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Keyword: cuneiform

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  • Noah’s Ark would have floated…even with 70,000 animals

    04/03/2014 7:23:19 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 53 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7:00AM BST 03 Apr 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    Noah’s Ark would have floated even with two of every animal in the world packed inside, scientists have calculated. Although researchers are unsure if all the creatures could have squeezed into the huge boat, they are confident it would have handled the weight of 70,000 creatures without sinking. A group of master’s students from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Leicester University studied the exact dimensions of the Ark, set out in Genesis 6:13-22. According to The Bible, God instructed Noah to build a boat which was 300 cubits long 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits high—recommending gopher wood...
  • The Ark: Could Noah's Tale Be True?

    04/01/2014 5:04:11 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 96 replies
    http://www.livescience.com ^ | March 28, 2014 | Benjamin Radford
    The new film "Noah" stars Russell Crowe as the man chosen by God to collect pairs of Earth's animals on a massive ark to save them from a global flood. The film, which opened March 28, is sizing up to be a Biblical blockbuster, replete with star power and stunning special effects. But how realistic is it? While many people consider the story of Noah's Ark merely an instructive myth or parable about God's punishment for man's wickedness, others believe that the story is historically accurate. To them, Noah's tale describes events that really happened only a few thousand years...
  • Does An Ancient Tablet Tell the Real Story of Noah’s Ark?

    03/27/2014 7:58:05 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 03/27/2014 | By JAVIER ESPINOZA
    As Darren Aronofsky and Russell Crowe unveil “Noah” in U.S. cinemas this week, British archaeologist Irving Finkel offers a new perspective on the story with his book “The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood.” In his book, published in the U.S. by Doubleday, Finkel tells the story of how he managed to get his hands on a cuneiform tablet, which was part of the flood story. As a curator for the British Museum, he relies on members of the public bringing artifacts to him for inspection. He was on duty one afternoon in 1985 when a man...
  • How the ark changed shape

    02/13/2014 9:34:14 AM PST · by NYer · 26 replies
    Catholic Herald ^ | February 13, 2014 | Will Gore
    Dr Irving Finkel In 1985 a man called Douglas Simmonds brought a bag of miscellaneous antiquities to the British Museum for inspection. Dr Irving Finkel, the museum’s assistant keeper of ancient Mesopotamian script, languages and cultures, went through the curiosities and quickly discovered that one of them, a small Babylonian tablet covered in cuneiform (an ancient form of script) was a historical document of great significance. As an expert in Assyriology and cuneiform, Finkel only needed to read the first few lines of this small, craggy tablet to realise that this was a segment of an ancient Mespotamian myth, the...
  • Relic reveals Noah's ark was circular

    01/02/2010 11:48:34 AM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 54 replies · 3,278+ views
    guardian.co.uk ^ | Jan. 1, 2010 | Maev Kennedy
    That they processed aboard the enormous floating wildlife collection two-by-two is well known. Less familiar, however, is the possibility that the animals Noah shepherded on to his ark then went round and round inside. According to newly translated instructions inscribed in ancient Babylonian on a clay tablet telling the story of the ark, the vessel that saved one virtuous man, his family and the animals from god's watery wrath was not the pointy-prowed craft of popular imagination but rather a giant circular reed raft. The now battered tablet, aged about 3,700 years, was found somewhere in the Middle East by...
  • BBC Report: Noah's Ark "...more credible version based on Babylonian sources."

    03/19/2004 10:44:41 AM PST · by yankeedame · 111 replies · 841+ views
    BBC On Line ^ | Friday, 19 March, 2004 | Jeremy Bowen
    Last Updated: Friday, 19 March, 2004, 11:06 GMT Did Noah really build an ark? By Jeremy Bowen Presenter, Noah's Ark In the Bible, God tells Noah he has to build an ark and load a pair of every kind of animal before a great flood engulfs the world. It is widely regarded as a myth, but could it actually be true? The story of Noah and his ark is one which sticks in the minds of children and never gets forgotten. God warned Noah - the only good man left in a world full of corruption and violence - to...
  • Is the Biblical Flood Account a Modified Copy of the Epic of Gilgamesh?

