Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • A top Cornell food researcher has had 13 studies retracted. That’s a lot.

    09/20/2018 7:15:00 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 42 replies
    Vox ^ | 20 Sept 2018 | Brian Resnick and Julia Belluz
    Cornell says Brian Wansink “committed academic misconduct,” and is leaving the university. He’s a cautionary tale in bad incentives in science. Thirteen of Wansink’s studies have now been retracted, including the six pulled from JAMA Wednesday. ...To date, 13 of his papers have been retracted. And that’s stunning given that Wansink was so highly cited and his body of work was so influential. Wansink also collected government grants, helped shape the marketing practices at food companies, and worked with the White House to influence food policy in this country.
  • World's oldest brewery discovered, was making beer 13,000 years ago

    09/16/2018 7:17:51 AM PDT · by ETL · 45 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Sept 14, 2018 | James Rogers
    Researchers from the U.S. and Israel have found evidence of the world’s oldest beer-making in an Israeli cave. Scientists studied three 13,000-year-old stone mortars uncovered in the Raqefet Cave near what is now the Israeli city of Haifa. Residues confirmed that the mortars were used for brewing of wheat and barley, as well as for food storage. Experts from Stanford University and the University of Haifa participated in the research. “This accounts for the oldest record of man-made alcohol in the world,” said Li Liu, a professor of Chinese archaeology at Stanford, in a statement. The cave formed part of...
  • ARCHAEOLOGISTS UNCOVER 13,000-YEAR-OLD BREWERY IN THE CARMEL

    09/14/2018 6:08:43 AM PDT · by ASA Vet · 30 replies
    The Jerusalem Post ^ | September 13, 2018 | TAMARA ZIEVE
    Study found the earliest evidence of alcohol production in a cave in northern Israel.Researchers have discovered the earliest evidence of alcohol production, from 13,000 years ago, in the Rakefet Cave in the Carmel, Haifa University announced Thursday. The discovery was made in a joint archaeological collaboration project by Haifa University and Stanford University researchers.Archaeologists analyzed three stone mortars from the 13,000-year-old Natufian burial cave site in Israel, concluding that these mortars were used for brewing wheat/barley, as well as for food storage. The researchers explained that the earliest archaeological evidence for cereal-based brewing, even before the advent of agriculture, comes...
  • 7,200-Year-Old Traces of Cheese Have Been Discovered in Cute Animal Pots

    09/06/2018 3:14:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    science alert ^ | 6 SEP 2018 | MIKE MCRAE
    Residue on 7,200 year old pottery found in Croatia has pushed back the dawn of cheese making in the Mediterranean. The find resets the timeline of agriculture in the region, with fermented dairy products being made a mere five centuries after milk was first stored. But its innovation was more than just a culinary milestone for dairy connoisseurs – it could have been a life saver. … Archaeological data shows people have been growing crops and raising livestock in the region for roughly 8,000 years. Impressed Ware, named for the simple shell-like impressions used to decorate the clay. They form...
  • The Speyer Wine Bottle: the oldest unopened bottle of wine in the world

    09/06/2018 10:56:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 86 replies
    The Vintage News ^ | November 23, 2016 | Brad Smithfield
    The age of the Speyer wine bottle is epic, estimated at around 1,650 years. Its makers did well by sealing it with hot wax and splashing it with olive oil, which is how the bottle, containing a presumably once drinkable white wine, has maintained the liquid inside it... Microbiologists have recommended not opening the wine and the same opinion was shared by the museum's wine department curator, Ludger Tekampe, who in the past stated that if the bottle were to be opened, "We are not sure whether or not it could stand the shock of the air." ..finding the Speyer...
  • Climate change killed off Neanderthals, study says

    08/31/2018 11:13:35 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    Fox ^ | Chris Ciaccia |
    The evidence is there that Europe experienced stark cold and dry spells, putting a strain on Neanderthals' food supply and ability to survive. Thanks to a group of researchers looking at stalagmites in Romania, we may have proof this was indeed the case. Dr. Ersek and his team looked at the stalagmites—rocks that gather in caves for long stretches of time —to look at the climate. Stalagmites contain rings, similar to trees, which can give an indication of how extreme weather patterns, occurring over thousands of years, impacted Neanderthals. The study was published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the...
  • The Assassin’s Cabinet: A Hollowed Out Book, Containing Cabinets Full of Poison Plants, Made in 1682

