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Keyword: anthropology

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  • Why Biblical Anthropology?

    11/06/2015 12:06:46 PM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 21 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | Nov. 5, 2015 | Alice C. Linsley
    Alice C. Linsley Biblical anthropology seeks to understand antecedents and explores the beliefs of Abraham's cattle-herding Nilo-Saharan ancestors. Until we better understand their beliefs and religious practices we will continue to impose incorrect or inadequate interpretations on the Bible. David Noel Freedman wrote, "The Hebrew Bible is the one artifact from antiquity that not only maintained its integrity but continues to have a vital, powerful effect thousands of years later." Anthropologists and archaeologists turn to the Bible for clues and data. Very often this has led to wonderful discoveries! The material in the Bible clearly has been divinely superintended through...
  • Why Biblical Anthropology?

    11/05/2015 9:53:32 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 50 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | Nov. 5, 2015 | Alice C. Linsley
    Biblical anthropology seeks to understand antecedents and explores the beliefs of Abraham's cattle-herding Nilo-Saharan ancestors. Until we better understand their religious practices we will continue to impose incorrect or inadequate interpretations on the Bible. David Noel Freedman has said: “The Hebrew Bible is the one artifact from antiquity that not only maintained its integrity but continues to have a vital, powerful effect thousands of years later.” The Bible contains material older than the first civilizations. The king lists of Genesis 4 and 5 are an example. Anthropological analysis of the kinship pattern of these ruler-priest lines has shown them to...
  • Were Adam and Eve Real? New Anthropological Evidence in 10-Year Update to Book (Interview)

    10/26/2015 8:33:29 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 57 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 10/26/2015 | Napp Nazworth
    Ten years after publication of Who Was Adam? by Fazale Rana and Hugh Ross, 13 new chapters detail the new scientific evidence on the origins of humankind in a second edition.Rana and Ross are scholars affiliated with Reasons to Believe, which also published the new edition of Who Was Adam? RTB works to spread the Gospel by showing how science supports the truths found in Scripture. Rana and Ross both have doctorate degrees in the physical sciences, biochemistry and astronomy, respectively. Unlike most second editions, this one leaves the original edition alone and adds the new chapters onto the original.During an interview...
  • Discovery Of 47 Teeth In Chinese Cave Changes Picture Of Human Migration Out Of Africa

    10/17/2015 9:09:33 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 33 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 15 October 2015 | Amina Khan
    Forty-seven smooth teeth dug out of a cave in southern China reveal that Homo sapiens may have arrived there 80,000 years ago...The findings, published this week in the journal Nature, may compel researchers to reconsider their theories about human migrations out of Africa.
  • Pyramids exist in Bosnia: Archaeologist

    08/14/2015 8:46:43 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    The Straits Times ^ | August 14, 2015 | Carolyn Khew
    But experts say the five that he identified in Bosnia-Herzegovina are natural hills.Despite his many critics, maverick archaeologist Sam Osmanagich stands by his claims that he has uncovered not one, but five structures which he says are pyramids in Visoko in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Dr Osmanagich, who earned his doctorate on the history of civilisations at the University of Sarajevo in 2008, was in Singapore recently for a conference, where he spoke about his work on pyramids. The 55-year-old claims that he has discovered the "biggest complex of pyramidal structures in the world" comprising five pyramids, all connected by underground tunnels. The...
  • Scientists Trace an Ancient Connection Between Amazonians and Australasians

    07/22/2015 3:07:40 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 21, 2015 | James Gorman
    Some people in the Brazilian Amazon are very distant relations of indigenous Australians, New Guineans and other Australasians, two groups of scientists who conducted detailed genetic analyses reported Tuesday. But the researchers disagree on the source of that ancestry. The connection is ancient, all agree, and attributable to Eurasian migrants to the Americas who had some Australasian ancestry, the scientists said. But one group said the evidence is clear that two different populations came from Siberia to settle the Americas 15,000 or more years ago. The other scientific team says there was only one founding population from which all indigenous...
  • Teeth found near Tel Aviv point to a new prehistoric human species

