Keyword: chinacoal

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  • China now burning as much coal as the rest of the world combined

    02/02/2013 12:05:17 PM PST · by redreno · 14 replies
    Washington Post ^ | January 29, 2013 | Brad Plumer
    Want a better sense for why climate change is such a daunting problem? Check out this striking new chart from the U.S. Energy Information Administration: China’s coal use grew 9 percent in 2011, rising to 3.8 billion tons. At this point, the country is burning nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined. Coal, of course, is the world’s premier fossil fuel, a low-cost source of electricity that kicks a lot of carbon-dioxide up into the atmosphere. And China’s growing appetite is a big reason why global greenhouse-gas emissions have soared in recent years, even as the...
  • China consumes nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined

    01/31/2013 7:01:50 AM PST · by thackney · 9 replies
    Energy Information Administration ^ | JANUARY 29, 2013 | Energy Information Administration
    Coal consumption in China grew more than 9% in 2011, continuing its upward trend for the 12th consecutive year, according to newly released international data. China's coal use grew by 325 million tons in 2011, accounting for 87% of the 374 million ton global increase in coal use. Of the 2.9 billion tons of global coal demand growth since 2000, China accounted for 2.3 billion tons (82%). China now accounts for 47% of global coal consumption—almost as much as the entire rest of the world combined. Robust coal demand growth in China is the result of a more than 200%...
  • Sunken Fires Menace Land and Climate

    04/03/2005 6:55:52 PM PDT · by Coleus · 34 replies · 2,070+ views
    NY Times via the national academies ^ | 01.15.02 | Andrew C. Revkin
    Sunken Fires Menace Land and Climate January 15, 2002 Fires are burning in thousands of underground coal seams from Pennsylvania to Mongolia, releasing toxic gases, adding millions of tons of heat-trapping carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and baking the earth until vegetation shrivels and the land sinks. Scientists and government agencies are starting to use heat-sensing satellites to map the fires and try new ways to extinguish them. But in many instances -- particularly in Asia -- they are so widespread and stubborn that miners simply work around the flames. There is geological evidence that grassland and forest fires, lightning...