Keyword: blackholes

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  • Black holes could be 'back doors' to other parts of the universe, claim scientists

    08/05/2016 10:43:13 AM PDT · by b4its2late · 51 replies
    UK Mirror ^ | 5 Aug 2016 | John von Radowitz
    Black holes could be "back doors" to other regions of the universe, a new study suggests. However, it is unlikely anyone passing through one of the gateways would survive, say scientists. First they would be "spaghettified" - stretched out like a strand of pasta - by the black hole's immense gravity. Once on the other side of the "door" the traveller would be compacted back to normal size, but could not count on being restored back to life.
  • Mystery Solved: Black Holes Twist Space-Time Like Taffy

    08/01/2016 9:20:39 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    space.com ^ | July 30, 2016 07:48am ET
    The story starts in the 1980s, when astronomers found that small (stellar-mass) black holes emit X-ray light that flickers in a curious pattern. At first, this flickering occurs every few seconds; however, the time between each flicker shortens over the course of a few months, eventually stopping completely. This "quasi-periodic oscillation" (QPO) was thought to be a result of a phenomenon predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity — that any object with enough mass, like a black hole, will twist space-time as it spins. Later, scientists calculated that these gravitational vortices will cause the orbits of particles around...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- GW151226: A Second Confirmed Source of Gravitational Radiation

    06/15/2016 1:43:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, June 15, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A new sky is becoming visible. When you look up, you see the sky as it appears in light -- electromagnetic radiation. But just over the past year, humanity has begun to see our once-familiar sky as it appears in a different type of radiation -- gravitational radiation. Today, the LIGO collaboration is reporting the detection of GW151226, the second confirmed flash of gravitational radiation after GW150914, the historic first detection registered three months earlier. As its name implies, GW151226 was recorded in late December of 2015. It was detected simultaneously by both LIGO facilities in Washington and Louisiana,...
  • Supermassive black holes in 'red geyser' galaxies cause galactic warming

    05/30/2016 4:08:50 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/25/2016 | University of Kentucky
    An international team of scientists, including the University of Kentucky's Renbin Yan, have uncovered a new class of galaxies, called "red geysers," with supermassive black hole winds so hot and energetic that stars can't form. Over the last few billion years, a mysterious kind of "galactic warming" has caused many galaxies to change from a lively place where new stars formed every now and then to a quiet place devoid of fresh young stars. But the mechanism that produces this dramatic transformation and keeps galaxies quiet has been one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in galaxy evolution. "These galaxies have...
  • Hawking at Harvard ... tackles the contradictory qualities of black holes

    05/10/2016 1:00:09 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    Harvard.edu ^ | 4/18/16 | Peter Reuell
    Hawking at Harvard At packed Sanders Theatre, theoretical physicist and cosmologist tackles the contradictory qualities of black holes April 18, 2016 | Editor's Pick Popular Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer"If determinism — the predictability of the universe — breaks down in black holes, it could break down in other situations. Even worse, if determinism breaks down, we can’t be sure of our past history either. The history books and our memories could just be illusions. It is the past that tells us who we are. Without it, we lose our identity," said Stephen Hawking. By Peter Reuell, Harvard Staff Writer Twitter...
  • Astrophysicists detect ultra-fast winds near supermassive black hole

    03/24/2016 12:44:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    phys.org ^ | March 21, 2016 | Provided by: York University
    Artist's illustration of turbulent winds of gas swirling around a black hole. Some of the gas is spiraling inward, but some is being blown away. Credit: NASA, and M. Weiss (Chandra X -ray Center) ============================================================================================================================================== New research led by astrophysicists at York University has revealed the fastest winds ever seen at ultraviolet wavelengths near a supermassive black hole. "We're talking wind speeds of 20 per cent the speed of light, which is more than 200 million kilometres an hour. That's equivalent to a category 77 hurricane," says Jesse Rogerson, who led the research as part of his PhD thesis in...
  • Cosmic rays fired at Earth – now we know where from

    03/17/2016 9:55:45 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies
    Cosmos ^ | 3/17/16 | Bill Condie
    Cosmic rays fired at Earth - now we know where from The violent region at the centre of our galaxy is the prime candidate, after gamma ray analysis, Bill Condie reports. Photo montage of gamma-rays as measured by the HESS array on the night sky over Namibia, with one of the small HESS telescopes in the foreground. Credit: H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Fabio Acero and Henning Gast Astronomers believe they may have identified the source of the stream of cosmic rays that rain down on Earth from outer space. Cosmic rays are extremely high-energy particles such as protons and atomic nuclei....
  • Clocking the Extreme Spin of a Monster Black Hole