    06/21/2015 10:29:47 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 59 replies
    Ynet News ^ | June 20, 2015 | Dudi Goldman
    Researchers found four teeth in the Qesem Cave near Rosh Ha'ayin (not far from Tel Aviv), and they were astonished at test results that conclude the fossils to be some 400,000-years-old. The significance of this is that it's possible that the origin of prehistoric man is in Israel, and not in East Africa. And an additional surprise is that prehistoric man was mainly vegetarian and not carnivorous. The cave is 10 meters deep and its surface area is approximately 300 square meters. Researchers have been sifting through it for some 15 years to discover remains from prehistoric times. The ancient...
  • DNA Deciphers Roots of Modern Europeans

    06/10/2015 3:20:13 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 29 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 10, 2015 | By Carl Zimmer
    For centuries, archaeologists have reconstructed the early history of Europe by digging up ancient settlements and examining the items that their inhabitants left behind. More recently, researchers have been scrutinizing something even more revealing than pots, chariots and swords: DNA. On Wednesday in the journal Nature, two teams of scientists one based at the University of Copenhagen and one based at Harvard University presented the largest studies to date of ancient European DNA, extracted from 170 skeletons found in countries from Spain to Russia. Both studies indicate that todays Europeans descend from three groups who moved into Europe...
  • 'New species' of ancient human found

    05/27/2015 10:23:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 41 replies
    The British Broadcasting Corporation ^ | May 28, 2015 | Rebecca Morelle
    A new species of ancient human has been unearthed in the Afar region of Ethiopia, scientists report. Researchers discovered jaw bones and teeth, which date to between 3.3m and 3.5m years old. It means this new hominin was alive at the same time as several other early human species, suggesting our family tree is more complicated than was thought. The study is published in the journal Nature. The new species has been called Australopithecus deyiremeda, which means "close relative" in the language spoken by the Afar people. The ancient remains are thought to belong to four individuals, who would have...
  • UCD archaeologists seek to recreate the world of our ancestors

    04/11/2015 9:05:16 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    The Irish Times ^ | April 11, 2015 | Ronan McGreevy
    Centre for Experimental Archaeology on Belfield campus is only one of its kind in the world.Brendan ONeill at work on his early medieval round house on the UCD campus. How did our ancestors create the world they lived in? How did they survive without the modern accoutrements that make our lives easy? The question is at the heart of archaeology and forms the basis of a unique project in a quiet corner of University College Dublins sprawling Belfield campus. UCD is the only university in the world with a centre for experimental archaeology. It is not made of bricks and...
  • Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge

    08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · by blam · 78 replies · 3,337+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
    Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
  • When Science is Betrayed and What Lessons We Should Learn

    01/15/2015 7:50:33 AM PST · by Salvation · 23 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 01-14-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    When Science is Betrayed – and What Lessons We Should Learn By: Msgr. Charles PopeThere is a great reverence for science in our culture. On the one hand, rightly so. Science has made enormous strides that have changed life as we know it. Profound discoveries have eradicated diseases, improved health, increased the world’s food supply, led to a computer revolution, drawn us higher into outer space and deeper into inner space, revealed hidden mysteries of nature, and produced technologies unimaginable to even our recent ancestors.On the other hand, the reverence of science has tipped perhaps too far in the direction of a...
  • Concerns About BioLogos

    01/17/2015 5:08:32 PM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 21 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | December 22, 2014 | Alice C. Linsley
    eborah Haarsma, the Director of BioLogos, is professor of Astronomy, and her husband, Loren Haarsma, teaches Physics at Calvin College in Michigan. The biology department of Calvin College issued this statement on May 7, 2010: "We teach evolutionary theory as the best scientific explanation for the dynamic diversity of life on Earth. . . . We teach biology from an evolutionary paradigm." Neither Deborah nor Loren are biologists, though biologists serve on the BioLogos team. Neither are anthropologists, and as far as I can discover, no anthropologists serve on the BioLogos team. That is unfortunate since anthropology has much to...
  • History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud [2005]

