenicians Left Deep Genetic Mark, Study Shows

    11/03/2008 5:16:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 480+ views
    New Jack City Times ^ | Thursday, October 30, 2008 | John Noble Wilford
    The Phoenicians, enigmatic people from the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, stamped their mark on maritime history, and now research has revealed that they also left a lasting genetic imprint. Scientists reported Thursday that as many as 1 in 17 men living today on the coasts of North Africa and southern Europe may have a Phoenician direct male-line ancestor. These men were found to retain identifiable genetic signatures from the nearly 1,000 years the Phoenicians were a dominant seafaring commercial power in the Mediterranean basin, until their conquest by Rome in the 2nd century B.C... The scientists who conducted the...
  • Sailor to recreate Phoenicians' epic African voyage

    03/24/2008 1:41:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 221+ views
    Stone Pages ^ | Sunday, March 23, 2008 | The Independent
    On the ancient Syrian island of Arwad, which was settled by the Phoenicians in about 2000 BCE, men are hard at work hammering wooden pegs into the hull of a ship. But this vessel will not be taking fishermen on their daily trip up and down the coast. It is destined for a greater adventure – one that could solve a mystery which has baffled archaeologists for centuries. The adventure begins not in Arwad but in Dorset, where an Englishman has taken it upon himself to try to prove that the Phoenicians circumnavigated Africa thousands of years before any Europeans...
  • How Ancient Trade Changed The World

    02/19/2008 3:20:32 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 45+ views
    Live Science ^ | 2-19-2008 | Heather Whipps
    How Ancient Trade Changed the WorldBy Heather Whipps, Special to LiveScience posted: 18 February 2008 09:24 am ET You've got the gold I need for my necklace and I've got the silk you need for your robe. What to do? Nowadays, if you need something, you go to the closest mall, shell out a few bucks and head home. Thousands of years ago, the process wasn't nearly as simple. If you or someone in your town didn't grow it, herd it or make it, you needed to abandon that desire or else travel for it, sometimes over great distances. For...
  • Eusebius' Onomasticon: Geographical Knowledge in Byzantine Palestine

    01/01/2005 1:36:08 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 520+ views
    Palestine Exploration Fund ^ | 17 March, 2004, Last modified 30 April, 2004 | Joan E. Taylor and Rupert L. Chapman
    The most widely held view is that the modern site of Beitin was Bethel, however, the detailed information given by Eusebius did not particularly suit this identification... Eusebius had used Bethel as a central place for identification of the location of other places, second in importance only to Jerusalem, and had given distances from four other locations. The first of these, at the twelfth milestone north of Jerusalem, presented few problems, but the second, 4 milestones east of Gibeon, was more problematic, did not really fit Beitin, and was better suited to el-Bireh... Archaeologically, although both Eusebius and Jerome described...
  • Scientists Discover Ancient Sea Wharf (Marine Silk Road)

    12/30/2004 11:46:01 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 782+ views
    East Day.Com ^ | 12-30-2004
    Scientists discover ancient sea wharf 30/12/2004 7:32 Archeologists say that they have found the country's oldest wharf and it is believed to be the starting point of an ancient sea route to Central and West Asia. The discovery has reaffirmed the widespread belief that the ancient trade route started in Hepu County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, archeologists said at yesterday's symposium on the nation's marine silk road. After three years of excavation, archeologists have unearthed a wharf that is at least 2,000 years old in Guchengtou Village, according to Xiong Zhaoming, head of the archeological team. At the same site,...
  • Quest for the Phoenicians (National Geographic special)

    10/17/2004 7:53:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 2,058+ views
    PBS ^ | Oct 20 2004 | National Geographic
    In "Quest for the Phoenicians," three renowned scientists, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and oceanographer Robert Ballard, geneticist Spencer Wells and archaeologist Paco Giles, search for clues about the Phoenicians in the sea, in the earth and in the blood of their modern-day descendents... Ballard looks at ancient shipwrecks along Skerki Bank off the island of Sicily... Paco Giles excavates a cave at the bottom of the rock of Gibraltar... Spencer Wells collects DNA from a 2,500-year-old Phoenician mummy's tooth, to extract its unique genetic code and compare it with DNA samples collected from men and women from Lebanon to Tunisia.
  • The Voyage around the Erythraean Sea

