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Keyword: cretaceous

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  • Amazon River Once Flowed in Opposite Direction

    10/24/2006 9:54:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 505+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | October 24, 2006 | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Russell Mapes, a graduate student from Grass Valley, Calif., ...explains that these sediments of eastern origin were washed down from a highland area that formed in the Cretaceous Period, between 65 million and 145 million years ago, when the South American and African tectonic plates separated and passed each other. That highland tilted the river's flow westward, sending sediment as old as 2 billion years toward the center of the continent. A relatively low ridge, called the Purus Arch, which still exists, rose in the middle of the continent, running north and south, dividing the Amazon's flow - eastward toward...
  • The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs almost got us, too

    06/29/2016 10:26:05 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 30 replies
    THE WEEK ^ | June 28, 2016 | Joshua A. Krisch
    The age of the dinosaurs ended 66 million years ago, when an asteroid six miles in diameter crashed into what is now southeastern Mexico. The world went up in flames. Dinosaurs, along with the massive reptiles that ruled the sea and the sky, perished as forest fires raged across the globe, dust blotted out the sun, and Earth experienced intense heat, frigid cooling, and then more heat. Conventional wisdom states that mammalian diversity emerged from the ashes of the mass extinction, ultimately giving rise to our own humble species. But according to a study in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology,...
  • New Cretaceous Fossils Shed Light On The Early Evolution Of Ants

    06/18/2016 2:33:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | May 30, 2016 | Current Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    The vast majority of Cretaceous ants belong to stem-group Formicidae and comprise workers and reproductives of largely generalized morphologies... recent discoveries from the Cretaceous suggest relatively advanced social levels. Remarkable exceptions to this pattern of generalized morphologies are ants with bizarre mouthparts in which both female castes have modified heads and bladelike mandibles that uniquely move in a horizontal rather than vertical plane... with the mandibles apparently acting as traps triggered by sensory hairs in a way distinct from that of modern trap-jaw ants... some of the most effective predatory ants are solitary hunters with powerful trap jaws... Dr. WANG...
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Unusual 'sail-backed' dinosaur roamed Spain 125 million years ago

    12/16/2015 7:34:46 PM PST · by EveningStar · 37 replies
    Reuters ^ | December 16, 2015 | Will Dunham
    Along a lush river delta in what is now northeastern Spain, a herd of dinosaurs munched on ferns and conifers similar to modern-day cypresses 125 million years ago. These creatures stood out from the others in this Cretaceous Period landscape by virtue of the unusual sail-like structure on their backs, and experts today can only hypothesize about its function.
  • Influence of Earth's history on the dawn of modern birds

    12/13/2015 11:06:28 AM PST · by JimSEA · 25 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/11/2015 | American Museum of Natural History
    New research led by the American Museum of Natural History reveals that the evolution of modern birds was greatly shaped by the history of our planet's geography and climate. The DNA-based work, published today in the journal Science Advances, finds that birds arose in what is now South America around 90 million years ago, and radiated extensively around the time of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that killed off the non-avian dinosaurs. The new research suggests that birds in South America survived this event and then started moving to other parts of the world via multiple land bridges while diversifying during...
  • Now that really IS a mutant turtle: Archaeologists find bizarre pig snouted created once roamed Utah

    10/22/2015 5:15:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | October 21, 2015 | Mark Prigg
    The extinct turtle was about 2 feet long from head to tail. Its streamlined shell was adapted for living in a riverine environment. When it was alive, 76 million years ago during the Cretaceous Period, Southern Utah looked more like present-day Louisiana. The climate was wet and hot, and the landscape was dominated by rivers, bayous and lowland flood plains. It lived alongside tyrannosaurs, armored ankylosaurs, giant duck-billed dinosaurs such as Gryposaurus and Parasaurolophus, and other dinosaurs that left abundant fossil remains in the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Southern Utah. But those fossil beds also hold the remains of...
  • 125-million-year-old mammal fossil reveals the early evolution of hair and spines

