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Keyword: cosmicrays

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  • Sun set for 11-year magnetic pole flip

    10/07/2013 9:31:58 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 36 replies
    Times of India ^ | Oct 7, 2013, 05.18 AM IST | Amit Bhattacharya, TNN
    NEW DELHI: A special event is about to occur in our sun, and it could impact our lives. The magnetic poles of the sun — which are like the ends of a giant bar magnet — are about to flip, that is, the polar north will become the polar south and vice versa. According to scientists at the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University , the sun could be barely two to three months away from this magnetic field reversal. The change is periodic, taking place once every 11 years or so. The flip also corresponds with peak activity during...
  • Source of High-Energy Cosmic Rays Nailed at Last

    02/14/2013 5:06:17 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 14 February 2013 | Daniel Clery
    Enlarge Image Ray maker. The "Jellyfish nebula" (IC 443) and another supernova remnant gave researchers firm evidence that cosmic rays come from exploding stars. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA For the past century, physicists have puzzled over cosmic rays, particles (mostly protons) that hurtle through space at high speed and seem to come from all directions equally. What's the source of these galactic projectiles? And how do they come to be traveling so fast? Today, an international team announced a major step toward answering those questions: conclusive evidence that at least some of the cosmic rays come from supernova remnants—expanding shells of...
  • Sun Is Moving Slower Than Thought

    05/14/2012 3:47:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | May 10, 2012 | Andrew Fazekas
    The sun is moving through the Milky Way slower than previously thought, according to new data from a NASA spacecraft. From its orbit around Earth, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) satellite measured the speeds of interstellar particles entering at the fringes of our solar system, 9 billion miles (14.5 billion kilometers) from the sun. Plugging the new data into computer models, the IBEX team calculates that the sun is moving at about 52,000 miles (83,700 kilometers) an hour -- about 7,000 miles (11,000 kilometers) slower than thought. The discovery suggests that the protective boundary separating our solar system from the...
  • New Link From Supernova to Life on Earth?

    05/02/2012 10:21:22 AM PDT · by Twotone · 36 replies
    54°40’ Or Fight! ^ | May 2, 2012 | Devon Watkins
    Through the Royal Astronomical Society in London the Danish scientist Henrik Svensmark released new scientific evidence in the last week that has not yet hit the mass media. This new examination could revolutionize the way that we view our world’s climate and even the history of life on Earth. Professor Svensmark examined the history of how supernova’s close to our solar system occurred over the last 500 million years. He compared this supernova history to our well known history of the number of different species on Earth over that same time period and found a remarkable correlation.
  • CERN experiment confirms cosmic ray action (The global warmists’ dam breaks)

    09/07/2011 8:16:54 AM PDT · by Texas Fossil · 24 replies
    Calder's Updates ^ | 8-24-2011 | Nigel Calder, Jasper Kirkby
    Calder's Updates Nigel Calder takes the pulse of science, as the author of Magic Universe and Einstein's Universe. He checks predictions of the past half-century, to see how they worked out. And his hand is on the brow of frenzied climatology, as a co-author of The Chilling Stars: A Cosmic View of Climate Change.   CERN experiment confirms cosmic ray action Climate Change – News and CommentsThe global warmists’ dam breaks A graph they'd prefer you not to notice. Tucked away near the end of online supplementary material, and omitted from the printed CLOUD paper in Nature, it clearly shows...
  • The climate just turned cold for non-physicists

    09/06/2011 7:14:57 PM PDT · by Coleus · 18 replies
    Star Ledger ^ | 09.06.2009 | Paul Mulshine
    Henrik Svensmark on Global Warming (part 1)Question: What could a climate scientist bring to the debate among physicists over the interaction of cosmic rays with the Earth’s atmosphere? Answer: the coffee. Physicists have long maintained that the question of climate change was properly within the realm of physics rather than that of those glorified weathermen who call themselves “climatologists.” Last week we got confirmation of that. It came in the form of a study by physicists in Switzerland .  The study, which was published in the prestigious peer-reviewed science publication Nature, gave support to an alternative theory of climate change...
  • Nature Journal of Science Discredits Man-made Global Warming

