Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

    03/17/2019 11:36:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 14, 2019 | University of Zurich
    Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as "f" in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history. Human speech is incredibly diverse, ranging from ubiquitous sounds like "m" and "a" to the rare click consonants in some languages of Southern Africa. This range of sounds is generally thought to have been established with the emergence of the Homo sapiens around 300,000 years ago. A study...
  • Changes in rat size reveal habitat of 'Hobbit' hominin

    03/17/2019 11:30:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 13, 2019 | Emory Health Sciences
    Murids, as the rat family is known, are more taxonomically diverse than any other mammal group and are found in nearly every part of the world... The study was based on remains recovered from the limestone cave known as Liang Bua, where partial skeletons of H. floresiensis have been found, along with stone tools and the remains of animals -- most of them rats. In fact, out of the 275,000 animal bones identified in the cave so far, 80 percent of them are from rodents... The study encompassed about 10,000 of the Liang Bua rat bones. The remains spanned five...
  • Neandertals' Main Food Source Was Definitely Meat

    02/20/2019 10:17:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 86 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | February 18, 2019 | Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    Neandertals' ...are traditionally considered carnivores and hunters of large mammals, but this hypothesis has recently been challenged by numerous pieces of evidence of plant consumption. Ancient diets are often reconstructed using nitrogen isotope ratios, a tracer of the trophic level, the position an organism occupies in a food chain. Neandertals are apparently occupying a high position in terrestrial food chains, exhibiting slightly higher ratios than carnivores (like hyenas, wolves or foxes) found at the same sites. It has been suggested that these slightly higher values were due to the consumption of mammoth or putrid meat. And we also know some...
  • A taste for fat may have made us human, says study

    02/11/2019 6:51:30 AM PST · by Openurmind · 59 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | 2/6/19 | Staff
    YALE UNIVERSITY—Long before human ancestors began hunting large mammals for meat, a fatty diet provided them with the nutrition to develop bigger brains, posits a new paper* in Current Anthropology. The paper argues that our early ancestors acquired a taste for fat by eating marrow scavenged from the skeletal remains of large animals that had been killed and eaten by other predators. The argument challenges the widely held view among anthropologists that eating meat was the critical factor in setting the stage for the evolution of humans. Our ancestors likely began acquiring a taste for fat 4 million years ago,...
  • What Did Gladiators Eat?

    01/22/2019 11:03:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    BAR ^ | Monday, January 21, 2019 | Robin Ngo
    "For abdominal cramp or bruises," states Marcus Varro, and I quote his very words, "your hearth should be your medicine chest. Drink lye made from its ashes, and you will be cured. One can see how gladiators after a combat are helped by drinking this." -- Pliny, Natural History XXXVI.203 The Roman gladiator calls to mind a fierce fighter who, armed with an assortment of weapons, battled other gladiators -- and even wild animals. What did gladiators eat? Roman author Pliny the Elder reported that gladiators went by the nickname "hordearii" ("barley-eaters") and drank a tonic of ashes after combat...
  • USO Canteen FReeper Style ~ Roman Gladiators ~ October 21, 2003

    10/21/2003 2:40:01 AM PDT · by LaDivaLoca · 371 replies · 2,011+ views
    Roman Gladiatorial Games ^ | October 21, 2003 | LaDivaLoca
        For the freedom you enjoyed yesterday... Thank the Veterans who served in The United States Armed Forces.     Looking forward to tomorrow's freedom? Support The United States Armed Forces Today!       ROMAN GLADIATORS The first gladiatorial contest at Rome took place in 264 BC as part of aristocratic funerary ritual, a munus or funeral gift for the dead. Decimus Junius Brutus put on a gladiatorial combat in honor of his deceased father with three pairs of slaves serving as gladiators in the Forum Boarium (a commercial area that was named after the Roman cattle...
  • 800 Years Of Human Sacrifice In Kent