    10/20/2015 10:47:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 14, 2015 | Provided by: University of Chicago Medical Center
    Skeleton of the Cretaceous mammal Spinolestes with preserved fur shadows. The outer ear can be seen at the upper edge of the photo (arrow). During preparation, the skeleton was transferred to a plastic matrix. Credit: Georg Oleschinski. With permission of Nature Publishing Group ====================================================================================================================== The discovery of a new 125-million-year-old fossil mammal in Spain has pushed back the earliest record of preserved mammalian hair structures and inner organs by more than 60 million years. The specimen, named Spinolestes xenarthrosus, was fossilized with remarkably intact guard hairs, underfur, tiny hedgehog-like spines and even evidence of a fungal hair infection. The unusually...
  • Dinosaur egg treasure trove found in Japan

    07/15/2015 9:53:12 AM PDT · by ETL · 17 replies
    FoxNews - Science ^ | July 14, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    Researchers have discovered fragments of fossilized dinosaur eggs in Southern Japan, according to a June 29 report in the journal Cretaceous Research. The 90 eggshell fragments once housed five different types of dinosaurs, all of them small. “We know from the eggshells that small dinosaurs were roaming Japan’s landscape in the Cretaceous Period [65 to 145 million years ago],” Darla Zelenitsky, an assistant professor of paleontology at the University of Calgary and study co-author, told Foxnews.com. “Many of the bones known from Japan are from larger dinosaurs, but we now know (from the eggshells) that small dinosaurs were also an...
  • Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood (46 Million Years OLD)

    10/14/2013 8:54:39 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies
    BI ^ | 10-14-2013 | Jennifer Welsh
    Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood Jennifer Welsh Oct. 14, 2013, 5:37 PMBlood engorged mosquito Researchers have just published an exciting find: a 46-million-year-old mosquito full of blood. Next stop "Jurassic Park"? Not so fast. The find is really interesting because it's the first example of blood-feeding in these ancient insects. We hadn't had clear evidence of when this began until now. They found the mosquito in shale sediments in Montana. They first found the presence of iron in the female mosquito's belly, then used a non-destructive technique to study the molecules inside the find. They...
  • ‘Jurassic World’s Saturday Slips 20%, Putting Dino Pic On Course For $200M Weekend

    06/14/2015 6:43:40 AM PDT · by C19fan · 20 replies
    Deadline Hollywood ^ | June 13, 2015 | Anthony D'Alessandro and Anita Busch
    5th UPDATE, Saturday, 11:45PM: Industry calculations tonight are pointing toward an opening weekend of $200M for Universal’s Jurassic World, which would make it the second biggest domestic opening of all-time behind The Avengers’ $207.4M all-time title. After posting a $83M Friday, JW‘s Saturday is coming in precisely where most expected it to be, down 20% from Friday, putting the second day for the dino redux at $66.8M. Most think Sunday will decline another 22%. By the time the fifth NBA final game airs tomorrow night at 5PM PST/8PM EST, the thinking is that it won’t taser the dinosaurs’ momentum. The...
  • 'JURASSIC WORLD' BITES OFF BIGGEST GLOBAL DEBUT OF ALL TIME

    06/15/2015 5:52:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    AP ^ | June 14, 2015 | Lindsey Bahr
    Dinosaurs are anything but extinct at the box office. "Jurassic World," the fourth film in the series, became the highest global opener of all time with a staggering $511.8 million in its first days in theaters. It also devoured a number of domestic box office records with a $204.6 million take, the Rentrak media-measurement company estimated on Sunday.
  • A Dinosaur Name in ‘Jurassic World’ is So ‘Racist’ That the Movie Has Come Under Fire

    06/23/2015 8:25:57 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 27 replies
    IJ Review ^ | 6/23/15 | MADDIE BRADSHER
    “Jurassic World” was an instant box office hit when it opened in theaters two weeks ago. But now, moviegoers are noticing details that aren’t sitting well with some people. The uproar started when moviegoers began complaining about one of the dinosaur species in the movie called Pachycephalosaurus: The long name led to an abbreviation used by the characters, and thus the movie line that came into question: “The Pachys are out of containment!” British comedian Mobeen, also known as “Guzzy Bear,” took issue with this term and called for a boycott of “Jurassic World:” According to Focus News, the “Pachy”...
  • Jurassic World Called "Racist" Over Dinosaur Name

