Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $17,061
19%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 19% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: cities

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Most Livable Cities? Questioning Those ‘Livability’ Rankings

    10/14/2018 8:10:47 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 41 replies
    Townhall ^ | 10/14/2018 | Colin McNickle
    “Livability” rankings have been all the rage for a number of years. Various entities devise the ratings; the media dutifully report them with little or no context. Public officials and booster organizations then tout the most laudatory rankings and reports as proof-positive that their respective cities and/or regions are “getting it right” or “on the move” or some other feel-good bromide. But as two recent cases illustrate, all ranking methodologies are not created equal and some of the criteria employed are suspect, bordering on “bogus,” according to an analysis (Policy Brief Vol. 18, No. 38) by the Allegheny Institute for...
  • (Newark, NJ) Ranking says it's the worst place to raise a family. Residents say, back off!

    09/05/2018 7:20:09 PM PDT · by Coleus · 16 replies
    NJ.com ^ | 09.05.18 | Barry Carter
    WalletHub has done it again to Newark and some residents are tired of seeing the place they love get thrown under the bus. In a study comparing 180 cities using 46 metrics the measure family dynamics, WalletHub determined that Newark is the worst place to raise a family.Newark scored 37.16 and was ranked dead last in a report that looked at categories such as family fun and recreation, health and safety, education and child care, affordability and socioeconomics.   Enough already, residents say. Newarkers know the problems. The school system is struggling, but it's no longer under state control after 22...
  • The Economist’s 10 most liveable cities in the world: Australia and Canada Dominate 6 of 10 spots

    08/19/2018 4:36:53 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 92 replies
    The Real Deal ^ | 08/18/2018
    America just isn’t that liveable compared to the rest of the world it seems.The annual global “liveability” ranking of cities saw the top 10 spots mostly split between Australia, Canada and Japan, according to CNBC. No American city made the top 20.The ranking is put together by the Economist Intelligence Unit and includes 140 cities in a process which considers healthcare, culture, infrastructure, crime and conflict, and education among others as factors in scoring. The highest-ranked American city was Honolulu at 23. Here’s a look at which cities made the top 10. [CNBC]—Erin Hudson1. Vienna, Austria (Credit: Pixabay) 2. Melbourne,...
  • These will be the world's biggest cities in 2030

    07/11/2018 8:32:32 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 34 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 07/11/2018 | Leanna Garfield
    With over 37 million residents, Greater Tokyo is the most populous metro area in the world today. Urban growth is not unique to Japan. By 2030, the United Nations predicts that the world will have 43 megacities, defined as metro areas with more than 10 million people. Most of them will be in developing regions in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. The UN recently released its annual World Urbanization Prospects, which estimates which metro areas will have the highest populations by 2030. On World Population Day this Wednesday, let's take a look at the top 13: 13. Greater New...
  • Survey: Washington DC, Detroit, New York Among The Worst-Run Cities In U.S.

    07/11/2018 7:41:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 19 replies
    CBS Detroit ^ | July 10, 2018 | Staff
    Washington D.C. may be the nation’s capitol, but a new survey is also calling it the “worst-run” city in America. Personal finance website WalletHub has released its rankings for the worst big cities in the country and found that several high-profile places are at the bottom of the list when it comes to city management and operating efficiency.
  • What Employers Want From Cities; What Factors Do Companies Consider When They Relocate?

    07/10/2018 10:48:36 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 29 replies
    Manhattan Institute ^ | 07/10/2018 | Aaron M. Renn
    There are various dueling popular narratives about what drives economic growth in a city or region. One narrative focuses on business climate factors such as taxes and regulation. Others stress the importance of locally available talent or affordable housing and commercial property. But the reality is that economic growth is multi-factorial. There’s no single component that drives every outcome. Places have to pay attention to many things, not just one. Consider, for example, the recent announcement that the investment management firm AllianceBernstein will relocate its headquarters and more than 1,000 jobs from New York City to Nashville. If talent were...
  • More Cities Are Banishing Highways Underground — And Building Parks on Top

    04/28/2018 1:04:22 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 34 replies
    The Pew Charitable Trusts ^ | April 2, 2018 | Martha T. Moore
    The most popular place to put a city park is, increasingly, on a highway. Cities looking to boost their downtowns, or to improve downtrodden neighborhoods, are creating “highway cap parks” on decks constructed over freeways that cut through the urban center. Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Denver and Dallas have deck parks underway. Atlanta, Houston, Minneapolis and Santa Monica, California, are among the cities considering similar projects. In crowded cities, highway deck parks are a way to create new acreage and provide green space that can spur downtown development. Capping a highway to create a park also can reconnect urban neighborhoods sliced apart...
  • How California Car Culture Killed The Promise Of A 20-Minute Commute

