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Keyword: darkenergy

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  • Is Earth Growing a Hairy Dark Matter 'Beard'?

    11/23/2015 4:24:17 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Nov 23, 2015 03:48 PM ET // by | Ian O'Neill
    Gary Prezeau of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., describes the results of his theoretical model that goes some way to explain how streams of dark matter particles may interact with our planet's gravitational field. "A (dark matter) stream can be much larger than the solar system itself, and there are many different streams crisscrossing our galactic neighborhood," said Prézeau in a JPL press release. "When gravity interacts with the cold dark matter gas during galaxy formation, all particles within a stream continue traveling at the same velocity." As these streams begin to interact with a planet, according to...
  • Leading Harvard physicist has a radical new theory for why humans exist

    11/15/2015 7:47:38 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 57 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/15/2015 | Jessica Orwig
    Where do we come from? There are many right answers to this question, and the one you get depends on who you ask. For example, an astrophysicist might say that the chemical components of our bodies were first forged in the nuclear fires of stars. On the other hand, an evolutionary biologist might look at the similarities between our DNA and that of other primates' and conclude we evolved from apes. Lisa Randall, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, has a different, and novel answer, which she describes in her latest book, "Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs." Randall has written...
  • The Astronomer Who Wanted to Rearrange the Solar System, Using Nukes

    CalTech astronomer Fritz Zwicky was the first to conceive of dark matter, supernovas and neutron stars. He also had a theory about colonizing the solar system using nuclear bombs. We could terraform other planets, he argued, by pulverizing them and then moving them closer or further from the sun. ...
  • What are white holes?

    10/12/2015 8:35:22 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 9, 2015 | by Fraser Cain, Universe Today
    White Hole. Credit: universe-review.ca =================================================================================================================== Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole? It's imagination day, and we're going to talk about fantasy creatures. Like unicorns, but even rarer. Like leprechauns, but even more fantastical! Today, we're going to talk about white holes. Before we talk about white holes, let's talk about black holes. And before we talk about Black Holes, what's is this thing you have with holes exactly? Black holes are places in the universe where matter and energy are compacted so densely together that their...
  • Goodbye Big Bang, Hello Black Hole? A New Theory Of The Universes Creation

    09/30/2015 7:10:11 PM PDT · by lbryce · 40 replies
    Universe Today ^ | September 18, 2015 | ELIZABETH HOWELL on SEPTEMBER 18, 2013
    Could the famed Big Bang theory need a revision? A group of theoretical physicists suppose the birth of the universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris. Before getting into their findings, lets just preface this by saying nobody knows anything for sure. Humans obviously werent around at the time the universe began. The standard theory is that the universe grew from an infinitely dense point or singularity, but who knows what was there before? For all physicists know, dragons could have come flying out of the singularity, stated Niayesh Afshordi, an...
  • The Case for Complex Dark Matter

    08/20/2015 7:50:41 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 8/20/15 | Liz Kruesi
    The Case for Complex Dark Matter The physicist James Bullock explains how a complicated dark sector of interacting particles may illuminate some puzzling observations of the centers of galaxies. Jonathan Alcorn for Quanta MagazineJames Bullock, a physicist at the University of California, Irvine, imagines what the universe would look like if dark matter interacted with itself. By: Liz KruesiAugust 20, 2015 Dark matter the unseen 80 percent of the universes mass doesnt emit, absorb or reflect light. Astronomers know it exists only because it interacts with our slice of the ordinary universethrough gravity. Hence the hunt for this...
  • Scientists Map the ["inferred"] Dark Matter Around Millions of Galaxies

    04/17/2015 2:15:22 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Ramin Skibba
    The research and maps, which span a large area of the sky, are the product of a massive effort of an international team from the US, UK, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, and Brazil. They announced their new results at the American Physical Society (APS) meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. According to cosmologists, dark matter particles stream and clump together over time in particular regions of the cosmos, often in the same places where galaxies form and cluster. Over time, a cosmic web develops across the universe. Though dark matter is invisible, it expands with the universe and feels the pull of gravity....
  • Fact or Fiction?: Dark Matter Killed the Dinosaurs

