Keyword: dig

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  • The Big Dig: Fed Data Shows Households Attack Mountain of Debt

    11/29/2011 10:13:07 AM PST · by Hojczyk · 12 replies
    Yahoo Finance ^ | November 29,2011 | Daniel Gross
    The long slog continues. The feature of the post-crisis economy has been a two-speed recovery. As a group, companies have done extremely well. Corporate profits and cash holdings are at record highs. The stock market has bounced back smartly since the lows of March 2009. But consumers haven't done quite as well. For consumers, it takes a lot longer to restructure debt. Families can't fire their kids, or walk away from financial commitments so easily. For most families, the biggest fixed cost is generally housing. And while it's possible to cut housing costs by defaulting, or refinancing, or downsizing, people...
  • Mammoth remains discovered near Castroville

    03/25/2011 4:00:12 AM PDT · by csvset · 14 replies
    The bones of a juvenile Ice Age Columbian mammoth have been found in a field near Castroville, the first discovery of its kind in Monterey County. The remains were uncovered by earthmoving equipment in December, said Mark Hylkema, Santa Cruz District archaeologist for the state Department of Parks. The precise location of the find is being kept under wraps to discourage souvenir hunters from damaging, looting or contaminating the site. Hylkema has specialized in the study of Native American culture on the Central Coast. He is recommending that a controlled excavation of the site be done "with a particular goal...
  • Feds threaten man on oiled Florida beach: "ILLEGAL TO DIG" -- NO SAND CASTLES

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIWI_KVGxA4&feature=player_embedded
  • Indian villager takes 14 years to dig tunnel through mountain

    12/18/2009 2:53:04 PM PST · by posterchild · 56 replies · 2,721+ views
    Guardian ^ | Dec 1, 2009 | Randeep Ramesh
    An Indian villager burrowed for 14 years with a hammer and chisel to cut a tunnel through a mountain so that his neighbours could reach nearby fields and he could park his truck outside his home. Ramchandra Das, 53, who lives in eastern Bihar state, carved a 10m-long, 4m-wide tunnel through the hill range from his village of Kewati. Das took up the Herculean task after villagers found the 7km trek over the mountain increasingly arduous. When the authorities refused to help to cut the journey time, Das began carving his way through the earth in the direction of the...
  • Barney Frank takes dig at Bachmann following health care protest

    11/06/2009 1:46:05 PM PST · by WOBBLY BOB · 77 replies · 2,793+ views
    pioneer press ^ | 11-6-09 | Associated Press
    WASHINGTON — Democratic Rep. Barney Frank took a dig Friday at the Republican lawmaker who organized a protest by conservatives against health care legislation. Frank, a Massachusetts liberal, told an audience: "Some of the people (at the rally) that wanted to engage me in conversation appeared to have been the losers in the 'Are you smarter than Michele Bachmann contest?'."
  • 'Breakthrough' At Stonehenge Dig

    04/09/2008 2:07:22 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 58+ views
    BBC ^ | 4-9-2008 | Rebecca Morelle
    'Breakthrough' at Stonehenge dig By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC News (Go To The BBC Site To View The Video)Professor Darvill explains what is happening at the Stonehenge dig Archaeologists carrying out an excavation at Stonehenge say they have broken through to a layer that may finally explain why the site was built. The team has reached sockets that once held bluestones - smaller stones, most now missing or uprooted, which formed the site's original structure. The researchers believe that the bluestones could reveal that Stonehenge was once a place of healing. The dig is the first to take place...
  • Archaeologist Begin Historic Stonehenge Dig

    03/31/2008 3:07:36 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 607+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 3-31-2008 | Nic Fleming
    Archaeologists begin historic Stonehenge dig By Nic Fleming, Science Correspondent Last Updated: 3:38pm BST 31/03/2008 Archaeologists began a historic dig on Monday which they hope will unlock the ancient secrets of Stonehenge once and for all. The researchers started digging a trench to examine the first stones erected at the site – the first excavation at the monument to be given the go-ahead for 44 years. Professors Geoffrey Wainwright (right) and Tim Darvill hope to unlock ancient secrets Samples recovered from the pit will provide material that could allow the team to date the start of work on the landmark...
  • At Jerusalem dig, archaeologists get a peek at palatial gardens