    01/14/2015 9:55:35 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 47 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 01/14/2015 | Luke Harding in Berlin
    It appeared to be one of archaeology's most sensational finds. The skull fragment discovered in a peat bog near Hamburg was more than 36,000 years old - and was the vital missing link between modern humans and Neanderthals. This, at least, is what Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten - a distinguished, cigar-smoking German anthropologist - told his scientific colleagues, to global acclaim, after being invited to date the extremely rare skull. However, the professor's 30-year-old academic career has now ended in disgrace after the revelation that he systematically falsified the dates on this and numerous other "stone age" relics. Yesterday...
  • Pictograph Photo Gallery

    09/11/2014 2:06:56 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 9/11/2014 | Staff
    Pictograph Photo Gallery A pictograph is a drawing or painting that is created on a rock. It is not "carved" into the rock - that would be a "petroglyph." This is a series of photographs of pictographs from around the world. There are many links to other galleries.
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 49 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • The Case of the Missing Ancestor: DNA from Russia adds a mysterious new member to the human family

    07/04/2014 8:40:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 2013 | Jamie Shreeve
    In the Altay Mountains of southern Siberia, some 200 miles from where Russia touches Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan, nestled under a rock face about 30 yards above a little river called the Anuy, there is a cave called Denisova. It has long attracted visitors. The name comes from that of a hermit, Denis, who is said to have lived there in the 18th century. Long before that, Neolithic and later Turkic pastoralists took shelter in the cave, gathering their herds around them to ride out the Siberian winters. Thanks to them, the archaeologists who work in Denisova today, surrounded by...
  • Omnivore Ancestors? Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat & vegetables

    06/27/2014 2:46:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Scientist ^ | June 26, 2014 | Jyoti Madhusoodanan
    Fossilized feces offer new evidence that Neanderthals ate both meat and plants. Chemical analysis confirmed the oldest-known ancient human fecal matter, according to a study published yesterday (June 25) in PLOS ONE. Previous isotope studies of bones suggested Neanderthals were primarily meat-eaters. Analyses of tartar from their teeth have indicated they may have also eaten plants, although some researchers noted that these plant remains could be traces from the stomach contents of herbivore prey. Stool, however, is "the perfect evidence because youre sure it was consumed," study author Ainara Sistiaga from the University of La Laguna in Spain told BBC...
  • Pope Francis Against Gay Adoption: Every Person Needs a Male Father and a Female Mother

    05/22/2014 3:22:52 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 54 replies
    CNSNews.com ^ | May 21, 2014 | Michael W. Chapman
    ...The Pope has rejected the idea of same-sex marriage as an anthropological regression and stressed that when it comes to adoption, every person needs a male father and a female mother. Pope Francis explained his views on these hot-button issues in his book, On Heaven and Earth: Pope Francis on Faith, Family, and the Church in the Twenty-First Century, which he co-wrote with Rabbi Abraham Skorka in 2010 and which was republished after the then-Argentine cardinal was elected to the papacy in March 2013. The book is a dialogue between Skorka and the future Pope and includes a chapter on...
  • Prehistoric Europeans Took Poppies and Mushrooms in Prayer

    05/17/2014 12:09:18 PM PDT · by Renfield · 24 replies
    It’s not much of a stretch to believe that getting stoned in the Stone Age was as popular among prehistoric Europeans as it is now. However, new evidence suggests that marijuana, mushrooms, alcohol and other mood-altering substances were used for more than zonking with Zonk – they played crucial roles in spiritual practices, especially burial rituals and communications with the after-world.Elisa Guerra-Doce of the Universidad de Valladolid in Spain has documented the cultural contexts in which forms of alcohol and drugs were used in prehistoric Europe. The forms she looked for were fossilized leaves and seeds of psychoactive plants, residues...
  • Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations

