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Keyword: cloning

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  • Gruesome mammoth 'kill site' discovered

    09/09/2018 12:22:53 PM PDT · by ETL · 52 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Sept 7, 2018 | James Rogers
    Archaeologists in Austria have uncovered a gruesome ‘kill site’ where Stone Age people slaughtered mammoths. The site, which was found during construction of a new bypass in Drasenhofen on the Czech border, contains mammoth tusks and bones. The remains have been dated to between 18,000 and 28,000 years ago. “This Paleolithic 'kill site' is the first one in Austria that has been excavated and analyzed according to the latest methods,” said Martin Krenn of Austria’s Federal Monuments Office, in a statement. “It gives us a sensational view of the way of life of the Palaeolithic people.”  An early Bronze Age settlement...
  • Scientists want to clone this extinct, frozen prehistoric horse

    09/06/2018 11:25:20 AM PDT · by ETL · 21 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Sept 6, 2018 | James Rogers
    Scientists are analyzing the perfectly preserved remains of a prehistoric horse in a bid to clone the now-extinct animal. Recently discovered in permafrost in the Siberian region of Yakutia, the skin, hair, hooves and tail of the carcass are all preserved. The remains are estimated to be 30,000 to 40,000 years old. Experts believe that the foal was about 2 months old when it died. Semyon Grigoryev, head of the Mammoth Museum in the regional capital of Yakutsk, was surprised to see the perfect state of the find. He noted it's the best-preserved ancient foal found to date. The Siberian...
  • Scientists take samples in bid to clone extinct ancient foal as ‘first step’ to ...woolly mammoth

    09/05/2018 6:52:16 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    The frozen carcass of the dark-brown baby horse is from an extinct species is up to 40,000 years old, and the animal was perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost in the Batagai crater in Yakutia, the coldest region in Russia. Leading researcher of the laboratory of Mammoth Museum Dr Semyon Grigoriev said: 'Fortunately, the animal's muscle tissues were undamaged and well preserved, so we managed to get samples of this unique find for biotechnology research.' South Korean cloning expert Professor Hwang Woo Suk, currently in Yakutsk, told The Siberian Times that a joint bid is underway to find a living...
  • World's most cloned dog 'Miracle Milly' has been copied 49 times by scientists ...

    07/06/2018 1:41:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 15:43 EDT, 6 July 2018 | By Joe Pinkstone
    World's most cloned dog 'Miracle Milly' has been copied 49 times by scientists in a bid to find the reason behind her record-breaking tiny size The dog, named 'Miracle Milly', weighed less than one ounce at birth She has become a global sensation, with more than 300,000 followers online Because of her diminutive stature, she was cloned a record 49 number of times Milly now stands less than 10cm (3.8in) tall and weighs the same as a large apple The smallest dog on the planet has been cloned a record-breaking 49 times – making her a two-time world record holder....
  • Cloning horror: Human clone fears as Euro scientists CREATE LIFE from ‘nothing’

    05/03/2018 6:35:45 AM PDT · by plain talk · 61 replies
    Express ^ | May 3, 2018 | Carly Read
    The experimental research combined two types of stem cells and created a viable embryo – which the team say would provide an unlimited stock for medical research. The created embryos would also be used for medical treatment testing and help shed light on one of the biggest infertility enigmas - why embryos fail to implant in the womb. However critics say it is a huge step towards human cloning. The researchers believe the wonder creation could see mice being cloned in three years time, and humans two decades later.
  • This Lab Will Clone Your Pet for $50K. Would You Do It?

    01/30/2018 5:47:02 AM PST · by C19fan · 32 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | January 30, 2018 | Jen Reeder
    Amy Vangemert shared a special bond with her dog, Buhner. But as her beloved toy poodle aged, the Washington resident began dreading his death. So when Buhner was 12 years old, Vangemert and her husband paid $50,000 to clone their dog.
  • Dolly the sheep health fears 'unfounded'

    11/23/2017 9:05:28 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    BBC ^ | 23 November 2017 | Helen Briggs
    Concerns that Dolly the cloned sheep suffered from early-onset arthritis were unfounded, a study suggests. In fact, wear-and-tear in her joints was similar to that of other sheep of her age, regardless of how they were conceived, say researchers. Dolly, the first mammal cloned from an adult cell, made countless headlines during her lifetime. She came under close scrutiny, due to fears that cloned animals might develop health problems or age prematurely. Researchers at the University of Nottingham, have re-examined her skeleton. "We felt we needed to set the record straight - how bad was Dolly?'' said Prof Kevin Sinclair....
  • Extinct Cave Lion in Perfect Condition Raises Hopes for Cloning.