    Skeptics claim that the flood narrative of Genesis1 is a rewritten version of an original myth, The Epic of Gilgamesh, from the Enuma Elish produced by the Sumerians. The flood of the Epic of Gilgamesh is contained on Tablet XI2 of twelve large stone tablets that date to around 650 B.C. These tablets are obviously not originals, since fragments of the flood story have been found on tablets that date to 2,000 B.C. It is likely that the story itself originated much before that, since the Sumerian cuneiform writing has been estimated to go as far back as 3,300 B.C.The...
  • British Museum: Prototype for Noah's Ark was round

    01/25/2014 2:08:46 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The Associated Press ^ | January 24, 2014 | Jill Lawless
    It was a vast boat that saved two of each animal and a handful of humans from a catastrophic flood. But forget all those images of a long vessel with a pointy bow - the original Noah's Ark, new research suggests, was round. A recently deciphered 4,000-year-old clay tablet from ancient Mesopotamia - modern-day Iraq - reveals striking new details about the roots of the Old Testament tale of Noah....
  • Ancient tablet suggests Noah’s Ark was round

    01/24/2014 4:52:19 PM PST · by Libloather · 58 replies
    NY Post ^ | 1/24/14 | Jill Lawless
    LONDON — It was a vast boat that saved two of each animal and a handful of humans from a catastrophic flood. But forget all those images of a long vessel with a pointy bow — the original Noah’s Ark, new research suggests, was round. A recently deciphered 4,000-year-old tablet from ancient Mesopotamia — modern-day Iraq — reveals striking new details about the roots of the Old Testament tale of Noah. It tells a similar story, complete with detailed instructions for building a giant round vessel known as a coracle — as well as the key instruction that animals should...
  • Noah's Ark 'Was a Massive Double-Decker Coracle'

    12/16/2013 10:52:52 AM PST · by Theoria · 180 replies
    International Business Times ^ | 15 Dec 2013 | Fiona Keating
    New evidence suggests that Noah's Ark was round, made from reeds and the length of six double-decker buses. For years, archaeologists have scoured the world for factual evidence for the Bible story of Noah's flood, but due to scant documentation, many believe the fable to be an Old Testament myth. Now, however, a new book claims that Noah's Ark was a round coracle and looked very different from its traditional image. In The Ark Before: Decoding the Story of the Flood by Irving Finkel, there are claims that the vessel had two decks with cabins for the animals. British Museum...
  • Drought May Have Killed Sumerian Language

    12/05/2012 6:54:00 AM PST · by blam · 3 replies
    Live Science ^ | 12-5-2012 | Tia Ghose
    Drought May Have Killed Sumerian Language Tia Ghose LiveScience Staff Writer Date: 04 December 2012 Time: 11:35 AM ETThe ancient Sumerians invented cuneiform, shown here on a clay tablet documenting barley rations issued monthly to adults and children. The language may have died out as a result of a 200-year drought 4,200 years ago. CREDIT: Public Domain SAN FRANCISCO — A 200-year-long drought 4,200 years ago may have killed off the ancient Sumerian language, one geologist says. Because no written accounts explicitly mention drought as the reason for the Sumerian demise, the conclusions rely on indirect clues. But several pieces...
  • 200-year-long drought may have killed Sumerian language

    12/05/2012 6:09:59 AM PST · by Renfield · 50 replies
    MSNBC ^ | 12-4-2012 | Tia Ghose
    A 200-year-long drought 4,200 years ago may have killed off the ancient Sumerian language, one geologist says. Because no written accounts explicitly mention drought as the reason for the Sumerian demise, the conclusions rely on indirect clues. But several pieces of archaeological and geological evidence tie the gradual decline of the Sumerian civilization to a drought. The findings, which were presented Monday here at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union, show how vulnerable human society may be to climate change, including human-caused change....
  • U of T researchers shed light on ancient Assyrian tablets

    04/08/2010 2:04:40 PM PDT · by decimon · 10 replies · 493+ views
    University of Toronto ^ | Apr 8, 2010 | Unknown
    A cache of cuneiform tablets unearthed by a team led by a University of Toronto archaeologist has been found to contain a largely intact Assyrian treaty from the early 7th century BCE. "The tablet is quite spectacular. It records a treaty — or covenant — between Esarhaddon, King of the Assyrian Empire and a secondary ruler who acknowledged Assyrian power. The treaty was confirmed in 672 BCE at elaborate ceremonies held in the Assyrian royal city of Nimrud (ancient Kalhu). In the text, the ruler vows to recognize the authority of Esarhaddon's successor, his son Ashurbanipal," said Timothy Harrison, professor...
  • Archaeology meets mythology in Mycenean Pylos (King Nestor)