    09/06/2011 5:31:32 PM PDT · by saganite · 58 replies
    biggovernment.com ^ | 6 Sep 2011 | Chriss W. Street
    Nature Journal of Science, ranked as the world’s most cited scientific periodical, has just published the definitive study on Global Warming that proves the dominant controller of temperatures in the Earth’s atmosphere is due to galactic cosmic rays and the sun, rather than by man. One of the report’s authors, Professor Jyrki Kauppinen, summed up his conclusions regarding the potential for man-made Global Warming: “I think it is such a blatant falsification.” The research was conducted by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, which invented the World Wide Web, built the multi-billion dollar Large Hadron Collider, and now has...
  • The Slowly Dying Myth of Man Made Global Warming

    08/30/2011 11:03:07 AM PDT · by Sudetenland · 16 replies · 1+ views
    The Houston Conservative ^ | 8/30.2011 | Will Malven
    You can hear the desperation in their voices. The stridency of their attacks. The proponents of the failed theory of man made global warming see their golden-egg laying goose slowly being roasted. Al Gore calls skeptics "the new 'racists.'" Earlier this month, ManBearPig (Gore) launched into a tirade of obscene language attacking those who question his pet theory--a theory, by the way, which has made him quite wealthy--and before that, he compared skeptics to Nazis. Has he no shame? . . . Of course not, HE'S A LIBERAL. The degree of their stridency will tell you just how desperate the...
  • CERN: 'Climate models will need to be substantially revised'

    08/25/2011 5:33:40 AM PDT · by magellan · 45 replies
    The Register ^ | 25th August 2011 | Andrew Orlowski
    CERN's 8,000 scientists may not be able to find the hypothetical Higgs boson, but they have made an important contribution to climate physics, prompting climate models to be revised. The first results from the lab's CLOUD ("Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets") experiment published in Nature today confirm that cosmic rays spur the formation of clouds through ion-induced nucleation. Current thinking posits that half of the Earth's clouds are formed through nucleation. The paper is entitled Role of sulphuric acid, ammonia and galactic cosmic rays in atmospheric aerosol nucleation. This has significant implications for climate science because water vapour and clouds play...
  • Mystery Cosmic Rays Zapping South Pole......

    05/05/2011 1:53:55 PM PDT · by TaraP · 19 replies
    Daily Galaxy ^ | May 5th, 2011
    Mystery Cosmic Rays Zapping South Pole -- "From the Neutron Star of the Vela Supernova?" Cosmic rays zapping the Earth over the South Pole appear to be coming from particular locations, rather than being distributed uniformly across the sky. Cosmic ray "hotspots" have also been seen in the northern skies too, yet there is no source close enough to produce this strange pattern.... We don't know where they are coming from," says Stefan Westerhoff of the University of Wisconsin, who used the IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole with a team of colleagues to create the most comprehensive map...
  • 'Telescope' buried a mile under the Antarctic ice to find source of cosmic rays

    10/18/2010 6:44:01 AM PDT · by LucyT · 18 replies
    Telegraph.co.uk ^ | 18 Oct 2010 | Richard Gray, Science Correspondent
    A "telescope" buried deep under Antarctic ice has detected the first signals that scientists hope will allow them to identify the source of mysterious particles that bombard Earth from outer space. For the past ten years scientists have been planning and building an ambitious experiment to explain the mystery of what produces the cosmic rays and elusive particles known as neutrinos, which constantly pepper our planet. more at Telegraph.co.UK
  • The Mystery of the Rocketing Particles That Shouldn't Exist