    03/26/2008 4:52:07 PM PDT · by NYer · 18 replies · 632+ views
    CNS ^ | March 26, 2008 | Karin Kloosterman
    JERUSALEM (CNS) -- Ancient kings, armies, prophets and pilgrims have made their mark on the ancient hills of Jerusalem and have left behind some of the world's most important archaeological finds. But with every stone overturned, puzzling questions about the history of modern Western civilization come to light. This is especially true at the Tel Aviv University-owned site of Ramat Rachel, an archaeological site from biblical times. For that reason, Jewish and Christian archaeologists, theologians and volunteers come to dig there year after year. Clues revealed by last year's dig, such as elaborate underground water tunnels, pools, pipes and gutters,...
  • Archaeologist Dig May Have Found Chumash Home Foundation

    02/11/2008 3:05:40 PM PST · by blam · 4 replies · 97+ views
    San Jose Mercury ^ | 2-11-2008
    Archaeologist dig may have found Chumash home foundation The Associated Press Article Launched: 02/11/2008 05:28:15 AM PST SANTA BARBARA, Calif.—Archaeologists digging in a garden at the Santa Barbara Mission may have unearthed the complete stone foundation of a Chumash house. The dig is expected to be completed Wednesday under the watchful eyes of American Indian representatives. The foundation of the home is believed to be part of what's left of a Chumash village at the site, which is at the northeastern edge of an Indian pueblo at the mission. Much of the village remains were destroyed over the years. In...
  • Berlin Dig Finds City Older Than Thought

    01/31/2008 6:45:24 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 98+ views
    Yahoo News - AP ^ | 1-30-2008 | David Risin
    Berlin dig finds city older than thought By DAVID RISING, Associated Press Writer Wed Jan 30, 1:59 PM ET BERLIN - An archaeological dig in downtown Berlin has uncovered evidence that the German capital is at least 45 years older than had previously been established, authorities said Wednesday. During excavation work last week in the Mitte district, archaeologists uncovered a wooden beam from an ancient earthen cellar, said Karin Wagner of the city-state's office for historical preservation. It was in exceptionally good condition, having lain under the water table for centuries, and scientists were able to determine from a sample...
  • Walker Archaeological Dig Unearths More Finds (Minnesota)

    11/11/2007 8:36:14 AM PST · by blam · 6 replies · 395+ views
    Enterprise.com - Pilot Independent ^ | 11-9-2007 | Gail De Boer
    Walker archeological dig unearths more finds Gail De Boer, Pilot Independent Published Friday, November 09, 2007 Despite not having as much time as he’d hoped to work at the Walker Hill site this summer, Leech Lake Heritage Sites (LLHS) program director and tribal archaeologist Thor Olmanson says it was a productive and exciting season. “We have boxes of things to go through this winter,” he declared Nov. 1, as he showed off recent “finds.” In 2004, LLHS, a for-profit archaeological consulting firm owned by the Leech Lake Band, was brought in to study the site chosen for the new Walker...
  • Dig Uncovers Ancient Desert Dwellers (Australia)

    11/01/2007 1:35:49 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 112+ views
    Science Alert ^ | 11-2-2007
    Dig uncovers ancient desert dwellers Friday, 02 November 2007 University of New England New archaeological evidence, published in October in the journal Australian Aboriginal Studies, reveals that Aboriginal people visited the Watarrka Plateau, south-west of Alice Springs, 13,000 years ago. Archaeologists Dr June Ross from the University of New England and Dr Mike Smith from the National Museum of Australia were dropped by helicopter on the Watarrka Plateau as part of a survey of rock art in the Watarrka (Kings Canyon) National Park. "The new finds were unexpected," said Dr Ross (who is pictured here at the Watarrka site). "We...
  • Mammoth graveyard may someday be open to public

    09/20/2007 6:21:38 AM PDT · by Dysart · 49 replies · 199+ views
    Star-Telegram ^ | 9-20-07 | R.A. DYER
    WACO -- Not far from modest suburban homes in the middle of some thick Texas woods lies a secret boneyard.Surrounded by a tall chain-link fence and covered by what looks like a red-and-white circus tent, the site contains the remains of towering monsters. Remains of at least 25 mammoths, signs of a big saber-toothed cat and a long extinct camel have been found at the site.This is the Waco Mammoth Site, a collection of prehistoric fossils embedded in the dirt not far from the Bosque River. The site could be a potent educational resource if it were not off-limits to...
  • Archaeologists Issue Urgent Warnings Against Temple Mount Dig

