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Keyword: biology

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  • After Bloodbath, The National Zoo Naked Mole-Rats Finally Choose Their Queen

    12/18/2018 8:34:29 AM PST · by Gamecock · 43 replies
    DCist ^ | 12/17/2018 | Natalie Delgadillo
    At last, we’ve reached the conclusion of this scintillating drama: the National Zoo’s naked mole-rat colony has chosen its queen. In case you’ve been living under a rock, let us catch you up: the Small Mammal House at the Smithsonian National Zoo is home to a colony of naked mole-rats, and for the last several months they’ve been engaged in a quiet—but brutal—battle for political supremacy. Naked mole-rats are one of just two eusocial mammalian species, which means they live much like colonies of bees or ants: one queen reigns supreme over everybody else, and challengers must fight and kill...
  • Venus flytraps kill with chemicals like those from lightning bolts

    11/12/2018 9:00:45 AM PST · by ETL · 21 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Nov 12, 2018 | Richard A. Lovett
    PORTLAND, OREGON—Venus flytraps have a well-known way of dispatching their victims: They snare inquisitive insects that brush up against trigger hairs in their fly-trapping pods (above). But now, physicists have discovered that the triggering process may involve the release of a cascade of exotic chemicals similar to the whiff of ozone that tingles your nose after a lightning bolt. To study this process, scientists used an electrical generator to ionize air into a “cold plasma,” which they then gently blew toward a flytrap in their lab. Normally, the flytrap’s closure is caused by an electrical signal created when two or...
  • 1,600 “scientists” defy science to support transgender activism

    11/04/2018 4:45:39 PM PST · by Kaslin · 41 replies
    Hotair.com ^ | November 4, 2018 | JAZZ SHAW
    This story came out earlier this week but it was shocking enough that it bears a look. The transgender activist community was all abuzz on Thursday over a letter that had actually been featured in the New York Times a week earlier. Buzzfeed picked it up and ran with it, adding to the celebratory mood. The document in question was an open letter published by a gaggle of 1,600 scientists who are rejecting the anticipated HHS memo defining sex and gender in traditional, scientifically accepted terms for purposes of Title IX questions. What’s truly amazing is the fact that these...
  • Texas biology teacher on leave for allegedly bullying pro-Trump student

    09/13/2018 1:27:16 PM PDT · by DFG · 26 replies
    Fox News ^ | 09/13/2018 | Caleb Parke
    A high school biology teacher is on administrative leave after she allegedly mocked a student for supporting President Trump and calling others “a bunch of Trumpies” in Round Rock, Texas. The incident occurred on the fifth day back from summer vacation, Aug. 22, at McNeil High School outside of Austin, according to district officials. The bullied student's mother claims the public school teacher said: “By the way, I hate Donald Trump with a burning passion and he is a complete douchebag."
  • Researchers reconstruct the genome of the ‘first animal’

    07/14/2018 8:14:11 AM PDT · by Moonman62 · 54 replies
    IMPC ^ | 7/9/2018 | Jordi Paps
    Humans and mice share approximately 98% of genes, and have similar physiology and anatomy. This is because we share a relatively recent common ancestor, around 80 million-years-ago. In contrast, the ancestor of all animals lived over 500 million-years-ago. As genomic data becomes available for more animal species a detailed family tree can be created, allowing novel insight into the genomes of long extinct species. In the guest post below Jordi Paps summarises recent research that attempts to reconstruct the genome of the ‘first animal’ by using the genomic data available on living animals. The first animals emerged on Earth at...
  • Mississippi Supreme Court to decide if boy’s legal ‘biological’ parents are two lesbians

    12/09/2017 9:15:48 AM PST · by EdnaMode · 52 replies
    Life Site News ^ | December 8, 2017 | Doug Mainwaring
    The Mississippi Supreme Court heard arguments last week about whether a boy born to a lesbian couple should be legally considered the biological son of his mother's female partner. Because of the nature of the child’s conception and the relationship of the adults in his life, the story is complicated. The two women who were “married” chose to have a child that would be conceived in one of them via anonymous sperm donation. The boy is now six years old. His mother’s “ex-spouse,” who helped raise the child from birth, sought to be recognized as a biological parent when the...
  • See these first-of-a-kind views of living human nerve cells