    04/02/2015 10:15:04 PM PDT · by grundle · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 25, 2015 | Lee Billings
    A new out-of-this-world theory links mass extinctions with exotic astrophysics and galactic architecture Every once in a great while, something almost unspeakable happens to Earth. Some terrible force reaches out and tears the tree of life limb from limb. In a geological instant, countless creatures perish and entire lineages simply cease to exist. The most famous of these mass extinctions happened about 66 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out in the planet-wide environmental disruption that followed a mountain-sized space rock walloping Earth. We can still see the scar from the impact today as a nearly 200-kilometer-wide crater in...
  • Dark matter is apparently darker than we thought

    03/27/2015 8:14:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 48 replies
    WaPo ^ | Rachel Feltman
    A new study published Thursday in Science suggests that dark matter might be able to zip through the universe without slowing or dragging because particles of it don't even interact with each other. Based on what we can observe about the universe, galaxies should be tearing themselves apart. That's where so-called dark matter comes in: It's a term for the as-of-yet unobserved matter that must be bulking up cosmos, giving galaxies the gravity they need to spin at the rates they do without falling to pieces. But even though we haven't caught dark matter (so named because it doesn't interact...
  • How Do We Know Dark Matter Exists?

    03/12/2015 10:32:02 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Fraser Cain
    Now, you might be saying, if we dont know what this thing is, and we cant detect it. How do we know its actually there? Isnt it probably not there, like dragons? How do we know dark matter actually exists, when we have no idea what it actually is? Oh, its there. In fact, pretty much all we know is that it does exist. Dark matter was first theorized back in the 1930s by Fritz Zwicky to account for the movement of galaxy clusters, but the modern calculations were made by Vera Rubin in the 1960s and 70s. She calculated...
  • Does Dark Matter Originate From Higgs Boson? New Theory To Be Tested At CERN's LHC

    03/07/2015 10:57:00 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    ibtimes.com ^ | Avaneesh Pandey 
    Dark matter has long remained one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the universe. While its presence can be inferred from the gravitational pull it exerts on visible matter, the fact that it does not emit or absorb any radiation makes it next to impossible to detect. ... The new model put forward by a team headed by Christoffer Petersson, a theoretical particle physicist from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, suggests that the Higgs boson, discovered by the LHC in 2012, might be responsible for the birth of dark matter particles. According to this model, if supersymmetry is real,...
  • Black hole 12bn times more massive than sun is discovered

    02/28/2015 10:32:14 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 60 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | Feb 25, 2015 | Press Association
    Scientists name new object SDSS J0100+2802 and say it is 12.8bn light years from Earth and was formed just 900m years after the Big Bang *************************************************************A monster black hole powering the brightest lighthouse in the distant universe has been discovered that is 12bn times more massive than the sun, scientists have revealed.The extraordinary object is at the centre of a quasar - an intensely powerful galactic radiation source - with a million billion times the suns energy output.For years the nature of quasars, discovered in 1963, remained a mystery. Today scientists believe they are generated by matter heating up as...
  • Dark Energy Camera Takes Accidental Gigantic, Magnificent Picture of Comet Lovejoy

    02/27/2015 11:32:31 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Nancy Atkinson
    On December 27, 2014, while the Dark Energy Survey was scanning the southern sky, C2014 Q2 entered the cameras view. Each of the rectangular shapes above represents one of the 62 individual fields of the camera. At the time this image was taken, the comet was passing about 82 million km (51 million miles) from Earth. Thats a short distance for the Dark Energy Camera, which is sensitive to light up to 8 billion light years away. The comets center is a ball of ice roughly 5 km (3 miles) across, and the visible head of the comet is a...
  • Monster Black Hole Is the Largest and Brightest Ever Found