    08/30/2007 12:52:22 PM PDT · by Nachum · 22 replies · 1,076+ views
    Arutz 7 ^ | Aug 30, 2007 | Hillel Fendel
    (IsraelNN.com) Top Israeli archaeologists held an emergency press conference on Thursday, warning that a Second Temple courtyard wall is in danger of being destroyed by the Arab excavations there. Members of the Committee to Prevent the Destruction of Temple Mount Antiquities warned that other artifacts could also be endangered by the unsupervised dig. (IsraelNN.com) Top Israeli archaeologists held an emergency press conference on Thursday, warning that a Second Temple courtyard wall is in danger of being destroyed by the Arab excavations there. Members of the Committee to Prevent the Destruction of Temple Mount Antiquities warned that other artifacts could also...
  • Russia Dig Finds 'Tsar's Family'

    08/24/2007 1:04:54 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 952+ views
    BBC ^ | 8-24-2007
    Russia dig finds 'tsar's family' 13-year-old Prince Alexei would have been the heir to the throne Russian archaeologists believe they may have found the remains of two children of Russia's last tsar, executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918. DNA tests will be carried out on the bones, thought to be those of Prince Alexei and his elder sister Maria. Archaeologists excavated ground close to the site in Yekaterinburg where the tsar, his wife and their three other daughters were found in 1991. The prosecutor-general is reopening an investigation into the case. Archaeologist Sergei Pogorelov says bullets found at the burial...
  • Muslim Protests As Israel Digs At Holy Site

    02/06/2007 10:52:46 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 627+ views
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 2-6-2007 | Rory McCarthy
    Muslim protests as Israel digs at holy site Rory McCarthy in Jerusalem Tuesday February 6, 2007 Guardian Unlimited (UK) Israeli archaeologists say that work at the Dome of the Rock is necessary on safety grounds. Photograph: Yoav Lemmer/AFP Israeli archaeologists began digging up a stone ramp near the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem's Old City today, bringing immediate protests from Palestinians and condemnation from the king of Jordan. The work is the first stage in a scheme to build a new, raised walkway up to the site, which is known as the Haram al-Sharif to Muslims and the Temple...
  • DUBAI DUETS

    03/05/2006 9:25:47 PM PST · by txroadkill · 19 replies · 1,173+ views
    The American Spectator ^ | 3/6/06 | Washington Prowler
    DUBAI DUETS Late Friday, Department of Justice lawyers in the Office of Legal Counsel were attempting to determine if former President Bill Clinton had registered as an "Agent of a Foreign Principal." Federal statute requires that anyone -- even a former President -- doing political or public affairs work on behalf of a foreign country, agency or official must register with the Department, and essentially update his status every six months. It was not clear the Clinton had done so. If his status is less clear, here is what we do know: If Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton did not know...
  • Prehistoric skeleton found along Lake Travis

    08/28/2006 12:11:13 AM PDT · by ValerieUSA · 42 replies · 3,344+ views
    austin american-statesman ^ | Monday, August 28, 2006 | Marty Toohey
    An archaeology crew excavated what its members think is a prehistoric skeleton from the banks of Lake Travis on Sunday. Evidence at the site indicates that the skeleton is between 700 and 2,000 years old, most likely dating back about 1,000 years, members of the excavation crew said. The nearly intact skeleton is being donated to the University of Texas for further study. The skeleton was found Aug. 9 by an Austin man riding a personal watercraft on Lake Travis. David Houston had pulled onto the sloped southern bank, admiring a nearby house, when he saw a jawbone, teeth and...
  • Archaeologists Dig Up More Ice Age Remains At Creswell Crags

    08/24/2006 4:18:32 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies · 818+ views
    24 Hour Museum ^ | 8-23-2006 | Graham Spicer
    ARCHAEOLOGISTS DIG UP MORE ICE AGE REMAINS AT CRESWELL CRAGS By Graham Spicer 23/08/2006 Creswell Crags is a limestone gorge containing important evidence of Ice Age life. Photo Creswell Heritage Trust Archaeologists searching for clues about Ice Age artists have completed a major excavation in Nottinghamshire, unearthing more than 1,000 finds. A team from the University of Sheffield and The British Museum conducted the dig in Church Hole cave at Creswell Crags between August 7 and 18 2006, the site of the only British discovery of Ice Age rock art. The rock art discoveries, made in 2003 and 2004, are...
  • Problems happened later, says Dukakis