    03/17/2016 6:36:54 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    D-News ^ | 15 Mar, 2016 | IAN O'NEILL
    upermassive black holes are the most extreme objects in the known universe, with masses millions or even billions of times the mass of our sun. Now astronomers have been able to study one of these behemoths inside a strange, distant quasar and they’ve made an astonishing discovery — it’s spinning one-third the speed of light. Studying a supermassive black hole some 3.5 billion light-years away is no easy feat, but this isn’t a regular object: it’s a quasar that shows quasi-periodic brightening events every 12 years or so — a fact that has helped astronomers reveal its extreme nature. Quasars...
  • Are Supermassive Black Holes Hiding Matter?

    02/29/2016 10:00:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    universetoday.com ^ |  29 Feb , 2016 | Matt Williams
    [S]cientists...for some time now, they have been working with a model that states that the Universe consists of 4.9% “normal” matter (i.e. that which we can see), 26.8% “dark matter” (that which we can’t), and 68.3% “dark energy”. From what they have observed, scientists have also concluded that the normal matter in the Universe is concentrated in web-like filaments, which make up about 20% of the Universe by volume. But a recent study performed by the Institute of Astro- and Particle Physics at the University of Innsbruck in Austria has found that a surprising amount of normal matter may live...
  • ASTRONOMERS JUST SNAPPED PHOTOS OF THE MOST MASSIVE BLACK HOLE WE’VE EVER OBSERVED

    02/18/2016 10:44:57 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 53 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 2/17/16 | Chloe Olewitz
    A new photograph of galaxy NGC 4889 may look peaceful from such a great distance, but it’s actually home to one of the biggest black holes that astronomers have ever identified. The Hubble Space Telescope allowed scientists to capture photos of the galaxy, located in the Coma Cluster about 300 million light-years away. The supermassive black hole hidden away in NGC 4889 breaks all kinds of records, even though it is currently classified as dormant. So how big is it, exactly? Well, according to our best estimates, the supermassive black hole is roughly 21 billion times the size of the...
  • Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows

    02/05/2016 1:08:03 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Princeton University ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
    Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands. Previous studies suggested that gamma rays coming from the dense region of space in the inner Milky Way galaxy could be caused when invisible dark matter particles collide. But using new statistical analysis methods, the two research teams independently found that the gamma ray...
  • Dark matter and the dinosaur: New theory challenges notions on origins of human life

    12/12/2015 1:32:59 AM PST · by Squawk 8888 · 22 replies
    National Post ^ | December 12, 2015 | Joseph Brean
    TORONTO — Dark matter inspires many strange theories, but until now few have involved giant lizards and the origins of humanity. If physicist Lisa Randall’s theory is correct, however, there is a clear link between dark matter, the great unknown majority of universal stuff and the extinction of the dinosaurs, which cleared the path for the rise of mammals, including that special species, homo sapiens. Roughly, her idea is that the rotation of a vast disc of dark matter through our solar system dislodged an asteroid from a weak and distant orbit, and sent it hurtling toward Earth, where it...
  • Black holes have a size limit of 50 billion suns

    12/10/2015 8:44:24 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 27 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10 Dec, 2015 | Joshua Sokol,
    Even gluttons can't eat forever. When black holes at the hearts of galaxies swell to 50 billion times the mass of our sun, they may lose the discs of gas they use as cosmic feedlots. Most galaxies host a supermassive black hole at their centre. Around this is a region of space where gas settles into an orbiting disc. The gas can lose energy and fall inwards, feeding the black hole. But these discs are known to be unstable and prone to crumbling into stars. Theoretically, a black hole could grow so big that it swallows up the stable part...
  • Milky Way’s black hole may be spewing out cosmic rays

    03/19/2016 9:24:38 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Science ^ | 16 Mar, 2016 | Daniel Clery
    Mysterious high-energy particles known as cosmic rays zip through space at a wide range of energies, some millions of times greater than those produced in the world’s most powerful atom smasher. Scientists have long thought cosmic rays from inside our galaxy come from supernova explosions, but a new study has fingered a second source: the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. With this new result, the search for cosmic ray origins, which has frustrated scientists for more than 100 years, has taken an unexpected new twist. “It’s very exciting,” says astrophysicist Andrew Taylor of the Dublin...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Two Black Holes Merge