    06/11/2013 7:40:09 PM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies
    Aardvarchaeology ^ | 6-10-2013 | Martin R
    British Archaeology #131 (July/August) has a feature by Pippa Bradley that caught my interest. It’s about a Wessex Archaeology dig in 2004-05 at Cliffs End farm in Thanet, a piece of north-east Kent that was an island up until the 16th century when silting finished connecting it to mainland England. What we’re dealing with here is ritual murder, some pretty strange disposal of the dead and ancient Scandinavian migrants. Use of the site begins in earnest with six ring-ditch barrows during the Early Bronze Age (2200-1500 cal BC). These were poorly preserved and yielded few interesting finds. People then leave...
  • McDonald’s unveils bacon Big Mac, cheesy bacon fries

    01/09/2019 7:26:20 PM PST · by be-baw · 97 replies
    mlive.com ^ | January 9, 2019 | Brandon Champion
    Bring on the bacon. That’s the word from McDonald’s, which is set to add to bacon to three of its most-popular menu items. The Big Mac Bacon burger, Quarter Pounder Bacon burger and Cheesy Bacon Fries will debut for a limited time at participating restaurants on Jan. 30. Bacon has long been a favorite delicacy among foodies. According to a news release, the tasty indulgence has been mentioned more than 17,000 times a day across U.S. online platforms since 2018. That’s 740 times an hour. “People love bacon, and they love our iconic Big Mac, fresh beef Quarter Pounder burgers...
  • New Thoughts on Neanderthals' Diet

    01/04/2019 1:38:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 2, 2019 | editors
    The levels of nitrogen-15 in Neanderthal bones are so high that they suggest the early human relatives ate more meat than do carnivores such as hyenas. According to a Science News report, paleobiologist Kimberly Foecke of George Washington University thinks those high levels of nitrogen-15 might be due to the condition of the meat that Neanderthals consumed. To check the levels of nitrogen in rotting meat, Foecke left steaks cut from animals that had been raised without hormones or antibiotics outside in a box covered with mesh, and sampled them daily for 16 days. Preliminary results suggest that the levels...
  • Ancient grape seeds may link Sri Lankan trading port to Roman world

    12/26/2018 12:28:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Science Mag ^ | December 12, 2018 | Lizzie Wade
    1500 years ago, Mantai was a bustling port where merchants traded their era’s most valuable commodities. Now, a study of ancient plant remains reveals traders from all corners of the world—including the Roman Empire—may have visited or even lived there... During that time, it would have been a nexus for the spice trade, which ferried Indonesian cloves and Indian peppercorns to Middle Eastern and Roman kitchens...“Because [spices] are so valuable, people in the past really made sure they didn’t lose them or burn them,” Kingwell-Banham says. “These things were worth more than gold.” The clove, in particular, must have made...
  • Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity - Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians

    01/02/2012 6:33:58 AM PST · by blam · 42 replies
    Science Direct ^ | Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden
    Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity Between Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians September 24, 2009. Summary The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century [1] , [2] and [3] . Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible [3] , [4] and [5] . Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early...
  • Ancient DNA reveals male diffusion through the Neolithic Mediterranean route

    06/02/2011 5:26:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    The Neolithic is a key period in the history of the European settlement. Although archaeological and present-day genetic data suggest several hypotheses regarding the human migration patterns at this period, validation of these hypotheses with the use of ancient genetic data has been limited. In this context, we studied DNA extracted from 53 individuals buried in a necropolis used by a French local community 5,000 y ago. The relatively good DNA preservation of the samples allowed us to obtain autosomal, Y-chromosomal, and/or mtDNA data for 29 of the 53 samples studied. From these datasets, we established close parental relationships within...
  • How Middle Eastern Milk Drinkers Conquered Europe

    10/15/2010 7:56:47 AM PDT · by Palter · 30 replies
    Spiegel ^ | 15 Oct 2010 | Matthias Schulz
    New research has revealed that agriculture came to Europe amid a wave of immigration from the Middle East during the Neolithic period. The newcomers won out over the locals because of their sophisticated culture, mastery of agriculture -- and their miracle food, milk. Wedged in between dump trucks and excavators, archeologist Birgit Srock is drawing the outline of a 7,200-year-old posthole. A concrete mixing plant is visible on the horizon. She is here because, during the construction of a high-speed rail line between the German cities of Nuremberg and Berlin, workers happened upon a large Neolithic settlement in the Upper...
  • Beer and the Wheel