    04/16/2018 8:33:57 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 40 replies
    KPBS News ^ | April 16, 2018 | Meghan McCarty Carino/KPCC
    As an innovator and early adopter of freeways, California became the symbolic capital of car culture. But the ease of movement conferred by the massive postwar freeway building boom was short-lived, turning the dream of car travel into a nightmare of congestion and long commutes. The story of how Californians went from getting around to getting stuck behind the wheel is deeply entwined with the history of the urban freeway, an enterprise that advanced earlier and on a larger scale here than anywhere else in the country. Half a century ago, there was reason for optimism about cars. Los Angeles...
  • STL’s white refugee syndrome

    03/29/2018 8:38:06 AM PDT · by GuavaCheesePuff · 42 replies
    The St. Louis American ^ | February 12, 2015 | CHARLES JACO
    Caucasian St. Louisans are to white flight as Kenyan runners are to the Boston Marathon. Volumes have been written about the ability of white St. Louisans to empty out a region, or as a former colleague from Fox 2 once said, “Yeah, a black family moved in seven blocks away and my parents ended up in Ellisville.” An entire library wing could be devoted to white flight in the Gateway City. From James Neal Primm’s 1998 Lion of the Valley to Colin Gordon’s 2009 Mapping Decline to 20 years of the Where We Stand reports from the East-West Gateway Council...
  • No, local mayors shouldn’t be running the country

    03/17/2018 6:01:40 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 20 replies
    Hot Air.com ^ | March 17, 2018 | JAZZ SHAW
    Last week the National League of Cities hosted a conference in Washington, D.C. where a couple thousand mayors and other municipal leaders from around the nation met to address various challenges facing their home towns in 2018. You can debate the usefulness of such confabs all you like, but the concept of shared experiences and an opportunity to develop solutions among local leaders surely has some value. Getting a bit carried away with the concept, however, was Washington Post editorial page editor Fred Hiatt. So impressed was he with some of the ideas which came out of the meeting that...
  • Report: Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S. (The South did not fare very well)

    03/08/2018 11:33:42 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 99 replies
    PJ Media ^ | 03/08/2018 | Paula Bolyard
    NeighborhoodScout, a web-based platform that, among other things, tracks crime statistics, released its annual list of the Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S. for 2018. According to a press release, the list is based on a comparison of the safety of cities with 25,000 or more people nationwide, "based on the number of violent crimes (murder, rape, armed robbery, and aggravated assault) reported to the FBI to have occurred in each city, and the population of each city, divided by 1,000." The calculation reveals the rate of violent crimes per 1,000 residents.The most dangerous city in American, according...
  • A Senate of the States: September 6th, 1787

    12/18/2017 12:51:00 AM PST · by Jacquerie · 7 replies
    Article V Blog ^ | December 18th 2017 | Rodney Dodsworth
    Presidential Elections. Little over a week before the close of the federal convention, the senate was still responsible for appointing a president should no one obtain a majority, or if two with a majority had an equal number, of electoral votes. While their electoral college system minimized the possibility of “pre-bought” presidents, our Framers nonetheless cast a suspicious eye at the senate. The convention intended a ‘high-toned’ second branch to check the house, but had they gone too far? Their senate had the power to appoint the president, name his officers, appoint judges, make treaties and try impeachments. This constituted...
  • Is the political war on rural Md. dead?

    11/10/2017 11:09:21 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 31 replies
    The Hagerstown Herald-Mail ^ | June 4, 2017 | J.F. MEILS Capital News Service
    ANNAPOLIS — In 2009, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley closed the visitor center at the Sideling Hill cut, the symbolic gateway to Western Maryland, as a cost-saving effort. Some saw the move as personal, or at least confirmation of how the former governor felt about the state’s rural counties. “We had only two visitor centers that were closed in the entire state under O’Malley,” said William Valentine, an Allegany County commissioner. “It wasn’t too hard to figure out what happened.” Current Gov. Larry Hogan reopened the Sideling Hill Visitor Center in 2015. Earlier this year when Hogan took the stage...
  • Judge in Chicago refuses to alter ruling on sanctuary cities