    02/12/2016 12:16:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    NASA ^ | February 12, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Just press play to watch two black holes merge. Inspired by the first direct detection of gravitational waves by LIGO, this simulation video plays in slow motion but would take about one third of a second if run in real time. Set on a cosmic stage the black holes are posed in front of stars, gas, and dust. Their extreme gravity lenses the light from behind them into Einstein rings as they spiral closer and finally merge into one. The otherwise invisible gravitational waves generated as the massive objects rapidly coalesce cause the visible image to ripple and slosh...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves from Merging Black Holes

    02/11/2016 4:37:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    NASA ^ | February 11, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Gravitational radiation has been directly detected. The first-ever detection was made by both facilities of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in Washington and Louisiana simultaneously last September. After numerous consistency checks, the resulting 5-sigma discovery was published today. The measured gravitational waves match those expected from two large black holes merging after a death spiral in a distant galaxy, with the resulting new black hole momentarily vibrating in a rapid ringdown. A phenomenon predicted by Einstein, the historic discovery confirms a cornerstone of humanity's understanding of gravity and basic physics. It is also the most direct detection of...
  • Stephen Hawking: Black Holes Have 'Hair'

    01/17/2016 2:42:02 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 23 replies
    Live Science ^ | 14 Jan, 2016 | Tia Ghos
    Black holes may sport a luxurious head of "hair" made up of ghostly, zero-energy particles, says a new hypothesis proposed by Stephen Hawking and other physicists. The new paper, which was published online Jan. 5 in the preprint journal arXiv, proposes that at least some of the information devoured by a black hole is stored in these electric hairs. Still, the new proposal doesn't prove that all the information that enters a black hole is preserved.
  • Stephen Hawking's New Black-Hole Paper, Translated: An Interview with Co-Author Andrew Strominger

    01/09/2016 2:33:42 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 1/8/16 | Seth Fletcher
    Stephen Hawking's New Black-Hole Paper, Translated: An Interview with Co-Author Andrew Strominger The Harvard string theorist explains the collaboration's long-awaited research on the black-hole information paradox Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Email Print Share via Google+Stumble Upon Penrose diagram for a semiclassical evaporating black hole, as presented in "Soft Hair on Black Holes." CREDIT: Prahar Mitra In the mid 1970s, Stephen Hawking made a string of unnerving discoveries about black holes—that they could evaporate, even explode, and destroy all information about what had fallen in. Physicists spent the next 40 years sorting through the wreckage. Then last year, at a...
  • The mystery of the naked black hole

    01/06/2016 6:59:33 PM PST · by Utilizer · 38 replies
    AAAS Science ^ | 5 January 2016 2:45 pm | Daniel Clery
    KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA--Most, if not all, galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centers surrounded by dense clouds of stars. Now, researchers have found one that seems to have lost almost its entire entourage. The team, which reported its find here today at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society, says it doesn't know what stripped the stars away. But it has put forward a tantalizing possibility: The object could be an extremely rare medium-sized black hole, which theorists have predicted but observers have never seen. The unusual black hole sits about 1 billion light-years from Earth in SDSS J1126+2944,...
  • Physicists figure out how to retrieve information from a black hole

    12/23/2015 1:17:47 PM PST · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | 23 December 2015 3:15 pm | By Adrian Cho
    Black holes earn their name because their gravity is so strong not even light can escape from them. Oddly, though, physicists have come up with a bit of theoretical sleight of hand to retrieve a speck of information that's been dropped into a black hole. The calculation touches on one of the biggest mysteries in physics: how all of the information trapped in a black hole leaks out as the black hole "evaporates." Many theorists think that must happen, but they don't know how. Unfortunately for them, the new scheme may do more to underscore the difficulty of the larger...
  • Black hole caught 'burping' galactic gas supply

    01/06/2016 2:18:17 PM PST · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 5 January 2016 | By Jonathan Webb
    NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E Schlegel et al Image caption The two waves of hot, X-ray emitting gas were seen in this image from Chandra ================================================================================================================ Astronomers have spotted two huge waves of gas being "burped" by the black hole at the heart of a nearby galaxy. The swathes of hot gas, detected in X-ray images from Nasa's Chandra space telescope, appear to be sweeping cooler hydrogen gas ahead of them. This vast, rippling belch is taking place in NGC 5195 - a small, neglected sibling of the "Whirlpool Galaxy", 26 million light years away. That makes it one of the closest...
  • Black holes can grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun... and then stop