    09/12/2004 7:55:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 858+ views
    Silk Road ^ | 2004 | William H. Schoff
    The Periplus Maris Erythraei (or "Voyage around the Erythraean Sea") is an anonymous work from around the middle of the first century CE written by a Greek speaking Egyptian merchant.  The first part of the work (sections 1-18) describes the maritime trade-routes following the north-south axis from Egypt down the coast of East Africa as far as modern day Tanzania.  The remainder describes the routes of the East-West axis running from Egypt, around the Arabian Peninsula and past the Persian Gulf on to the west coast of India.  From the vivid descriptions of the places mentioned it is generally...
  • Expedition Seeks Clues To Lost Bronze Age Culture (Minoans - Robert Ballard)

    06/04/2006 4:05:30 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 656+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 6-1-2006 | Richard C. Lewis
    Expedition seeks clues to lost Bronze Age culture By Richard C. Lewis Thu Jun 1, 4:11 PM ETReuters Photo: Deep-sea explorer Robert Ballard speaks at the National Geographic Society in an undated file photo.... PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (Reuters) - An underwater explorer who found the Titanic and a team of international scientists will soon survey waters off the Greek island of Crete for clues to a once-powerful Bronze Age-era civilization. The expedition about 75 miles northwest of Crete aims to learn more about the Minoans, who flourished during the Bronze Age, and seeks to better understand seafaring four millennia ago,...
  • German man hopes to sail raft made of reeds across Atlantic

    05/28/2007 7:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 413+ views
    Newsday ^ | May 28, 2007 | author
    A man who is convinced, despite a lack of evidence, that adventurers regularly crossed the Atlantic Ocean 14,000 years ago is using reeds and eucalyptus to build a raft so he can imitate their voyage. Dominique Gorlitz, 40, a former school teacher from Chemnitz, Germany, says the two-month journey he and 11 others will make on 41-foot-long craft will prove people could have traveled across the Atlantic Ocean in prehistoric times... More than 25 volunteers are working on the craft at Liberty Landing Marina. Gorlitz based the craft's design on a northeastern African drawing from 6,000 years ago. He said...
  • Ancient Vessel Traces Voyages Of The Past

    06/13/2002 2:31:03 PM PDT · by blam · 16 replies · 2,402+ views
    Cyprus Mail ^ | 6-13-2002
    Ancient vessel retraces voyages of the past By Stefanos Evripidou IT LOOKS like a tree house stuck on a bamboo banana. In reality it's the incarnation of a pre-Pharaonic reed boat, designed and built to unravel the mysteries of prehistoric navigation. The Abora II drifted in to Larnaca marina yesterday. Weighing in at six- tonnes, the vessel is a totra-reed boat. It is 11.5 metres long, 3.5 metres wide and 1.5 metres deep. The man responsible for building the huge boat is Dominique Goerlitz, a biology teacher at a school in Germany. As a student, Goerlitz was fascinated by the...
  • In the Footsteps of Heyerdahl

    09/19/2002 2:02:05 PM PDT · by robowombat · 5 replies · 183+ views
    richard poe.com ^ | August 16, 2002 | Richard Poe
    In the Footsteps of Heyerdahl By Richard Poe August 16, 2002 WHEN THOR HEYERDAHL died in April, the mass media fell oddly mute. Some readers told me that they learned of the great Norwegian explorer’s death only a week later, by reading my eulogy on the Internet. Such apathy seems hard to fathom. Every schoolboy once read Kon-Tiki and dreamed of conquering the waves as Heyerdahl had done. Perhaps, imbued with the modern philosophy of "safety first," today’s journalists no longer wish to encourage such dreams. Media apathy has likewise greeted Dominique Goerlitz – Heyerdahl’s apprentice and heir apparent. On...
  • In the Footsteps of Heyerdahl