    08/23/2018 9:28:48 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 11 replies
    stored in the drawers, including Hyoscyamus Niger, which in medieval times "was often used in combination with other plants to a make ‘magic brews’ with psychoactive properties"; Aconitum Napellus, which in ancient Roman times "was a such a common poison of choice among murders and assassins that its cultivation was prohibited"; and Cicuta Virosa, which some have speculated "was the hemlock used by the ancient Greek Republic as the state poison but as it is a native of northern Europe this may not be true," but "is so toxic that a single bite into its root can be fatal" regardless.
  • Top 10 Most Poisonous Plants

    06/27/2018 2:49:37 PM PDT · by BBell · 57 replies
    https://adventure.howstuffworks.com/ ^ | AMY HUNTER & CLINT PUMPHREY
    10. ManchineelWould you believe that there's a tree so poisonous that you don't actually have to touch it to be harmed? It's called the manchineel tree (Hippomane mancinella), found throughout the Florida Everglades, Central America and the Caribbean. Inhaling sawdust or smoke from the 30-foot (9.1-meter) tall tree may result in a variety of uncomfortable side effects, including coughing, laryngitis and bronchitis. Some reports suggest that simply standing beneath the tree during a rainstorm and being splashed by runoff may result in rashes and itching. Your car isn't even safe from this toxic tree: Park under its low branches, and...
  • Evidence in the bones reveals rickets in Roman times

    08/23/2018 12:53:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Sunday, August 19, 2018 | Mark Brown
    Rickets is mostly seen as a 19th-century disease, but research has revealed that the Romans also had a big problem with getting enough vitamin D. Researchers from Historic England and McMaster University in Canada examined 2,787 skeletons from 18 cemeteries across the Roman empire and discovered that rickets was a widespread phenomenon 2,000 years ago. Rickets is caused by vitamin D deficiency, often because of a lack of exposure to sunshine... During the three-year project, researchers examined skeletons from northern England to southern Spain, looking for the deformities generally seen in rickets. Evidence for rickets was found in more than...
  • Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road

    08/21/2018 1:49:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | August 14, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Studies of ancient preserved plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agricultural crops in the heart of the ancient Silk Road. Spengler identified a rich assemblage of fruit and nut crops, showing that many of the crops we are all familiar with today were cultivated along the ancient trade...
  • Eating crickets can be good for your gut, according to new clinical trial

    08/06/2018 3:17:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 51 replies
    The University of Wisconsin-Madison ^ | August 3, 2018 | Kelly April Tyrrell
    Valerie Stull was 12 when she ate her first insect. “I was on a trip with my parents in Central America and we were served fried ants,” she says. “I remember being so grossed out initially, but when I put the ant in my mouth, I was really surprised because it tasted like food — and it was good!” Today, Stull, a recent doctoral graduate of the University of Wisconsin–Madison Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, is the lead author of a new pilot clinical trial published in the journal Scientific Reports that looks at what eating crickets does to the...
  • World’s Oldest Solid Cheese Found in 3,200-Year-Old Jar in Egypt

    08/19/2018 3:48:36 PM PDT · by ETL · 38 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 16, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Ptahmes was Mayor of Memphis and high-ranking official under the Pharaohs Sethi I and Ramses II (1290-1213 BC) of the XIX dynasty. His tomb is located in the south of the Causeway of the Pharaoh Unas which yields a number of tombs dated to the New Kingdom. It was rediscovered in 2010 after a part of it was revealed in 1885 and lost under the sands at the end of the 19th century. During the 2013/2014 excavation season, Cairo University archeologists found broken jars at the site. One jar contained a solidified whitish mass, as well as canvas fabric that...
  • Oldest Cheese Ever Found in Egyptian Tomb

    08/16/2018 10:09:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | August 16, 2018 | Katherine J. Wu
    Last month, archaeologists cracked open a tomb excavated in Alexandria, Egypt, revealing three skeletons bathing in an crimson pool of sludgy sewage. In response, tens of thousands around the world immediately petitioned for the right to sip from the freshly uncorked casket of amontillado. (Spoiler: It hasn't worked out.) But fear not, coffin connoisseurs: There's a new artisanal artifact in town -- the world's oldest solid cheese, over 3,000 years in the making. The tomb of Ptahmes, mayor of Memphis, the ancient capital of Egypt during the 13th century BC, contains quite the trove of treasures. First uncovered in 1885,...
  • Thousands petition to let people DRINK liquid found inside 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus(tr)