    06/10/2010 6:32:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 521+ views
    Discover mag ^ | April 2010 issue | Andrew Grant
    From deep space, cosmic rays come fast and pack a heck of a punch. They may also carry clues to the most vexing mysteries in the universe. Nothing on the tree-less plains of western Argentina seems to expend much energy. Cattle stand nearly motionless as they graze on the thin grass, which grows slowly in the dry heat and high altitude. A cylindrical water tank with a small solar panel and a skyward-facing antenna sits unobtrusively in the nearly motionless landscape. But hidden within this scene is plenty of drama. At any given moment, millions of projectiles from deep space...
  • Environmentalist Blame Sun for Global Warming

    03/23/2010 10:34:30 AM PDT · by Comedylover · 39 replies · 946+ views
    A group of environmental scientists and the United Nations has discovered the sun is causing much of the global warming we experience today. “We’ve suspected this for some time,” said IPCC regular contributor Gordy Columbo. “But there was no way to prove it. Now we can.” The scientists checked the temperature of the atmosphere in the daylight, when the sun was shining, and at night, when the sun was not. Amazingly, they found the daylight temperatures to be much warmer.
  • On CLOUD nine [Important Experiment on Cloud Cover Effects of Sun's Cosmic Rays]

    02/07/2010 1:49:58 PM PST · by Enchante · 20 replies · 554+ views
    CERN: European Center for Nuclear Research ^ | Mon 08 Jun 2009 | CERN Staff
    The CLOUD team will be able to recreate the conditions of any part of the atmosphere inside the new chamber, from the polar stratosphere to the low level tropics. The link between cosmic rays and climate change is one that has been hotly debated over the past decade, grabbing the attention of the media. The idea revolves around the possibility that particles entering the atmosphere from space can affect cloud formation, which in turn affects the climate. But despite the controversy surrounding the theory, the central question – ‘do cosmic rays help create clouds?’ – has barely been tested in...
  • Five Decades Of Cooling Ahead

    12/24/2009 3:44:23 PM PST · by raptor22 · 86 replies · 4,041+ views
    Investors.com ^ | December 24, 2009 | INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY staff
    Climate Change: A peer-reviewed study by a respected Canadian physicist blames the interplay of cosmic rays and chlorofluorocarbons for 20th-century warming. The CFCs are now gone, and so is warming — perhaps for the next 50 years. Much of the nation got a white Christmas this year, some in unprecedented quantities. A record-breaking storm deposited 12 to 30 inches of snow in Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. Many places set records for the most snow in a single December day as more than 50% of the U.S. was covered by the white stuff. Scientists (and here we use the word...
  • Henrik Svensmark on Global Warming (video)

    12/15/2009 8:23:27 PM PST · by MetaThought · 5 replies · 398+ views
    Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5
  • Cosmic Rays Help Trees Grow Big and Strong

    10/21/2009 9:08:59 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies · 519+ views
    Daily Tech ^ | October 21, 2009 1:26 PM | Jason Mick (Blog)
    Turns out a little radiation is good for you -- if you're a tree at least Scientists have discovered that tree growth appears to be spurred by increased amounts of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). (Source: Sigrid Dengel) Scientists often see the need to confirm what we already know.  For example, every 11-year-old (or 41-year-old) comic book fan living with their parents knows radiation makes organisms grow bigger and stronger.  However, for those who don't read comics or have hyperactive imaginations, that presumption turns out to be somewhat true -- for trees at least. A new study from the University of...
  • Galactic cosmic rays hit 50-year high (Global warming obfuscation/agitprop sans byline)

    09/30/2009 8:32:03 PM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies · 1,146+ views
    MSNBC ^ | Sept . 29, 2009 | NA
    Increase means NASA may need to rethink astronauts’ radiation shielding Galactic cosmic rays have just hit a Space Age high, new data from a NASA spacecraft indicates. "In 2009, cosmic ray intensities have increased 19 percent beyond anything we've seen in the past 50 years," said Richard Mewaldt of Caltech. "The increase is significant, and it could mean we need to re-think how much radiation shielding astronauts take with them on deep-space missions." The surge, which poses no threat to Earth, was detected by NASA's ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) spacecraft. The cause of the surge is solar minimum, a deep...
  • Correlation demonstrated between cosmic rays and temperature of the stratosphere

