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Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Dirty jokes in latrine mosaics entertained Ancient Romans

    11/06/2018 9:39:09 AM PST · by ETL · 46 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Nov 6, 2018 | Megan Gannon Live Science Contributor | LiveScience
    As men relieved themselves at the public toilets in the coastal city of Antiochia ad Cragum some 1,800 years ago, they probably would have been amused by dirty scenes crafted into floor mosaics, archaeologists have found. "We were stunned at what we were looking at," said Michael Hoff, an archaeologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. "You have to understand the myths to make it really come alive, but bathroom humor is kind of universal as it turns out."The two mosaic scenes twist common tropes in Greek and Roman art. Narcissus is typically shown falling in love with his own reflection...
  • World’s oldest chocolate was made 5300 years ago—in a South American rainforest

    11/04/2018 12:35:57 PM PST · by ETL · 40 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Oct 29, 2018 | Colin Barras
    Our love affair with chocolate is much older than we thought, and newly discovered traces of cocoa on ancient pots suggest it started in the rainforests of what is now Ecuador some 5300 years ago. That’s nearly 1500 years older than earlier evidence, and it shifts the nexus of cocoa production from Central America to the upper Amazon. “This is an incredibly strong demonstration,” says Rosemary Joyce, an archaeologist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was not involved in the new study. “It puts to rest any lingering claims that the use of [cocoa] pods … was an invention...
  • The Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon were using cocoa 5,300 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:06:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 30, 2018 | presse@cirad.fr
    Traces of cocoa dating back 5300 years have been found in ancient pots in the Ecuadorian Amazon. This is the oldest proof of cocoa use ever found. It predates the domestication of cocoa by the Olmec and the Maya in Central America by some 1500 years. This evidence was collected in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon, at the Santa Ana La Florida (SALF) archaeological site near Palanda, discovered 16 years ago by the archaeologist Francisco Valdez and his Franco-Ecuadorian team (IRD/INPC) (2). The Mayo Chinchipe, the oldest known Amerindian civilization in the upper Amazon, had consumed cocoa almost continuously from at...
  • Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:30:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 31, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic animals -cattle, sheep, and goat - made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrgyzstan more than four millennia ago... in many of the most important channels of the Silk Road itself, including Kyrgyzstan's Alay Valley (a large mountain corridor linking northwest China with the oases cities of Bukhara and Samarkand), very little is...
  • Fungi that live in cockroaches, oil paintings, and other bizarre places come to light in new report

    09/12/2018 6:58:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | Sep. 11, 2018 , 7:01 PM | Erik Stokstad
    Those pale button mushrooms in your supermarket hardly do justice to the diversity of fungi. The world hosts an incredible array of these important organisms—and mycologists are discovering more than 2000 new species a year, including ones that live on driftwood, bat guano, and even an oil painting. That’s according to a new report, titled State of the World’s Fungi, from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, a botanical research institution in Richmond, U.K. The lavishly illustrated overview covers the usefulness of fungi (think beer, bread, and penicillin, for starters) as well as the serious threats that some fungi pose to...
  • 'Man the Hunter' theory is debunked in new book

    02/03/2005 2:27:13 PM PST · by aculeus · 202 replies · 2,790+ views
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | February 2, 2005 | By Neil Schoenherr
    Feb. 2, 2005 — You wouldn't know it by current world events, but humans actually evolved to be peaceful, cooperative and social animals. In a new book, an anthropologist at Washington University in St. Louis goes against the prevailing view and argues that primates, including early humans, evolved not as hunters but as prey of many predators, including wild dogs and cats, hyenas, eagles and crocodiles. Despite popular theories posed in research papers and popular literature, early man was not an aggressive killer, argues Robert W. Sussman, Ph.D., professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences. Sussman's book, "Man the Hunted:...
  • Extensive trade in fish between Egypt and Canaan already 3,500 years ago

    10/22/2018 9:50:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Popular Archeology ^ | Tuesday, October 16, 2018 | editors
    Some 3,500 years ago, there was already a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea. This conclusion follows from the analysis of 100 fish teeth that were found at various archeological sites in what is now Israel. The saltwater fish from which these teeth originated is the gilthead sea bream, which is also known as the dorade. It was caught in the Bardawil lagoon on the northern Sinai coast and then transported from Egypt to sites in the southern Levant. This fish transport persisted for about 2,000 years, beginning in the Late Bronze Age and...
  • Roman rubbish dump reveals secrets of ancient trading networks