    07/18/2006 5:55:41 PM PDT · by A. Pole · 26 replies · 829+ views
    The Boston Globe ^ | July 18, 2006 | Andrea Estes
    Governor Michael S. Dukakis, whose administration hired Big Dig manager Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff, yesterday attributed problems on the huge construction project to later administrations. Dukakis, the last Democrat to hold the Massachusetts governor's office, told a television interviewer last night that he had urged Governor William F. Weld, a Republican, to ask Frederick P. Salvucci, transportation secretary under Dukakis, "to stay on and run that project for you." "Well, he didn't do that," Dukakis said of Weld on WGBH's "Greater Boston." "So we've had a series of people over there who aren't bad people," Dukakis said, "but they didn't have anywhere...
  • Workers doubted ceiling method. Firm prevailed on fasteners despite tests.

    07/18/2006 6:07:46 AM PDT · by A. Pole · 128 replies · 2,201+ views
    The Boston Globe ^ | July 18, 2006 | Sean P. Murphy and Raja Mishra
    Field tests by construction workers indicated that bolt-and-epoxy fasteners might not support the multi-ton ceiling panels in the Interstate 90 connector tunnel, but the firm that designed the tunnel persuaded Big Dig officials to use the system anyway, law enforcement officials said yesterday. [...] The Massachusetts Turnpike Authority and lead management contractor Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff approved both decisions as the tunnel ceiling was built in 1999. As the connector tunnel ceiling was under construction, Modern Continental Corp. workers expressed concerns after field tests indicated the bolt fixtures were unsound, law enforcement officials said. [...] The workers' concerns were sent to Modern...
  • Volunteers To Dig Into Croatan Indian Village Site Again ("Lost Colony")

    05/28/2006 6:25:38 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 1,690+ views
    Virginian - Pilot ^ | 5-28-2006 | Catherine Kozak
    Volunteers to dig into Croatan Indian village site again By CATHERINE KOZAK, The Virginian-Pilot © May 28, 2006 The last time the long-dormant Croatan site was investigated, a team of archaeologists unearthed a 16th-century gold ring that may be the most significant archaeological find of early American history. In June, the team, with many of the same members who were there in 1998 when the English nobleman's ring was found, will be back to revive exploration of the ancient capital of the Croatan Indians in Buxton. Organized by The Lost Colony Center for Science and Research , the team of...
  • Creepy Cupcakes Mark Jimmy Hoffa Search

    05/26/2006 3:20:05 PM PDT · by Westlander · 6 replies · 491+ views
    The Associated Press ^ | May 25, 2006 | AP
    MILFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. -- Residents in Oakland County, Mich., near the site of the search for Jimmy Hoffa are having a little bit of fun with it. Milford Township businesses are selling T-shirts, special salads, and even baked goods. FBI agents looking for Hoffa should check the Milford Baking Co. The bakery has a hot seller with its Jimmy Hoffa cupcakes.
  • Treasure (Archaeology) Dig Threatens Bosphorus Rail Link

    05/02/2006 11:44:06 AM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 1,254+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-2-2006 | Sarah Rainsford
    Treasure dig threatens Bosphorus rail link By Sarah Rainsford BBC News, Istanbul The port has been uncovered at the site designated for a railway hub It's been called the project of the century: a mission to connect two continents with a $2.6bn rail-tunnel running deep beneath the Bosphorus Straits. The idea of linking the two sides of Istanbul underwater was first dreamt of by Sultan Abdul Mecit 150 years ago. See how the tunnel will cross the Bosphorus Now that Ottoman dream is finally being realised. But the modern version of that vision has hit a historical stumbling block. Istanbul...
  • Dig Finds Long-Term Use At Hell's Half Acre (6,000BC)

    04/17/2006 2:45:58 PM PDT · by blam · 12 replies · 1,328+ views
    Billings Gazette ^ | 4-17-2006 | AP
    Dig finds long-term use at Hell's Half AcreSite was home to Indians at least 1,200 years ago By The Associated Press CASPER, Wyo. -- A preliminary report on an archaeological dig says Hell's Half Acre, west of Casper, was home to prehistoric American Indians at least 1,200 years ago, and perhaps as long as 8,000 years ago. John Albanese, chairman of the Natrona County Historic Preservation Society, told Natrona County commissioners on Thursday that archaeological evidence shows Indians were hunting bison at Hell's Half Acre between 1,200 and 3,000 years ago, and that some evidence appeared to be much older....
  • Massachusetts seeks Big Dig refund