    09/11/2009 6:02:06 AM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies · 1,295+ views
    Science Codex ^ | Sep 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Close-up of palace walls. Credit: University of Missouri-St.Louis Pylos drain. Credit: University of Missouri-St Louis Clearing thick brush from a mound at his archaeological dig site in Pylos, Greece, Michael Cosmopoulos found a real-life palace dating back to the mythical Trojan War. The palace is from the Mycenaean period (1600-1100 B.C.), famous for such mythical sagas as the Trojan War. It is thought to sit within one of the capital cities of King Nestor, a personality featured in the legends of the war. "We are thrilled, excited and fascinated at the prospect of continuing its excavation," said Cosmopoulos, the Hellenic...
  • Computers to translate world's 'lost' languages after program deciphers ancient text

    07/21/2010 12:27:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 7/20/2010 | Niall Firth
    Scientists have used a computer program to decipher a written language that is more than three thousand years old. The program automatically translated the ancient written language of Ugaritic within just a few hours. Scientists hope the breakthrough could help them decipher the few ancient languages that they have been unable to translate so far. Ugaritic was last used around 1200 B.C. in western Syria and consists of dots on clay tablets. It was first discovered in 1920 but was not deciphered until 1932. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told the program that the language was related to...
  • Decoding antiquity: Eight scripts that still can't be read

    05/29/2009 9:14:19 PM PDT · by BGHater · 38 replies · 1,621+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 27 May 2009 | Andrew Robinson
    WRITING is one of the greatest inventions in human history. Perhaps the greatest, since it made history possible. Without writing, there could be no accumulation of knowledge, no historical record, no science - and of course no books, newspapers or internet.The first true writing we know of is Sumerian cuneiform - consisting mainly of wedge-shaped impressions on clay tablets - which was used more than 5000 years ago in Mesopotamia. Soon afterwards writing appeared in Egypt, and much later in Europe, China and Central America. Civilisations have invented hundreds of different writing systems. Some, such as the one you are...
  • Greek treasures unearthed (Minoans, Linear A, Linear B)

    11/12/2005 8:42:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 945+ views
    News 24 dot com ^ | November 12, 2005 | staff writer
    [T]he finds were excavated at a long-abandoned site on a hill overlooking the port of Chania in Western Crete, which has been identified with the Minoan city of Kydonia. Among the discoveries was an amphora containing an intact text written in linear B, the language of the court at Mycenae where the legendary Agamemnon ruled. Also found were two terracotta tablets containing texts in Linear A, an even older alphabet - used around 1700 years before the common era - which has not yet been deciphered. The ministry said the archaeologists found evidence of a violent fire believed to have...
  • LINGUISTICS: Early Date for the Birth of Indo-European Languages

    11/28/2003 10:24:23 AM PST · by Lessismore · 36 replies · 3,431+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-11-28 | Michael Balter
    Ever since British jurist Sir William Jones noted in 1786 that there are marked similarities between diverse languages such as Greek, Sanskrit, and Celtic, linguists have assumed that most of the languages of Europe and the Indian subcontinent derive from a single ancient tongue. But researchers have fiercely debated just when and where this mother tongue was first spoken. Now a bold new study asserts that the common root of the 144 so-called Indo-European languages, which also include English and all the Germanic, Slavic, and Romance languages, is very ancient indeed. In this week's issue of Nature, evolutionary biologist Russell...
  • Mother of all Indo-European languages was born in Turkey

    11/26/2003 5:35:02 PM PST · by a_Turk · 114 replies · 991+ views
    AFP ^ | 11/26/2003 | N/A
    PARIS (AFP) - The vast group of languages that dominates Europe and much of Central and South Asia originated around 8,000 years ago among farmers in what is now Anatolia, Turkey. So say a pair of New Zealand academics who have remarkably retraced the family tree of so-called Indo-European languages -- a linguistic classification that covers scores of tongues ranging from Faroese to Hindi by way of English, French, German, Gujarati, Nepalese and Russian. Russell Gray and Quentin Atkinson, psychologists at the University of Auckland, built their language tree on the same principles as the theory of genetic evolution. According...
  • The Riddle Of The Labyrinth: The Quest To Break An Ancient Code

