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Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Archeologists Find World's Oldest Bread

    07/18/2018 6:36:50 AM PDT · by C19fan · 40 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | July 17, 2018 | Avery Thompson
    Bread is life, but according to new research, it might be even more than that. A group of archeologists in northeastern Jordan have found the oldest bread in the world, and their findings show that this bread predates the invention of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. According to this discovery, the hunt for better bread ingredients may have triggered the agricultural revolution, which would make bread largely responsible for all of civilization as we know it. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, University College London and University of Cambridge were excavating an archeological site in Jordan when they discovered...
  • Scientists Have Discovered The Earliest Evidence of Bread, And It's Much Older Than We Expected

    07/16/2018 9:01:11 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    The people who built the ancient structure, members of what's called the Natufian culture, struggled in a "hostile environment to gain more energy from their food," said Ehud Weiss, an archaeobotanist at Bar-Ilan University in Israel who was not involved with the study. Archaeologists found the bread remains in sediment samples at a site named Shubayqa 1 in Jordan. The structure was oval with a fireplace in the center, and its builders carefully laid stones into the ground. Arranz Otaegui said she did not know whether the building was a dwelling or had other, perhaps ceremonial, purposes. Sifting through the...
  • Chocolate milk may be better than sports drinks for exercise recovery

    07/13/2018 8:26:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 66 replies
    Yahoooo! ^ | July 12, 2018 | [Reuters] By Lisa Rapaport
    Athletes who drink chocolate milk during exercise or after a hard workout may recover just as quickly as they would with sports drinks, a research review suggests. What people eat and drink during intense exercise and afterward can impact how well their muscles recover and how rapidly their body replaces fluids and electrolytes lost during the workout, previous research has found. Most studies assessing whether drinks with carbohydrates and electrolytes, or with protein, might aid recovery have been too small to draw firm conclusions about which beverages are the best option, the authors of the new review write in European...
  • Do Low-Carb Diets Help Diabetes?

    07/15/2018 2:20:17 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 104 replies
    WebMD ^ | March 15, 2006 | Salynn Boyles
    Should people with type 2 diabetes follow very low carbohydrate diets? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says "no", but a small study from Sweden suggests such a diet may be one of the best ways to manage the disease and reduce the need for medication. “Many people are essentially cured of their [type 2] diabetes by low-carbohydrate diets, but that message is not getting out," says low-carb proponent and biochemistry professor Richard Feinman, PhD, of the SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. While agreeing that carbohydrate restriction helps people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar, ADA spokesman...
  • Ancient 'Iceman' shows signs of a well-balanced last meal

    07/12/2018 5:57:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    apey-news ^ | Thursday, July 12, 2018 | Emiliano Rodriguez Mega
    Talk about a paleo diet. Scientists have uncovered the last meal of a frozen hunter who died 5,300 years ago in the Alps. The stomach contents of the corpse, widely known as Oetzi the Iceman, offer a snapshot of what ancient Europeans ate more than five millennia ago, researchers said. On the menu, described Thursday in the journal Current Biology, were the fat and meat of a wild goat, meat of a red deer and whole wheat seeds, which Oetzi ate shortly before his death. Traces of fern leaves and spores were also discovered in Oetzi's stomach. Scientists think he...
  • Beware those scientific studies -- most are wrong, researcher warns

    07/06/2018 7:40:10 AM PDT · by SMGFan · 23 replies
    Yahoo AFP ^ | July 5, 2018
    Washington (AFP) - A few years ago, two researchers took the 50 most-used ingredients in a cook book and studied how many had been linked with a cancer risk or benefit, based on a variety of studies published in scientific journals. The result? Forty out of 50, including salt, flour, parsley and sugar. "Is everything we eat associated with cancer?" the researchers wondered in a 2013 article based on their findings. Their investigation touched on a known but persistent problem in the research world: too few studies have large enough samples to support generalized conclusions. But pressure on researchers, competition...
  • Is Vertical Farming Really the Future of Agriculture?

    07/05/2018 3:29:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Eater ^ | July 3, 2018 | Steve Holt
    By now, the images of shelves full of perfect greens in hulking warehouses, stacked floor to ceiling in sterile environs and illuminated by high-powered LED lights, have become familiar. Food futurists and industry leaders say these high-tech vertical farming operations are the future of agriculture — able to operate anywhere, virtually invincible against pests, pathogens, and poor weather, and producing local, fresh, high-quality, lower-carbon food year-round. That future seemed one step closer to reality last year when San Francisco-based indoor farming startup Plenty, which grows a variety of salad and leafy greens hydroponically (without soil) and uses artificial lighting in...
  • Roman Tomb Unearthed; to Everyone’s Surprise, It’s Intact [4th c BC]

    06/11/2018 12:57:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2018 | Elisabetta Povoledo
    Sometimes the most extraordinary finds occur by sheer luck. At least that was the case of a fourth century B.C. chamber tomb that came to light five weeks ago during the construction of an aqueduct in a Rome suburb, when an earthmover accidentally opened a hole in the side of the chamber... The tomb contained the remains of four occupants -- three men and a woman -- and funerary wares. Archaeologists are calling it "the Tomb of the Athlete" because of the presence of two bronze strigils, the instrument used by ancient Greek and Roman athletes to scrape sweat from...
  • Haifa U. Reveals Role of Pigeons in Turning the Negev Green 1,500 Years Ago