    06/07/2015 9:12:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | June 4, 2015 | Nick Squires
    The world's largest ancient Roman rubbish dump is revealing intriguing details about the extent and sophistication of trade in the Mediterranean 2,000 years ago. Monte Testaccio is an artificial hill in the centre of Rome that is made up of an estimated 25 million shards of broken amphorae, many from as far afield as Spain and North Africa. The amphorae, containing wine and olive oil, were broken up and dumped on the spoil heap after being unloaded from a nearby port on the River Tiber. They could not be reused because wine and oil residue seeped into the clay, turning...
  • An ancient wreck tells the tale of Romans in France

    03/20/2014 3:03:49 PM PDT · by NYer · 11 replies
    National Geographic ^ | March 20, 2014 | Robert Kunzig
    Published: April 2014Roman Boat Romans in France An ancient wreck tells the tale of Romans in France. By Robert Kunzig Photograph by Rémi Bénali The Romans had a serious trash problem, though by our standards it was good-looking trash. Their problem was amphorae. They needed millions of the curvy clay jars to ship wine, olive oil, and fish sauce around the empire, and often they didn’t recycle their empties. Sometimes they didn’t even bother to pop the cork—it was quicker to saber the neck or the pointy base, drain the thing, then chuck it. In Rome there’s a five-acre,...
  • Trash Talk [ Monte Testaccio, imperial Roman landfill ]

    05/05/2012 8:34:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 62 Number 2 ^ | March/April 2009 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    In the middle of Rome's trendiest neighborhood, surrounded by sushi restaurants and nightclubs with names like Rodeo Steakhouse and Love Story, sits the ancient world's biggest garbage dump--a 150-foot-tall mountain of discarded Roman amphorae, the shipping drums of the ancient world. It takes about 20 minutes to walk around Monte Testaccio, from the Latin testa and Italian cocci, both meaning "potsherd." But despite its size--almost a mile in circumference--it's easy to walk by and not really notice unless you are headed for some excellent pizza at Velavevodetto, a restaurant literally stuck into the mountain's side. Most local residents don't know...
  • Easter Island inhabitants collected freshwater from the ocean's edge in order to survive

    10/12/2018 12:24:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 9, 2018 | Binghamton University
    The process of coastal groundwater discharge makes it possible for humans to collect drinkable freshwater directly where it emerges at the coast of the island... "The porous volcanic soils quickly absorb rain, resulting in a lack of streams and rivers," Lipo said. "Fortunately, water beneath the ground flows downhill and ultimately exits the ground directly at the point at which the porous subterranean rock meets the ocean. When tides are low, this results in the flow of freshwater directly into the sea. Humans can thus take advantage of these sources of freshwater by capturing the water at these points." ...He...
  • Allen West: We Are Now Fully Embroiled in an Uncivil Ideological Civil War

    10/08/2018 11:54:58 PM PDT · by kingattax · 35 replies
    CNS News ^ | 10-8-18 | Allen West
    Let me start by cautioning constitutional conservatives on being giddy, gloating, and excessively celebrating over the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh. College football head coach emeritus Lou Holtz once admonished his players that when they end up in the end zone and score a touchdown, act like you have been there before. Yes, a good man survived, withstood, the most vile, vicious, and vitriolic of assaults and character assassination from the progressive, socialist left. Already the left has evidenced that they are not done. They now want to investigate and impeach Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The question to be asked: why?
  • Cuisine of early farmers revealed by analysis of proteins in pottery from Catalhoyuk

    10/08/2018 11:45:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | October 3, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Çatalhöyük was a large settlement inhabited from about 7100 BC to 5600 BC by early farmers, and is located in what is now central Turkey. The site showcases a fascinating layout in which houses were built directly next to each other in every direction and stands out for its excellent preservation of finds... For this study, the researchers analyzed vessel sherds from the West Mound of Çatalhöyük, dating to a narrow timeframe of 5900-5800 BC towards the end of the site's occupation. The vessel sherds analyzed came from open bowls and jars, as shown by reconstructions and had calcified residues...
  • Traces of opiates found in ancient Cypriot vessel