    06/30/2013 2:47:37 PM PDT · by OddLane · 57 replies
    NPR ^ | Jume 30, 2013 | NPR Staff
    Critics have called Margalit Fox's new book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, a paleographic detective procedural. It follows the story of the laborious quest to crack a mysterious script, unearthed in Crete in 1900, known by the sterile-sounding name Linear B. Fox, an obituary writer for The New York Times, is good at bringing the departed to life. In The Riddle of the Labyrinth, she tells the story of Alice Kober, a classics professor at Brooklyn College, who worked alone over decades and discovered the essential grammar of Linear B, only to die in 1950 before she could complete her...
  • Who Invented the Alphabet: The Semites or the Greeks?

    01/17/2011 6:27:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Archaeolgy Odyssey ^ | Winter 1998 | Barry B. Powell
    I would make the startling suggestion that the alphabet was invented by a single human being, who created this remarkable technology to record the Greek hexameters of the poet we call Homer. Certainly everyone agrees that the invention of the alphabet made possible the development of philosophy, science and democracy, some of the finest achievements in the history of human culture. But who invented the alphabet? Was it really the Semitic-speaking Phoenicians, as many of us learned in grammar school? Or was it actually the Greeks, to whom the Phoenicians supposedly passed it? I don't believe the Phoenicians actually had...
  • Tablets That May Reveal El Nino Secrets Are Feared Lost In Iraq

    06/08/2003 4:10:20 PM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 493+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 6-9-2003 | Ben Russell
    Tablets that may reveal El Niño secrets are feared lost in Iraq By Ben Russell, Political Correspondent 09 June 2003 The secrets of El Niño, one of the most mysterious and destructive weather systems, could be unlocked by hundreds of thousands of ancient clay tablets now feared lost or damaged in the chaos of Iraq. Researchers believe the tablets, written using a cuneiform text, one of the earliest types of writing, form the world's oldest records of climate change and could give vital clues to understanding El Niño and global warming. Academics are demanding that ministers act to protect the...
  • The Law Code of Hammurabi. (Complete Translation)

    08/27/2002 7:51:44 AM PDT · by vannrox · 25 replies · 754+ views
    The Yale School of Law. ^ | ~3000BC translated 1996. FR Post 8-26-02 | Translated by L. W. King
    The Avalon Project at Yale Law School The Code of Hammurabi Translated by L. W. King When Anu the Sublime, King of the Anunaki, and Bel, the lord of Heaven and earth, who decreed the fate of the land, assigned to Marduk, the over-ruling son of Ea, God of righteousness, dominion over earthly man, and made him great among the Igigi, they called Babylon by his illustrious name, made it great on earth, and founded an everlasting kingdom in it, whose foundations are laid so solidly as those of heaven and earth; then Anu and Bel called by name me,...
  • The Sea Peoples, from Cuneiform Tablets to Carbon Dating

    10/04/2012 3:01:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    PLOS ONE ^ | David Kaniewski et al (see below)
    Whereas the Sea People event constitutes a major turning point in ancient world history, attested by both written and archaeological (e.g. Ugarit, Enkomi, Kition, Byblos) evidence, our knowledge of when these waves of destructions occurred rests on translation of cuneiform tablets preceding the invasions (terminus ante quem) and on Ramses III's reign (terminus post quem). Here, we report the first absolute chronology of the invasion from a rare, well-preserved Sea People destruction layer (Fig. 2) from a Levantine harbour town of the Ugarit kingdom. The destruction layer contains remains of conflicts (bronze arrowheads scattered around the town, fallen walls, burnt...
  • Ancient Clay Tablets Recovered from 9/11 Attack Restored and Translated

    05/22/2012 1:44:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, May 21, 2012 | unattributed
    They were stored in the basement of the Customs House at 6 World Trade Center... when the building was destroyed by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The ancient, 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets, 302 in all, were looted from a site in southern Iraq sometime before the attacks. They had been confiscated by U.S. customs while they were in the process of being smuggled into Newark, N.J. and then placed temporarily in the basement of the Trade Center... Scholars now know that the tablets resided in an archive near the city of Nippur, the religious capital of Sumeria, and 145...
  • Ancient Clay Tablets Recovered from 9/11 Attack Restored and Translated