    02/26/2015 5:24:51 AM PST · by C19fan · 27 replies
    Space.com ^ | February 25, 2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Astronomers have discovered the largest and most luminous black hole ever seen an ancient monster with a mass about 12 billion times that of the sun that dates back to when the universe was less than 1 billion years old. It remains a mystery how black holes could have grown so huge in such a relatively brief time after the dawn of the universe, researchers say.
  • The mystery signal from a galaxy far away:Brief pulse from deep in outer space baffles astronomers

    01/27/2015 3:32:02 AM PST · by Las Vegas Dave · 30 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | Tuesday, Jan 27th 2015 | Mark Prigg
    Is it a message from far beyond out own galaxy? A brief mysterious pulse detected by Arecibo telescope has baffled boffins. The discovery of a split-second burst of radio waves by scientists using the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico raises major new questions over what caused it. The finding by an international team of astronomers, published July 10 in The Astrophysical Journal, marks the first time that a so-called 'fast radio burst' has been detected using an instrument other than the Parkes radio telescope in Australia.
  • Mystery radio bursts from outside the Milky Way baffles astronomers

    05/18/2014 7:00:11 AM PDT · by shove_it · 52 replies
    DailyMail/Drudge ^ | 16 May | JONATHAN O'CALLAGHAN
    ~snip~ In 1967 British astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell was left stunned by mysterious pulsing signals she detected coming from outside the solar system. For months she suggested the signals could be of an extraterrestrial intelligent origin, but they were later proven to be rapidly spinning stars known as pulsars. However, a new series of mysterious signals, known as Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), has again got astronomers scratching their heads and wondering if, maybe, were picking up alien messages...
  • In theory, the Milky Way could be a 'galactic transport system' (it could be a huge wormhole!)

    01/22/2015 2:13:28 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/21/15 | Source: Sissa Medialab
    Based on the latest evidence and theories our galaxy could be a huge wormhole (or space-time tunnel, have you seen the movie "Interstellar?") and, if that were true, it would be "stable and navigable." This is the hypothesis put forward in a study published in Annals of Physics and conducted with the participation of SISSA in Trieste. The paper, the result of a collaboration between Indian, Italian and North American researchers, prompts scientists to re-think dark matter. "If we combine the map of the dark matter in the Milky Way with the most recent Big Bang model to explain the...
  • Why wormholes (probably) dont exist

    01/27/2015 2:09:07 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Galileo's Pendulum ^ | 1/26/15 | Matthew Francis
    The test rig for the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at Fermilab. I picked this image today because it kinda sorta looks like the wormhole-making machine from the film version of Contact. [Credit: moi]A lot of science fiction plot devices are devoted to getting around the speed of light. In the real Universe, nothing with mass can travel faster than light, which means we cant travel to distant stars without taking decades, centuries, or longer in transit. So, sci-fi draws from teleportation, hyperdrive, warp drive, and the ultimate cosmic short-cut: wormholes.[1] In some cases, the source of a science fiction...
  • The Paradoxes That Threaten To Tear Modern Cosmology Apart

    01/20/2015 4:43:30 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 99 replies
    Medium ^ | 1/20/15
    Some simple observations about the universe seem to contradict basic physics. Solving these paradoxes could change the way we think about the cosmos Revolutions in science often come from the study of seemingly unresolvable paradoxes. An intense focus on these paradoxes, and their eventual resolution, is a process that has leads to many important breakthroughs. So an interesting exercise is to list the paradoxes associated with current ideas in science. Its just possible that these paradoxes will lead to the next generation of ideas about the universe. Today, Yurij Baryshev at St Petersburg State University in Russia does just this...
  • The Chameleon in the Vacuum Chamber (physics, dark energy)

    01/14/2015 10:38:37 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    The Chameleon in the Vacuum Chamber A new proposal for an experiment that could test the presence of a fifth force with unprecedented precision. It still amazes me that everything I see is made up of only some few dozen particles and four interactions. For all we know. But maybe this isnt all there is? Physicists have been speculating for a while now that our universe needs a fifth fundamental force, one responsible for the phenomenon of dark energy, to maintain the observed expansion rate. Although this idea has been around for more than a decade, it has turned...
  • Lost in Space: Half of All Stars Are Rogues Between Galaxies