    06/21/2015 12:03:14 PM PDT · by rightistight · 76 replies
    The Social Memo ^ | 6/21/15 | Aurelius
    Some viewers of Jurassic World are taking offense to the film, calling one of the lines in the movie "racist." Specifically, the abbreviation of the dinosaur Pachycephalosaurus. During the course of the film, the Pachycephalosaurus escape from their enclosures, leading one character to shout, "The Pachys are out of containment!" This has led news outlets and Twitter users to call the film "racist." A British comedian originally brought attention to the line, offering a tongue-in-cheek rant against the dinosaur's name. However, people did not get the joke, and are actually calling the film racist. The Independent called the line "very...
  • Liberal Claim That Jurassic World Is Sexist Is Hilarious

    06/12/2015 4:36:58 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 44 replies
    I’m not sure if I’ll see Jurassic World but if I do, it will likely be for the reasons summed up by New York Post film critic Kyle Smith:
  • ‘Jurassic World’ Destroys Record for Global Box Office With $511 Million Debut

    06/14/2015 4:21:27 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 46 replies
    More than two decades after Steven Spielberg created a new era of the summer blockbuster with “Jurassic Park,” dinosaurs again ruled the Earth with “Jurassic World’s” $511.8 million worldwide opening — the best global rollout in history. It’s the first time a film has ever grossed more than $500 million in one weekend, and Universal and Legendary’s “Jurassic World” opened at No. 1 in all 66 foreign markets in which it debuted.
  • 'Jurassic World' Set to Bite Off $125M-Plus in U.S. Debut

    06/12/2015 1:42:57 PM PDT · by ETL · 38 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | June 9, 2015 | The Hollywood Reporter - Yahoo
    The dinosaurs are back, and they're looking more bad-ass than ever. Jurassic World — opening 22 years after Steven Spielberg's first Jurassic Park stomped into theaters — is tracking to open to $125 million or higher in its three-day North American debut, one of the best showings in recent times. It begins rolling out Thursday night before landing in a total of 4,273 theaters on Friday, the widest release in Universal's history. Overseas, the tentpole opens in 66 markets, including China. And it's getting the widest-ever day-and-date release in Imax houses, or more than 800 locations. In North America, even...
  • 'Jurassic World' Dinosaurs Stuck in the 1980s, Experts Grumble

    11/27/2014 10:48:23 AM PST · by EveningStar · 38 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 26, 2014 | Linda Qiu and Dan Vergano
    Who doesn't love a dinosaur flick? Well, paleontologists have a few fossil bones to pick with Jurassic World, the latest in a line of dinosaur movies that once bragged about its scientific credibility. The trailer for the new movie, a reboot of the popular 1990s Jurassic Park franchise, was released Tuesday and has already been viewed more than 14 million times on YouTube. Like the original movie, Jurassic World takes place in an island safari park, where tourists visit living dinosaurs cloned from ancient DNA—until one hybrid monster goes rogue. Despite global fervor among fans, dinosaur scientists are not thrilled...
  • Jurassic World (2015 Film)

    11/25/2014 7:10:19 PM PST · by EveningStar · 37 replies
    Multiple links in body of thread | November 25, 2014
    Jurassic World, the fourth film in the Jurassic Park series, is scheduled for release on June 12, 2015. Colin Trevorrow is the director and Steven Spielberg is one of the executive producers. The official trailer has been released and you can watch it here. More links: WikipediaIMDbWhy did Steven Spielberg invent a new dinosaur for Jurassic World?Official SiteUK SiteNewsFacebookTwitter Of course, many of the dinosaurs depicted in the Jurassic Park series lived in the Cretaceous period rather than the Jurassic period.
  • Pachycephalosaurus: Jurassic World’s ‘Racist’ Dinosaur

    06/24/2015 5:12:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Age: Extinct, since the Late Cretaceous. Appearance: Thick-headed dinosaur, hence the name, which means “thick-headed lizard”. Thick-headed as in stupid? Well, they weren’t clever, but it’s really because they had spiky, domed skulls to protect their tiny brains. They’re dinosaurs. What else are they like? Socially aggressive, accidentally racist. How can a dinosaur be racist? It’s due to their appearance in the blockbuster Jurassic World. From what I’ve seen, the dinosaurs in Jurassic World are equal-opportunity devourers. True, but early on in the film, after some pachycephalosauruses have escaped their sector, a character utters the line: “The pachys are out...
  • Ocean hot in days of dinosaurs, study finds