    05/22/2012 1:44:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, May 21, 2012 | unattributed
    They were stored in the basement of the Customs House at 6 World Trade Center... when the building was destroyed by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The ancient, 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets, 302 in all, were looted from a site in southern Iraq sometime before the attacks. They had been confiscated by U.S. customs while they were in the process of being smuggled into Newark, N.J. and then placed temporarily in the basement of the Trade Center... Scholars now know that the tablets resided in an archive near the city of Nippur, the religious capital of Sumeria, and 145...
  • Unknown Ancient Language Found on Clay Tablet

    05/12/2012 11:32:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    Sci-News ^ | Fri, May 11th, 2012 | Enrico de Lazaro
    The archaeologists working at Ziyaret Tepe, the probable site of the ancient Assyrian city of Tushan, believe that this language may have been spoken by deportees originally from the Zagros Mountains, on the border of modern-day Iran and Iraq. In keeping with a policy widely practiced across the Assyrian Empire, these people may have been forcibly moved from their homeland and resettled in what is now south-east Turkey, where they would have been set to work building the new frontier city and farming its hinterland. The evidence for the language they spoke comes from a single clay tablet, which was...
  • Fuente Magna (The Rosetta Stone Of The Americas)

    01/03/2006 6:26:08 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 1,456+ views
    Geocities ^ | 11-5-2002 | J M Allen
    Fuente Magna Rosetta stone of the Americas "Atlantis: the Andes Solution" by J.M.Allen (pub Windrush Press 1998) and basis of the Discovery film "Atlantis in the Andes" by Lisa Hutchison proposes the question "did anyone ever consider that the first reed boats may have crossed from west to east perhaps following the route from the River Plate eastwards across the Atlantic, past the Cape of Good Hope and via the Indian Ocean to enter the Persian Gulf and Red Sea to found the early civilisations of Mesopotamia and Egypt?" It is obvious that at that time, the author suspected a...
  • Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian ale.

    08/11/2002 3:28:50 PM PDT · by vannrox · 4 replies · 347+ views
    BBC News ^ | Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK | Editorial Staff
    Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian ale Did King Tut sup on the Old Kingdom recipe? A Japanese beer maker has taken a 4,400-year-old recipe from Egyptian hieroglyphics and produced what it claims is a brew fit for the Pharaohs. The Kirin Brewery Co. has called the concoction Old Kingdom Beer. It has no froth, is the colour of dark tea and carries an alcohol content of 10% - about double most contemporary beers. Sakuji Yoshimura, an Egyptologist at Waseda University in Tokyo, helped transcribe the recipe from Egyptian wall paintings. Kirin spokesman Takaomi...
  • 3,800-year-old Babylonian tablets contain recipe!

    11/16/2001 1:21:02 PM PST · by Libloather · 38 replies · 910+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 11/12/01
    Monday November 12 10:18 AM ET Ancient Tablets Offer Beer Primer DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) - A Syrian-Belgian-British archaeological mission unearthed 3,800-year-old Babylonian beer-making instructions on cuneiform tablets at a dig in northern Syria. Abdel-Massih Baghdo, director of the Hassakeh Archaeological Department, told The Associated Press in a telephone call that the 92 tablets were found in the 14th layer of Tell Shagher, a site just north of Hassakeh. He said the tablets showed beer-making methods and tallied quantities of beer produced and distributed in the region.'' Hassakeh, 400 miles northeast of Damascus, is known these days for its wheat production. ...
  • Looters May Have Destroyed Priceless Cuneiform Archive

    04/18/2003 2:10:35 AM PDT · by wideminded · 105 replies · 517+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | April 18th, 2003 | Guy Gugliotta
    Looters at Iraq's National Museum of Antiquities pillaged and, perhaps, destroyed an archive of more than 100,000 cuneiform clay tablets -- a unique and priceless trove of ancient Mesopotamian writings that included the "Sippar Library," the oldest library ever found intact on its original shelves. Experts described the archive as the world's least-studied large collection of cuneiform -- the oldest known writing on Earth -- a record that covers every aspect of Mesopotamian life over more than 3,000 years. The texts resided in numbered boxes each containing as many as 400 3-inch-by-2-inch tablets. The Sippar Library, discovered in 1986 at...
  • Scrolls, Scripts & Stelae- A Norwegian Collector Shows BAR His Rare Inscriptions