    08/16/2002 1:32:09 PM PDT · by Richard Poe · 34 replies · 978+ views
    RichardPoe.com ^ | August 16, 2002 | Richard Poe
    WHEN THOR HEYERDAHL died in April, the mass media fell oddly mute. Some readers told me that they learned of the great Norwegian explorer’s death only a week later, by reading my eulogy on the Internet. Such apathy seems hard to fathom. Every schoolboy once read Kon-Tiki and dreamed of conquering the waves as Heyerdahl had done. Perhaps, imbued with the modern philosophy of "safety first," today’s journalists no longer wish to encourage such dreams. Media apathy has likewise greeted Dominique Goerlitz – Heyerdahl’s apprentice and heir apparent. On July 20, this 35-year-old German schoolteacher landed in Alexandria, Egypt, after...
  • (Prince) Madoc In America

    07/10/2003 5:56:52 PM PDT · by blam · 74 replies · 7,275+ views
    Madoc In AmericaNative American Histories in the USA Is truth stranger than fiction? Of course it is; it always has been One subject that has been debated for the last four hundred years was whether or not a Khumric-Welsh Prince called Madoc discovered America. Queen Elizabeth I was persuaded by her advisors that this was so and the Khumric-Welsh discovery was put forward as somehow giving England a prior claim in the political wrangles over first rights in the New World of the Americas. No one ever thought to investigate the British records. Caradoc of Llancarfan wrote about it circa...
  • Prince Madoc and the Discovery of America

    01/06/2011 9:51:05 PM PST · by Palter · 73 replies
    BBC ^ | 11 Oct 2010 | Phil Carradice
    Who discovered America? It's a simple question and one that usually brings the standard response - Christopher Columbus. But here in Wales we have our own theory. And that theory says that America was actually discovered 300 years before Columbus sailed "the ocean blue" in 1492 - and more importantly, that it was discovered by a Welshman. Mandan Indians used Bull Boats for transport and fishing that are identical to the Welsh coracle. The man in question was Prince Madoc, the son of Owain Gwynedd, one of the greatest and most important rulers in the country, and while the legend...
  • Britons In USA In 6th Century - Shock Claim (Prince Madoc)

    11/26/2003 3:31:04 PM PST · by blam · 40 replies · 957+ views
    REweb.com ^ | 11-26-2003
    <p>Historians and researchers announced today that Radio Carbon dating evidence, and the discovery of ancient British style artefacts and inscriptions, provided "the strongest indications yet" that British explorers, under the Prince Madoc ap Meurig, arrived in the country during the 6th Century and set up colonies in the American Midwest.</p>
  • As they say in Kentucky; "Cymru am bith".

    08/29/2002 9:51:38 AM PDT · by scouse · 62 replies · 1,787+ views
    News Wales (UK) ^ | 8/26/02 | Unknown
    Did the Welsh discover America? 26/8/2002 A team of historians and researchers announced today that Radio Carbon dating evidence, and the discovery of ancient British style artefacts and inscriptions in the American Midwest, provide the strongest indications yet" that British explorers, under the Prince Madoc ap Meurig, arrived in the country during the 6th Century and set up colonies there. Research team members have known the location of burial sites of Madoc's close relatives in Wales for some time, it emerged today; but they have decided to break their self-imposed silence in order that their research be fully known and...
  • Island Hopping To A New World

    02/18/2004 2:24:06 PM PST · by Fedora · 28 replies · 1,037+ views
    U.S. News ^ | 2/23/2004 | Alex Markels
    Special Report 2/23/04 Island Hopping To A New World The first Americans may have arrived not on foot but by boat from Asia, even Europe By Alex Markels Digging in a dank limestone cave in Canada's Queen Charlotte Islands last summer, 21-year-old Christina Heaton hardly noticed the triangular piece of chipped stone she'd unearthed in a pile of muddy debris. But as her scientist father, Timothy, sifted through the muck, he realized she'd struck pay dirt. "Oh my God!" he yelled to her and the team of other researchers scouring the remote site off the coast of British Columbia. "It's...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 7:31:23 AM PST · by Renfield · 55 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 2-29-2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow....
  • Ancient Mariners Reveal Tales From The Earth's Core