    02/18/2006 7:38:53 AM PST · by worldclass · 43 replies · 935+ views
    Sometimes we make that first dash into the ocean on summer vacation and happily announce, "It's warm as bathwater." But a new study based on ancient sediments collected off South America indicates that the tropical Atlantic Ocean really did hit temperatures as high as 107 degrees Fahrenheit back when dinosaurs ruled. The finding, reported Friday by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, also estimates that carbon dioxide made up as much as six times more of the atmosphere at that time than it does today.
  • Dinosaur footprint found in Alaska national park

    07/06/2005 1:37:52 AM PDT · by phoenix_004 · 11 replies · 464+ views
    Reuters ^ | Jul 5, 2005
    A recently discovered fossilized footprint shows that dinosaurs once roamed in what is now a national park in Alaska, scientists said on Tuesday. The footprint, estimated to be 70 million years old, was discovered on June 27, the first evidence of dinosaurs ever found in Denali National Park and Preserve, the National Park Service said. The find was made by a University of Alaska Fairbanks student attending a field camp in the park. The three-toed track, six inches wide and nine inches long, appears to be from the left foot of a therapod, a class of two-legged predators, said Anthony...
  • Rapid short-term cooling following the Chicxulub impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

    05/19/2014 4:31:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    PNAS.org ^ | approved April 11, 2014 | Johan Vellekoop et al
    Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), we are able to demonstrate unambiguously that the impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (K–Pg, ∼66 Mya) was followed by a so-called “impact winter.” This impact winter was the result of the injection of large amounts of dust and aerosols into the stratosphere and significantly reduced incoming solar radiation for decades. Therefore, this phase will have been a key contributory element in the extinctions of many biological clades, including the dinosaurs. The K–Pg boundary impact presents a unique event in Earth history because it caused global change at an unparalleled rate. This detailed...
  • Collision in the Asteroid Belt?

    02/03/2010 10:09:08 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 16 replies · 764+ views
    Centauri Dreams ^ | 2/3/10 | Paul Gilster
    Collisions between asteroids should be highly energetic affairs, with an average impact speed of close to 5 kilometers per second. We may be looking at the debris of a head-on collision between two asteroids in imagery provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The object in question, originally thought to have been a comet, is P/2010 A2, discovered by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) sky survey on January 6 of this year. The follow-up Hubble imagery dates from late January, and shows an unusual filamentary pattern near the nucleus.Image: HST picture of the comet-like object called P/2010 A2. The object...
  • Ancient Ancestor of Tulip Tree Line Identified

    09/16/2013 8:09:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Science News ^ | Thursday, September 12, 2013 | Indiana University
    The modern-day tulip tree, state tree of Indiana as well as Kentucky and Tennessee, can trace its lineage back to the time of the dinosaurs, according to newly published research by an Indiana University paleobotanist and a Russian botanist. The tulip tree, Liriodendron tulipfera, has been considered part of the magnolia family. But David Dilcher of Indiana University Bloomington and Mikhail S. Romanov of the N.V. Tsitsin Main Botanical Garden in Moscow show that it is closely related to fossil plant specimens from the Lower Cretaceous period. Their findings suggest the tulip tree line diverged from magnolias more than 100...
  • New Giant Volcano Below Sea Is Largest in the World (Size of New Mexico)

    09/06/2013 12:25:15 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 26 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Published September 5, 2013 | Brian Clark Howard
    Tamu Massif in the northwest Pacific challenges traditional views of oceanA volcano the size of New Mexico or the British Isles has been identified under the Pacific Ocean, about 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) east of Japan, making it the biggest volcano on Earth and one of the biggest in the solar system. Called Tamu Massif, the giant shield volcano had been thought to be a composite of smaller structures, but now scientists say they must rethink long-held beliefs about marine geology. “This finding goes against what we thought, because we found that it’s one huge volcano,” said William Sager, a...
  • UK Impact Crater Debate Heats Up