    08/27/2002 7:42:34 AM PDT · by vannrox · 3 replies · 531+ views
    Biblicial Archaeology Review ^ | FR Post 8-26-2 | Hershel Shanks
    Scrolls, Scripts & Stelae A Norwegian Collector Shows BAR His Rare Inscriptions Hershel Shanks If you have a Dead Sea Scroll for sale, you should get in touch with Martin Schøyen (pronounced Skoo-yen) in Oslo. He is a prime prospect. He already owns several Dead Sea Scroll fragments—making him one of the few individuals in the world (I can think of only one other) who own Dead Sea Scroll material. In his spacious London pied-à-terre, Schøyen also has one of the unusual pottery jars from Qumran in which the Bedouin found the first intact scrolls in 1947 or 1948....
  • Rare Cuneiform Script Found on Island of Malta

    12/24/2011 9:27:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, December 22, 2011 | Vol. 5 December 2011
    A small-sized find in an ancient megalithic temple stirs the imagination. Excavations among what many scholars consider to be the world's oldest monumental buildings on the island of Malta continue to unveil surprises and raise new questions about the significance of these megalithic structures and the people who built them. Not least is the latest find -- a small but rare, crescent-moon shaped agate stone featuring a 13th-century B.C.E. cuneiform inscription, the likes of which would normally be found much farther west in Mesopotamia. Led by palaeontology professor Alberto Cazzella of the University of Rome "La Sapienza", the archaeological team...
  • One of the earliest known examples of math homework

    12/01/2011 7:56:37 PM PST · by thecodont · 27 replies
    BoingBoing ^ | at 10:42 am Thursday, Dec 1 2011 | By Maggie Koerth-Baker
    It's stuff like this that makes me love archaeology. Turns out, we can trace the concept of math homework back to at least 2300 B.C.E., in ancient Mesopotamia. In the early 20th century, German researchers found several clay tablets at the site of Šuruppak. (Today, that's basically the Iraqi city of Tell Fara.) Some of the tablets appear to be the remains of math instruction, including two different tablets that are working the same story problem. A loose translation of the problem is: A granary. Each man receives 7 sila of grain. How many men? That is, the tablets concern...
  • Cuniform Tablets And Royal Stamp Unearthed In Northeast Syria (+1800BC)

    06/04/2005 11:50:32 AM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 837+ views
    Arabic News ^ | 6-2-2005
    Cuneiform tablets and royal stamp unearth in northeast Syria Syria, Local, 6/2/2005 The Syrian-Belgian joint excavation mission in northeast Syria has recently discovered some cuneiform tablets dating back to the neo Assyrian king in the Mesopotamia Shamshi Adad, 1800 BC, as well it unearthed the king personal stamp. Head of the Belgian team of excavations told SANA today that after the discovery of the king special stamp, the mission is doing her best to come across the full palace of the king, noting that the mission has started her excavation work this year at Shager Bazar hill in Hassaka, northeast...
  • Ancient world dictionary finished — after 90 years

    06/04/2011 7:47:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 27 replies
    Associated Press ^ | June 4, 2011 | SHARON COHEN
    CHICAGO – It was a monumental project with modest beginnings: a small group of scholars and some index cards. The plan was to explore a long-dead language that would reveal an ancient world of chariots and concubines, royal decrees and diaries — and omens that came from the heavens and sheep livers. The year: 1921. The place: The University of Chicago. The project: Assembling an Assyrian dictionary based on words recorded on clay or stone tablets unearthed from ruins in Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, written in a language that hadn't been uttered for more than 2,000 years. The scholars...
  • Researchers replicate rare cuneiform tablets using 3-D scanning and printing

    06/05/2011 8:09:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Cornell Chronicle ^ | Monday, May 23, 2011 | Anne Ju
    Today's Assyriology scholars study Sumerian and Babylonian cuneiform tablets with the help of digital photographs or handwritten copies of the texts, but ideally, they visit collections to see the tablets firsthand. Technology could introduce a new way to connect researchers to these precious, unique artifacts by creating exact replicas. Such an effort is under way at Cornell in the lab of Hod Lipson, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, who specializes in the burgeoning field of 3-D scanning and printing of everyday objects. Natasha Gangjee '12, a student in Lipson's lab, worked with six cuneiform tablets to try and...
  • Italians Find Ancient Ur Tablets (Iraq)