    11/24/2018 8:27:46 AM PST · by sodpoodle · 23 replies
    email and multiple sites author not listed | 11/24/2018 | unknown
    The two most important events in all of history were the invention of beer and the invention of the wheel. Beer required grain and that was the beginning of agriculture, about 9,000 years ago. Neither the glass bottle nor aluminum can were invented yet, so while our early humans were sitting around waiting for them to be invented, they just stayed close to the brewery. That's how villages were formed. The wheel was invented to get man to the beer and vice versa. These two were the foundation of modern civilization and together were the catalyst for the splitting of...
  • Romaine lettuce is not safe to eat, CDC warns U.S. consumers...

    11/20/2018 12:14:28 PM PST · by caww · 192 replies
    washingtonpost ^ | 11/20/2018 | washingtonpost
    Romaine lettuce is unsafe to eat in any form, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday in a broad alert in response to a new outbreak of illnesses caused by a particularly dangerous type of E. coli contamination. The CDC told consumers to throw away any romaine lettuce they may already have purchased. Restaurants should not serve it, stores should not sell it, and people should not buy it, no matter where or when the lettuce was grown. It doesn’t matter if it is chopped, whole head or part of a mix. All romaine should be avoided.
  • Farm animals may soon get new features through gene editing

    11/15/2018 2:18:23 PM PST · by ETL · 32 replies
    OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its technology in the livestock industry. But first, it needs to convince regulators that gene-edited animals are no different than conventionally bred ones. To make the technology appealing and to ease any fears that it may be creating Franken-animals, Recombinetics isn't starting with productivity. Instead, it's introducing gene-edited traits as a way to ease...
  • Dirty jokes in latrine mosaics entertained Ancient Romans

    11/06/2018 9:39:09 AM PST · by ETL · 46 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Nov 6, 2018 | Megan Gannon Live Science Contributor | LiveScience
    As men relieved themselves at the public toilets in the coastal city of Antiochia ad Cragum some 1,800 years ago, they probably would have been amused by dirty scenes crafted into floor mosaics, archaeologists have found. "We were stunned at what we were looking at," said Michael Hoff, an archaeologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. "You have to understand the myths to make it really come alive, but bathroom humor is kind of universal as it turns out."The two mosaic scenes twist common tropes in Greek and Roman art. Narcissus is typically shown falling in love with his own reflection...
  • World’s oldest chocolate was made 5300 years ago—in a South American rainforest

    11/04/2018 12:35:57 PM PST · by ETL · 40 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Oct 29, 2018 | Colin Barras
    Our love affair with chocolate is much older than we thought, and newly discovered traces of cocoa on ancient pots suggest it started in the rainforests of what is now Ecuador some 5300 years ago. That’s nearly 1500 years older than earlier evidence, and it shifts the nexus of cocoa production from Central America to the upper Amazon. “This is an incredibly strong demonstration,” says Rosemary Joyce, an archaeologist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was not involved in the new study. “It puts to rest any lingering claims that the use of [cocoa] pods … was an invention...
  • The Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon were using cocoa 5,300 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:06:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 30, 2018 | presse@cirad.fr
    Traces of cocoa dating back 5300 years have been found in ancient pots in the Ecuadorian Amazon. This is the oldest proof of cocoa use ever found. It predates the domestication of cocoa by the Olmec and the Maya in Central America by some 1500 years. This evidence was collected in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon, at the Santa Ana La Florida (SALF) archaeological site near Palanda, discovered 16 years ago by the archaeologist Francisco Valdez and his Franco-Ecuadorian team (IRD/INPC) (2). The Mayo Chinchipe, the oldest known Amerindian civilization in the upper Amazon, had consumed cocoa almost continuously from at...
  • Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:30:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 31, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic animals -cattle, sheep, and goat - made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrgyzstan more than four millennia ago... in many of the most important channels of the Silk Road itself, including Kyrgyzstan's Alay Valley (a large mountain corridor linking northwest China with the oases cities of Bukhara and Samarkand), very little is...