    05/12/2006 4:59:30 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 874+ views
    Nature ^ | 5-11-2006 | Phillip Ball
    <p>Ship logs and pottery show how the geomagnetic field has changed.</p> <p>Old ship records of magnetic north have helped to unravel a record of our planet's field.</p> <p>While sailors plied the Seven Seas in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, little did they know that their ships' logs would one day help scientists to reconstruct the history of the Earth's magnetic field.</p>
  • Claudius' Naumachia on Fucine Lake (Those About To Die, chap III)

    11/24/2005 7:45:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1,178+ views
    Those About To Die (via Kurt Saxon) ^ | 1950s (I believe) | Daniel P. Mannix
    The greatest naumachia of all time was the naval engagement staged by Claudius. As Augustus' lake was too small, the mad emperor decided to use the Fucine Lake (now called the Lago di Fucino) some sixty miles to the east of Rome. This lake had no natural outlet and in the spring it often flooded many miles of surrounding county. To overcome this trouble, a tunnel three and a half miles long had been cut through solid rock from the lake to the Litis River to carry off the surplus water. This job had taken thirty thousand men eleven years...
  • Salvaging Caligula [Nemi Ships, Caligula, and Mussolini]

    11/25/2005 4:40:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 7,719+ views
    Time ^ | Feb. 4, 1929 | staff
    Nineteen centuries of foundered orgy looked up at the hydroairplane which last week waltzed high over Lake Nemi in the Alban hills back of Rome. And Giuseppe Cultrera, Etruscan scholar in the plane,* looked down from the vantage of his flying height through Nemi's waters and could see what none but groping divers theretofore had seen—the sunken Golden Barge whereon epileptic Emperor Caligula, great-grandson of Augustus, and his minions held their carouses.
  • A Visigoth In Kent?

    02/21/2006 12:03:31 PM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 573+ views
    A Visigoth in Kent? The excavations at Springhead uncovered a large number of brooches. One in particular has turned out to be a very exciting discovery. X-ray photography showed that the 5th-6th century iron bow brooch was of Visigothic design, of a type known as Estagel. The Visigoths (West Goths) were one of the German tribes. Settled near the Black Sea in the 3rd century AD, by the 6th century they had migrated west and reached Spain and northern France. Kent was probably the most cosmopolitan region in the country at this time and Saxons and Jutes have left evidence...
  • A Visigoth in Kent?

    02/21/2006 12:19:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 331+ views
    Wessex Archaeology ^ | January 2006 | Roman Finds Group Newsletter
    Kent was probably the most cosmopolitan region in the country at this time and Saxons and Jutes have left evidence of their culture here. In the last 30 years or so, a number of objects of Visigothic design have come to light, mainly in south-east England. Now this brooch adds to the evidence for connections between the people of Kent and the small number of Visigothic groups known to have lived in northern France at the time.
  • When In Vietnam, Build Boats As The Romans Do

    04/21/2006 11:03:33 AM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,154+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 3-26-2006 | Richard Stone
    When in Vietnam, Build Boats as the Romans Do Richard Stone INDO-PACIFIC PREHISTORY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS, 20-26 MARCH 2006, MANILA In December 2004, researchers drained a canal in northern Vietnam in search of ancient textiles from graves. They found that and a whole lot more. Protruding from the canal bank at Dong Xa was a 2000-year-old log boat that had been used as a coffin. After a closer look at the woodwork, archaeologists Peter Bellwood and Judith Cameron of Australia National University in Canberra and their colleagues were astounded to find that the method for fitting planks to hull matched that...
  • The Marsala Punic Warship

    04/13/2006 12:31:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 319+ views
    Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum ^ | circa 1999 | Honor Frost
    Punta Scario is opposite to and only twenty minutes by sail from, the Egadi Islands which gave their name to the Roman naval victory that took place on the morning of March the 10th, 241 BC and ended the First Punic War. The wreck's contents, epigraphy and Carbon 14 determinations are consistent with this period, while circumstantial evidence points to a connection with the Battle itself. The Ship's architecture and contents show that it was not a merchantman, but some kind of hastily built auxiliary warship, possibly a Liburnian. After the Battle the wind had changed direction, so that by...
  • Roman relics found near Elephanta