    01/13/2014 3:40:59 PM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 1-7-2014 | Crystal McMichael
    Look around the Amazon rainforest today and its hard to imagine it filled with people. But in recent decades, archaeologists have started to find evidence that before Columbuss arrival, the region was dotted with towns and perhaps even cities. The extent of human settlement in the Amazon remains hotly debated, partly because huge swaths of the 6-million-square-kilometer rainforest remain unstudied by archaeologists. Now, researchers have built a model predicting where signs of pre-Columbian agriculture are most likely to be found, a tool they hope will help guide future archaeological work in the region. In many ways, archaeology in the Amazon...
  • Did BEER create modern society? Ancient man developed agriculture to brew alcohol and not to bake...

    12/20/2013 10:57:34 AM PST · by Teotwawki · 35 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | December 20, 2013 | Sam Webb
    Full Title: Did Beer create modern society? Ancient man developed agriculture to brew alcohol and not to bake bread, claims scientist Some scientists claim beer - not bread - is the reason early man adopted a society based on farming around 10,000 years ago, a key moment in our evolution. The cultivation of grain saw the transition away from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle and a widely-accepted theory is that the crops were used to bake bread, but experts claim it was the prospect of a brew that drove the desire to settle down and start a farm.
  • The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

    12/19/2013 12:22:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 56 replies
    The Scientist ^ | December 18, 2013 | Ruth Williams
    A high-quality genome sequence obtained from a female Neanderthal toe bone reveals that the individuals parents were close relatives and that such inbreeding was prevalent among her recent ancestors, according to a paper published today (December 18) in Nature. But the sequence also reveals that interbreeding occurred between Neanderthals and other hominin groups, including early modern humans. Did humans evolve like a constantly branching tree? A lot of people think so, said Milford Wolpoff, a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, who was not involved in the study. But theres also been this thread of thought, by some...
  • Beer Domesticated Man

    12/19/2013 5:54:42 AM PST · by Second Amendment First · 35 replies
    Nautilus ^ | December 19, 2013 | Gloria Dawson
    The domestication of wild grains has played a major role in human evolution, facilitating the transition from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to one based on agriculture. You might think that the grains were used for bread, which today represents a basic staple. But some scientists argue that it wasnt bread that motivated our ancestors to start grain farming. It was beer. Man, they say, chose pints over pastry. Beer has plenty to recommend it over bread. First, and most obviously, it is pleasant to drink. Beer had all the same nutrients as bread, and it had one additional advantage, argues Solomon...
  • Baffling 400,000-Year-Old Clue to Human Origins

    12/05/2013 11:46:56 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 37 replies
    The New York Times ^ | December 4, 2013 | Carl Zimmer
    An artist's interpretation of the hominins that lived near the Sima de los Huesos cave in Spain. Scientists have found the oldest DNA evidence yet of humans biological history. But instead of neatly clarifying human evolution, the finding is adding new mysteries. In a paper in the journal Nature, scientists reported Wednesday that they had retrieved ancient human DNA from a fossil dating back about 400,000 years, shattering the previous record of 100,000 years. The fossil, a thigh bone found in Spain, had previously seemed to many experts to belong to a forerunner of Neanderthals. But its DNA tells a...
  • For the anthropologist, the widespread failure to marry is a sign of cultural collapse

    11/25/2013 3:54:01 PM PST · by NYer · 62 replies
    Catholic Herald ^ | November 25, 2013 | FRANCIS PHILLIPS
    A new booklet on the decline of marriage should concern us.Commitment is difficult but rewarding Family Education Trust, an independent think-tank that supports family life founded on marriage between a man and a woman through research and the publication of resources, has produced a new on-line resource: A Brief History of Marriage by John de Waal. In PDF format, it is intended for downloading as a teaching resource for PSHE, history or RE classes.It provides a short survey of marriage throughout the ages, from the ancient world, through the Old Testament and then the Christian centuries, up to the present...
  • Are humans really different from animals?