    03/30/2007 2:44:14 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 192+ views
    BBC ^ | 3-30-2007 | Jonathan Fildes
    UK impact crater debate heats up By Jonathan Fildes Science and technology reporter, BBC News Seismic surveys show a trough surrounded by concentric fractures A deep scar under the North Sea thought to be the UK's only impact crater is no such thing, claims a leading geologist. Professor John Underhill, from the University of Edinburgh, says the Silverpit structure, as it is known, has a far more mundane explanation. Detailed surveys reveal nine similar vast chasms in the area, he says. This suggests it was part of a more widespread process, probably the movement of salt rocks at depth, not...
  • Dressed to kill: A feathered tyrannosaur is discovered in China

    04/05/2012 4:39:12 AM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 4-4-2012 | Pete Spotts
    It's not often you see a dinosaur with a girth and toothy grimace reminiscent of Tyrannosaurus rex yet covered in a downy winter coat worthy of L.L. Bean. But that's what a team of paleontologists in China reports. They've dubbed their find Yutyrannus huali (beautiful feathered tyrant), a creature that stretched 30 feet from tail-tip to snout and weighed 1.5 tons. It's the largest dinosaur yet to host feather-like features all over its body – features well preserved on three nearly complete, mostly intact fossil skeletons the team found....
  • Bright Idea: Ancient monster tsunami mixed fossils

    02/01/2005 6:37:34 PM PST · by IllumiNaughtyByNature · 12 replies · 1,002+ views
    The Albuquerque Tribune ^ | 01/31/05 | Sue Vorenberg
    A 65 million year old tsunami is still wreaking havoc in the scientific community, a New Mexico State University professor says. The 300-foot-tall tsunami - an aftereffect of the giant meteor impact that some scientists think killed off the dinosaurs - scrambled fossils and rock and has made the event very hard to date, said Timothy Lawton, head of NMSU's geology department.
  • Oldest pregnant lizard fossil discovered

    07/22/2011 5:55:54 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | July 22, 2011 | by Deborah Braconnie
    A new paper published in Naturwissenschaft reveals a fossil from 120 million years ago that proves that some lizards were not laying eggs but rather giving birth to live young. The fossil was discovered by Susan Evans, a professor from the University College London Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, in the Jehol region of Northeast China. This area has revealed hundreds of dinosaur, amphibian, reptile, fish, bird, mammal, invertebrate and plant fossils. The lizard in this case has been identified as Yabeinosaurus which scientists believe to be similar to the gecko. Evans did not pay much attention to the...
  • Endogenous Proteins Found in a 70-Million-Year- Old Giant Marine Lizard

    05/02/2011 7:58:24 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    Lund University ^ | May 2, 2011 | Unknown
    Fossil – just stone? No, a research team in Lund, Sweden, has discovered primary biological matter in a fossil of an extinct varanoid lizard (a mosasaur) that inhabited marine environments during Late Cretaceous times. Using state-of-the-art technology, the scientists have been able to link proteinaceous molecules to bone matrix fibres isolated from a 70-million-year-old fossil; i.e., they have found genuine remains of an extinct animal entombed in stone. With their discovery, the scientists Johan Lindgren, Per Uvdal, Anders Engdahl, and colleagues have demonstrated that remains of type I collagen, a structural protein, are retained in a mosasaur fossil. The scientists...
  • Mysterious Fossils Reveal New Insect Order


    07/20/2011 11:32:22 AM PDT · by null and void · 16 replies
    Coxoplectoptera Adult (upper), Coxoplectoptera Larva (lower) German scientists at the Stuttgart Natural History Museum were leading in the discovery of a new insect order from the Lower Cretaceous of South America. The spectacular fossils were named Coxoplectoptera by their discoverers and their findings were published in a special issue on Cretaceous Insects in the scientific journal Insect Systematics & Evolution. The work group, led by basal insect experts Dr. Arnold H. Staniczek and Dr. Günter Bechly, determined that these fossils represent extinct relatives of modern mayflies. Coxoplectoptera, however, significantly differ from both mayflies and all other known insects in...
  • New 'thunder-thighs' dinosaur discovered (w/ Video)

