Keyword: appalachia

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  • U.S. Shale Oil Output to Hit Record 8.4 Million Bpd in March: EIA

    02/19/2019 1:43:23 PM PST · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    money.usnews.com ^ | Feb. 19, 2019, at 3:15 p.m. | by Devika Krishna Kumar, Jonathan Oatis, Marguerita Choy)
    NEW YORK - U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise 84,000 barrels per day (bpd) in March to a record of about 8.4 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said in a monthly report on Tuesday. The largest change is forecast in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, where output is expected to climb by 43,000 bpd to a record 4.024 million bpd in March. A shale revolution has helped boost the United States to the position of world's biggest crude oil producer, ahead of Saudi Arabia and Russia. Overall crude production...
  • Bluestone hiring nearly 300 new mine workers

    10/25/2018 11:33:24 AM PDT · by buckalfa · 3 replies
    WV MetroNews ^ | October 25, 2018 | Pete Davis
    BECKLEY, W.Va. — Bluestone Resources announced on Thursday it is hiring 290 additional workers for the company’s coal mines in West Virginia, Virginia and Kentucky. Bluestone Resources Inc CEO Jay Justice Most of the new positions will be at the Keystone Surface Mine in McDowell County and at the Bishop Surface Mine in Tazewell County, which is reopening. Bluestone also will be hiring miners at its Wise, Virginia, and Pike County, Kentucky, sites. Jay Justice, who operates the mines for Justice Companies, said in a press release that a variety of jobs are being offered, and that a new training...
  • Rise of the Rest in Appalachia

    09/23/2018 9:17:53 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    The Carthage Standard ^ | September 19, 2018 | Salena Zito
    PIKEVILLE, Ky. — On Election Day 2016, Jonathan Webb found himself on a lavish cruise liner with America‘s elite, gliding along the Atlantic outside of Miami. Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, was there, and so were Quentin Tarantino, Erin Brockovich, TV legend Norman Lear and singer will.i.am. Celebrity chefs were stationed at different eateries; yoga gurus offered spiritual talks and meditations. Webb, who was working with the Obama White House at the time, was used to being in rarefied company. But still, he found the experience surreal — and it was about to get even weirder. On TV screens...
  • Where Trump is seen as saviour

    07/23/2017 5:58:52 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    The British Broadcasting Corporation ^ | July 23, 2017 | Valeria Perasso, Social Affairs correspondent
    Jamestown, Tennessee, is one of the poorest towns with a majority-white population in the US. The area overwhelmingly voted for Donald Trump and locals believe new jobs will now come - but will that be enough to turn around decades of economic distress? Nine years after his plumbing company collapsed at the height of the credit crunch, Clint Barta is feeling confident enough to start again. "It's only been days, so it's a bit slow," says Barta who has been in the business for 33 years. "But I'm meeting with a builder tomorrow." The plumber had to lay off 75...
  • Appalachia and the Rust Belt Do Not Need Big Government

    06/12/2017 1:53:57 PM PDT · by davikkm · 13 replies
    IWB ^ | Robert Carbery
    Laura Reston and Sara Jones wrote an April piece in the New Republic about why Appalachia needs big government. In the article, they lay out why the Appalachian Regional Commission, or ARC, is an example of big government at its best. And with Trump’s budget taking aim at this extra layer of government bureaucracy, the authors declare that the president has abandoned this part of the country that helped propel him to victory last fall. Places like Hancock County, Tennessee, have seen manufacturing jobs disappear over the last decade. Plants are moving to China. Coal jobs are vanishing. Since Hillary...
  • Ethane hub gets bipartisan support (100,000 jobs in West Virginia averaging $90,000 a year)

    05/20/2017 2:50:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    The Herald-Star ^ | May 20, 2017 | Joselyn King
    WHEELING — West Virginia’s congressional delegation is showing a unified front in pushing for an ethane storage hub for central Appalachia, and they hope state leaders in Ohio and Pennsylvania join them. U.S. Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., were joined Thursday by Rep. David McKinley, R-Wheeling, and American Chemistry Council President Cal Dooley for a news conference to tout the economic benefits of placing the hub near oil and gas reserves in Appalachia rather than near chemical industry operations on the Gulf Coast. Manchin and Moore, along with Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, last week introduced the...
  • I Remember When Appalachia Wasn’t Trump Country (liberal psychosis)