    11/22/2013 1:58:08 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 51 replies
    WPTV-TV / CNN ^ | November 21, 2013 | Thomas Suddendorf, CNN
    We humans tend to think of ourselves as better than, or at least separate from, all other species on this planet. But every species is unique, and in that sense humans are no different. Nevertheless, it seems obvious that there is something extra special about us -- after all, we are the species running the zoos. In "The Gap," I survey what we currently do and do not know about what exactly sets humans apart. What are the physical differences that distinguish us from our closest animal relatives? There are some notable ways in which our bodies differ from those...
  • First South Americans Ate Giant Sloths (30,000 years ago!)

    11/21/2013 4:11:30 AM PST · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 11-19-2013 | Jennifer Viegas
    Giant sloths were eaten by a population living in Uruguay 30,000 years ago, suggesting humans arrived in the Americas far earlier than previously thought, according to a new study. The discovery, along with other recent findings, strengthens the theory that people arrived in South America via ocean crossings long before humans might have walked into North America from northeastern Asia, during the end of the last glacial period around 16,000 years ago. The study was published in the latest Proceedings of the Royal Society B. These brave individuals apparently did not shy away from big game either, with giant sloth...
  • No seafood for early Easter Islanders -- they ate rats

    09/27/2013 3:48:08 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    NBC News ^ | 9-26-2013 | Owen Jarus
    Chemical analyses of teeth from 41 human skeletons excavated on Easter Island revealed the inhabitants ate rats rather than seafood; Here, Moai statues at Ahu Tongariki on the south-eastern part of the island, where 26 of the skeletons were found. The inhabitants of Easter Island consumed a diet that was lacking in seafood and was, literally, quite ratty. The island, also called Rapa Nui, first settled around A.D. 1200, is famous for its more than 1,000 "walking" Moai statues, most of which originally faced inland. Located in the South Pacific, Rapa Nui is the most isolated inhabited landmass on Earth;...
  • What is your American dialect?

    09/16/2013 11:54:23 AM PDT · by Theoria · 118 replies
    Gene Expression ^ | 16 Sept 2013 | Razib Khan
    Razibs Dialect SimilarityLanguage dialect is something that we often pick up unconsciously, so I find it an interesting if narcissistic project to query my own dialect affinities. The above was generated using a 140 question test (warning: server often slow). In case you were curious, my most similar city (to my dialect) is Sunnyvale, California. Though most of my life has been spent on the West coast of the United States, I did spend my elementary age years in upstate New York. You can see evidence of that in the heat-map. There are particular words I use and pronunciations that...
  • Scientists link ancient remains with living Canadian woman

    07/09/2013 5:36:49 AM PDT · by Renfield · 13 replies
    Terra Daily ^ | 7-6-2013
    Scientists say they have established a genetic link between three North American women, one who died 5,000 years ago, one 2,500 years ago and one living. The evidence shows the living woman, a Tsimshian from the Metlakatla First Nation in British Columbia, is descended from the women who died centuries ago or from one of their close female relatives, PostMedia News reported. All three had the same mitogenome or mitochondrial DNA, which is passed from mother to child. The research conducted by Canadian and U.S. scientists was published this week in PLoS ONE, one of the journals produced by the...
  • Worlds Oldest Cancer Found in Bone of 120,000 Year-Old Neanderthal

    06/06/2013 4:27:44 PM PDT · by SatinDoll · 15 replies
    International Business Times ^ | June 6, 2013 | Ewan Palmer
    The world's oldest known human tumor has been found in the rib bone of a Neanderthal who lived more than 120,000 years ago. The bone was evacuated from a site in Krapina, Croatia more than 100 years ago and has been found to have contracted the fibrous dysplasia tumor, a cancer which is common among modern-day humans. This discovery by David Frayer from the University of Kansas predates previous evidence of the tumor by more than 100,000 years. Before this discovery, the earliest bone tumor was seen in an Egyptian mummy around 2,000 years ago. David Frayer, professor of anthropology...
  • Southern Europeans More African Than Thought