    10/08/2018 11:40:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | October 2, 2018 | University of York
    Researchers at the University of York and the British Museum have discovered traces of opiates preserved inside a distinctive vessel dating back to the Late Bronze Age. Vessels of this type, known as 'base-ring juglets', have long been thought to have links with opium use because when inverted they resemble the seed head of the opium poppy; they are known to have been widely traded in the eastern Mediterranean ca. 1650 - 1350BC. Researchers used a range of analytical techniques to study a particular juglet housed in the British Museum, which is a sealed vessel, allowing the contents inside to...
  • Humans delayed the onset of the Sahara desert by 500 years

    10/01/2018 9:21:20 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 73 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 1, 2018 | University College London
    Credit: Chris Ford via Flickr ====================================================================== Humans did not accelerate the decline of the 'Green Sahara' and may have managed to hold back the onset of the Sahara desert by around 500 years, according to new research led by UCL. The study by a team of geographers and archaeologists from UCL and King's College London, published in Nature Communications, suggests that early pastoralists in North Africa combined detailed knowledge of the environment with newly domesticated species to deal with the long-term drying trend. It is thought that early pastoralists in North Africa developed intricate ways to efficiently manage sparse...
  • Prehistoric art hints at lost Indian civilisation

    10/01/2018 4:59:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | Monday, October 1, 2018 | unattributed
    The rock carvings -- known as petroglyphs -- have been discovered in their thousands atop hillocks in the Konkan region of western Maharashtra. Mostly discovered in the Ratnagiri and Rajapur areas, a majority of the images etched on the rocky, flat hilltops remained unnoticed for thousands of years... animals, birds, human figures and geometrical designs are all depicted. The way the petroglyphs have been drawn, and their similarity to those found in other parts of the world, have led experts to believe that they were created in prehistoric times and are possibly among the oldest ever discovered. "Our first deduction...
  • Research proves South East Asian population boom 4,000 years ago

    09/24/2018 7:38:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | September 20, 2018 | Australian National University
    Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth. Using the new population measurement method, which utilises human skeletal remains, they have been able to prove a significant rapid increase in growth across populations in Thailand, China and Vietnam during the Neolithic Period, and a second subsequent rise in the Iron Age. Lead researcher Clare McFadden, a PhD Scholar with the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology, said the population trend was consistent across samples taken...
  • "White People Food" Is Creating An Unattainable Picture Of Health

    08/30/2018 3:59:32 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 111 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | Aug. 30, 2018 | Kristen Aiken
    Tanisha Gordon doesn’t see what white people love so much about cottage cheese. Or salads, especially when they’re topped with fussy ingredients like candied almonds, pickled carrots or Brussels slaw. Gordon is a 37-year-old employee at an IT company in the Washington, D.C. area, and until recently, her diet was deeply saturated with fast food - McDonald’s, Taco Bell, you name it. When her doctor diagnosed her last year with pre-diabetes and prescribed her a CPAP machine to help her sleep through the night, she began working with a nutritionist to clean up her diet. But the lifestyle change she...
  • A top Cornell food researcher has had 13 studies retracted. That’s a lot.

    09/20/2018 7:15:00 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 60 replies
    Vox ^ | 20 Sept 2018 | Brian Resnick and Julia Belluz
    Cornell says Brian Wansink “committed academic misconduct,” and is leaving the university. He’s a cautionary tale in bad incentives in science. Thirteen of Wansink’s studies have now been retracted, including the six pulled from JAMA Wednesday. ...To date, 13 of his papers have been retracted. And that’s stunning given that Wansink was so highly cited and his body of work was so influential. Wansink also collected government grants, helped shape the marketing practices at food companies, and worked with the White House to influence food policy in this country.
  • World's oldest brewery discovered, was making beer 13,000 years ago

    09/16/2018 7:17:51 AM PDT · by ETL · 45 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Sept 14, 2018 | James Rogers
    Researchers from the U.S. and Israel have found evidence of the world’s oldest beer-making in an Israeli cave. Scientists studied three 13,000-year-old stone mortars uncovered in the Raqefet Cave near what is now the Israeli city of Haifa. Residues confirmed that the mortars were used for brewing of wheat and barley, as well as for food storage. Experts from Stanford University and the University of Haifa participated in the research. “This accounts for the oldest record of man-made alcohol in the world,” said Li Liu, a professor of Chinese archaeology at Stanford, in a statement. The cave formed part of...