    12/21/2015 1:15:25 PM PST · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | December 21, 2015 12:30 GMT | By Matt Atherton
    Black holes can only grow if they have a gas disc to feed on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr ======================================================================================================== Black holes can only grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun, before they lose their only source of 'food' and stop growing. Scientists discovered that black holes have a size limit, as when it gets so big, the gas which feeds the great void loses its energy, and falls into the unknown. A researcher from the University of Leicester analysed the disc of gas which surrounds supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies. He found that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- When Black Holes Collide

    10/20/2015 4:32:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | October 20, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What happens when two black holes collide? This extreme scenario likely occurs in the centers of some merging galaxies and multiple star systems. The featured video shows a computer animation of the final stages of such a merger, while highlighting the gravitational lensing effects that would appear on a background starfield. The black regions indicate the event horizons of the dynamic duo, while a surrounding ring of shifting background stars indicates the position of their combined Einstein ring. All background stars not only have images visible outside of this Einstein ring, but also have one or more companion images...
  • More Evidence for Coming Black Hole Collision (total mass > a billion suns)

    09/22/2015 9:34:46 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 49 replies
    NYTimes ^ | 9/16/15 | Dennis Overbye
    The apocalypse is still on, apparently — at least in a galaxy about 3.5 billion light-years from here. Last winter, a team of Caltech astronomers reported that two supermassive black holes appeared to be spiraling together toward a cataclysmic collision that could bring down the curtains in that galaxy. The evidence was a rhythmic flickering from the galaxy’s nucleus, a quasar known as PG 1302-102, which Matthew Graham and his colleagues interpreted as the fatal mating dance of a pair of black holes with a total mass of more than a billion suns. Their merger, the astronomers calculated, could release...
  • Two giant black holes might crash into each other in 21 years

    05/28/2015 6:23:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 57 replies
    Geek.com ^ | 5/23/15 | Ryan Whitwam
    In the center of most galaxies (ours included) there is a supermassive black hole that holds everything together. However, one galaxy 10.5 billion light years away looks like it might have two black holes, and just like in Highlander, there can be only one. Scientists believe the pair are going to crash into each other in just 21 years. This could provide an unprecedented opportunity to observe the mind-boggling physics of such an event. The galaxy in question doesn’t have a snazzy name — it’s known only as PSO J334.2028+01.4075. It’s what is known as a quasar, or an “active...
  • NASA May Have Accidentally Created a Warp Field (MAY)

    04/24/2015 10:35:10 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 52 replies
    mysteriousuniverse.org ^ | 4/24/2015 | mysteriousuniverse.org
    “Star Trek” introduced the world outside of rocket science circles to the concept of warp drive – the propulsion system that allowed the starship Enterprise to travel faster than the speed of light. Warp speed is the holy grail that would let us explore the universe safely surrounded and protected by a space-distorting warp field. After watching the SpaceX rocket recently just try to land on a platform, you’d think this ability is years if not decades away. Yet the buzz on space websites is that NASA may have accidentally discovered a way to create a warp field. Wait, what?...
  • Wormholes Untangle a Black Hole Paradox

    04/26/2015 10:30:30 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 4/24/15 | K.C. Cole
    Wormholes Untangle a Black Hole Paradox A bold new idea aims to link two famously discordant descriptions of nature. In doing so, it may also reveal how space-time owes its existence to the spooky connections of quantum information. By: K.C. ColeApril 24, 2015 Comments (19) One hundred years after Albert Einstein developed his general theory of relativity, physicists are still stuck with perhaps the biggest incompatibility problem in the universe. The smoothly warped space-time landscape that Einstein described is like a painting by Salvador Dalí — seamless, unbroken, geometric. But the quantum particles that occupy this space are more like...
  • Black holes don't erase information, scientists say

    04/04/2015 10:19:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | by Charlotte Hsu
    The "information loss paradox" in black holes—a problem that has plagued physics for nearly 40 years—may not exist. Shred a document, and you can piece it back together. Burn a book, and you could theoretically do the same. But send information into a black hole, and it's lost forever. That's what some physicists have argued for years: That black holes are the ultimate vaults, entities that suck in information and then evaporate without leaving behind any clues as to what they once contained. But new research shows that this perspective may not be correct. "According to our work, information isn't...
  • There Are No Such Things As Black Holes