    06/05/2013 9:10:12 AM PDT · by Renfield · 28 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 6-3-2013 | Tia Ghose
    Southern Europeans get a significant portion of their genetic ancestry from North Africa, new research suggests. The findings are perhaps not surprising, given that the Romans occupied North Africa and set up extensive trade routes in the region, and the Moors, a North African people, ruled a medieval territory called El-Andalus on the Iberian Peninsula. But the findings, published today (June 3) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest the impact of these connections went beyond culture and architecture, and may explain why Southern Europeans have more genetic diversity than their northern counterparts. "The higher level...
  • New geoglyphs of the Jordanian Harrat

    05/15/2013 2:36:27 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 5-15-2013 | Stephan F.J. Kempe, Ahmad Al-Malbeh
    Fig. 1. Map of the Harrat in Syria, Jordan and northern Saudi Arabia. Stephan F.J. Kempe1, Ahmad Al-Malbeh21: Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany; 2: Hashemite University Zarka, Jordan The eastern “panhandle” of the kingdom of Jordan is partly covered by a vast and rugged lava desert, the Harrat, covering about ca. 11.400 km2 (Fig. 1). Scoured by wind in winter and scorched dry by the sun in summer, the surface is covered by black basalt stones, making this area seem as uninviting, hostile and inaccessible as is imaginable.Nevertheless this modern day desolate desert proves to be as rich in archaeological heritage...
  • Is Man Tripartite or Bipartite?

    04/22/2013 2:41:15 PM PDT · by NYer · 9 replies
    Catholic Answers ^ | April 21, 2013 | Tim Staples
    Televangelist and Founder and President of Charis Bible College, Andrew Wommack, has said: The most important revelation I have ever received is the understanding that we were created by God with three distinct parts: spirit, soul, and body This idea of man as essentially tripartite verses the Catholic and biblical notion of man as a body/soul composite is a rather common misconception among Evangelicals and Pentecostals. They may not go as far as Mr. Wommack and say this is the most important revelation they have ever received, but they will be quick to defend their position nonetheless. And I...
  • Ancient Chinese coin found on Kenyan island by Field Museum expedition

    03/14/2013 11:12:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-14-2014 | Provided by Field Museum
    A joint expedition of scientists led by Chapurukha M. Kusimba of The Field Museum and Sloan R. Williams of the University of Illinois at Chicago has unearthed a 600-year-old Chinese coin on the Kenyan island of Manda that shows trade existed between China and east Africa decades before European explorers set sail and changed the map of the world. The coin, a small disk of copper and silver with a square hole in the center so it could be worn on a belt, is called "Yongle Tongbao" and was issued by Emperor Yongle who reigned from 1403-1425AD during the Ming...
  • Worlds Earliest Figurative Sculpture - Ice Age Lion Man (40,000 Year-Old Mammoth Ivory Statue)

    02/08/2013 8:19:54 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 20 replies
    The Art Newspaper ^ | Saturday 9 Feb 2013 | The Art Newspaper
    Ice Age Lion Man is worlds earliest figurative sculpture Work carved from mammoth ivory has been redated and 1,000 new fragments discoveredbut it wont make it to British Museum show The star exhibit initially promised for the British Museums Ice Age Art show will not be comingbut for a good reason. New pieces of Ulms Lion Man sculpture have been discovered and it has been found to be much older than originally thought, at around 40,000 years. This makes it the worlds earliest figurative sculpture. At the London exhibition, which opens on 7 February, a replica from the Ulm...