    03/18/2006 8:20:30 AM PST · by george76 · 41 replies · 1,275+ views
    Yahoo news ^ | 3-18-06 | Reuters
    Massachusetts' attorney general is demanding that contractors refund $108 million for poor work on Boston's "Big Dig," which is the biggest public works project in U.S. history and has been plagued by leaks and delays. Attorney General Tom Reilly's office plans to sue Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff and other companies if the two sides do not reach an agreement over some 200 complaints of shoddy work in putting a major highway running through downtown Boston underground... Costs for building the 7.8 mile underground roadway through Boston ballooned from under $3 billion to the current $14.6 billion.
  • Ancient Prison Cells Unearthed In Tiberias Dig

    11/28/2005 11:27:50 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 913+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 11-28-2005 | Eli Ashkenazi
    An Antiques Authority worker climbing out of one of the recently discovered prison cells in Tiberias. (Yaron Kaminsky) Last update - 02:16 28/11/2005 Ancient prison cells unearthed in Tiberias dig By Eli Ashkenazi A bit of what prisoners suffered in ancient times can be seen as of yesterday at the archaeological dig in the old city of Tiberias. Excavations of the basilica compound in the eastern part of the old city recently unearthed two small chambers believed to have served as holding cells for prisoners awaiting trial. If today's custody conditions at police stations elicit complaints from detainees and defense...
  • Archaeologists Suprised To Discover Ancient Horse Skeletons In Jaffa Dig

    11/27/2005 2:32:02 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 648+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 11-23-2005 | Yuval Azoulay
    Archaeologists uncovering the horse skeletons found recently during a salvage dig beneath the Armenian monastery in Jaffa. (Nir Kafri) Last update - 02:21 23/11/2005 Archaeologists surprised to discover ancient horse skeletons in Jaffa dig By Yuval Azoulay Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists conducting a salvage dig in the Armenian monastery in Jaffa expected to find artifacts connected to the ancient fortifications of the city. However, a few days ago they were surprised to discover, some 60 centimeters below the monastery floor, no fewer than 10 horse skeletons. Excavation directors Amit Re'em and Martin Peilstoker said yesterday the horses may have...
  • Mammoth site hearing set

    10/26/2005 6:11:43 PM PDT · by ValerieUSA · 30 replies · 627+ views
    Waco Tribune-Herald ^ | October 26, 2005 | J.B. Smith
    The public will get a chance tomorrow to weigh in on a proposal to add the Waco Mammoth Site to the national park system. A team of National Park Service officials is kicking off its study of the mammoth park idea with a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Baylor University's Mayborn Museum. Officials with Baylor and the city of Waco are trying to rally community support for the project. “It's important for us to have a good turnout,” said Mayborn director Ellie Caston. “We need to be able to show the team that the community is concerned about...
  • Days-Long Dig Yields Thousands of Munitions

    10/17/2005 5:44:08 PM PDT · by SandRat · 24 replies · 715+ views
    Defend America News ^ | Oct 17, 2005 | Army Sgt. Matthew Wester
    U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Owen Williams, assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 70th Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division, carries two artillery shells out of a weapons cache site northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Oct. 4, 2005. Williams is from West Plains, Mo. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Matthew Wester Days-Long Dig Yields Thousands of Munitions During a traffic stop, two men were questioned about the fuses in their truck;the information they provided led U.S. soldiers to thousands of buried munitions. By U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew Wester 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division TAJI, Iraq, Oct. 17, 2005 — A...
  • Schroder Bows Out With Dig At Blair And Bush

    10/12/2005 6:28:49 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,001+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10-13-2005 | Kate Connolyin Berlin
    Schröder bows out with a dig at Blair and Bush By Kate Connollyin Berlin (Filed: 13/10/2005) Germany's outgoing chancellor, Gerhard Schröder, took swipes at Britain and America yesterday as he announced that he would not be part of the next government. In a speech to trade unionists in his home town of Hanover, he criticised Tony Blair over his vision for the future of the European Union. Gerhard Schröder yesterday "I say to my British friend that people in Germany, in Europe, do not want complete denationalisation," he said. "They want a state that is not in front of their...
  • Neolithic Agricultural Community's Daily Life Shown In Amazing Detail (Greece, 7,500 YA)