    02/23/2011 10:25:26 AM PST · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    PHYSORG.COM ^ | February 23, 2011 | STAFF
    Brontomerus mcintoshi is a newly discovered dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of North America. The name Brontomerus means "Thunder thighs" -- a name chosen because the peculiar shape of the hip bone shows that it would have had enormously powerful thigh muscles in life. (PhysOrg.com) -- A new dinosaur named Brontomerus mcintoshi, or "thunder-thighs" after its enormously powerful thigh muscles, has been discovered in Utah, USA. The new species is described in a paper recently published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica by an international team of scientists from the U.K. and the U.S. A member of the long-necked sauropod...
  • New 'thunder-thighs' dinosaur discovered

    02/23/2011 6:54:46 AM PST · by decimon · 25 replies
    University College London ^ | February 23, 2011 | Unknown
    LONDON – A new dinosaur named Brontomerus mcintoshi, or "thunder-thighs" after its enormously powerful thigh muscles, has been discovered in Utah, USA. The new species is described in a paper recently published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica by an international team of scientists from the U.K. and the U.S. A member of the long-necked sauropod group of dinosaurs which includes Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, Brontomerus may have used its powerful thighs as a weapon to kick predators, or to help travel over rough, hilly terrain. Brontomerus lived about 110 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous Period, and probably had...
  • Prehistoric mammal hair found in Cretaceous amber

    06/14/2010 2:14:31 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 51 replies · 1,140+ views
    bbc ^ | 14 June 2010 | Matt Walker
    Palaeontologists have discovered two mammal hairs encased in 100 million-year-old amber. While older 2D fossilised hairs are known, those preserved in the amber are the oldest 3D specimens known. The hairs, found alongside a fly pupa in amber uncovered in southwest France, are remarkably similar to hair found on modern mammals. That implies that the shape and structure of mammal hair has remained unchanged over a vast period of time.
  • New Dinosaur: "Exquisite" Raptor Found

    03/20/2010 9:11:31 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 23 replies · 1,388+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | March 19, 2010
    Like a zombie clawing its way out of the grave, a new dinosaur species was discovered when scientists spotted a hand bone protruding from a cliff in the Gobi desert of Inner Mongolia, paleontologists have announced. Called Linheraptor exquisitus, the new dinosaur is a raptor, a type of two-legged meat-eater, that lived during the late Cretaceous period in what is now northeastern China "We were looking at these very tall red sandstone walls that were all abraded by the wind, and I saw this claw sticking out of the side of the cliff," recalls Jonah Choiniere, a grad student at...
  • Aznalcóllar disaster compared with Cretaceous mass extinction

    02/02/2010 6:52:10 AM PST · by decimon · 10 replies · 354+ views
    Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have compared the disaster caused by the Aznalcóllar spillage in the Doñana National Park in Andalusia 11 years ago with the biggest species extinction known to date. What do these two disasters have in common? The scientists say that carrying out comparisons of this kind will make it possible to find out how ecosystems recover following mass extinctions. Until now, scientists used to study the fossil record in order to analyse how organisms responded to major environmental changes in the past, such as the mass extinction of species during the Cretaceous period (65...
  • Marine plankton found in amber

    11/15/2008 10:24:14 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 57 replies · 698+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | 11/13/08
    (PhysOrg.com) -- Marine microorganisms have been found in amber dating from the middle of the Cretaceous period. The fossils were collected in Charente, in France. This completely unexpected discovery will deepen our understanding of these lost marine species as well as providing precious data about the coastal environment of Western France during the Cretaceous.This work was carried out by researchers at the Géosciences Rennes laboratory (CNRS/Université de Rennes 1), together with researchers from the Paléobiodiversité et Paléoenvironnement laboratory in Paris (CNRS/Muséum national d'histoire naturelle/Université Pierre et Marie Curie) and the Centre de Géochimie de la Surface in Strasbourg (CNRS/Université de...
  • Scientists Discover 356 Animal Inclusions Trapped In Opaque Amber 100 Million Years Old