    10/13/2017 3:29:48 PM PDT · by iowamark · 34 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | 10/13/2017 | Jason Meisner
    A federal judge in Chicago on Friday refused to alter his previous ruling barring Attorney General Jeff Sessions from requiring sanctuary cities nationwide to cooperate with immigration agents in exchange for receiving public safety grant money. In granting the preliminary injunction last month, U.S. District Judge Harry Leinenweber said Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration could suffer “irreparable harm” in its relationship with the immigrant community if it were to comply with the U.S. Department of Justice’s new rules. The judge also said the attorney general overstepped his authority by imposing the special conditions, agreeing with the city’s argument that it was...
  • Texas' Toll Roads: A Big Step Towards Open Markets For Transportation

    10/10/2017 8:10:17 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 96 replies
    Forbes ^ | June 30, 2017 | Scott Beyer
    No city in America runs on anything resembling a free-market model. But Texas' major cities are probably the closest thing, with vast improvements to their economies and living standards to show for it. Their looser land-use laws mean that housing supply grows quickly, stabilizing prices. Their lighter tax and regulatory structure helps businesses locate there and grow. And—shenanigans from the governor's office notwithstanding—their openness to immigrants means they have cheap and robust labor forces.But one market-oriented aspect little discussed is Texas' approach to transportation. The state has 25 toll roads, more than any other state. They are particularly common in Houston and Dallas,...
  • Unlocking billions of dollars of infrastructure funding capacity

    09/28/2017 5:32:33 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 16 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | September 13, 2017 | Charles "Skip" Stitt
    The nation’s approach to managing public infrastructure is often inefficient. Best practices, such as life-cycle asset management and preventive maintenance, are rarely a priority. We can, however, unlock billions of dollars of infrastructure funding capacity now trapped in existing assets by improving how we build, operate and finance infrastructure. While experts discuss the size and urgency of our infrastructure needs, the debates focus on how to pay for new infrastructure. The Trump administration has identified public-private partnerships (P3) as a primary strategy. A majority of states and D.C. have statutes allowing P3s. Other countries have also adopted P3s as a...
  • Amazon Set To Build A Second HQ And Cities Say ‘Pick Me!’ (50,000 six-figure jobs)

    09/23/2017 3:08:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    Gears of Biz ^ | September 23, 2017 | Daniela Blot
    Amazon said Thursday that it will spend $5 billion to build another headquarters in North America to house 50,000 new employees. In April, workers constructed three glass-covered domes in an expansion of the company’s downtown Seattle campus. Amazon made the sort of announcement Thursday morning that mayors dream about. The tech juggernaut said it was looking for the right city in which to build its “HQ2”: a second headquarters in North America, equal to its campus in Seattle. And it’s going to make that selection process a public one, akin to how cities bid to host an Olympic Games. “We...
  • Transportation Funding: Why It’s Still Toll Roads Versus Public Transit

    09/21/2017 11:08:05 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 7 replies
    EfficientGov ^ | September 20, 2017 | Andrea Fox
    Is fighting sprawl still a goal for those who decide the fate of transportation funding at the federal, state and local levels?Transportation planning is deeply connected to economic development, but there in any agreement about transportation funding among government leaders often ends.Parag Khanna, a senior public policy analyst in Singapore and author of “Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization,” summarized the political divide over transportation planning like this: “America is increasingly divided not between red states and blue states, but between connected hubs and disconnected backwaters.”But division that stymies transportation planning goes further. Government leaders have always been divided...
  • America's Most Dangerous Cities (chart)

    08/28/2017 2:26:54 PM PDT · by freedumb2003 · 71 replies
    Statista ^ | 7/22/2017 | statista
    Given that 2016 was the worst year for homicides in nearly two decades in Chicago, it comes as little surprise that the city has a reputation as one of the most violent places in the United States. Last year, there were 762 murders, 3,550 shooting incidents and 4,331 shooting victims with an average of 12 people shot every single day. In fact, the Windy City experienced more murders than New York and Los Angeles combined last year with the number of homicides there since 2001 eclipsing U.S. war dead in Iraq and Afghanistan by late November. Even though it had...
  • North Korea missile tests didn't fail, US military says in revised report

    08/26/2017 2:31:15 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    fox news ^ | Published August 25, 2017
    According to earlier reports, U.S. Pacific Command spokesman and Cmdr. David Benham suggested two North Korean missiles "failed in flight" while the third one had "blown up almost immediately." The U.S. Pacific Command has since revised its evaluation of the missile launch, now reporting no missile failures -- in line with the South Korean military assessment.