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Keyword: atomicbomb

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  • Atom bomb nearly detonated over North Carolina in 1961

    09/21/2013 6:42:38 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 61 replies
    The US Air Force came dramatically close to detonating a huge atomic bomb over North Carolina in 1961, according to a newly declassified document published by Britain's Guardian newspaper on Saturday.Two hydrogen bombs were accidentally dropped over the city of Goldsboro, North Carolina on January 23, 1961 when the B-52 plane carrying them broke up in mid-air, according to the file.
  • ‘It wasn’t necessary to hit them with that awful thing’ --- Why dropping the A-Bombs was wrong

    08/10/2013 6:09:00 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 317 replies
    Washington Examiner ^ | 08/10/2013 | Timothy Carney
    Based on a detailed investigation of all the facts and supported by the testimony of the surviving Japanese leaders involved, it is the Survey’s opinion that certainly prior to 31 December 1945 and in all probability prior to 1 November 1945, Japan would have surrendered even if the atomic bombs had not been dropped, even if Russia had not entered the war, and even if no invasion had been planned or contemplated.That was a conclusion of the 1946 U.S. Bombing Survey ordered by President Harry Truman in the wake of World War II.Gen. Dwight Eisenhower said in 1963, “the Japanese were...
  • Atomic bomb re-enacting dropped from Ohio air show

    04/18/2013 8:54:51 AM PDT · by oxcart · 32 replies
    Associated Press ^ | April 18, 2013 | By DAN SEWELL
    CINCINNATI (AP) -- A popular southwest Ohio air show has canceled plans to stage a re-enactment of the devastating World War II atomic bomb attack on Japan after protests, officials said Thursday. Dayton Air Show spokeswoman Brenda Kerfoot said the June 22-23 event at Dayton International Airport will keep a planned "Great Wall of Fire" pyrotechnic show but not as an event meant to re-enact the Aug. 6, 1945, bombing of Hiroshima. The B-29 plane "Fifi," similar to the Enola Gay B-29 bomber used to attack Japan, will remain in the show but in a separate role. Air show officials...
  • NOAA.gov - (Subject: C5c) Why Don't We Try to Destroy Tropical Cyclones by Nuking Them?

    Subject: C5c) Why don't we try to destroy tropical cyclones by nuking them? Contributed by Chris Landsea During each hurricane season, there always appear suggestions that one should simply use nuclear weapons to try and destroy the storms. Apart from the fact that this might not even alter the storm, this approach neglects the problem that the released radioactive fallout would fairly quickly move with the tradewinds to affect land areas and cause devastating environmental problems. Needless to say, this is not a good idea. Now for a more rigorous scientific explanation of why this would not be an effective...
  • Enrico Fermi’s Anniversary (World's first nuclear reactor was built in the middle of Chicago)

    12/06/2012 2:00:50 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    National Review ^ | 12/06/2012 | Robert Zubrin
    This week marks the 70th anniversary of a turning point in human history. It was on December 2, 1942, that Enrico Fermi ordered the control rods pulled from the nuclear reactor he had built under the west stands of the University of Chicago’s Stagg Field stadium, thereby initiating the first artificial sustained-fission reaction in human history. A cryptic message flashed the electrifying news back to Washington. “The Italian navigator has landed in the new world.” The consequences of Fermi’s success were profound. Within two and a half years, the Manhattan Project advanced to build both uranium-isotope-separation and plutonium-manufacturing facilities on...
  • December 2, 1942: Enrico Fermi and atomic Chicago

    12/01/2012 8:05:44 PM PST · by smokingfrog · 4 replies
    WBEZ91.5 ^ | 12-2-11 | John Schmidt
    The story begins with a letter from Albert Einstein to Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939. The celebrated physicist warned the president that Nazi Germany was developing the makings of an atomic bomb. Roosevelt knew what would happen if Hitler got such a weapon. The president ordered a massive secret project to make sure the U.S. beat him to it. Scientists from all over the country were enlisted in the effort. Early in 1942 Enrico Fermi and a team of physicists gathered at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory. Their goal was to develop a self-sustaining nuclear pile. This was the...
  • US planned to blow up the MOON with a nuclear bomb to win Cold War bragging rights over USSR

    11/25/2012 4:28:28 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 104 replies
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | 25 November 2012 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Revealed: How the U.S. planned to blow up the MOON with a nuclear bomb to win Cold War bragging rights over Soviet Union - Scientists were hoping for giant flash on the moon that would intimidate the Soviet Union - Aim of mission was to launch the nuke by 1959 - Plan was later scrapped due to possible danger to people on Earth It may sound like a plot straight out of a science fiction novel, but a U.S. mission to blow up the moon with a nuke was very real in the 1950s. At the height of the space...
  • Can You Stop a Hurricane by Nuking It?