    03/24/2018 8:16:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | March 21, 2018 | JNi.Media
    The study, which focused on the ancient settlements of Shivta and Sa'adon, found archaeological evidence that the Byzantines in the Negev did not raise their pigeons for food, but to fertilize the dry loess soil and making it more suitable for intensive agriculture. Loess is made up of fragment of geological detritus, formed by the accumulation of wind-blown dust. But despite its lowly origins, loess tends to develop into very rich soils. Under appropriate climatic conditions, it forms some of the most agriculturally productive terrain in the world. "The pigeon droppings are rich in phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen, which are...
  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...
  • Tree rings tell tale of drought in Mongolia over the last 2,000 years

    03/19/2018 9:41:20 PM PDT · by George - the Other · 15 replies
    Science News ^ | March 19, 2018 | DAN GARISTO
    "It was suspected that a harsh drought from about 2000 to 2010 that killed tens of thousands of livestock was unprecedented in the region’s history and primarily the result of human-caused climate change. But the tree ring data show that the dry spell, while rare in its severity, was not outside the realm of natural climate variability, researchers report online March 14 in Science Advances."
  • The 900 Billion dollar fungus

    03/14/2018 7:58:50 PM PDT · by Fungi · 47 replies
    Blog.oup ^ | February, 2018 | Nicholas Money
    I never post, but this is noteworthy. Brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is responsible for five percent of our gross domestic product. From bread to beer and beyond, this fungus has an incredible impact on our lives. Fungi are important!
  • Fat Cells Are Sensitive to Sunlight

    02/01/2018 10:56:14 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    Sleep Review Magazine ^ | January 31, 2018
    fatcells A study by University of Alberta researchers has shown the fat cells that lie just beneath our skin shrink when exposed to the blue light emitted by the sun. “When the sun’s blue light wavelengths—the light we can see with our eye—penetrate our skin and reach the fat cells just beneath, lipid droplets reduce in size and are released out of the cell. In other words, our cells don’t store as much fat,” says Peter Light, PhD, senior author of the study, who is a professor of pharmacology and the director of UAlberta’s Alberta Diabetes Institute, in a release....
  • Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

    01/18/2018 2:45:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday, January 18, 2018 | Maev Kennedy
    More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago... Archaeologists from three different countries involved in an ongoing excavation have found evidence of a complex of drainage tunnels -- constructed 1,000 years before the famous indoor plumbing of the Minoan palace of Knossos on Crete -- and traces...
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 51 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Chinese archaeologists find 2,000-year-old meat soup

    12/17/2016 10:20:36 AM PST · by LouieFisk · 50 replies
    newkerala.com ^ | December 15th 2016 | newkerala.com
    A vessel containing meat soup, prepared more than 2,000 years ago, was discovered during archaeological excavations in China's Henan province, authorities said on Thursday. The stew, containing beef bones and other ingredients, was discovered on Monday at an archaeological tomb site in Chengyang district near the city of Xinyang, Efe news reported.
  • Scientists have isolated the very first rust pathogen gene that wheat plants detect...

    12/21/2017 3:31:44 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Mr Jiapeng Chen, a PhD candidate from the University of Sydney who initiated the work by sequencing and analysing the genome of a virulent rust isolate, said this was the first important step in addressing the diagnostic challenges posed by ever-changing fungi, which result in new rust pathogen strains. Professor Park explained: "It's like an ongoing arms race - we've got to keep one step ahead of this changing pathogen. "The last major epidemic of wheat stem rust in Australia alone, in 1973, caused $AU300 million in damage - imagine what that would be today." Co-corresponding author, Dr Peter Dodds...
  • Ancient barley took high road to China

    11/26/2017 3:45:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, November 22, 2017 | Washington University in St. Louis
    First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research... "Wheat was introduced to central China in the second or third millennium B.C., but barley did not arrive there until the first millennium B.C.," Liu said. "While previous research suggests wheat cultivation moved east along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our study calls attention to the possibility of a southern route...
  • Was Johnny Appleseed for real?

    11/26/2017 8:46:53 AM PST · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 26, 2017
    AN APPLE A DAY may or may not keep the doctor away, but it's a sentiment shared by just about everyone our Mo Rocca has been visiting: At the Johnny Appleseed Festival in Fort Wayne, Ind., there's no such thing as a bad apple. There you can indulge in apple dumplings -- a skinless apple wrapped in dough, and deep-fried. Rocca asked, "How healthy is this? "Very healthy -- it's an apple!" he was told Or partake of apple petals ("Better than apple dumplings!" enthused cutthroat vendor Logan Forbing), and sample some apple sausages. Fort Wayne is where John Chapman...
  • World’s earliest evidence of wine-making found in Georgia

    11/14/2017 6:38:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | November 14, 2017 | Staff
    he world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday. Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the Zagros Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.