    03/28/2006 10:53:21 AM PST · by blam · 44 replies · 1,278+ views
    ANSA ^ | 3-28-2006
    Italians find ancient Ur tabletsWritings could lead to buried library (ANSA) - Rome, March 28 - Italian archeologists working in Iraq have found a trove of ancient stone tablets from the fabled civilisation of Ur . The tablets bear around 500 engravings of a literary and historical nature, according to team leader Silvia Chiodi . "This is an an exceptional find," she said, noting that the area in question had previously only yielded prehistoric artefacts . She said the tablets, made of clay and bitumen, were discovered by chance at an archaeological site not far from the location of the...
  • Q&A: Dead Languages Reveal a Lost World [ interview with Gonzalo Rubio ]

    01/01/2011 7:11:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, December 28, 2010 | Clara Moskowitz
    Gonzalo Rubio spends his days reading dead languages that haven't been spoken for thousands of years. An assyriologist at Pennsylvania State University, Rubio studies the world's very first written languages, Sumerian and Akkadian, which were used in ancient Mesopotamia (an area covering modern-day Iraq). Sumerian appeared first, almost 5,000 years ago around the year 3,100 B.C. This writing was scratched into soft clay tablets with a pointed reed that had been cut into a wedge shape. Archaeologists call this first writing "cuneiform," from the Latin "cuneus," meaning wedge. Sumerian and Akkadian were the languages of the ancient Mesopotamian civilization, which...
  • Hunting for the Dawn of Writing, When Prehistory Became History

    10/30/2010 7:17:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 19, 2010 | Geraldine Fabrikant
    One of the stars of the Oriental Institute's new show, "Visible Language: Inventions of Writing in the Ancient Middle East and Beyond," is a clay tablet that dates from around 3200 B.C. On it, written in cuneiform, the script language of ancient Sumer in Mesopotamia, is a list of professions, described in small, repetitive impressed characters that look more like wedge-shape footprints than what we recognize as writing. In fact "it is among the earliest examples of writings that we know of so far," according to the institute's director, Gil J. Stein, and it provides insights into the life of...
  • Reading the Zip Codes of 3,500-Year-Old Letters

    08/06/2010 3:31:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    American Friends of Tel Aviv University ^ | Thursday, August 5, 2010 | unattributed
    ...by adapting an off-the-shelf portable x-ray lab tool that analyzes the composition of chemicals, Prof. Yuval Goren of Tel Aviv University's Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations can reveal hidden information about a tablet's composition without damaging the precious ancient find itself. These x-rays reveal the soil and clay composition of a tablet or artefact, to help determine its precise origin. But Prof. Goren's process, based on x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, can go much further. Over the years, he has collected extensive data through physical "destructive" sampling of artefacts. By comparing this data to readouts produced by the...
  • Extracts of Cyrus Cylinder found in China

    08/03/2010 4:41:39 PM PDT · by Palter · 18 replies · 44+ views
    The Art Newspaper ^ | 02 Aug 2010 | Martin Bailey
    British Museum curator has identified cuneiform text inscribed on horse bones Two fossilised horse bones with cuneiform inscriptions have been found in China, carved with extracts from the Cyrus Cylinder. They were initially dismissed as fakes because of the improbability of ancient Persian texts turning up in Beijing. But following new research, British Museum (BM) specialist Irving Finkel is now convinced of their authenticity. This discovery looks set to transform our knowledge about what is arguably the most important surviving cuneiform text, written in the world’s earliest script. Dating from 539BC, the Cyrus Cylinder was ceremonially buried in the walls...
  • Is Holy Land Archaeology Being Hyped by Politics?