    10/30/2012 11:11:40 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 27 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 29, 2012 | Rachel Kaufman, TechNewsDaily Contributor
    Can You Stop a Hurricane by Nuking It? To save lives and reduce costs, there would be tremendous advantage if science had a way to stop a devastating hurricane like Sandy. And scientists have thought of it before. One idea that rears its head almost every hurricane season recently is the notion of bombing a hurricane into submission. The theory goes that the energy released by a nuclear bomb detonated just above and ahead of the eye of a storm would heat the cooler air there, disrupting the storm's convection current. Unfortunately, this idea, which has been around in some...
  • Haunting 1950 images imagine the effects of an atomic bomb attack on the Big Apple

    08/21/2012 8:00:36 PM PDT · by moonshot925 · 29 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 21 August 2012 | Daily Mail Reporter
    It wasn't a movie poster for a monster or disaster film. It was an illustration of America's worst nightmare - that an atomic bomb would strike a major U.S. metropolis. The harrowing image of the New York City skyline marred by a giant mushroom cloud splashed the cover of Collier's magazine on August 5, 1950 - at a time of heightened American anxiety. The Collier's issue was spotlighted recently on Smithsonianmag.com, which ran the same pictures that appeared in the same 1950 issue of the magazine. While recent films like The Avengers, Independence Day and Cloverfield touched on a fictional...
  • Thyroid cancer risk persists decades after Japan atomic bombs: study

    08/20/2012 3:47:12 PM PDT · by moonshot925 · 14 replies
    Reuters ^ | 20 August 2012 | Staff
    Aug 20 (Reuters) - People who survived the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as children continue to have a higher-than-normal risk of thyroid cancer more than 50 years after radiation exposure, according to a U.S. study. Thyroid cells are particularly vulnerable to ionizing radiation, the kind produced by the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown or the atomic bombings in Japan. The study published in the International Journal of Cancer tracked new cancer diagnoses in people who were in Japan during the bombings in 1945 and those who were not. In total, there were 371 thyroid cancers diagnosed between 1958 and 2005...
  • Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan Was Imperative

    08/10/2012 11:02:37 AM PDT · by Retain Mike · 53 replies
    Self | August 10, 2012 | Self
    We now mark the 67th anniversary of dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II. The generations which developed the information and made the decisions for World War II, including dropping the atomic bombs on Japan, have passed away. The generation which faced the tragic violence required for carrying out those decisions is rapidly leaving us. As this personal knowledge becomes ever rarer, we must listen increasingly to revisionist contra-factual analyses as they expound on what a needless, tragic and profoundly immoral decision the United States had made. In support of dropping the atomic bombs historians often...
  • The Third Atomic Bomb Was Going To Be Dropped On 19 August

    08/05/2012 4:49:23 PM PDT · by moonshot925 · 61 replies
    National Security Archive ^ | 13 August 1945 | General Hull and Colonel Seaman
    This is a telephone conversation transcript between Colonel Seaman of the Manhattan Project and General Hull of Marshall's staff that took place on 13 August 1945. The subject is atomic bomb deployment and production timeline.
  • Harry Truman grandson to visit Hiroshima

    07/30/2012 5:10:13 PM PDT · by moonshot925 · 38 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 30 July 2012 | Martin Foster
    Clifton Truman Daniel will visit Japan from August 2, and attend ceremonies in Hiroshima August 6, and Nagasaki on August 9, according to Kyodo News as reported in the Nihon Keizai Shinbun. It is the first time a member of the late president’s family will attend the ceremonies, and will holds a deep symbolic meaning for the Japanese. Public papers from his time in office reveal a man with no regrets about using the A-bomb, but his grandson told Kyodo News that the late-president was horrified by the destructive power of the Bomb.
  • Officials want to turn World War II nuclear-weapon development sites into national parks