    11/07/2014 1:26:34 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    space.com ^ | Charles Q. Choi
    A star mystery solved? These newfound stars could help solve the so-called "photon underproduction crisis," which suggests that an extraordinary amount of ultraviolet light appears to be missing from the universe. The intergalactic stars could also help address what is known as the "missing baryon problem." Baryons are a class of subatomic particles that includes the protons and neutrons that make up the hearts of atoms inside normal matter. Theories of the formation and evolution of the universe predict there should be far more baryons than scientists currently see. The baryons that astronomers have accounted for in the local cosmic...
  • Black Holes Renamed 'Super High Gravity Locations' (Political Correctness...in SPACE!)

    06/26/2007 6:42:04 AM PDT · by Ultra Sonic 007 · 45 replies · 2,306+ views
    BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - The International Space Nomenclature Council today adopted the term 'emplacements de hauts gravit super' - or 'super high gravity locations' - as the official replacement name for black holes. Originally named in reference to the fact that light cannot escape their intense gravity, the term 'black hole' was increasingly criticized as being insensitive to African-Americans and African-Europeans. "We're glad the council finally took action on this issue." said Isaiah Herman, Chairman of the National African-American Coalition of People. "The unimaginable destructive power of these super high gravity locations was giving the word 'black' a negative connotation throughout...
  • Missing Light Crisis: 'Something is Amiss in the Universe'

    07/10/2014 6:57:55 AM PDT · by shove_it · 40 replies
    IBTimes ^ | 10 Jul 2014 | Hannah Osborne
    There is a "missing light crisis" taking place in the universe with a huge deficit on what there should be and what there actually is, astronomers have said. In a statement, experts from the Carnegie Institution for Science said "something is amiss in the universe" with 80% of the light missing. Lead author of the study Juna Kollmeier said: "It's as if you're in a big, brightly-lit room, but you look around and see only a few 40-watt lightbulbs. Where is all that light coming from? It's missing from our census." Published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, scientists found that the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Gamma Rays from Galactic Center Dark Matter?

    03/10/2014 5:36:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | March 10, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What is creating the gamma rays at the center of our Galaxy? Excitement is building that one answer is elusive dark matter. Over the past few years the orbiting Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been imaging our Galaxy's center in gamma-rays. Repeated detailed analyses indicate that the region surrounding the Galactic center seems too bright to be accounted by known gamma-ray sources. A raw image of the Galactic Center region in gamma-rays is shown above on the left, while the image on the right has all known sources subtracted -- leaving an unexpected excess. An exciting hypothetical model that...
  • Scientists proud of dark matter study that turns up nothing

    11/12/2013 6:08:01 PM PST · by Tailgunner Joe · 28 replies
    upi.com ^ | October 31, 2013 | Caroline Lee
    Scientists at the Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota running the biggest, most sensitive dark matter detector yet released its first round of results yesterday -- and they found nothing. The Large Underground Xenon dark matter experiment, or LUX, consists of a vat of 368 kilograms of liquid xenon to minus 110 degrees Celsius, surrounded by a tank of water. LUX sits 4,850 feet underground at the old mine, shielded from cosmic rays. An international team of researchers watched for three months to see if any WIMPS -- weakly interacting massive particles -- would pass through the rock and reveal...
  • 'We may be able to watch dark energy turn on': U-M involved in unprecedented sky survey

    09/03/2013 4:20:57 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    U-Mich ^ | 9/3/13 | Nicole Casal Moore
    ANN ARBORMoonless nights outside the Cerro Tololo astronomical observatory in Chile are so dark that when you look down, you can't see your feet. "You can't see your hands," said David Gerdes, physics professor at the University of Michigan. "But you can hold them up to the sky and see a hand-shaped hole with no stars in it. It's really incredible." From this site in the Andes over the next five years, an international team will map one-eighth of the sky in unprecedented detailaiming to make a time lapse of the past 8 billion years of a slice of the...
  • Physicists suggest possible existence of other kinds of dark matter