    02/02/2013 3:46:13 AM PST · by ABrit · 59 replies
    World Net Daily ^ | Feb 2nd 2013 | COLIN FLAHERTY
    Thandiwe testified he purchased a gun to enforce beliefs hed developed about white people during his years as an anthropology major at the University of West Georgia. I was trying to prove a point that Europeans had colonized the world, as a result, we see a lot of evil today, he said. In terms of slavery, it was something that needed to be answered for. I was trying to spread the message of making white people mend. The night before at a Peace Party, he was enraged that two white people were there. I was upset, he said. I was...
  • The Flores Hobbit's face revealed

    12/10/2012 2:53:37 PM PST · by Renfield · 14 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12-10-2012 | Sunanda Creagh
    An Australian anthropologist has used forensic facial reconstruction techniques to show, for the first time, how the mysterious Flores 'hobbit' might have once looked. Homo floresiensis, as the hobbit is officially known, caused a storm of controversy when it was discovered in Flores, Indonesia in 2003. Some argued the hobbit was an entirely new species, while others suggested it may have simply been a diseased specimen of an existing human species. Using techniques she has previously applied to help police solve crimes, Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Wollongong and specialist facial anthropologist, Dr Susan Hayes, moulded muscle...
  • Redheaded Tocharian Mummies of the Uyghir Area, China

    12/06/2012 3:35:36 PM PST · by Renfield · 39 replies
    Frontiers of Anthropology ^ | 11-28-2012 | Dale Drinnon
    ~~~snip~~~ hey did a DNA test on the Cherchen man (the 3800 year old 6'6 tall dark blonde mummy and the oldest mummy found), and the beauty of Loulan (the red hair mummy), and both of these mummies contained East Asian Mongoloid DNA. Even the Chinese scientist were astonished. The Mongoloid component of the Tocharians are not from Han Chinese or pre Han Chinese, but most likely from Altaic types of Mongoloids such as Uyghurs, Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, and Mongolians. This obviously indicates that the Tocharians were already mixed for quite a few generations, since they looked mostly Caucasian. Very interesting....
  • Linguist Makes Sensational Claim: English Is a Scandinavian Language

    11/29/2012 2:59:29 PM PST · by Renfield · 97 replies
    Apollon Magazine (via Science Daily) ^ | 11-27-2012 | Trine Nickelsen
    "Have you considered how easy it is for us Norwegians to learn English?" asks Jan Terje Faarlund, professor of linguistics at the University of Oslo. "Obviously there are many English words that resemble ours. But there is something more: its fundamental structure is strikingly similar to Norwegian. We avoid many of the usual mistakes because the grammar is more or less the same. Faarlund and his colleague Joseph Emmonds, visiting professor from Palack University in the Czech Republic, now believe they can prove that English is in reality a Scandinavian language, in other words it belongs to the Northern Germanic...
  • How the West Was Lost by Native Americans

    11/21/2012 5:24:18 AM PST · by Renfield · 104 replies
    Frontiers of Anthropology ^ | 11-20-2012 | Dale Drinnon
    Everybody knows that Europeans took a lot of land from Native Americans, but this animated GIF by Tumblr user sunisup gives a great sense of just how fast the people living in North America were pushed west after Christopher Columbus "discovered" the continent. She turned an old graphic by Louisiana State professor Sam B. Hillard into a mini-movie that viscerally demonstrates the gradual chopping away of Native American land through cessions, or a surrender of territory to another entity. The green represents Native American land, and any part that turns white was ceded. She writes: "Made because I was having...
  • Uncommon Features of Einstein's Brain Might Explain His Remarkable Cognitive Abilities

    11/17/2012 3:49:48 PM PST · by EveningStar · 48 replies
    newswise ^ | November 15, 2012 | Florida State University
    Portions of Albert Einsteins brain have been found to be unlike those of most people and could be related to his extraordinary cognitive abilities, according to a new study led by Florida State University evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk.
  • Anthropologist suggests Mediterranean islands inhabited much earlier than thought

    11/16/2012 8:16:41 AM PST · by Renfield · 3 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-16-2012 | Bob Yirka
    Modern science has held that islands such as Cypress and Crete were first inhabited by seafaring humans approximately 9,000 years ago by agriculturists from the late Neolithic period. Simmons writes that research over the past 20 years has cast doubt on that assumption however and suggests that it might be time to rewrite the history books. He cites evidence such as pieces of obsidian found in a cave in mainland Greece that were found to have come from Melos, an island in the Aegean Sea and were dated at 11,000 years ago as well as artifacts from recent digs on...
  • 30,000-year-old DNA preserved in poo a window into the past