    11/16/2017 10:22:05 AM PST · by wildbill · 86 replies
    Ancient Origens Magazine ^ | 11/11/2017 | Siberian Reporter
    A prehistoric lion cub has been found in permafrost on the bank of Tirekhtykh River of the Abyisky district of Yakutia by local resident Boris Berezhnov. The young beast's head was resting on a paw in frozen ground for up to 50,000 years, as shown in these amazing first pictures. The preservation is so good that it raises hopes of cloning the species back to life, he said. The discovery is seen as better preserved than two tiny cave lion cubs found in the same Siberian region in 2015.
  • 20 Years After Dolly the Sheep, What Have We Learned About Cloning?

    02/23/2017 9:38:51 AM PST · by Mozilla · 28 replies
    Live Science ^ | 2/23/17 | Stephanie Bucklin, Live Science Contributor
    Yesterday marked the 20th anniversary of the announcement of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal cloned from an adult cell. Her creation left a lasting impact on both the public and the field of developmental biology, experts say. Although Dolly was born in July 1996, Researchers announced Dolly's existence on Feb. 22, 1997. The delay in the announcement was due to the time needed to amass sufficient data on the project, check the data, write and get the manuscript published, said Bruce Whitelaw, the head of the Division of Developmental Biology at the Roslin Institute. Dolly died in February 2003,...
  • Woolly mammoth on verge of resurrection, scientists reveal

    02/16/2017 11:16:20 AM PST · by C19fan · 55 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | February 16, 2017 | Hannah Devlin
    The woolly mammoth vanished from the Earth 4,000 years ago, but now scientists say they are on the brink of resurrecting the ancient beast in a revised form, through an ambitious feat of genetic engineering. Speaking ahead of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Boston this week, the scientist leading the “de-extinction” effort said the Harvard team is just two years away from creating a hybrid embryo, in which mammoth traits would be programmed into an Asian elephant.
  • Portrait of a U.S. Vigilante in Afghanistan

    07/11/2004 11:40:35 AM PDT · by Archangelsk · 8 replies · 927+ views
    NY Times ^ | 071104 | By DAVID ROHDE
    KABUL, Afghanistan, July 10 - Journalists remember him as Jack, an eccentric, heavily armed and at times, it seemed, dangerously unbalanced, middle-aged former American Special Forces soldier, who appeared in Afghanistan in the fall of 2001. Surrounded by armed Afghan guards and rumors that he worked for the Central Intelligence Agency, he quickly rose to prominence. In the next two years, he was interviewed by Fox and CBS News, helped write a book called "The Hunt for bin Laden" and said he had discovered evidence in Afghanistan that linked Iraq to Al Qaeda. This week, Jack, a convicted felon...
  • 'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

    07/26/2016 8:07:31 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    npr.org ^ | July 26, 201611:04 AM ET | Rae Ellen Bichell
    About four years ago, Kevin Sinclair inherited an army of clones. Very fluffy clones. "Daisy, Debbie, Denise and Diana," says Sinclair, a developmental biologist at the University of Nottingham in England. The sheep are just four of 13 clones that Sinclair shepherds, but they're the most famous because of their relation to Dolly, the sheep that made headlines two decades ago as the first successfully cloned mammal. " 'Sister clones' probably best describes them," Sinclair says. "They actually come from the exactly the same batch of cells that Dolly came from." Recently, Sinclair and his colleagues celebrated the sister clones'...
  • Scientists talk privately about Creating a Synthetic Human Genome

    05/13/2016 8:45:13 PM PDT · by plain talk · 42 replies
    NY Times ^ | May 13, 2016 | Andrew Pollack
    Scientists are now contemplating the fabrication of a human genome, meaning they would use chemicals to manufacture all the DNA contained in human chromosomes.
  • Chimeras, Werewolves, and Pigmen Oh My! Science Stranger than Fiction