    07/29/2012 5:53:01 AM PDT · by moonshot925 · 7 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 28 July 2012 | Darryl Fears
    Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory was such a well-kept secret during World War II that most Americans still don’t know that it sits off one of busiest highways in the South. Every year, streams of vacationers whiz by the complex that enriched uranium for America’s first atomic bomb project. It’s on the way to Great Smoky Mountains National Park — the most-visited U.S. national park. And every year, right about this time, the city of Oak Ridge, just west of Knoxville on Interstate 40, holds a Secret City Festival, crying out to potential tourists. “They don’t even know we’re here,”...
  • A Los Alamos Story Worthy of Stephen King (The Plutonium 239 Demon Core)

    07/26/2012 8:37:22 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 29 replies
    IO9 ^ | Jul 26, 2012 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    A Los Alamos Story Worthy of Stephen King Ever heard of The Demon Core? It was named by Los Alamos scientists — who are generally not a superstitious lot — after it claimed multiple lives, in a series of strange and horrible accidents. Discover a legend of science... that's worthy of a horror movie. When I was reading Stephen King stories, I was constantly amazed at the things he made scary. It was like reading the legend of the monkey's paw over and over again, with increasingly weird objects. His most famous evil objects are the hotel in The Shining...
  • THE TRINITY SITE: WHERE THE FIRST ATOMIC BOMB WAS EXPLODED

    07/15/2012 10:18:20 PM PDT · by NEWwoman · 22 replies
    travelthruhistory.com ^ | 2008 | Susan K. Smith
    In 1939, Albert Einstein sent a letter (written largely by Leó Szilárd) to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The pressing concern was that Nazi Germany might be conducting research to create atomic bombs, and the letter suggested that the United States should begin researching the possibility itself. This was the impetus for the Manhattan project, which culminated in the explosion of the first atomic bomb at the Trinity Site in New Mexico. Socorro, New Mexico, a little more than an hour’s drive south of Albuquerque, is one of the meeting places for those who plan to visit the Trinity Site. Socorro,...
  • (Weird History) In 1958 America Accidentally Dropped a Nuclear Weapon on Two Little Girls’ Playhouse

    04/24/2012 10:28:08 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    IO9 ^ | Apr 24, 2012 | Cyriaque Lamar
    In 1958, America accidentally dropped a nuclear weapon on two little girls’ playhouse For certain rural residents of the Carolinas during the Cold War, apocalyptic anxiety hit disturbingly close to home. In 1958 and 1961, the American Air Force lost nuclear weapons over the skies of South and North Carolina, respectively, raining potential apocalypse on the folks below. In both incidents, complete catastrophe was avoided thanks to that ever-potent combination of foresight and unmitigated dumb luck. And in the former incident, the bomb fell square on some unsuspecting children's playhouse. The first accident occurred over Florence, South Carolina on March...
  • U.S. does not believe Iran is trying to build nuclear bomb

    02/24/2012 7:35:14 AM PST · by gandalftb · 61 replies · 1+ views
    Los Angeles Times ^ | February 23, 2012 | Ken Dilanian
    U.S. intelligence agencies don't believe Iran is actively trying to build an atomic bomb. A highly classified U.S. intelligence assessment circulated to policymakers early last year largely affirms that view, originally made in 2007. Both reports, known as national intelligence estimates, conclude that Tehran halted efforts to develop and build a nuclear warhead in 2003. The most recent report, which represents the consensus of 16 U.S. intelligence agencies, indicates that Iran is pursuing research that could put it in a position to build a weapon, but that it has not sought to do so. Senior U.S. officials say Israel does...
  • Japan Developed Atom Bomb; Russians Grabbed Scientists

    04/05/2011 7:20:55 PM PDT · by SteveH · 58 replies
    Atlanta Constitution via reformation.org ^ | October 1, 1946 | David Snell
    Actual Test Was Success Japan developed and successfully tested an atomic bomb three days prior to the end of the war. She destroyed unfinished atomic bombs, secret papers and her atomic bomb plans only hours before the advance units of the Russian Army moved into Konan, Korea, site of the project. Japanese scientists who developed the bomb are now in Moscow, prisoners of the Russians. They were tortured by their captors seeking atomic "know-how." The Konan area is under rigid Russian control. They permit no American to visit the area. Once, even after the war, an American B-29 Superfortress en...
  • The Bomb Chroniclers: Secret Corps of Filmmakers Documented Nuclear Bomb Tests