    09/15/2006 12:58:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 329+ views
    Daily News & Analysis ^ | Friday, September 15, 2006 | Ninad D Sheth
    The marine branch of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has discovered Roman artefacts dating back to the 5th and 6th centuries from the inter-tidal zone (the area between the high-tide and low-tide lines) of Elephanta Island. The find, made last winter, includes artefacts like wine amphorae (vases), pot sheds, storage devices, and stone anchors. The discovery shows that trade between Rome and India continued much later than previously thought... Alok Tripathi, ASI's head of underwater archaeology, said, "The entire Maharashtra coast has evidence of Roman contact on a large scale. We are particularly interested in Elephanta, Sindhudurg, Malvan, and...
  • Roman-era shipwreck reveals ancient medical secrets

    07/09/2011 2:48:31 PM PDT · by george76 · 39 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 09 Jul 2011 | Nick Squires
    A first-aid kit found on a 2,000-year-old shipwreck has provided a remarkable insight into the medicines concocted by ancient physicians to cure sailors of dysentery and other ailments. A wooden chest discovered on board the vessel contained pills made of ground-up vegetables, herbs and plants such as celery, onions, carrots, cabbage, alfalfa and chestnuts – all ingredients referred to in classical medical texts. The tablets, which were so well sealed that they miraculously survived being under water for more than two millennia, also contain extracts of parsley, nasturtium, radish, yarrow and hibiscus. They were found in 136 tin-lined wooden vials...
  • Divers discover 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck that is so well preserved even the FOOD is intact

    08/09/2012 8:38:47 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 38 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 8/9/12 | Mark Prigg
    The ship, a navis oneraria, or merchant vessel, was located at a depth of about 200 feet after a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was used to scour the seabed. A search for the shipwreck was launched after local fisherman revealed they kept finding pieces of pottery in their nets. The divers found the wreck so well preserved even the food, still sealed in over 200 pots, is intact.
  • Romans In Brazil During The Second Third Century?

    12/10/2003 5:37:14 PM PST · by blam · 97 replies · 7,762+ views
    Romans in Brazil During the Second or Third Century? Ex-marine and underwater explorer/archaeologist/treasure-hunter Robert Marx states rather flatly: Amongst my most notable discover[ies] was that of a 2nd century BC Roman shipwreck in the Bay of Guanabara, near Rio de Janeiro. This is a discovery that has received little to no examination, much less validation, from the realm of mainstream archaeology, no doubt in part because Marx is not a Ph.D. archaeologist. Scouring the web for more information about this finding, I did find a reference to the discovery in an article from Dr. Elizabeth Lyding Will, an expert on...
  • Romans in China?

    07/18/2004 8:43:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 1,650+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 52 Number 3, May/June 1999 | Erling Hoh
    This idea was first proposed by Homer Hasenphlug Dubs, an Oxford University professor of Chinese history, who speculated in 1955 that some of the 10,000 Roman prisoners taken by the Parthians after the battle of Carrhae in southeastern Turkey in 53 B.C. made their way east to Uzbekistan to enlist with Jzh Jzh against the Han. Chinese accounts of the battle, in which Jzh Jzh was decapitated and his army defeated, note unusual military formations and the use of wooden fortifications foreign to the nomadic Huns. Dubs postulated that after the battle the Chinese employed the Roman mercenaries as border...
  • Ancient Romans In Texas?