    10/06/2005 4:59:11 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 702+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 10-5-2005 | Iota Sykka
    Neolithic agricultural community’s daily life shown in amazing detail in dig at ancient site Well-preserved settlement in Kastoria, northern Greece, dating 7,500 years ago illuminates the characteristics of rural life of the times Remains of buildings (trenches for foundations, poles, wall coating, floorings) in the western section of the excavation. By Iota Sykka - Kathimerini The finds at Avgi in Kastoria are far from common. At a site of 3.5 hectares near the Aghia Triada municipality, a 7,500-year-old rural community has been unearthed. Rare miniature vessels the size of a ring, nine fine impressive stamps, 20 human and animal-shaped idols,...
  • Dig Unearths 1,500 Year Old 'Tarbat Man' (Pict)

    09/23/2005 4:05:01 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,685+ views
    North Star ^ | 9-22-2005
    Dig unearths 1,500 year old 'Tarbat Man' HUMAN remains have been discovered at Portmahomack - but police will not be called in as the skeleton is thought to be around 1,500 years old and likely to be that of a Pictish monk. The discovery was made by archaeologists from the University of York who come to the Port each season to dig in the grounds of the Tarbat Old Church, one of the most important Pictish sites in Scotland. They are excited by the find came in the last week of the archaeological dig and means that the team will...
  • If I Dig a Very Deep Hole, Where Will I End Up? (Another stupid application for Google Maps...)

    09/03/2005 1:01:21 AM PDT · by Dallas59 · 12 replies · 525+ views
    Dig To The Other Side ^ | 9/3/05 | Dig To The Other Side
    Well...I believe the majority of us end up in the Indian Ocean...Not even close to China...
  • Dig Reveals More Of Isles' Bloody History (Scotland)

    08/17/2005 4:54:27 PM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 432+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 8-16-2005 | John Ross
    Dig reveals more of isles' bloody history JOHN ROSS NEW evidence of bloody clan battles at a medieval stronghold in the Western Isles has been unearthed by archaeologists. A team from Glasgow University has revealed a fortified settlement on Dun Eistean, a sea stack on the north-east coast of Lewis, thought to have been a refuge and spiritual home for the Clan Morrison 400 to 800 years ago. The discovery of musket balls, a lookout tower and a defensive wall around the perimeter of the island points to battles with the Morrisons' fierce rivals, including the Macaulays. Rachel Barrowman and...
  • Dig Backs Biblical Account Of Philistine City Of Gat

    08/14/2005 8:20:53 PM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 974+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 8-9-2005 | Amiram Barkat
    Dig backs biblical account of Philistine city of GatLast update - 02:53 09/08/2005 By Amiram BarkatThe moat running around Gat that was to enforce the siege. David Bachar New evidence regarding the bitter end of Gat, the largest and most important Philistine city, was recently unearthed at a dig at Tel Zafit near the Masmia intersection in the Lachish region. According to Kings II (12:18), Gat was conquered by King Hazael of Aram. He intended to capture Jerusalem as well, but King Jehoash of Judah saved the capital while losing treasure taken from the Temple (Kings II 14:14). Findings at...
  • Scientists Seek Fresh Chance To Dig Up Stonehenge's Secrets

    07/24/2005 1:07:56 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 1,062+ views
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 7-24-2005 | Robin McKie
    Scientists seek fresh chance to dig up Stonehenge's secrets Robin McKie, science editor Sunday July 24, 2005 The Observer (UK) Stonehenge has always mystified. Julius Caesar thought it was the work of druids, medieval scholars believed it was the handiwork of Merlin, while local folk tales simply blamed the devil. Now scientists are demanding a full-scale research programme be launched to update our knowledge of the monument and discover precisely who built it and its burial barrow graves. This is the key recommendation of Stonehenge: an Archaeological Research Framework, edited by Timothy Darvill of Bournemouth University, soon to be published...
  • Furness Dig May Have Found St Patrick's Birthplace