    09/16/2010 9:16:09 AM PDT · by Virginia Ridgerunner · 27 replies
    The New York Times ^ | September 13, 2010 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    They risked their lives to capture on film hundreds of blinding flashes, rising fireballs and mushroom clouds. The blast from one detonation hurled a man and his camera into a ditch. When he got up, a second wave knocked him down again. Then there was radiation. While many of the scientists who made atom bombs during the cold war became famous, the men who filmed what happened when those bombs were detonated made up a secret corps. Their existence and the nature of their work has emerged from the shadows only since the federal government began a concerted effort to...
  • Hiroshima 65 years later: US attends ceremony, but offers no apology

    08/06/2010 7:59:03 AM PDT · by americanophile · 75 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | August 6, 2010 | Gavin Blair
    Sixty-five years after the United States dropped "Little Boy" on Hiroshima, effectively ending World War II and ushering in an era of nuclear dread, the US sent its first delegation to the annual ceremony to remember the over 100,000 Japanese who lost their lives in the bombing. Britain and France also sent representatives for the first time. While some Japanese hailed the presence of the US and other nuclear powers as a sign of commitment to eventual nuclear disarmament, for others it was too little, too late. Some Japanese still want an apology for the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and...
  • U.S. Sends Ambassador to Hiroshima Ceremony: Revisionist History You Can’t Believe In – Videos

    08/06/2010 7:11:55 AM PDT · by Federalist Patriot · 14 replies
    Freedom's Lighthouse ^ | August 6, 2010 | Brian
    Here are video reports on today’s observance in Hiroshima, Japan of the 65th anniversary of the dropping of the first atomic bomb by the United States on Japan. President Harry Truman made the decision to drop the bomb after warning Japan repeatedly the terrible weapon was coming and would be used if they did not surrender. Truman dropped the bomb to avoid an already planned invasion of the Japanese home islands that would have brought an estimated 1 Million+ U.S. casualties, and even more Japanese casualties. Yet, despite the obvious historic justification for the dropping of the bomb, President Obama...
  • U.S., allies to send first delegation to Hiroshima memorial

    08/05/2010 7:15:42 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 21 replies
    AP via Yahoo ^ | August 5, 2010 | Staff
    Sixty-five years after dropping an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, and killing more than 140,000 people, the United States will send its first ever delegation to a ceremony commemorating the attack. On Friday, U.S. Ambassador John Roos will join representatives from 75 countries at the Hiroshima event, but he is not expected to speak. World War II allies France and Britain will also send delegations to the ceremony for the first time.
  • Son of Pilot Who Dropped A-Bomb Opposes Plan to Send U.S. Delegation to Hiroshima Ceremony

    08/04/2010 12:45:04 PM PDT · by Stoat · 77 replies · 1+ views
    Fox News ^ | August 4, 2010 | Joshua Rhett Miller
    EXCLUSIVE:  The son of the U.S. Air Force pilot who dropped the first atomic bomb in the history of warfare says the Obama administration's decision to send a U.S. delegation to a ceremony in Japan to mark the 65th anniversary of the attack on Hiroshima is an "unsaid apology" and appears to be an attempt to "rewrite history." James Tibbets, son of Brig. Gen. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., says Friday's visit to Hiroshima by U.S. Ambassador John Roos is an act of contrition that his late father would never have approved. "It's an unsaid apology," Tibbets, 66, told FoxNews.com...
  • B61 Forever

    07/07/2010 10:22:51 PM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 27 replies · 1+ views
    Strategy Page ^ | 7/7/2010 | Strategy Page
    When it comes to nuclear weapons, oldies are goodies. Take, for example, the American B61 nuclear device. About the same shape as a 1,000 pound (455 kg) bomb, many NATO fighter bombers were equipped (with the electronics) to use this bomb during the Cold War (and many can still do so). Some 3,200 B61s were built since it entered service in the late 1960s, and about a third of those remain available for use. Some are to be refurbished, but politicians are still debating doing this just to keep B61s good for another two decades. Without the refurb, all these...
  • Pakistan rejects A-bomb Talks