    07/23/2018 3:18:23 PM PDT · by BBell · 87 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ ^ | 7/22/18 | JESSICA GREEN
    Thousands sign petition to let people DRINK red liquid found inside 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus believing it is the elixir of life while experts say it is just sewage water Thousands sign petition to let people drink red liquid found inside sarcophagus The 2,000-year-old Egyptian coffin was found earlier this month in Alexandria Tongue-in-cheek petition created last week and now has over 11,000 signaturesA petition to let people drink from a red liquid found inside a 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus has received thousands of signatures. Speculations about the large black granite sarcophagus quickly started after its opening in the coastal city of...
  • Preserved foods were the ‘Hamburger Helper of ancient times’

    08/14/2018 9:46:48 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    The Jewish News of Northern California ^ | August 13, 2018 | Alix Wall
    aren Solomon’s new cookbook, “Cured Meat, Smoked Fish & Pickled Eggs: Recipes and Techniques for Preserving Protein-Packed Foods,” is, on the one hand, very Jewish. Ashkenazi Jews have been at the forefront of food preservation for generations and will appreciate recipes for gravlax, several types of herring and “Killer Smoked Fish Salad.” The book also has recipes for prosciutto made from duck, and for pastrami that Solomon considers one of her top crowd-pleasers. “People just love it,” she said. “There are certain things I make that make people really happy. Bacon tops the list, but that pastrami recipe is right...
  • This Beer Is from 500 BC, and Now Scientists Are Trying to Brew It

    08/15/2018 11:32:34 AM PDT · by C19fan · 89 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | August 15, 2018 | Sarah Rense
    Archaeologists have found traces of beer in Iraq that are super old, dating back 2,500 years to ancient Mesopotamia and the Babylonian Empire. While texts from those forgotten days speak of fermented drinks, this is the "oldest direct evidence" of beer discovered, Smithsonian reports. And now the archaeologists who discovered the traces are trying to replicate the recipe for us to enjoy in the modern era. Eons pass and civilizations fall, but beer is always good. Elsa Perruchini, the lead author on the study announcing the discovery, used a process called gas chromatography, which has never before been used to...
  • Eating Habits in Ancient Greece

    08/12/2018 4:32:50 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 37 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Philip Chrysopoulos
    The eating habits of ancient Greeks were developed after a deep and detailed study of the needs of the body and the spirit. Their diet, which was an important part of their philosophical vision, was based on rules that combined enjoyment with well-being. Unlike what many modern nutritionists believe about the benefits of a hearty breakfast, the ancient Greeks, and especially the Athenians, used to start their day with a very frugal meal that included “akratisma“, a little barley bread dipped in wine. Sometimes they were adding olives and figs. More often, however, their breakfast was limited to a boiled...
  • Reclining and Dining (and Drinking) in Ancient Rome

    08/12/2018 4:49:25 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 33 replies
    The Iris ^ | Shelby Brown
    The ancient Greeks had a recumbent approach to their (male-only) dinner parties, as I discussed in a previous post: elite men reclined, propped on pillows, to drink, converse, and—sometimes—overindulge. The practice of reclining and dining continued into ancient Rome, but with a few additions—for one, respectable women were invited to join the party, and for another, drinking was not a separate, post-dinner event, but became part of the dining experience. An association of dining with luxury led to 19th-century depictions, like the one above, of Roman diners leading the soft life (here, without reclining). The Greeks used single couches onto...
  • What did King Louis XIV of France eat and How did the Sun King dine?

    08/12/2018 5:03:55 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 35 replies
    Zippy Facts ^ | Karen Hill
    From the moment the Sun King arose from his sumptuous gold bed, aligned with the rising sun at the centerpiece of his beloved Versailles, the château was alive with activity. The life of every courtier, minister, lovely lady, doctor, and cook was finely tuned to the rituals of the King, his dressing, shaving, dining, meetings, and evening comedie, dancing or appartement when the halls were flooded with light and the courtiers played billiards, gambled, and ate sweets. Living under a pretense of usefulness to Louis XIV and the government of France, the courtiers were largely a source of amusement...
  • China may have to resume U.S. soybean purchases in weeks: Oil World

    08/07/2018 12:50:59 PM PDT · by xzins · 38 replies
    AP ^ | 7 Aug 18 | AP staff
    HAMBURG (Reuters) - China may have to start buying U.S. soybeans again in coming weeks despite the trade war between the two countries as other regions cannot supply enough soybeans to meet China’s needs, Hamburg-based oilseeds analysts Oil World said on Tuesday.