    05/26/2013 4:08:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 51 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 24, 2013 | Bob Yirka
    Credit: Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 211302 (2013) (Phys.org) A team of Harvard University physicists has proposed the possible existence of a type of dark matter not described by current physics models. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team suggests it's possible that not all dark matter is cold and collision-less. In the visible universe, galaxies form into a disk shapethe Milky Way is a good example. All of its members align roughly along a single plane, this due to the forces of gravity and spin. Objects form into masses which, over time, spread out...
  • Theorists weigh in on where to hunt dark matter

    05/26/2013 6:21:28 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 22, 2013 | Lori Ann White
    Enlarge Left panel: Air molecules whiz around at a variety of speeds, and some are very fast. When they collide with both heavy and light elements - for example, xenon (purple) and silicon (orange) - these fast moving particles have enough momentum to affect both nuclei. Right panel: Dark matter particles are moving more slowly and are less able to affect the heavy xenon nucleus. As a result, detectors made from lighter materials like silicon may prove to be more effective at picking up signals of dark matter. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Phys.org) Now that it looks...
  • Astroboffins map GIANT MASS of dark matter

    10/18/2012 9:31:59 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 10 replies
    The Register ^ | 17th October 2012 15:15 GMT | Brid-Aine Parnell
    3D image shows ginormous filament of Big Bang batter Dark matter can't really be "seen" as such, it can only be detected by looking at the gravitational effects it has on the space around it. But by collating images from the Hubble Space telescope, the researchers now have a picture of dark matter (shown in blue above) extending 60 million light-years away from one of the most massive galaxy clusters astrophysicists know about MACS J0717. Big Bang theories predict that when the universe was first created, dense matter condensed into a web of tangled dark matter filaments throughout the...
  • IU mathematician offers unified theory of dark matter, dark energy, altering Einstein field...

    09/08/2012 1:36:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    Indiana University ^ | Sept. 6, 2012 | NA
    IU mathematician offers unified theory of dark matter, dark energy, altering Einstein field equations BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- A pair of mathematicians -- one from Indiana University and the other from Sichuan University in China -- have proposed a unified theory of dark matter and dark energy that alters Einstein's equations describing the fundamentals of gravity. Shouhong Wang, a professor in the IU College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Mathematics, and Tian Ma, a professor at Sichuan University, suggest the law of energy and momentum conservation in spacetime is valid only when normal matter, dark matter and dark energy are...
  • Universe has more hydrogen than we thought (Undark matter hidden in plain view)

    06/02/2012 11:45:49 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 26 replies
    The Register ^ | 31st May 2012 23:59 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A re-analysis of radio telescope observations from three countries has yielded a surprising result: nearby galaxies harbour one-third more hydrogen than had previously been estimated. While nothing like enough matter to solve physics dark matter problem, the work by CSIRO astronomer Dr Robert Braun (chief scientist at the agencys Astronomy and Space Science division in Sydney) also helps explain why the rate of star formation has slowed down. While theres more hydrogen than astronomers had thought, its distribution makes star formation more difficult. Andromeda the galaxy headed for a catastrophic collision with our own in about four billion years...
  • Results From South Pole Support Einsteins Cosmological Constant

    04/04/2012 1:05:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 5 replies
    R & D ^ | April 2,2012 | Staff
    Analysis of data from the National Science Foundation-(NSF) funded 10-m South Pole Telescope (SPT) in Antarctica provides new support for the most widely accepted explanation of dark energy, the source of the mysterious force that is responsible for the accelerating expansion of the universe. The results begin to hone in on the tiny mass of the neutrinos, the most abundant particles in the universe, which until recently were thought to be without mass. The SPT data strongly support Albert Einstein's cosmological constantthe leading model for dark energyeven though researchers base the analysis on only a fraction of the SPT data...
  • Survey gets a grip on dark energy (the BOSS project - Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey)