    04/01/2008 1:07:06 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 91+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 4-1-2008 | European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.
    Scientists Discover 356 Animal Inclusions Trapped In Opaque Amber 100 Million Years OldExamples of virtual 3D extraction of organisms embedded in opaque amber: a) Gastropod Ellobiidae; b) Myriapod Polyxenidae; c) Arachnid; d) Conifer branch (Glenrosa); e) Isopod crustacean Ligia; f) Insect hymenopteran Falciformicidae. (Credit: M. Lak, P. Tafforeau, D. Néraudeau (ESRF Grenoble and UMR CNRS 6118 Rennes)) ScienceDaily (Apr. 1, 2008) — Paleontologists from the University of Rennes (France) and the ESRF have found the presence of 356 animal inclusions in completely opaque amber from mid-Cretaceous sites of Charentes (France). The team used the X-rays of the European light source...
  • Cracking the Mystery (Cretaceous, Great Dying, Chicxulub)

    12/29/2005 8:32:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 484+ views
    Time Magazine ^ | May 5 1997 | Anthony Spaeth with Maseeh Rahman/Dahod
    The Shiva Crater is discussed in a recent article in Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, an Australian scientific journal, by the two scientists. In the early 1990s, based on new geological evidence, Chatterjee surmised that a crater extending from the seabed off the city of Bombay into the state of Gujarat was created by a meteor fall. He named it after Shiva. He also argued that the Shiva Crater was actually one-half of a larger crater; the other part lay undersea near the Seychelle Islands, 2,800 km southeast of India. When pieced together, the original crater (split by continental shifting)...
  • Researchers Find Sauropod Dinosaur Skulls (big dinosaurs with little heads)

    06/01/2005 9:15:35 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 24 replies · 3,236+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 6/1/05 | Deseret Morning News
    SALT LAKE CITY - The first known North American skulls of Cretaceous era sauropods — big dinosaurs with little heads — have been uncovered in recent years by Brigham Young University and Dinosaur National Monument researchers. About a dozen sauropod skulls are known from the earlier Jurassic era, but these are the first in North America for the Cretaceous, the final 80 million years of the dinosaur period. The four Cretaceous sauropod skulls or parts of skulls were found close to each other at the monument, which straddles the Utah-Colorado border. "We've really got a remarkable — it's almost mind-boggling...
  • Bite marks reveal behavior of dinosaur-eating croc

    03/15/2012 12:36:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Wisconsin-Parkside ^ | Friday, March 2, 2012 | unattributed
    Research by Dr. Christopher Noto and a team of paleontologists published this week in the international journal Palaios describes recently discovered fossils from the Cretaceous Period (145-65 million years ago) of Texas that show evidence of attack by a new species of giant crocodyliform (croc-relative). Bite marks on fossil bones provide a rare glimpse of predatory behavior that indicate this animal was a top predator that regularly consumed turtles and even ate dinosaurs... For most extinct species, scientists can never directly observe such predatory behavior. Paleontologists must resort to other, indirect indicators. Bite marks on fossil bone are a great...
  • First Long-Necked Dinosaur Fossil Found In Antarctica

    11/07/2011 11:15:17 PM PST · by Altariel · 12 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | November 4, 2011 | Stephanie Pappas
    It's official, long-necked sauropod dinosaurs once roamed every continent on Earth — including now-frigid Antarctica. The discovery of a single sauropod vertebra on James Ross Island in Antarctica reveals that these behemoths, which included Diplodocus, Brachiosaurus and Apatosaurus, lived on the continent in the upper Cretaceous Period about 100 million years ago.
  • Dinosaur-Bird Flap Ruffles Feathers

    10/11/2005 4:07:11 AM PDT · by mlc9852 · 330 replies · 11,487+ views
    Yahoo!News ^ | October 10, 2005 | E.J. Mundell
    MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Head to the American Museum of Natural History's Web site, and you'll see the major draw this fall is a splashy exhibit on dinosaurs. And not just any dinosaurs, but two-legged carnivorous, feathered "theropods" like the 30-inch-tall Bambiraptor -- somewhat less cuddly than its namesake. The heyday of the theropods, which included scaly terrors like T. rex and velociraptor, stretched from the late Triassic (220 million years ago) to the late Cretaceous (65 million years ago) periods.
  • Perfect fossil could be most complete dinosaur ever