    03/05/2017 1:38:03 PM PST · by pabianice · 25 replies
    NY Times Fishwrap ^ | 3/5/17 | Peters
    "... Nineteen sixty-five was the year everything began to change. First, there was Vietnam. Opposition to the war tended to divide the country along class lines, with the college-educated elite avoiding service and the fighting and dying left to the average man..."
  • A town has hope that it hasn’t been forgotten (Sandy Hook, Kentucky)

    01/15/2017 5:20:19 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 2 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | January 15, 2017 | Holly Bailey, National Correspondent
    In the weeks leading up to the inauguration, Yahoo News visited towns and cities across the country, speaking to voters who had supported Donald Trump in the election. As the shape of his administration emerged, we asked voters if they were happy with their choice and optimistic about the future. Here is some of what we found: SANDY HOOK, Ky.—It used to be known as the most reliably Democratic county in America. In a state that had long ago gone deep red, Elliott County, located here in the winding forested hills of remote eastern Kentucky, was a true anomaly. Since...
  • Hate Didn’t Elect Donald Trump; People Did

    11/17/2016 9:25:58 AM PST · by Ciaphas Cain · 8 replies
    Tori's Thought Bubble ^ | November 12, 2016 | Victoria Sanders
    Over the summer, my little sister had a soccer tournament at Bloomsburg University, located in central Pennsylvania. The drive there was about three hours and many of the towns we drove through shocked me. The conditions of these towns were terrible. Houses were falling apart. Bars and restaurants were boarded up. Scrap metal was thrown across front lawns. White, plastic lawn chairs were out on the drooping front porches. There were no malls. No outlets. Most of these small towns did not have a Walmart, only a dollar store and a few run down thrift stores. In almost every town,...
  • How the Democrats lost the white working class (Appalachia)

    11/16/2016 6:35:40 AM PST · by Uncle Sam 911 · 42 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | 11/13/16 | SALENA ZITO
    On Thursday morning the "Today" show had a segment with a psycologist who was there to guide parents on how to explain Hillary Clinton's loss to their children. "Well that is interesting, they sure didn't have a child psycologist on to explain to my children the loss of Mitt Romney, or John McCain. You just simply did not have that," said a suburban mother sitting in the waiting room of a doctor's office with the morning show streaming on the television. The young mother, an IT professional who lives in Pittsburgh, the "Paris of Appalachia," said she was stunned once...
  • China’s Wild Ginseng Craze Has Spread All the Way to Appalachia

    10/17/2016 4:27:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies
    Real Clear Life ^ | October 17, 2016
    The Far East’s Ginseng root is best known for its medicinal (and aphrodisiacal) qualities. The root, in its natural state, is wildly popular in Asia—but also in short supply. To sate this demand, a black market for wild ginseng has cropped in the most unlikely of places: Appalachia. Currently, the global market for wild ginseng is around $2 billion. Long a staple in China and Korea, the root is finding new popularity in Singapore and Malaysia now, too. Most ginseng is grown in factory-like settings on a mass scale. But wild ginseng is considered more potent and, thus, more expensive....
  • Down in the valley, up on the ridge

    08/29/2016 11:48:15 AM PDT · by Theoria · 8 replies
    The Economist ^ | 27 Aug 2016 | The Economist
    An Appalachian people offers a timely parable of the nuanced history of race in America Head into Sneedville from the Clinch river, turn left at the courthouse and crawl up Newman’s Ridge. Do not be distracted by the driveways meandering into the woods, the views across the Appalachians or the shadows of the birds of prey; heed the warnings locals may have issued about the steepness and the switchbacks. If the pass seems challenging, consider how inaccessible it must have been in the moonshining days before motor cars. Halfway down, as Snake Hollow appears on your left, you reach a...
  • 'White Trash' — The Original Underclass

    08/06/2016 3:34:10 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 89 replies
    ProPublica ^ | Aug. 5, 2016 | Alec MacGillis
    Sometime during the past few years, the country started talking differently about white Americans of modest means. Early in the Obama era, the ennobling language of campaign pundits prevailed. There was much discussion of “white working-class voters,” with whom the Democrats, and especially Barack Obama, were having such trouble connecting. Never mind that this overbroad category of Americans — the exit pollsters’ definition was anyone without a four-year college degree, or more than a third of the electorate — obliterated major differences in geography, ethnicity, and culture. The label served to conjure a vast swath of salt-of-the-earth citizens living and...
  • Bluegrass music patriarch Ralph Stanley dies at 89