    01/23/2009 11:14:46 PM PST · by neverdem · 28 replies · 407+ views
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | 2009/01/22 | Anthony Watts
    This offers renewed hope for Svensmark’s theory of cosmic ray modulation of earth’s cloud cover. Here is an interesting correlation published just yesterday in GRL. Cosmic rays detected deep underground reveal secrets of the upper atmosphere Watch the video animation here (MPEG video will play in your media player) Published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters and led by scientists from the UK’s National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), this remarkable study shows how the number of high-energy cosmic-rays reaching a detector deep underground, closely matches temperature measurements in the upper atmosphere...
  • Cosmic-ray hot spots puzzle researchers - Proton discovery may cast doubt on dark-matter...

    11/29/2008 1:24:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 17 replies · 942+ views
    Nature News ^ | 26 November 2008 | Philip Ball
    Proton discovery may cast doubt on dark-matter theories. The Milagro detector has seen cosmic-ray hot-spots.Milagro / U. Maryland / LANL Hot on the heels of speculation that cosmic rays may have revealed the signature of elusive dark matter in space, new observations could challenge that idea and reinforce an alternative explanation.A seven-year-long experiment at the Milagro cosmic-ray detector near Los Alamos, New Mexico, has revealed 'bright patches' of high-energy cosmic rays in the sky1 – something incompatible with a dark-matter source.Cosmic rays are charged particles, mostly protons and electrons, that are produced in space and generally have a characteristic energy...
  • Solar Activity, Earth's Magnetic Field and Galactic Cosmic Rays Affect Climate

    11/12/2007 10:07:52 PM PST · by Robert A. Cook, PE · 48 replies · 524+ views
    CO2Science.org ^ | 20 June 2007 | Dergachev, V.A., Dmitriev, P.B., Raspopov, O.M. and Jungner, H.
    References: Dergachev, V.A., Dmitriev, P.B., Raspopov, O.M. and Jungner, H. 2006. Cosmic ray flux variations, modulated by the solar and earth's magnetic fields, and climate changes. 1. Time interval from the present to 10-12 ka ago (the Holocene Epoch). Geomagnetizm i Aeronomiya 46: 123-134. What was done The authors review what they deem to be the salient features of the interacting effects of variations in solar activity and earth's magnetic field on the flux of galactic cosmic rays, together with the likelihood of their potential impact on earth's climate, based on "direct and indirect data on variations in cosmic rays,...
  • Political Science (Global Warming)

    02/03/2007 3:28:13 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 40 replies · 1,160+ views
    Wall Street Journal ^ | February 3, 2007 | Philip Stott
    I confess I was afflicted by a profound world-weariness following the release yesterday of the latest gloomy machinations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The U.N.'s global-warming caravanserai, founded in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Program, had this time pitched camp in Paris, in order to issue the "Summary for Policy Makers" relating to Working Group One of its "Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007." This is the group that focuses on "The Physical Science Basis" of climate change, and its summary was greeted with the usual razzmatazz, the Eiffel Tower's 20,000...
  • Cosmic Rays Linked to Global Warming

    10/24/2006 7:42:17 PM PDT · by Freeport · 38 replies · 842+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 23 October 2006 | Sara Goudarzi
    Earth's recent warming trend might in part be due to a lack of starlight reaching our planet, a new study suggests. But other scientists are not so sure. According to a theory proposed a decade ago, when a star explodes far away in the Milky Way, cosmic rays—high-speed atomic particles—go through the Earth’s atmosphere and produce ions and free electrons. The released electrons act as catalysts and accelerate the formation of small clusters of sulfuric acid and water molecules, the building blocks of clouds. Therefore, cosmic rays would increase cloud cover on Earth, reflecting sunlight and keeping the planet relatively...
  • Surprises from the Edge of the Solar System