    01/26/2010 12:21:12 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 245+ views
    Straits Times ^ | 1/26/2010 | Reuters
    PAKISTAN, citing a 'clear and present danger' from its nuclear-armed rival India, ruled out on Monday global negotiations to ban the future production of material to make atomic bombs. Confirming a Reuters report from Jan 22, Pakistan's ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva, Zamir Akram, said such a treaty would leave Pakistan - the most recent member of the nuclear club - at a permanent disadvantage. Pakistan's stance, triggered by nuclear and arms deals between India and the United States as well as with other nuclear powers, is a blow to the Obama administration's efforts to revive global disarmament....
  • 'Lucky' Yamaguchi, the man who survived both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, dies aged 93

    01/06/2010 8:59:27 PM PST · by bogusname · 42 replies · 906+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | January 6, 2010 | Wil Longbottom
    Tsutomu Yamaguchi, the only person officially recognised as a survivor of both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings at the end of World War II, has died at the age of 93. Mr Yamaguchi, known as 'Lucky', was in Hiroshima on a business trip for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries on August 6, 1945, when a U.S. B-29 dropped an atomic bomb on the city. He suffered serious burns to his upper body as well as temporary blindness and spent the night in the city. He then returned to his hometown of Nagasaki, about 190 miles to the southwest, which suffered a...
  • Soviet H-bomb scientist Ginzburg dies

    11/11/2009 9:40:40 AM PST · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies · 651+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 11/11/09 | Dmitry Solovyov and Michael Stott
    MOSCOW (Reuters) – Vitaly Ginzburg, a Russian physicist who survived Stalin's purges by working on the Soviet atomic bomb project and later won the Nobel Prize for physics, died in Moscow late on Sunday after a long illness. He was 93. Ginzburg won the 2003 Nobel physics prize for developing the theory behind superconductors, materials which allow electricity to pass without resistance at very low temperatures. He shared the prize with British-American Anthony Leggett and Russian-born U.S. scientist Alexei Abrikosov. But Ginzburg's career as a Soviet scientist almost ended when he took as his second wife a woman arrested in...
  • Iran's Supreme Leader Warns of New Election Crackdown

    10/29/2009 7:47:05 AM PDT · by Shellybenoit · 103+ views
    Yahoo News/The Lid ^ | 10/29/09 | The Lid
    ...This is the same administration that cut of aid to Honduras because it booted a president who was breaking its constitution and trying to enslave it citizenry. So while the tyrants in Iran are continuing to develop an atomic bomb, and are threatening more attacks on their own people, the Iranian protesters have no hope. You see the United States foreign policy is totally void of a moral fiber...that is the change Obama made.
  • A-bomb cities extend invitation to Obama

    10/27/2009 10:00:55 PM PDT · by Saije · 10 replies · 586+ views
    Boston Herald ^ | 10/27/2009 | Herald Wire Services
    A speech and a Nobel prize have raised hopes in Japan that Barack Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima or Nagasaki, the two cities leveled by atom bombs in World War II. But the issue is seen as a political minefield, and U.S. officials say it is unlikely Obama will visit either city during a two-day stop in Tokyo next month. Yesterday, the mayors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki went to the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo to formally invite Obama to their cities before a U.N. review of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in May. Sunao Tsuboi,...
  • USA: THE WORLD'S PUNCH LINE!

    10/07/2009 8:53:26 AM PDT · by Edisto Joe · 7 replies · 699+ views
    The Edisto Joe Outlook ^ | 10/07/2009 | Edisto Joe
    Hugo Chavez and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad joke about Iran's nuclear capability and the atomic bomb at their meeting in Tehran on Saturday. The man in the middle is laughing, but he dosen't know why. Edisto Joe
  • Obama knew of Iran plant before U.N. assembly