    03/31/2012 3:07:36 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 20 replies
    BBC News ^ | 3/30/12 | Jonathan Amos
    Astronomers have measured the precise distance to over a quarter of a million galaxies to gain new insights into a key period in cosmic history. The 3D map of the sky allows scientists to probe the time six billion years ago when dark energy became the dominant influence on the Universe's expansion. No-one knows the true nature of this repulsive force, but the exquisite data in the international BOSS survey will help test various theories. The analysis appears in six papers. These have all been posted on the arXiv preprint server. "This is an incredibly exciting time to be working...
  • Dwarf galaxies suggest dark matter theory may be wrong

    09/16/2011 3:33:06 PM PDT · by decimon · 56 replies
    BBC ^ | September 16, 2011 | Leila Battison
    Scientists' predictions about the mysterious dark matter purported to make up most of the mass of the Universe may have to be revised.Research on dwarf galaxies suggests they cannot form in the way they do if dark matter exists in the form that the most common model requires it to. That may mean that the Large Hadron Collider will not be able to spot it. Leading cosmologist Carlos Frenk spoke of the "disturbing" developments at the British Science Festival in Bradford. The current theory holds that around 4% of the Universe is made up of normal matter - the stuff...
  • NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer Helps Confirm Nature of Dark Energy

    05/21/2011 6:38:05 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    NASA JPL ^ | 5/19/11 | Whitney Clavin
    PASADENA, Calif. -- A five-year survey of 200,000 galaxies, stretching back seven billion years in cosmic time, has led to one of the best independent confirmations that dark energy is driving our universe apart at accelerating speeds. The survey used data from NASA's space-based Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Anglo-Australian Telescope on Siding Spring Mountain in Australia. The findings offer new support for the favored theory of how dark energy works -- as a constant force, uniformly affecting the universe and propelling its runaway expansion. They contradict an alternate theory, where gravity, not dark energy, is the force pushing space...
  • New method 'confirms dark energy'

    05/19/2011 3:02:45 PM PDT · by decimon · 30 replies
    BBC ^ | May 19, 2011 | Paul Rincon
    First results from a major astronomical survey have confirmed the existence of mysterious dark energy using a cutting-edge technique. Dark energy makes up some 74% of the Universe and its existence explains why the Universe appears to be expanding at an accelerating rate. The finding was based on studies of more than 200,000 galaxies. Scientists used two separate kinds of observation to provide an independent check on previous dark energy results. Two papers by an international team of researchers have been accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society journal. One type of observation used by...
  • Is an Adjacent Universe Causing the Dark Flow of Hundred of Millions of Stars at the Edge of the...

    04/16/2011 5:50:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 4/15/11
    Is an Adjacent Universe Causing the Dark Flow of Hundred of Millions of Stars at the Edge of the Observable Universe? Or, Might It Be Something ElseBack in the Middle Ages, maps showed terrifying images of sea dragons at the boundaries of the known world. Today, scientists have observed strange new motion at the very limits of the known universe -- kind of where you'd expect to find new things, but they still didn't expect this. A huge swathe of galactic clusters seem to be heading to a cosmic hotspot and nobody knows why. The unexplained motion has hundreds of...
  • Dark energy and flat Universe exposed by simple method

    11/24/2010 12:52:49 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 39 replies
    BBC News ^ | 11/24/10 | BBC
    Researchers have developed a simple technique that adds evidence to the theory that the Universe is flat. Moreover, the method - developed by revisiting a 30-year-old idea - confirms that "dark energy" makes up nearly three-quarters of the Universe. The research, published in Nature, uses existing data and relies on fewer assumptions than current approaches. Author Christian Marinoni says the idea turns estimating the Universe's shape into "primary school" geometry. While the idea of the Earth being flat preoccupied explorers centuries ago, the question of whether the Universe itself is flat remains a debatable topic. The degree to which the...
  • Physicists Discover "Violation of a Fundamental Symmetry of the Universe"