    06/24/2016 7:46:56 AM PDT · by Cecily · 27 replies
    The Charlotte Observer/Associated Press ^ | June 23, 2016 | Kristin M. Hall
    Ralph Stanley, a patriarch of Appalachian music who with his brother Carter helped expand and popularize the genre that became known as bluegrass, died Thursday. He was 89. Stanley died at his home in Sandy Ridge, Virginia, because of difficulties from skin cancer, publicist Kirt Webster said. Stanley was born and raised in Big Spraddle, Virginia, a land of coal mines and deep forests where he and his brother formed the Stanley Brothers and their Clinch Mountain Boys in 1946. Their father would sing them old traditional songs like "Man of Constant Sorrow," while their mother, a banjo player, taught...
  • Bear bites Appalachian Trail hiker in Tennessee

    05/13/2016 12:19:27 PM PDT · by StCloudMoose · 88 replies
    reuters ^ | 5/13/16
    A black bear bit through the tent and into the lower leg of a man who was hiking the Appalachian Trail and camped for the night at a national park in Tennessee, park officials said on Thursday. Bradley Veeder, 49, of Las Vegas, was sleeping around 11 p.m. local time in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park on Tuesday when the bear attacked, park spokeswoman Dana Soehn said by telephone. Because it was so dark, Veeder and nearby campers did not see the bear, which was initially scared away by his screams, Soehn said. Park officials said it was a...
  • How Donald Trump dominated Appalachia, in 1 startling map

    05/11/2016 10:22:04 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 72 replies
    As if the election results weren't enough proof that Donald Trump absolutely dominated Appalachia, this map offers a pretty good picture of just how widespread the presumptive GOP nominee's support is in the region:
  • Tracking Appalachia's Swing From Hillary Clinton to Donald Trump Country

    05/04/2016 9:58:11 AM PDT · by Milhous · 27 replies
    ABC News ^ | May 4, 2016, 11:57 AM ET | MERIDITH MCGRAW
    During his victory speech Tuesday night after the Indiana primary, Donald Trump emphasized a region that could be ground zero for support: Appalachia. “The miners in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, Ohio and all over, they’re going to start to work again,” Trump said. “We are not going to be like Hillary Clinton,” he said, taking aim at her ill-timed remarks last more for which she ultimately apologized. Once upon a time in coal country -- states stretching along the Appalachian Mountains and the Marcellus Shale, a formation rich in underground resources like natural gas and coal -- the Clinton...
  • Eastern Mountain Lions May Be Extinct, but Locals Still See Them

    08/29/2015 8:23:32 AM PDT · by Theoria · 122 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | 28 Aug 2015 | Jennifer Levitz
    Officials ponder changing cat’s status, causing roar of protest; sighting a ‘U.F.O.’ Diana Marchibroda insists she saw the beast near the Appalachian Trail in Virginia in May. From the woods sauntered a “tall, very sleek” mountain lion, she says. Ms. Marchibroda, a dentist who is 62 years old, says she and her silver-haired miniature schnauzer, Sophie, “both watched in awe.” “My sighting is ABSOLUTE,” she wrote the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in July. “I know what I saw.” Dozens of similar missives have poured into the agency as it proposes removing the Eastern mountain lion from the list of...
  • Appalachia gripped by hepatitis C epidemic, bracing for HIV

    06/04/2015 4:05:03 AM PDT · by markomalley · 37 replies
    AP ^ | 6/4/15 | CLAIRE GALOFARO
    Patton Couch shook his head and clenched his teeth, recounting the night four years ago when he plucked a dirty needle from a pile at a flophouse and jabbed it into his scarred arm. He knew the odds; most of the addicts in the room probably had hepatitis C. "All I cared about was how soon and how fast I could get it in," he says. "I hated myself, it was misery. But when you're in the grips of it, the only way I thought I could escape it was one more time." Couch, 25 years old and one month...
  • Baltimore Is Not About Race

    05/05/2015 7:04:45 AM PDT · by KeyLargo · 7 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | May 4, 2015 | William McGurn
    Baltimore Is Not About Race Government-induced dependency is the problem—and it’s one with a long history. By William McGurn May 4, 2015 For those who see the rioting in Baltimore as primarily about race, two broad reactions dominate. One group sees rampaging young men fouling their own neighborhoods and concludes nothing can be done because the social pathologies are so overwhelming. In some cities, this view manifests itself in the unspoken but cynical policing that effectively cedes whole neighborhoods to the thugs. Opinion Journal Video Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Jason Riley on what prompted the violence and what comes next....