    07/13/2005 4:00:07 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 1,131+ views
    NW Evening Mail ^ | 7-12-2005
    FURNESS DIG MAY HAVE FOUND ST PATRICK'S BIRTHPLACE Published on 12/07/2005 ARCHAEOLOGISTS believe they have found the birthplace of St Patrick. A dig in Urswick has uncovered a Roman fort which may be the Banna Vernta Berniae, thought by scholars to be where Ireland’s patron saint was born. Excavations are being led by Steve Dickinson, from Ulverston, who tutors archaeology at Lancaster University. Evidence of the Romans in Furness is rare. But Mr Dickinson is convinced the finds at Urswick are Roman with their typical layout of foundations and ditches. Mr Dickinson said: “I can’t tell you how important it...
  • North Korea To Help Iran Dig Secret Missile Bunkers

    06/11/2005 5:20:06 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,164+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6-12-2005 | Con Coughlin
    North Korea to help Iran dig secret missile bunkersBy Con Coughlin(Filed: 12/06/2005) Iran is secretly negotiating with North Korea to build a network of underground bunkers to conceal its clandestine nuclear weapons project. A team of construction experts has arrived in Teheran to conduct a survey of Iranian requirements. It included a senior North Korean specialist in underground construction who helped to design the bunkers that contain Pyongyang's illegal weapons programme. Current talks centre on whether the North Koreans will undertake the work for the Iranians, or act as advisers to Iranian construction companies. The North Koreans specialise in the...
  • Big Back Hoe....

    04/30/2005 4:05:33 AM PDT · by Dallas59 · 34 replies · 1,701+ views
    Email ^ | 4/30/05 | Dallas59
  • Tiberias Dig Unearths Very Rare Marble Floor

    04/08/2005 11:13:37 AM PDT · by blam · 110 replies · 2,277+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 4-8-2005 | Eli Ashkenazi
    Tiberias dig unearths very rare marble floor By Eli Ashkenazi A marble floor dating from the first century CE was unearthed during this season's excavations of ancient Tiberias. According to archaeologist Professor Yizhar Hirschfeld, director of the three-week dig that ended yesterday, the floor is apparently a remnant of a pavement in the palace of Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great, who ruled the Galilee from 4 BCE to 38 CE.
  • Archaeologists Dig Up Ancient Casting Centre

    04/06/2005 11:43:59 AM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 566+ views
    Vietnam News ^ | 4-5-2005
    Archeologists dig up ancient casting centre (05-04-2005) Story in stone: An arterfact found at Den Citadel. — Archeologists claim to have found the country’s largest Bronze Age metallurgy centre, estimated to be 3,500 years old. The site, located at the Den Citadel in Phu My Hamlet, Tu Lap Commune, Me Linh District, in the northern province of Vinh Phuc, has yielded many discoveries which indicate that the site is the largest centre of bronze casting in Viet Nam to have been discovered so far, said Lam Thi My Dung, director of the Museum of Anthropology. Metallurgy and bronze-casting are representative...
  • Scientists Interrupt Search for the “Mayan Atlantis" in the Caribbean.

    03/30/2005 2:16:20 PM PST · by vannrox · 24 replies · 3,740+ views
    Cuban Newpaper: GRANMA ^ | November 2004 / FR Post 3-30-05 | Editorial Staff
    Scientists Interrupt Search for the “Mayan Atlantis" in the Caribbean. Cuban Newpaper: GRANMA Mexico City, November 6, 2004 Forwarded by David Drewelow This story updates this prior story . - A group of scientists searching for a hypothetical “Mayan Atlantis" found a pyramid of 35 meters under the waters of the Caribbean, but it had to interrupt the mission due to technical problems, as reported by the Mexican newspaper Millenium, today. After 25 days of work in the sea, near the southwestern end of Cuba, the investigations deeper than 500 meters had to be abandoned due to problems with the...
  • Hillary Clinton 2008 Confirmed?

    01/17/2005 4:38:09 PM PST · by yoe · 51 replies · 6,759+ views
    National Ledger ^ | Jan. 16, 2005 | Staff
    New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) has long been rumored as desperately seeking the democratic nomination for president in 2008. And while many political observers fully expect the power hungry former First Lady to hit the campaign trail within only a few months of being re-elected as a US Senator in 2006, US News & World report claims to have a confirmation of sorts. From USNews.Com's Washington Whispers: Hillary's in… You don't have to take it from us about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton 's desire to run for president. Her brothers, Hugh and Tony Rodham, say it's true. Friends...
  • Archaeologist Continues To Dig Up History (Meadowcroft, 16K Year Old)

    10/17/2004 6:25:09 PM PDT · by blam · 12 replies · 941+ views
    Pittsburglive ^ | 10-17-2004 | Majorie Wertz
    Archaeologist continues to dig up history By Marjorie Wertz For The Tribune-Review Sunday, October 17, 2004 In the past 30 years archaeologists worldwide have visited the Meadowcroft Rockshelter in Washington County. The general public can now see what's involved in the archaeological dig that has proved the existence of early humans dating back 16,000 years. "The site was opened last year for the first time to the public," said David Scofield, director of Meadowcroft Museum of Rural Life. "We are now in the process of getting an architect to create a design for a permanent roof over the excavation. This...
  • Did the First Americans Come From, Er, Australia?