    11/13/2017 9:22:58 PM PST · by ETL · 22 replies
    ScienceNews.com ^ | November 09, 2017 | Laura Sanders
    New database could shed light on how people’s brains tick The human brain is teeming with diversity. By plucking out delicate, live tissue during neurosurgery and then studying the resident cells, researchers have revealed a partial cast of neural characters that give rise to our thoughts, dreams and memories. So far, researchers with the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle have described the intricate shapes and electrical properties of about 100 nerve cells, or neurons, taken from the brains of 36 patients as they underwent surgery for conditions such as brain tumors or epilepsy. To reach the right spot,...
  • The ghosts of HeLa: How cell line misidentification contaminates the scientific literature

    10/22/2017 10:19:38 PM PDT · by Sam_Damon · 8 replies
    PLOS One ^ | October 12, 2017 | Serge P. J. M. Horbach , Willem Halffman
    While problems with cell line misidentification have been known for decades, an unknown number of published papers remains in circulation reporting on the wrong cells without warning or correction. Here we attempt to make a conservative estimate of this ‘contaminated’ literature. We found 32,755 articles reporting on research with misidentified cells, in turn cited by an estimated half a million other papers.
  • To find aliens, we must think of life as we don’t know it

    09/21/2017 4:33:12 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 62 replies
    Aeon ^ | Ramin Skibba
    From blob-like jellyfish to rock-like lichens, our planet teems with such diversity of life that it is difficult to recognise some organisms as even being alive. That complexity hints at the challenge of searching for life as we don’t know it – the alien biology that might have taken hold on other planets, where conditions could be unlike anything we’ve seen before. ‘The Universe is a really big place. Chances are, if we can imagine it, it’s probably out there on a planet somewhere,’ said Morgan Cable, an astrochemist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. ‘The question is,...
  • Ancient Giant ‘Ghost’ Crocodile With T-Rex-Sized Teeth Discovered in Madagascar

    07/05/2017 9:18:48 AM PDT · by C19fan · 11 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 4, 2017 | Hannah Osborne
    Scientists have discovered an ancient, giant, crocodile-like creature in Madagascar that had T-Rex-sized teeth it used for crunching bones,. The discovery helps to fill in the evolutionary gaps of a 74 million year long crocodilian “ghost lineage.” Researchers first discovered fossils of a giant predator on the island over a decade ago. At the time, scientists believed they had discovered a large predator from the Jurassic period and they named the creature Razanandrongobe sakalavae, meaning “giant lizard ancestor from Sakalava region.”
  • The death of the dinosaurs was good news for frogs

    07/05/2017 6:32:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Cosmos ^ | July 4, 2017 | Tim wallace
    The asteroid that crashed into the planet about 66 million years might have been the end of the line for much of life on Earth, but for a few frogs it allowed a great leap forward. Genetic analysis by an international team of researchers from the US and China indicates that 88% of existing frog species are descended from just three frog families that survived and prospered following the mass extinction event known as the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary, which wiped out an estimated three-quarters of animals including non-avian dinosaurs and most large mammals.
  • Q&A: Robert Hazen on studying 'deep carbon'

    06/28/2017 12:31:55 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 5 replies
    Robert Hazen's field -- mineralogy -- might seem like the most appropriate scientific specialty for studying what's happening below Earth's surface. But, he says, that job requires partnering with scientists from as many different disciplines as possible. Over more than two decades, NSF supported Hazen's research to address fundamental questions about what happens to minerals in hot, high-pressure environments as found in the deep interiors of Earth and other planets, and how minerals interact with the molecules of living beings. Now, Hazen is working in an area where NSF has also made significant investments: the study of "deep carbon," or...
  • EXPERIMENT: Women Try 'Manspreading'! | Louder With Crowder

    06/22/2017 4:37:42 AM PDT · by Mechanicos · 23 replies
    YouTube ^ | June 21, 2017 | Steven Crowder
    Why do men "manspread'? Real women experience the every day discomfort men do on public transit.
  • Stanford Research on Sex Differences Reveals a Leftist Rejection of Science