    09/25/2009 10:22:46 AM PDT · by RobinMasters · 17 replies · 801+ views
    WorldNetDaily ^ | SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 | Jerome R. Corsi
    The Obama administration reportedly knew about the second secret Iranian uranium enrichment program prior to the United Nations meeting, yet the president chose to say nothing about the revelation, either during his address to the General Assembly or yesterday, when he chaired a Security Council session. Since the 2008 presidential campaign, Obama has maintained his determination to engage in direct negotiations with Iran over the Iranian nuclear program. A meeting between Iran and the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council – the U.S., Britain, France, China and Russia – plus Germany is scheduled for Oct. 1 in Geneva....
  • Libyan Leader Mu'ammar Qadhafi: Libya Was on the Brink of Producing a Nuclear Bomb

    08/10/2009 7:01:52 PM PDT · by Cindy · 11 replies · 1,198+ views
    Note: Includes a video. Special Dispatch - No. 2479 August 10, 2009 Libyan Leader Mu'ammar Qadhafi: Libya Was on the Brink of Producing a Nuclear Bomb Following are excerpts from a public address delivered by Libyan Leader Mu'ammar Al-Qadhafi, which aired on Al-Sa'a TV on July 15, 2009: To view this clip on MEMRITV, visit http://www.memritv.org/clip/en/2185.htm .
  • It's time to Stop the Revisionist History on the Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb - Video

    08/06/2009 5:35:39 AM PDT · by Federalist Patriot · 23 replies · 560+ views
    Freedom's Lighthouse ^ | August 6, 2009 | BrianinMO
    Today marks the 64th anniversary of the dropping of the first atomic bomb by the United States on Japan, August 6, 1945. The decision by President Harry Truman to drop the bomb has been roundly criticized by revisionist historians and others on the Left. Some have even gone so far as to call Truman a "war criminal" for doing so. They could not be more wrong. The United States had already suffered hundreds of thousands of casualties at the hands of Japan, in a war Japan started. The Japanese had shown in battle after battle their willingness to fight to...
  • German intel: Iran could have nuclear bomb in six months

    07/16/2009 1:19:09 AM PDT · by Cindy · 26 replies · 934+ views
    SNIPPET: "BERLIN - Germany’s BND foreign intelligence agency believes Iran is capable of producing and testing an atomic bomb within six months, much sooner than most analysts estimate, according to a report in German weekly Stern. The report, which quotes BND experts, says the agency has information supporting the view that Iran has mastered the enrichment technology necessary to make a bomb and has enough centrifuges to make weaponised uranium. “If they wanted to, they could detonate an atomic bomb in half a year’s time,” the story quoted a BND expert as saying. The BND did not return two calls...
  • Jon Stewart: Truman Was a War Criminal, Too

    04/30/2009 1:13:32 PM PDT · by mojito · 62 replies · 2,168+ views
    Weekly Standard ^ | 4/30/2009 | Michael Goldfarb
    It comes at about the 5:50 mark. Cliff May asks Stewart whether Truman's use of the atomic bomb was a war crime, Stewart ruminates and then responds with an unequivocal "yes." He's certainly not the only American who would take that view, but it's a useful reminder that the most vocal and popular criticism of the Bush administration's war on terror policies comes from people who, if they were being as honest as Stewart, would also judge Lincoln (suspension of habeas), FDR (internment), and Truman (use of nuclear weapons) as war criminals or tyrants or worse. Stewart repeats the charge...
  • Japanese man certified as double A-bomb victim (Was in both bombings)

    03/24/2009 5:25:36 PM PDT · by raybbr · 30 replies · 1,261+ views
    Boston.com ^ | 3/24/2009 | Mari Yamaguchi
    TOKYO—A 93-year-old Japanese man has become the first person certified as a survivor of both U.S. atomic bombings at the end of World War II, officials said Tuesday. Tsutomu Yamaguchi had already been a certified "hibakusha," or radiation survivor, of the Aug. 9, 1945, atomic bombing in Nagasaki, but has now been confirmed as surviving the attack on Hiroshima three days earlier as well, city officials said. Yamaguchi was in Hiroshima on a business trip on Aug. 6, 1945, when a U.S. B-29 dropped an atomic bomb on the city. He suffered serious burns to his upper body and spent...
  • Remember where you were! Iran a step nearer building a bomb.