    09/11/2004 8:23:29 AM PDT · by vannrox · 13 replies · 1,271+ views
    Reuters via Yahoo News ^ | Mon Sep 6, 9:24 AM ET | Editorial Staff
    Did the First Americans Come From, Er, Australia? Mon Sep 6, 9:24 AM ET EXETER, England (Reuters) - Anthropologists stepped into a hornets' nest on Monday, revealing research that suggests the original inhabitants of America may in fact have come from what is now known as Australia.   The claim will be extremely unwelcome to today's native Americans who came overland from Siberia and say they were there first. But Silvia Gonzalez from John Moores University in Liverpool said skeletal evidence pointed strongly to this unpalatable truth and hinted that recovered DNA would corroborate it. "This is very contentious," Gonzalez,...
  • Maryland Dig May Reach Back 16,000 Years

    08/17/2004 6:05:45 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 848+ views
    Newsday ^ | 8-17-2004
    RAWLINGS, Md. -- Robert D. Wall is too careful a scientist to say he's on the verge of a sensational discovery. But the soybean field where the Towson University anthropologist has been digging for more than a decade is yielding hints that someone camped there, on the banks of the Potomac River, as early as 14,000 B.C. If further digging and carbon dating confirm it, the field in Allegany County could be among the oldest and most important archaeological sites in the Americas.
  • 'Scientific American' Shines Spotlight On SC Dig (Topper Site - TV Tonight)

    07/20/2004 3:03:17 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 4,153+ views
    The State.com ^ | 7-20-2004 | Doug Nye
    ‘Scientific American’ shines spotlight on S.C. dig By DOUG NYETelevision Editor Posted on Tue, Jul. 20, 2004 About 12,000 years ago, the first people to journey to the American continents did so by crossing the Bering land bridge from Asia. At least, that’s what archaeologists have long believed. But tonight’s edition of “Scientific American Frontiers” examines five archaeological sites that could prove that humans walked this land much earlier. Among the digs spotlighted is USC’s Topper excavation site in Allendale County, supervised by archaeologist Albert C. Goodyear, director of the Allendale Paleo-Indian Expedition of the S.C. Institute of Archaeology and...
  • Dig Under Manezh Yields Suprises

    06/02/2004 1:59:17 PM PDT · by blam · 11 replies · 972+ views
    Itar-Tass ^ | 6-2-2004 | Kevin O'flynn
    Wednesday, June 2, 2004. Dig Under Manezh Yields Surprises By Kevin O'Flynn Staff Writer Itar-Tass Alexander Veksler showing a rare sword from the 13th or 14th century that was dug up from beneath the Manezh hall. She was a fashionable young woman of her time. Wealthy and sophisticated, with a bracelet on one arm and rings, she was buried close to the Kremlin -- where she lay entombed for about 850 years. The young woman is among 40 human remains, a centuries-old sword, a rare Peter the Great coin and hundreds of other artifacts unearthed recently beneath the Central Manezh...
  • Dig discovery is oldest 'pet cat'

    04/09/2004 5:34:44 AM PDT · by vannrox · 60 replies · 700+ views
    BBC ^ | Thursday, 8 April, 2004, 18:00 GMT 19:00 UK | By Paul Rincon
    The oldest known evidence of people keeping cats as pets may have been discovered by archaeologists. The discovery of a cat buried with what could be its owner in a Neolithic grave on Cyprus suggests domestication of cats had begun 9,500 years ago. It was thought the Egyptians were first to domesticate cats, with the earliest evidence dating to 2,000-1,900 BC. French researchers writing in Science magazine show that the process actually began much earlier than that. The evidence comes from the Neolithic, or late stone age, village of Shillourokambos on Cyprus, which was inhabited from the 9th to the...