    09/24/2014 12:36:10 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 87 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | September 24, 2014 | Jason Major on
    That’s the conclusion reached by one researcher from the University of North Carolina: black holes can’t exist in our Universe — not mathematically, anyway. “I’m still not over the shock,” said Laura Mersini-Houghton, associate physics professor at UNC-Chapel Hill. “We’ve been studying this problem for a more than 50 years and this solution gives us a lot to think about.” In a news article spotlighted by UNC the scenario suggested by Mersini-Houghton is briefly explained. Basically, when a massive star reaches the end of its life and collapses under its own gravity after blasting its outer layers into space —...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Two Black Holes Dancing in 3C 75

    09/27/2014 9:50:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | September 28, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening at the center of active galaxy 3C 75? The two bright sources at the center of this composite x-ray (blue)/ radio (pink) image are co-orbiting supermassive black holes powering the giant radio source 3C 75. Surrounded by multimillion degree x-ray emitting gas, and blasting out jets of relativistic particles the supermassive black holes are separated by 25,000 light-years. At the cores of two merging galaxies in the Abell 400 galaxy cluster they are some 300 million light-years away. Astronomers conclude that these two supermassive black holes are bound together by gravity in a binary system in part...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The View Near a Black Hole

    03/23/2014 4:38:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    NASA ^ | March 23, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In the center of a swirling whirlpool of hot gas is likely a beast that has never been seen directly: a black hole. Studies of the bright light emitted by the swirling gas frequently indicate not only that a black hole is present, but also likely attributes. The gas surrounding GRO J1655-40, for example, has been found to display an unusual flickering at a rate of 450 times a second. Given a previous mass estimate for the central object of seven times the mass of our Sun, the rate of the fast flickering can be explained by a black...
  • Meet the Indian who took on Stephen Hawking

    08/02/2004 10:16:56 PM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 97 replies · 5,002+ views
    Rediff.com ^ | August 03, 2004 10:06 IST | Rediff.com
    An Indian theoretical physicist who questioned the existence of black holes and thereby challenged Stephen Hawking of Britain at last feels vindicated. But he is sad. Abhas Mitra, at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in Mumbai, was perhaps the first and the only scientist who had the guts to openly challenge Hawking of Cambridge University who is regarded by many as the modern-day Einstein. For over 30 years Hawking and his followers were perpetuating the theory that black holes -- resulting from gravitational collapse of massive stars -- destroy everything that falls into them preventing even light or information...
  • A surge of attacks against classical GR (General Relativity)

    10/01/2014 1:02:17 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 9 replies
    The Reference Frame ^ | September 29, 2014 | Luboš Motl
    ... Well, even 90 years isn't enough, it seems, so right now, we are entering new waters – the denial of some basic results of general relativity, our modern theory of gravity that has been around and available to everyone since 1916. So in the last week, hundreds of publications informed their readers that it's been "mathematically proven" that the big bang theory is wrong and the black holes don't exist. These nutty claims boil down to some papers by a crackpot named Ms Laura Mersini-Houghton (no, I really, really won't accept her doctorate) who had previously claimed that she...
  • Earth Is Safe: No Black Holes Spun Out of Atom Smasher, Yet

    05/01/2014 7:37:16 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    Live Science ^ | April 30, 2014 09:52am ET | Charles Q. Choi
    The most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider, has not yet created any black holes as some have feared, researchers say. Even if this atom smasher does create black holes, there is no danger of those black holes destroying Earth, added scientists of the new study published online March 5 in the journal Physical Review Letters.
  • XMM-Newton Discovers Unique Pair Of Hidden Black Holes

    04/24/2014 12:34:27 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 18 replies
    redorbit.com ^ | April 22, 2014 | Source: ESA
    21 Image Caption: Artist's impression of a binary supermassive black hole system. Credit: ESA - C. Carreau ESAA pair of supermassive black holes in orbit around one another have been spotted by XMM-Newton. This is the first time such a pair have been seen in an ordinary galaxy. They were discovered because they ripped apart a star when the space observatory happened to be looking in their direction.Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. Two supermassive black holes are the smoking gun that the galaxy has merged...
  • Flight MH370: My theory

    03/17/2014 12:42:01 PM PDT · by McGruff · 9 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 17 March 2014 | My demented mind
    US Navy reveals plot to beam power from SPACE using giant orbiting solar panels System could capture power in space and beam to Earth Arrays of panels 1km wide could be assembled by robots in orbit Could power military installations and even cities Would be nine times larger than the International Space Station
  • ‘Is It Preposterous’ to Think a Black Hole Caused Flight 370 to Go Missing?