    07/18/2010 5:53:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 1+ views
    AOL "News" ^ | July 16, 2010 | Matthew Kalman
    ..."exaggeration and speculation the likes of which haven't been seen since pieces of the 'true cross' were found all across Europe in the Middle Ages," said Jim West, adjunct professor of biblical studies at the Quartz Hill School of Theology... Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University announced that she had unearthed "the oldest written document ever found in Jerusalem" after sifting debris from a site between the Temple Mount and the City of David, in Jerusalem... Mazar said the discovery provides "solid evidence of the importance of Jerusalem during the Late Bronze Age" and "lends weight to the importance that...
  • Discovery in Jerusalem: Oldest Writing Ever Found There Unearthed

    07/14/2010 4:55:00 PM PDT · by Salvation · 75 replies · 1+ views
    Jerusalem Post via A Sacred Page ^ | 07-11-10 | Jerusalem Post
    Sunday, July 11, 2010 Discovery in Jerusalem: Oldest Writing Ever Found There Unearthed From the Jerusalem Post: Hebrew University excavations recently unearthed a clay fragment dating back to the 14th century BCE, said to be the oldest written document ever found in Jerusalem. The tiny fragment is only 2 cm. by 2.8 cm. in surface area and 1 cm. thick and appears to have once been part of a larger tablet. Researchers say the ancient fragment testifies to Jerusalem’s importance as a major city late in the Bronze Age, long before it was conquered by King David. The minuscule...
  • Hebrew U. archeologists find Patriarchs-era tablet

    07/31/2010 6:26:07 AM PDT · by Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus · 233 replies · 10+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 27 July 2010 | Judy Siegel
    A document written on two cuneiform tablets around the time of the patriarch Abraham, containing a law code in a style and language similar to parts of the famous Code of Hammurabi, has been discovered for the first time in an Israeli archeological dig. The code, dating from the Middle Bronze Age in the 18th and 17th centuries BCE, was found at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s excavations this summer at Hazor National Park in the North. However, it has not yet been determined whether the document was written at Hazor – where a school for scribes was located in...
  • Oldest written document ever found in Jerusalem discovered by Hebrew University

    07/12/2010 10:40:47 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem ^ | July 12, 2010 | Unknown
    Jerusalem, July 11, 2010 -- A tiny clay fragment – dating from the 14th century B.C.E. – that was found in excavations outside Jerusalem's Old City walls contains the oldest written document ever found in Jerusalem, say researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The find, believed to be part of a tablet from a royal archives, further testifies to the importance of Jerusalem as a major city in the Late Bronze Age, long before its conquest by King David, they say. The clay fragment was uncovered recently during sifting of fill excavated from beneath a 10th century B.C.E. tower...
  • Syria: Scholar Composes Music from Archaeological Ugaritic Cuneiform Tablet

    07/09/2010 9:34:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 2+ views
    Global Arab Network ^ | Thursday, July 8, 2010 | H. Sabbagh
    Musical scholar Ziad Ajjan composed eight poetry and musical pieces from the musical archaeological cuneiform tablet known as "Hymn of Supplication" H6 discovered in Ugarit in the early 20th century. Ajjan composed three musical pieces based on the musical notes in the tablet which dates back to 1400 BC, naming the pieces "Sunrise," "Sunset" and "Holiday in Ugarit." This marks the recording of the oldest music notation in the history of the world. Ajjan said he is still working on the tablet based on information he reached after extensive study and previous experiment, making use of previous research by fellow...
  • Unearthed: The Humble Origins Of World Diplomacy (Hittites)

    01/18/2003 2:51:58 PM PST · by blam · 40 replies · 847+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 1-19-2003 | David Keys
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh

    07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 2,926+ views
    BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
    [T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...
  • The Trowel vs. the Text: How the Amarna letters challenge archaeology

    12/30/2008 8:35:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 890+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | Jan/Feb 2009 | Nadav Na'aman
    Caught Between A Rock And A Reed's Trace. The Amarna letters are a collection of more than 300 cuneiform tablets discovered at el-Amarna in Egypt in the late 1800s. Dating to the Late Bronze Age (1500-1150 B.C.E.), the archive consists of royal correspondence of Pharaoh Amenophis III (1391-1353 B.C.E.) and his son, Pharaoh Akhenaten (Amenophis IV, 1353-1337 B.C.E.) with local rulers of various Canaanite city-states. This tablet (catalogued as EA 289) and several others were sent to the pharaoh by 'Abdi-Heba, the ruler of Urusalim (Jerusalem), indicating that there was a significant city at the site in the 14th...