    05/05/2016 10:47:12 AM PDT · by Stand Up For America Today · 12 replies
    Stand Up For America Today ^ | 5/5/2016 | AJ Watson
    For those of us who remember bits and pieces of Greek mythology, or who play lots of role playing video games, a Chimera was a monstrous hybrid creature often depicted as part lion, part goat, and part snake. In today’s world however Chimeras are very real and in this writer’s humble opinion, very disturbing. The word Chimera today refers most often to animals that are gene spliced with other animals creating a kind of hybrid species. As if this attempt at playing God isn’t alarming enough, human cells are being added to pigs, sheep, goats, mice, and other animals that...
  • Jurrasic lion park? We’re apparently going to try to revive extinct cave lions

    04/21/2016 9:15:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 32 replies
    Hot Air ^ | April 21, 2016 | Jazz Shaw
    This is some news that actually cropped up last month which caught my eye, but we haven’t gotten a chance to circle back to it until now. If you’re in the market for one of the more exotic pet options out there you may have the chance to look into getting yourself a Panthera Leo Spelaea, better known as the Eurasian cave lion. Under most circumstances this would seem like a bit of a tall order because the big cat has been extinct for more than 12,000 years. (Some time during the end of the last ice age.) Up until...
  • China ‘clone factory’ scientist eyes human replication

    12/02/2015 4:11:54 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Live Mint ^ | December 2, 2015
    Beijing: The Chinese scientist behind the world’s biggest cloning factory has technology advanced enough to replicate humans, he told AFP, and is only holding off for fear of the public reaction. Boyalife Group and its partners are building the giant plant in the northern Chinese port of Tianjin, where it is due to go into production within the next seven months and aims for an output of one million cloned cows a year by 2020. But cattle are only the beginning of chief executive Xu Xiaochun’s ambitions....
  • Woolly Mammoth Clones Closer Than Ever, Thanks to Genome Sequencing

    07/05/2015 7:03:27 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 23 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07/03/2015 | by Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
    Scientists are one step closer to bringing a woolly mammoth back to life. A new analysis of the woolly mammoth genome has revealed several adaptations that allowed the furry beasts to thrive in the subzero temperatures of the last ice age, including a metabolism that allowed them to pack on insulating fat, smaller ears that lost less heat and a reduced sensitivity to cold. The findings could enable researchers to "resurrect" the ice-age icon — or at least a hybridized Asian elephant with a few of the physical traits of its woolly-haired cousin, said study co-author Vincent Lynch, an evolutionary...
  • BOFFIN: Will I soon be able to CLONE a MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? NO

    07/04/2015 1:40:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | ,3 Jul 2015 at 09:28, | Lewis Page
    It will definitely be possible within the foreseeable future to bring back the long-extinct woolly mammoth, a top geneticist has said. However, in his regretful opinion such a resurrection should not be carried out. The assertion comes in the wake of a new study of mammoth genetics as compared to their cousins the Asian and African elephants, which live in warm habitats very different from the icy northern realms of the woolly giant. The new study offers boffins many revelations as to the differences which let the elephants and mammoths survive in such different conditions. “This is by far the...
  • Lab-Grown Burgers Become So Cheap, They Might be in Supermarkets Soon

    04/10/2015 7:44:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 48 replies
    Sputnik International ^ | April 7, 2015
    Scientists in the Netherlands are one step closer to producing a viable lab-grown alternative to the conventional beef burger patty. Last year, Professor Mark Post and his team of scientists at the Maastricht University in the Netherlands produced the first prototype of a lab-grown burger. Benefits of this new burger production method include a decrease in animal slaughter, savings in land, water, and energy use required for livestock, and a reduction in greenhouse gases. The project has faced several hurdles, though, not the least of which was the enormous price tag of 250,000 Euros, or $273,000. That was roughly how...
  • Scientists Take DNA Sample From Woolly Mammoth Leg for Cloning Project

    03/17/2015 10:56:20 AM PDT · by C19fan · 66 replies
    NBC News ^ | March 16, 2015 | Devin Coldewey
    A group of Russian and South Korean researchers has begun their attempt to clone a woolly mammoth, starting by extracting DNA from a spectacularly well-preserved specimen discovered in the Siberian permafrot in 2013. The project is led by Hwang Woo-Suk, a Korean cloning scientist who was the focus of a scandal in 2006 involving fraudulent research on human stem cells. Hwang has had success with animals, however, reportedly creating the world's first cloned dog and several cloned coyotes.