    03/19/2014 8:52:03 PM PDT · by MeshugeMikey · 110 replies
    mediaite.com ^ | March 19th, 2014 | Josh Feldman
    CNN’s Don Lemon has been entertaining all sorts of theories about the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, including the chance something “supernatural” happened, but on Wednesday night, he actually asked panelists about the possibility a black hole was involved.
  • Astrophysicists duo propose Planck star as core of black holes

    02/17/2014 10:49:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | February 14, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    The current thinking regarding black holes is that they have two very simple parts, an event horizon and a singularity. Because a probe cannot be sent inside a black hole to see what is truly going on, researchers have to rely on theories. The singularity theory suffers from what has come to be known as the "information paradox"—black holes appear to destroy information, which would seem to violate the rules of general relativity, because they follow rules of quantum mechanics instead. This paradox has left deep thinking physicists such as Stephen Hawking uneasy—so much so that he and others have...
  • Why Hawking is Wrong About Black Holes

    02/01/2014 1:03:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 1, 2014 | Brian Koberlein on
    Black holes can radiate in a way that agrees with thermodynamics, and the region near the event horizon doesn’t have a firewall, just as general relativity requires. So Hawking’s proposal is a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist.
  • Weird Black Hole's Incredible Brightness Perplexes Scientists

    01/25/2014 8:25:23 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies
    Space.com ^ | November 27, 2013 01:00pm ET | By Mike Wall, Senior Writer
    A black-hole system in a neighboring galaxy is twice as bright as astronomers had thought possible, a new study reports. The incredible luminosity of the system in question, which resides about 22 million light-years from Earth in the Pinwheel Galaxy, may force a rethink of the theories that explain how some black holes radiate energy, researchers said.
  • Black holes 'do not exist'

    03/31/2005 4:41:46 PM PST · by Michael_Michaelangelo · 84 replies · 3,300+ views
    Nature ^ | 03/31/05 | Philip Ball
    Black holes are staples of science fiction and many think astronomers have observed them indirectly. But according to a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, these awesome breaches in space-time do not and indeed cannot exist. Over the past few years, observations of the motions of galaxies have shown that some 70% the Universe seems to be composed of a strange 'dark energy' that is driving the Universe's accelerating expansion. George Chapline thinks that the collapse of the massive stars, which was long believed to generate black holes, actually leads to the formation of stars that contain...
  • Stephen Hawking stuns physicists by declaring ‘there are no black holes’—says there are GREY ones

    01/25/2014 12:03:14 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 35 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 15:59 EST, 24 January 2014 | Mark Prigg
    Stephen Hawking has shocked physicists by admitting “there are no black holes”. In a paper published online, Professor Hawking instead argues there are “grey holes”. “The absence of event horizons means that there are no black holes—in the sense of regimes from which light can't escape to infinity,” he says in the paper, called Information Preservation and Weather Forecasting For Black Holes.He says that the idea of an event horizon, from which light cannot escape, is flawed. He suggests that instead light rays attempting to rush away from the black hole’s core will be held as though stuck on a...
  • A cosmic feast! Milky Way’s mysterious black hole set to gobble up giant gas cloud

    01/14/2014 5:41:54 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 14, 2014 | Ellie Zolfaghasifard
    The Milky Way’s black hole is about to gobble up its first dinner, and astronomers are hoping to have front row seats when it happens. A huge gas cloud, about three times the mass of Earth, is on course to collide with the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in March. Astronomers expect the gas cloud will swing so close to the black hole that it will heat up to the point where it produces spectacular X-rays.
  • Spin rate of black holes pinned down

    08/08/2013 1:35:04 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 12 replies
    Nature ^ | 8/6/13 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    Black holes can be described by just two fundamental characteristics: mass and spin. Astronomers have been able to measure the objects’ mass for decades, by looking for gravitational effects on the orbits of nearby stars. But measuring spin, which records the angular momentum of the matter that falls into the holes, has proved troublesome, particularly for the supermassive black holes that lie at the centres of galaxies. No light emanates from the black holes’ spinning event horizons, so astronomers instead look for proxies that emit X-rays, such as the swirling disks of matter that feed into some holes. Such indirect...
  • NASA Finds Black Hole Cluster (Unprecedented Cluster)