    11/16/2012 8:08:30 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Murdoch University DNA scientists have used 30,000-year-old faecal matter known as middens to ascertain which plants and animals existed at that time in the hot, arid Pilbara region of North Western Australia.To date, this is the oldest environmental sample from which DNA has been obtained in Australia. It had previously been considered unrealistic to extract DNA from hot, arid zone samples due to the extreme heat.PhD candidate Dith Murray from Murdochs Ancient DNA Lab said that comparing the genetic signatures obtained from old material such as middens to present day plant and animal surveys would allow for an exploration...
  • Iceman Mummy Finds His Closest Relatives

    11/11/2012 12:44:27 PM PST · by Renfield · 37 replies
    Live Science ^ | 11-9-2012 | Tia Ghose
    SAN FRANCISCO tzi the Iceman, an astonishingly well-preserved Neolithic mummy found in the Italian Alps in 1991, was a native of Central Europe, not a first-generation migr from Sardinia, new research shows. And genetically, he looked a lot like other Stone Age farmers throughout Europe. he new findings, reported Thursday (Nov. 8) here at the American Society of Human Genetics conference, support the theory that farmers, and not just the technology of farming, spread during prehistoric times from the Middle East all the way to Finland. "The idea is that the spread of farming and agriculture, right now we...
  • Prehistoric 'Kennewick Man' Was All Beefcake

    10/21/2012 2:59:58 PM PDT · by Renfield · 43 replies
    NPR.org ^ | 10-21-2012 | Anna King
    For nearly a decade, scientists and Northwest tribes in Washington state fought bitterly over whether to bury or study the 9,500-year-old bones known as Kennewick Man. Scientists won the battle, and now, after years of careful examination, they're releasing some of their findings. For starters, Kennewick Man was buff. I mean, really beefcake. So says Doug Owsley, head of physical anthropology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, and the man who led the study of the ancient remains. Owsley can read the bones like we might read a book. He looks for ridge lines that indicate which muscles...
  • In Prehistoric Britain Cannibalism Was Practical and Ritualistic

    09/25/2012 6:50:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 46 replies
    Scientific American Blogs ^ | 9-24-2012 | Kate Wong
    BORDEAUXMealtime in Goughs cave in Somerset, England, 14,700 years ago, was not for the faint of heart. Humans were on the menu, for consumption by their own kind. Anthropologists have long studied evidence for cannibalism in the human fossil record, but establishing that it occurred and ascertaining why people ate each other have proved difficult tasks. A new analysis provides fresh insights into the human defleshing that occurred at this site and what motivated itand hints that cannibalism may have been more common in prehistory than previously thought....
  • Aspergers Man- The Search for Multi-Regional Human Speciation

    08/30/2012 10:45:34 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 11 replies
    The Freehold | August 29-30, 2012 | Jonathan David Baird
    My first love will always be archaeology and the study of what makes us human.This article is speculation. This is my personal musing on the development of certain psychological and physiological human traits. This is not to be taken as anything but my personal opinion. I have no evidence that there was an Aspergers man. This article was also written several years ago and since then more evidence for the possibility of interbreeding with other hominids has come to light in Russia and in Africa that may support my original idea... Part 1Part 2
  • Siberian Princess reveals her 2,500 year old tattoos

    08/16/2012 8:42:37 AM PDT · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 8-14-2012
    The ancient mummy of a mysterious young woman, known as the Ukok Princess, is finally returning home to the Altai Republic this month. She is to be kept in a special mausoleum at the Republican National Museum in capital Gorno-Altaisk, where eventually she will be displayed in a glass sarcophagus to tourists. For the past 19 years, since her discovery, she was kept mainly at a scientific institute in Novosibirsk, apart from a period in Moscow when her remains were treated by the same scientists who preserve the body of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin. To mark the move 'home', The...