    06/07/2017 3:54:55 AM PDT · by Mechanicos · 10 replies
    Brietbart ^ | June 5, 2017 | Tom Ciccotta
    Research on sex-based cognitive differences from Stanford University’s magazine on medicine published this week indirectly highlights the “anti-science” attitude that runs throughout modern progressive thought. ...
  • NASA to investigate unknown fungus found growing on the space station (This is how it Starts)

    04/26/2017 11:36:50 AM PDT · by brucedickinson · 87 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 4-26-2017 | Mark Prigg
    NASA is set to use a radical new 'tricorder' DNA sequencer to work out what a mysterious fungus found growing on the International Space Station is. Astronauts have reported funding the strange microbial growths on walls and surfaces, and it has even clogged waterlines. Now, two instruments onboard will be used to analyse it in orbit, allowing mission controllers to work out how to deal with it
  • Suffer the children

    04/10/2017 11:56:38 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    World News ^ | issue dated 4/15/17 | Jamie Dean
    Some say the growing rush to label children ‘transgender’ promotes physician-approved child abuse. But speaking out against the practice provokes ire. Who will defend the vulnerable? When Cari Stella recounts her transgender experience in a series of YouTube videos, she doesn’t shed tears, but she does talk about pain. As a teenage girl, Stella felt a strong desire to live as a man. A therapist...prescribed testosterone. Stella was 17. A few years later, she underwent a double mastectomy. Stella says her family was supportive, and her workplace included transgender leadership. Her transition seemed like a success. Except it wasn’t. Soon,...
  • Tardigrades Use Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Survive Desiccation

    03/17/2017 1:50:15 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 43 replies
    cell ^ | 16 March 2017 | Thomas C. Boothby
    Tardigrades are microscopic animals that survive a remarkable array of stresses, including desiccation [extreme drying]. How tardigrades survive desiccation has remained a mystery for more than 250 years. Trehalose, a disaccharide essential for several organisms to survive drying, is detected at low levels or not at all in some tardigrade species, indicating that tardigrades possess potentially novel mechanisms for surviving desiccation. Here we show that tardigrade-specific intrinsically disordered proteins (TDPs) are essential for desiccation tolerance. TDP genes are constitutively expressed at high levels or induced during desiccation in multiple tardigrade species. TDPs are required for tardigrade desiccation tolerance, and these...
  • Racists and Transgender Apologists Both Reject Basic Biology

    02/27/2017 5:13:27 AM PST · by DWW1990 · 11 replies
    Trevor Grant Thomas.com ^ | 2/26/2017 | Trevor Grant Thomas
    Many biologists avoid the term “race” and prefer a phrase such as “continental ancestry.” Thus, to prefer one “race” over another, or to declare one “race” superior to another, is biologically ignorant. Or, put another way, the “racists”—or “race-baiters”—of any era, of any color, on any continent, who battled against the cause of human rights of those of another skin color are guilty of contradicting the laws of basic human biology. Likewise, those who fight to further the cause of the gender-confused (“transgenders”) are also guilty of contradicting the laws of basic human biology. Only in a world corrupted by...
  • Changes coming to Elyria High School graduation robes to create unity principal says [OH]

    02/01/2017 7:16:38 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    WEWS, ABC 5, Cleveland ^ | 7:55 PM, Feb 1, 2017 | Paul Kiska
    For years male students wore red robes, and female students wore white robes to graduation at Elyria High School. Red and white are the school colors, but that’s changing for graduation this spring. The change happened after a group of students went to the principal on behalf of a student who was born female but does not identify as male or female. Wanting to be inclusive, school official switched to gender neutral robes. Now, all students will wear red robes. …
  • 133 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2016

    12/21/2016 9:12:49 PM PST · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/21/2016 | California Academy of Sciences
    In 2016, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 133 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include one bee fly, 43 ants, 36 beetles, one sand wasp, four spiders, six plants, 23 fishes, one eel, one shark, seven nudibranchs, five fossil urchins (and one fossil sand dollar), one coral, one skate, one African lizard, and an alarming new bird virus. More than a dozen Academy scientists -- along with several dozen international collaborators -- described...