    11/04/2010 12:31:54 PM PDT · by lbryce · 110 replies · 1+ views
    i09.com ^ | November 3, 2010 | Staff
    Today physicists announced that they may have found the key to explaining dark matter in the universe. It all has to do with the potential discovery of a "sterile neutrino." According to a release about the new study: Neutrinos are neutral elementary particles born in the radioactive decay of other particles. The known "flavors" of neutrinos are the neutral counterparts of electrons and their heavier cousins, muons and taus. Regardless of a neutrino's original flavor, the particles constantly flip from one type to another in a phenomenon called "neutrino flavor oscillation." An electron neutrino might become a muon neutrino, and...
  • Cosmic Lens Used to Probe Dark Energy for First Time

    08/22/2010 7:57:00 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    PASADENA, Calif. -- Astronomers have devised a new method for measuring perhaps the greatest puzzle of our universe -- dark energy. This mysterious force, discovered in 1998, is pushing our universe apart at ever-increasing speeds. For the first time, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope were able to take advantage of a giant magnifying lens in space -- a massive cluster of galaxies -- to narrow in on the nature of dark energy. Their calculations, when combined with data from other methods, significantly increase the accuracy of dark energy measurements. This may eventually lead to an explanation of what the...
  • Dark energy may not exist in space, scientists claim

    06/22/2010 3:48:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Tuesday, June 15, 2010 | Heidi Blake
    British scientists have claimed that the method used to calculate the make-up of the universe may be wrong. The universe as we know it -- formed of recognisable components such as planets, stars, asteroids and gas -- accounts for just four per cent of the cosmos, according to the decades old Standard Model. The rest is thought to be made up of mysterious dark matter and dark energy. This permeates space and powers the expansion of the universe. But physicists at Durham University now claim the calculations on which the Standard Model is based could be fatally flawed. This raises...
  • Key to the universe found on the Iron Range? [WIMP scatters detected?]

    12/18/2009 6:56:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 843+ views
    Star Tribune ^ | Friday, December 18, 2009 | Bob Von Sternberg
    Scientists announced Thursday that they believe they have detected evidence of dark matter in data collected at an underground physics lab in Soudan... According to the Department of Energy's Fermilab, which is conducting the search for dark matter at the Soudan lab, "judging by the way galaxies rotate, scientists have known for 70 years that the matter we can see does not provide enough gravitational pull to hold the galaxies together. There must exist some form of matter that does not emit or reflect light." In the announcement, the lab said the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment has "detected...
  • Tweak Gravity: What If There Is No Dark Matter?

    11/08/2009 6:07:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies · 946+ views
    Scientific American ^ | Thursday, November 5, 2009 | John Matson
    What if the discrepancy arises from a flaw in our theory of gravity rather than from some provider of mass that we cannot see? In the 1980s physicist Mordehai Milgrom of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, proposed a modification to Newtonian dynamics that would explain many of the observational discrepancies without requiring significant mass to be hidden away in dark matter. But it fell short of describing all celestial objects, and to incorporate the full span of gravitational interactions, a modification to Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity is needed. A review article in the November 6...
  • Is Earth AGAIN The Center of The Universe?

    09/03/2009 8:13:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies · 1,387+ views
    Christian Post ^ | 9/3/2009 | Allen J. Epling
    I came across a news item in the USA Today website, dated August 18, that got my attention. It concerns "Dark Energy", the mysterious force that seems to be speeding up the expansion of the universe, that no one can find or explain. Two scientists say is doesn't exist now because of a "mathematical solution they have produced, that suggests it is a natural result of the Big Bang. Part of the article is reproduced here. "What's the answer? It doesn't exist, suggest mathematicians Blake Temple and Joel Smoller, in a study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National...
  • The day the universe froze; New dark energy model includes cosmological phase transition