    10/16/2011 7:07:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    New Scientists ^ | 13 October 2011 | Jeff Hecht
    Dinosaur fossils don't come much more impressive than this. With 98 per cent of its skeleton preserved, this young predatory theropod from southern Germany may be the most complete dinosaur ever found. Oliver Rauhut, curator of the Bavarian State Collection for Palaeontology and Geology in Munich, announced the find yesterday. Although Chinese bird and dinosaur fossils are famed for delicate details such as their feathers, they don't match this 72-centimetre-long theropod in terms of clarity and completeness of preservation. The young dinosaur has been dated at 135 million years old, putting it in the early Cretaceous, but it has yet...
  • Oldest spider silk preserved in amber

    08/06/2003 1:25:16 PM PDT · by Pokey78 · 17 replies · 408+ views
    Ananova ^ | 08/06/03
    The world's oldest known spider silk has been found in a 130 million-year-old piece of amber. The discovery, which dates from the Early Cretaceous period, was made in amber beds located near Jezzine in Lebanon. The fibre is 90 million years older than the thread that previously held the record for the oldest preserved silk, according to the report in the journal Nature. The Lebanese silk strand is four millimetres in length and has tiny glue droplets spaced out along it. The diameter of the thread, and the size, density, arrangement and shape of the droplets, closely match those in...
  • Dino impact gave Earth the chill

    06/01/2004 1:02:01 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 33 replies · 1,537+ views
    BBC NEWS ^ | 05/31/04 | N/A
    Dino impact gave Earth the chill A cloud of sulphate particles may have blocked out the sun's warmth Evidence has been found for a global winter following the asteroid impact that is thought to have killed off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Rocks in Tunisia reveal microscopic cold-water creatures invaded a warm sea just after the space rock struck Earth. The global winter was probably caused by a pollutant cloud of sulphate particles released when the asteroid vapourised rocks at Chicxulub, Mexico. The results are reported in the latest issue of the journal Geology. Italian, US and Dutch...
  • New Dinosaur from Angola

    03/18/2011 6:51:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Projecto PaleoAngola ^ | March 2011 | unattributed
    Angolatitan adamastor, a new sauropod dinosaur, is the first dinosaur discovered in Angola. It is the only occurrence of these long-necked dinosaurs in sub-Saharan Africa of its geological age. An international team of paleontologists unveiled the newly discovered dinosaur fossil today. The large plant-eating dinosaur was 13 meters long and lived 90 million years ago (Late Cretaceous Period). "To us, finding such a dinosaur in rocks of this age in Africa is extremely surprising" says paleontologist Octávio Mateus, who discovered the skeleton... The new dinosaur is known only from a forelimb, discovered in 2005 about 70 km north of Luanda...
  • Pterosaur reptile used "pole vault" trick for take-off

    11/15/2010 4:05:35 PM PST · by decimon · 13 replies
    BBC ^ | November 15, 2010 | Unknown
    A new study claims that the ancient winged reptiles known as pterosaurs used a "pole-vaulting" action to take to the air.They say the creatures took off using all four of their limbs. The reptiles vaulted over their wings, pushing off first with their hind limbs and then thrusting themselves upwards with their powerful arm muscles - not dissimilar to some modern bats. The research is published in the open-access journal Plos One. Pterosaurs lived at the same time as the dinosaurs, but belonged to a different group of reptiles. They existed from the Triassic Period until the end of the...
  • T. rex's big tail was its key to speed and hunting prowess

    11/15/2010 2:37:19 PM PST · by decimon · 26 replies
    University of Alberta ^ | November 15, 2010 | Unknown
    Tyrannosaurus rex was far from a plodding Cretaceous era scavenger whose long tail only served to counterbalance the up-front weight of its freakishly big headTyrannosaurus rex was far from a plodding Cretaceous era scavenger whose long tail only served to counterbalance the up-front weight of its freakishly big head. T. rex's athleticism (and its rear end) has been given a makeover by University of Alberta graduate student Scott Persons. His extensive research shows that powerful tail muscles made the giant carnivore one of the fastest moving hunters of its time. As Persons says, "contrary to earlier theories, T. rex had...