    02/19/2009 2:41:14 PM PST · by Kartographer · 7 replies · 561+ views
    Remember where you where the day the world slipped toward TEOTWAWKI. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f367aada-fec8-11dd-b19a-000077b07658.html
  • Hidden Travels of the Atomic Bomb

    12/09/2008 1:07:36 AM PST · by neverdem · 15 replies · 1,383+ views
    NY Times ^ | December 9, 2008 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    In 1945, after the atomic destruction of two Japanese cities, J. Robert Oppenheimer expressed foreboding about the spread of nuclear arms. “They are not too hard to make,” he told his colleagues on the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, N.M. “They will be universal if people wish to make them universal.” That sensibility, born where the atomic bomb itself was born, grew into a theory of technological inevitability. Because the laws of physics are universal, the theory went, it was just a matter of time before other bright minds and determined states joined the club. A corollary was that trying...
  • This day in History: Atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki (Happy Nagasaki Day!)

    08/09/2008 3:50:28 AM PDT · by abb · 120 replies · 1,072+ views
    History Channel ^ | August 9, 2008 | Staff
    On this day in 1945, a second atom bomb is dropped on Japan by the United States, at Nagasaki, resulting finally in Japan's unconditional surrender. The devastation wrought at Hiroshima was not sufficient to convince the Japanese War Council to accept the Potsdam Conference's demand for unconditional surrender. The United States had already planned to drop their second atom bomb, nicknamed "Fat Man," on August 11 in the event of such recalcitrance, but bad weather expected for that day pushed the date up to August 9th. So at 1:56 a.m., a specially adapted B-29 bomber, called "Bock's Car," after its...
  • OAK RIDGE: Hiroshima Day brings contrasting reactions

    08/06/2008 10:58:42 PM PDT · by SmithL · 29 replies · 342+ views
    Knoxville News Sentinel ^ | 8/7/8 | Bob Fowler
    Annual event near Y-12 features protest, praise of nukes - OAK RIDGE - At the minute Wednesday that an atomic bomb was dropped 63 years ago, Ralph Hutchison suddenly stopped reading somber reflections on that historic instant when the world forever changed.During the moment of silence that followed, a woman in favor of nuclear weapons could be heard in the background, defiantly singing "Onward Christian Soldiers." Such is the study in contrasts typical for the Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance's annual commemoration of Hiroshima Day.In front of the Y-12 nuclear weapons plant, alliance members protested the production of nuclear weapons,...
  • ANTI-AMERICAN PROTESTERS HOLD HIROSHIMA DAY EVENT

    08/02/2008 9:19:16 PM PDT · by SHATNERFAN1706 · 53 replies · 229+ views
    SHATNERFAN1706
    Hiroshima Day remembrance. In California, Moonbats will be ragging on America again for defeating Japanese fascism. Corner of Seal Beach Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway. Sunday, August 3, 2008. Counters are needed. From 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM.
  • U.S. to Take North Korea Off Terror List

    06/26/2008 7:11:52 AM PDT · by dead · 53 replies · 237+ views
    New York Times ^ | June 27, 2008 | NORIMITSU ONISHI and EDWARD WONG
    TOKYO — North Korea took a step on Thursday toward reintegration into the world community and rapprochement with the United States by submitting for outside inspection a long-delayed declaration of its nuclear program. The 60-page declaration from North Korea, one of the world’s most isolated and impoverished nations, was expected to describe in previously undisclosed detail its capabilities in nuclear power and nuclear weapons — meeting a major demand of the United States and other countries that consider the North a dangerous source of instability. “This can be a moment of opportunity for North Korea,” said President Bush, announcing the...
  • Headstone for Tibbets

    11/05/2007 7:46:16 AM PST · by WrightOnTarget · 30 replies · 50+ views
    WorldNetDaily ^ | 11-5-07 | Doug Powers
    Retired Brig. Gen. Paul Tibbets, Jr., who piloted the aircraft Enola Gay, which dropped the first atomic bomb used in war, died last week at the age of 92. The life story of Tibbets, Jr. ends with a bit of what I consider a tragedy that should never again befall an American hero. When somebody says "Fat Man" and "Little Boy" these days, they could be referring to Michael Moore and Dennis Kucinich, but 60 years ago, devices sporting those seemingly innocuous monikers caused historically unmatched destruction, and ended a long war. There are many who believe this makes the...
  • Paul Tibbets and “The Family of Man”