    05/08/2009 1:40:50 PM PDT · by Mike Fieschko · 19 replies · 478+ views
    euarekalert.org ^ | May 8, 2009 | David F. Salisbury [?]
    Imagine a time when the entire universe froze. According to a new model for dark energy, that is essentially what happened about 11.5 billion years ago, when the universe was a quarter of the size it is today. The model, published online May 6 in the journal Physical Review D, was developed by Research Associate Sourish Dutta and Professor of Physics Robert Scherrer at Vanderbilt University, working with Professor of Physics Stephen Hsu and graduate student David Reeb at the University of Oregon. A cosmological phase transition -- similar to freezing -- is one of the distinctive aspects of this...
  • Study plunges standard theory of cosmology into crisis

    05/05/2009 7:17:29 AM PDT · by decimon · 32 replies · 805+ views
    As modern cosmologists rely more and more on the ominous "dark matter" to explain otherwise inexplicable observations, much effort has gone into the detection of this mysterious substance in the last two decades, yet no direct proof could be found that it actually exists. Even if it does exist, dark matter would be unable to reconcile all the current discrepancies between actual measurements and predictions based on theoretical models. Hence the number of physicists questioning the existence of dark matter has been increasing for some time now. Competing theories of gravitation have already been developed which are independent of this...
  • Does Dark Energy Really Exist?: Or does Earth occupy a very unusual place in the universe? (LOL!)

    03/29/2009 6:32:33 PM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 74 replies · 2,881+ views
    Scientific American ^ | March 2009 | Timothy Clifton and Pedro G. Ferreira
    Does Dark Energy Really Exist? Or does Earth occupy a very unusual place in the universe? Scientific American, March 2009 By Timothy Clifton and Pedro G. Ferreira ... Most of us are very familiar with the idea that our planet is nothing more than a tiny speck orbiting a typical star, somewhere near the edge of an otherwise unnoteworthy galaxy. In the midst of a universe populated by billions of galaxies that stretch out to our cosmic horizon, we are led to believe that there is nothing special or unique about our location. But what is the evidence for this...
  • New Data Suggests We Dont Live in a Void, and Supports Dark Energy

    02/03/2009 8:26:34 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies · 568+ views
    physorg.com ^ | January 28th, 2009 | Lisa Zyga
    Temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background, among other data, are helping researchers better understand the accelerating expansion of the universe. Image credit: NASA. (PhysOrg.com) -- An alternative proposal to dark energy in which the Earth sits near the center of a large void is undergoing scrutiny, and the results show that void models fit poorly with observed data. Nevertheless, scientists say that more research will be needed to determine if void models, dark energy, or something else can accurately explain how the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. Almost a decade ago, theorists proposed a void model as...
  • Astronomers Aim to Grasp Mysterious Dark Matter (In search of WIMPs)

    12/29/2008 2:46:01 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 6 replies · 484+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 12/29/08 | Clara Moskowitz
    For the past quarter century, dark matter has been a mystery we've just had to live with. But the time may be getting close when science can finally unveil what this befuddling stuff is that makes up most of the matter in the universe. Dark matter can't be seen. Nobody even knows what it is. But it must be there, because without it galaxies would fly apart. Upcoming experiments on Earth such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator in Switzerland, and a new spacecraft called Gaia set to launch in 2011, could be the key to closing the...
  • Tsunami invisibility cloak, dark energy v. the void, sorting nanotubes with light, and more

    09/26/2008 4:30:39 AM PDT · by decimon · 12 replies · 490+ views
    American Physical Society ^ | Sep 26, 2008 | Unknown
    Tsunami invisibility cloak, dark energy v. the void, sorting nanotubes with light, and moreNews from the American Physical SocietyTsunami Invisibility Cloak M. Farhat, S. Enoch, S. Guenneau and A.B. Movchan Physical Review Letters (forthcoming) Rather than building stronger ocean-based structures to withstand tsunamis, it might be easier to simply make the structures disappear. A collaboration of physicists from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and Aix-Marseille Universite in France and the University of Liverpool in England have conducted laboratory experiments showing that it's possible to make type of dike that acts as an invisibility cloak that hides off-shore...