    06/15/2013 2:30:31 PM PDT · by lbryce · 53 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | June 15, 2013 | Staff
    Title:NASA Finds Black Hole Cluster No matter how old you are, space never stops being cool. That applies doubly to black holes, which is why NASA's latest discovery should be considered totally awesome: using the Chandra X-ray observatory, the agency found an "unprecedented" cluster of black holes in the Andromeda galaxy. How unprecedented? There could be 26 of them in this cluster alone. And these were just the ones that were immediately identifiable, as scientists say there are likely many more that are currently invisible. Said the lead author of the study, "We think it's just the tip of the...
  • Hitler Psychopathology in Light of Our Current Tyrant - Weekend Vanity

    05/24/2013 7:37:27 PM PDT · by dagogo redux · 34 replies
    Individual Differences Research ^ | 5/24/13 | dagogo redux
    Understanding Madmen: A DSM-IV Assessment of Adolf Hitler Frederick L. Coolidge*, Felicia L. Davis, & Daniel L. Segal University of Colorado at Colorado Springs ABSTRACT - Adolf Hitler’s personality was investigated posthumously through the use of an informant version of the Coolidge Axis II Inventory (CATI), which is designed for the assessment of personality, clinical, and neuropsychological disorders. Five academic Hitler historians completed the CATI. The overall mean inter-rater correlation was moderately high for all 38 CATI scales’ T scores (median r = .72). On Axis I, the highest mean T scores across raters were Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (76), Psychotic...
  • Herschel gets to the bottom of black-hole jets

    03/15/2013 9:41:44 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    European Space Agency. ^ | 12 Mar 2013 | Stéphane Corbel & Göran Pilbratt
    Astronomers using ESA's Herschel space observatory have detected emission from the base of black-hole jets for the first time. While studying the black-hole binary system GX 339-4 in a multi-wavelength observation campaign, they noticed changes in the source's X-ray and radio emissions signalling the onset of powerful jets being released from the black hole's vicinity. This prompted the astronomers to observe the source at far-infrared wavelengths with Herschel. As the first observation of emission from jets in a black-hole binary system at these wavelengths, the data have allowed the astronomers to probe the jets down to their base, where the...
  • 'Young' black hole is nearby, NASA says; doorway to a new universe?

    02/16/2013 1:48:31 PM PST · by skinkinthegrass · 22 replies
    herocomplex.latimes.com ^ | Feb. 13, 2013 | 2:30 p.m. | Amy Hubbard
    ‘Young’ black hole is nearby, NASA says; doorway to a new universe? Feb. 13, 2013 | 2:30 p.m. A supernova remnant may contain the most recent black hole formed in the Milky Way galaxy, according to NASA. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/MIT/L.Lopez et al; Infrared: Palomar; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA ) A supernova remnant may contain the most recent black hole formed in the Milky Way galaxy, according to NASA. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/MIT/L.Lopez et al; Infrared: Palomar; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA )Asteroid 2012 DA14 is bearing down on Earth, rattling nerves and making sci-fi fans’ eyes light up. But the cool science news doesn’t stop there. Researchers believe...
  • Astronomers find biggest black hole, 17 BILLION times the size of Sun

    11/28/2012 2:29:09 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 30 replies
    The Register ^ | 28th November 2012 21:21 GMT | Iain Thomson in San Francisco
    A team at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy has found the largest recorded black hole, one that swallows an unprecedented amount of its home galaxy, potentially requiring a rethink in our understanding of galactic formation. The huge hole has been spotted in the heart of the disk system NGC 1277, a smallish galaxy about 10 per cent of the size of the Milky Way and situated around 220 million light-years from Earth, in the constellation Perseus. Almost all galaxies have black holes at their centers, but they typically only take up around 0.1 per cent of the total galactic...
  • Evidence found for existence of intermediate size black hole

    07/08/2012 10:58:16 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 6, 2012 | Bob Yirka report
    EnlargeGalaxy ESO 243-49, about 300 million light-years away, is home to the newly found black hole. Credit: NASA, ESA and S. Farrell (U. Sydney) (Phys.org) -- Over the years, cosmologists have found ample evidence of just two kinds of black holes: stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes. The former are considered small by most standards, just several times the weight of our sun; the latter, as their name implies, huge and as heavy as millions of our sun combined. Not so easy to find have been those that lie somewhere in-between, and because of that, their existence...