    09/21/2006 2:38:20 PM PDT · by Pete from Shawnee Mission · 48 replies · 1,893+ views
    NASA Headlines ^ | 9-21-06 | Dr. Tony Phillips
    Sept. 21, 2006: Almost every day, the great antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network turn to a blank patch of sky in the constellation Ophiuchus. Pointing at nothing, or so it seems, they invariably pick up a signal, faint but full of intelligence. The source is beyond Neptune, beyond Pluto, on the verge of the stars themselves. It's Voyager 1. The spacecraft left Earth in 1977 on a mission to visit Jupiter and Saturn. Almost 30 years later, with the gas giants long ago seen and done, Voyager 1 is still going and encountering some strange things....
  • Cosmic rays set climate change on Earth, expert says - Scientist challenges greenhouse-gas theory

    03/20/2006 11:45:53 AM PST · by Daralundy · 40 replies · 1,258+ views
    Edmonton Journal via canada.com ^ | March 16, 2006 | Tom Spears
    OTTAWA - Stars, not greenhouse gases, are heating up the Earth. So says prominent University of Ottawa science professor Jan Veizer. He knows challenging the accepted climate-change theory may lead to a nasty fight. It's a politically and economically loaded topic. Yet, he is speaking out about his published research. "Look, maybe I'm wrong," he said. "But I'm saying, at least let's look at this and discuss it. "Every one of these things (parts of his theory) has its problems. But so does every other model" of how Earth's climate behaves. Veizer says high-energy rays from distant parts of space...
  • Scientists Close in on Source of Cosmic Rays

    11/03/2004 9:07:26 PM PST · by RightWingAtheist · 13 replies · 535+ views
    Science-Reuters via Yahoo ^ | Nov 3 2004 | Unknown
    LONDON (Reuters) - An international team of astronomers believe they have solved a mystery that has been perplexing scientists for 100 years -- the origin of cosmic rays. Scientists first discovered the energetic particles that bombard the Earth nearly a century ago but where they come from has been one of the big questions in astrophysics. Using an array of four telescopes in Africa, the scientists produced the first image showing that the source of cosmic rays could be the remnant of a supernova, a powerful explosion of a star at the end of its life. "This is the first...
  • Galactic dust cooling Earth?

    07/07/2003 6:14:04 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 24 replies · 356+ views
    Nature ^ | 8 July 2003 | TOM CLARKE
    Controversial climate claim exonerates carbon dioxide. The impact of cosmic rays on our climate might outweigh that of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, a controversial new report suggests1. "It's no excuse to ignore sensible resource use," says one of the report's authors, physicist Nir Shaviv of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel. "But the bottom line is that carbon dioxide is not the bad boy that people claim it is." The suggestion has met with scepticism, however: "I don't buy it," says climate-change expert Wallace Broecker of Columbia University in New York. Shaviv and climatologist Ján Veizer of...
  • Shuttle breakup occurred in mysterious part of atmosphere

    02/07/2003 5:12:19 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 39 replies · 356+ views
    SJ Mercury News ^ | 2/7/03 | Matthew Fordahl - AP
    <p>SAN JOSE, Calif.(AP) - The space shuttle Columbia broke up in a mysterious area of the upper atmosphere once so little understood and difficult to study that scientists dubbed it the "ignorosphere."</p> <p>On Friday, NASA said it has asked outside atmospheric scientists for their opinion on whether some sort of electrical discharge could have occurred as the shuttle screamed toward touchdown at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.</p>
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 3-15-02

    03/14/2002 9:44:54 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 2 replies · 273+ views
    NASA ^ | 3-15-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 March 15 Neutron Mars Credit: Mars Odyssey, GRS Team, ASU/LPL, NASA Explanation: Looking for water on Mars, researchers using detectors on board the orbiting Mars Odyssey spacecraft have created this false-color global map of energetic neutrons from the otherwise Red Planet. What do neutrons have to do with water? As cosmic rays from interplanetary space penetrate the thin martian atmosphere and reach the surface they interact with...