    04/14/2002 6:23:47 AM PDT · by Hellmouth · 131 replies · 7,016+ views
    Science Frontiers online ^ | Nov-Dec 1993 | William Corliss
    ANCIENT ROMANS IN TEXAS? If one searches long enough and hard enough, one can discover hints that just about any ancient culture you care to name set foot in the New World well before the Vikings and Columbus. Old coins, inscriptions, language concordances, and the like are taken by many as proofs that Egyptians visited Oklahoma, the Chinese moored along the Pacific coast, the Celts toured New England, and so on. Now, according to Professor V. Belfiglio, the ancient Romans had Texas on their itineraries. Belfiglio's evidence is fourfold, and so are mainstream criticisms: Roman coins found in Texas....
  • Vast and Deadly Fleets May Yield Secrets at Last

    07/25/2004 6:26:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 691+ views
    New York Times ^ | April 20, 2004 | William J. Broad
    The Persian Wars may be famed in history, but few artifacts and material remains have emerged to shed light on how the ancient Greeks defeated the Asian invaders and saved Europe in what scholars call one of the first great victories of freedom over tyranny. It is well known that a deadly warship of antiquity, the trireme, a fast galley powered by three banks of rowers pulling up to 200 oars, played a crucial role in the fierce battles. Its bronze ram could smash enemy ships, and armed soldiers could leap aboard a foe's vessel in hand-to-hand combat with...
  • Vast and Deadly Fleets May Yield Secrets at Last (Freedom Over Tyranny Alert)

    04/20/2004 8:06:37 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 34 replies · 489+ views
    New York Times ^ | April 20, 2004 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    The Persian Wars may be famed in history, but few artifacts and material remains have emerged to shed light on how the ancient Greeks defeated the Asian invaders and saved Europe in what scholars call one of the first great victories of freedom over tyranny. It is well known that a deadly warship of antiquity, the trireme, a fast galley powered by three banks of rowers pulling up to 200 oars, played a crucial role in the fierce battles. Its bronze ram could smash enemy ships, and armed soldiers could leap aboard a foe's vessel in hand-to-hand combat with swords...
  • Roman Brooch find in Shetland extends ancient travel routes

    07/11/2003 7:21:17 PM PDT · by WoofDog123 · 16 replies · 1,152+ views
    the herald(uk) ^ | 11JULY03 | Stephen Stewart
    Roman brooch find in Shetland extends ancient travel routes STEPHEN STEWART AMATEUR archaeologists may have found Britain's most northerly ancient Roman artefact, it emerged yesterday. The fibula, or brooch, which has been dated to between 50BC and 50AD, could have belonged to an islander returning to the area around Norwick on Shetland after serving in the Roman army. The archaeologists made the find when they were called in after bulldozers unearthed items while extending the graveyard at Norwick. It is highly unusual to find Roman goods so far north and the item gives a revealing insight into trade routes and...
  • Researchers suggest Vikings used crystals with sun compass to steer at night

    03/29/2014 9:14:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | March 26, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers working in Hungary has proposed that a sun compass artifact found in a convent in 1948 might have been used in conjunction with crystals to allow Vikings to guide their boats even at night. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical & Engineering Sciences, the team describes theories they've developed that might explain how Viking sailors were able to so accurately sail to places such as Greenland. Since the discovery of the sun compass fragment, researchers have theorized that Viking sailors used them to plot their course—at least when the...
  • Japanese kayaker hopes to show Kennewick Man could have traveled by boat

    04/23/2012 9:44:02 PM PDT · by Theoria · 30 replies
    Tri-City Herald ^ | 10 April 2012 | John Trumbo
    By week's end, Ryota Yamada hopes to slip his sea kayak gently into the Columbia River at Clover Island, embarking on the first leg of a 10,000-mile adventure to Japan. The retired scientist who did nanotechnological research intends to paddle downriver to the ocean, then via the Inland Passage north to Alaska, and eventually across the Bering Strait to the Asian continent. It will take him four summers, but if he succeeds in reaching his homeland, Yamada said, he will have shown that Kennewick Man could have made his way by boat 9,300 years ago from Japan to North America....
  • Kensington Rune Stone

    01/09/2002 12:52:12 PM PST · by crystalk · 161 replies · 1,010+ views
    myself | 1-9-02 | myself
    Kensington Rune Stone This subject used to fascinate me when I was 9 or 11. I read everything the late Hjalmar Holand ever wrote. It has fascinated many others, unfortunately mainly “professional Scandinavians” who have made their lives out of their ethnicity, especially as professors of that language or culture. Most have used it only as a way to get a cheap Ph.D. thesis by demolishing it once again, or by using its possible validity to back up some ulterior theory or hobby-horse they may have. Few if any mainstream observers of American antiquities have been willing to touch it. ...
  • First Americans