    11/01/2007 11:58:06 AM PDT · by pabianice · 54 replies · 126+ views
    The Nav Log ^ | 11/1/07 | ltn72
    When I was a child, my mother had one of the early coffee table books on display in the living room. “The Family of Man” (http://www.amazon.com/Family-Man-Greatest-Photographic-Exhibition/dp/B000J1AMR6/ref=sr_1_1/103-5108515-2439061?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1193940207&sr=1-1) was, to a kid in grade school in the mid-50s, a fascinating book. There was little TV in those days, few magazines for kids, and of course, no video games, computers, or cell phones. This book’s 500 or so black and white pictures, taken from many magazines, showed a vast array of people from many nations engaged in a wide variety of activities. I spent hours and hours staring at the pictures, fascinated. I...
  • Paul Tibbets Jr., who flew plane that dropped first atomic bomb, dies at 92

    11/01/2007 8:43:44 AM PDT · by snippy_about_it · 155 replies · 1,035+ views
    Columbus Dispatch ^ | Thursday, November 1, 2007 10:29 AM
    Paul Tibbets Jr., who flew the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb — on Hiroshima, Japan — died this morning at his East Side home. He was 92. Tibbets had suffered small strokes and heart failure in his final years and had been in hospice care. He was born in Quincy, Ill., but grew up in Miami after his father moved the family there. See link for complete story. Tibbets fell in love with flight and, at age 12, volunteered as a backseat assistant to a biplane pilot, dropping leaflets for the Curtiss Candy Co. at fairs, carnivals and...
  • The jaws massacre: How 900 stricken men were surrounded by killer sharks (USS Indianapolis)

    08/18/2007 10:18:49 AM PDT · by wagglebee · 44 replies · 2,004+ views
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 8/17/07 | Tony Rennell
    There were fins all around, the killer sharks just circling, waiting, assessing their prey in their usual silent, sinister way. For the men strung out in the oil-streaked water, clinging to the sides of flimsy rafts or floating in sodden life-jackets, the sight was terrifying and the underwater brush of leathery skin against a submerged leg, or the nudge of a snout, was gut-wrenching. These men were already survivors, the remaining 900 sailors of the U.S.S. Indianapolis. Just three-quarters of the crew had managed to get off the heavy cruiser when she was blown apart by torpedoes from a Japanese...
  • (On This Day in History) July 16, 1945 : U.S. Conducts First Test of the Atomic Bomb

    07/16/2007 8:10:27 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 38 replies · 1,097+ views
    History.com ^ | July 16, 2007 | History.com
    1945 : United States conducts first test of the atomic bomb The United States conducts the first test of the atomic bomb at its research facility in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The terrifying new weapon would quickly become a focal point in the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. The official U.S. development of the atomic bomb began with the establishment of the Manhattan Project in August 1942. The project brought together scientists from the United States, Great Britain, and Canada to study the feasibility of building an atomic bomb capable of unimaginable destructive power. The...
  • Japanese Defense Chief: Atomic Bombing 'Couldn't Be Helped'

    06/30/2007 7:49:10 AM PDT · by weef · 68 replies · 1,502+ views
    FoxNews.com ^ | 6/30/2007 | AP
    TOKYO — Defense Minister Fumio Kyuma said the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan by the United States during World War II was an inevitable way to end the war, a news report said Saturday. "I understand that the bombing ended the war, and I think that it couldn't be helped," Kyodo News agency quoted Kyuma as saying in a speech at a university in Chiba, just east of Tokyo. Kyuma's remarks drew immediate criticism from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. "The U.S. justifies the bombings saying they saved many American lives," said Nobuo Miyake, 78, director-general of a group of...
  • (On This Day In History) June 19, 1953 - Atomic Bomb Spies Julius and Ethel Rosenberg Executed

    06/19/2007 11:09:54 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 56 replies · 1,766+ views
    History.com ^ | June 19, 2007 | History.com
    June 19, 1953 : Julius and Ethel Rosenberg executed Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, a married couple convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage in 1951, are put to death in the electric chair. The execution marked the dramatic finale of the most controversial espionage case of the Cold War. Julius was arrested in July 1950, and Ethel in August of that same year, on the charge of conspiracy to commit espionage. Specifically, they were accused of heading a spy ring that passed top-secret information concerning the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union. The Rosenbergs vigorously protested their innocence, but after a...