    07/15/2003 5:52:59 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 3,666+ views
    Discover ^ | 9-1999 | Karen Wright
    Discover Feb, 1999 First Americans.(origins of man) Author/s: Karen Wright Not long ago we thought the first humans in the New World were mammoth hunters from Siberia who crossed the Bering Strait at the end of the Ice Age. Now, we are learning, none of that may be true not the who, not the where, not the how, and certainly not the when. You don't expect someone who has been dead for more than 9,000 years to have any odor left--let alone a strong one. But you don't expect him to have any hair or skin or clothes left, either,...
  • Iberia, Not Siberia

    12/21/2003 9:48:22 AM PST · by blam · 18 replies · 3,482+ views
    Team Atlantis ^ | 12-6-2000 | Michael A Arbuthnot
    IBERIA, NOT SIBERIA?A Look at the Evidence Supporting a Late Pleistocene Migration to the New World from Europe Michael A. Arbuthnot ANT 5152 Paleoindian Archaeology Dr. Michael Faught December 6th, 2000 Perhaps the most provocative question facing North American paleo-archaeologists is the origin of the Clovis complex. Traditional models have placed Clovis origins in Asia, though one controversial theory contends that Clovis progenitors may have migrated from Iberia (Spain, France, and Portugal). This theory suggests that the descendants of an Upper Pleistocene culture known as Solutrean were the first unquestionable inhabitants of the New World. The recent revitalization of a...
  • First Mariners

    09/25/2004 12:44:19 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 696+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 51 Number 3 May/June 1998 | Mark Rose
    Mata Menge, however, produced a small number of stone tools, including some made of nonlocal chert, as well as remains of large stegodon, crocodile, giant rat, freshwater molluscs, and plants... Morwood dated the sites using a technique that analyzes individual zircon crystals from volcanic deposits. A sample from Tangi Talo, taken near a pygmy stegodon tusk and giant tortoise shell fragments, yielded a date of about 900,000 years ago. At Mata Menge, a sample from just beneath the artifact-bearing level dated to about 880,000 years ago, while another, taken above in situ artifacts, gave a date of about 800,000... Tools...
  • Discoveries Challenge Beliefs on Humans’ Arrival in the Americas

    03/28/2014 9:09:21 AM PDT · by Theoria · 68 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 27 Mar 2014 | SIMON ROMERO
    Niede Guidon still remembers her astonishment when she glimpsed the paintings. Preserved amid the bromeliad-encrusted plateaus that tower over the thorn forests of northeast Brazil, the ancient rock art depicts fierce battles among tribesmen, orgiastic scenes of prehistoric revelry and hunters pursuing their game, spears in hand. “These were stunning compositions, people and animals together, not just figures alone,” said Dr. Guidon, 81, remembering what first lured her and other archaeologists in the 1970s to this remote site where jaguars still prowl. Hidden in the rock shelters where prehistoric humans once lived, the paintings number in the thousands. Some are...
  • Ancient Mariners: Did Neanderthals Sail to Mediterranean?

    11/24/2012 8:17:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, November 15, 2012 | Charles Choi
    Neanderthals and other extinct human lineages might have been ancient mariners, venturing to the Mediterranean islands thousands of years earlier than previously thought. This prehistoric seafaring could shed light on the mental capabilities of these lost relatives of modern humans, researchers say. Scientists had thought the Mediterranean islands were first settled about 9,000 years ago by Neolithic or New Stone Age farmers and shepherds... For instance, obsidian from the Aegean island of Melos was uncovered at the mainland Greek coastal site of Franchthi cave in layers that were about 11,000 years old, while excavations on the southern coast of Cyprus...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 10:22:47 AM PST · by presidio9 · 14 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 29 February 2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow. Now, George Ferentinos of...