Keyword: electrolysis

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  • Making crude oil out of thin air?

    01/09/2014 3:15:36 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies
    Bakken.com ^ | November 22, 2013 | John Bestoloffe
    There is big news coming out of the Middle East that one of the hottest commodities can be made out of the earth’s two most common elements, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Energy could see a substantial progression of discovery thanks to a group of researchers at Ben-Gurion University (BGU) of the Negev in Israel. The group reports that they have pioneered a process that converts carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas into a renewable alternative for crude oil. The alternative has been dubbed “green feed” crude oil. This innovative idea was made possible by the use of nanomaterials which reduces the...
  • Biotech Company to Patent Fuel-Secreting Bacterium

    09/15/2010 1:09:11 PM PDT · by neverdem · 39 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 13, 2010 | MATTHEW L. WALD
    A biotech company plans to announce Tuesday that it has won a patent on a genetically altered bacterium that converts sunlight and carbon dioxide into ingredients of diesel fuel, a step that could provide a new pathway for making ethanol or a diesel replacement that skips several cumbersome and expensive steps in existing methods. The bacterium’s product, which it secretes like sweat, is a class of hydrocarbon molecules called alkanes that are chemically indistinguishable from the ones made in oil refineries. The organism can grow in bodies of water unfit for drinking or on land that is useless for farming,...
  • Engineered Eggshells To Help Make Hydrogen Fuel

    09/26/2007 12:36:21 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies · 574+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 9/26/2007 | Ohio State University
    Engineers at Ohio State University have found a way to turn discarded chicken eggshells into an alternative energy resource The patented process uses eggshells to soak up carbon dioxide from a reaction that produces hydrogen fuel. It also includes a unique method for peeling the collagen-containing membrane from the inside of the shells, so that the collagen can be used commercially. L.S. Fan, Distinguished University Professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Ohio State, said that he and former Ohio State doctoral student, Mahesh Iyer, hit upon the idea when they were trying to improve a method of hydrogen production...
  • Anything Into Oil

    04/24/2003 10:20:45 PM PDT · by zarf · 6 replies · 281+ views
    Discover ^ | May 2003 | Brad Lemley
    Technological savvy could turn 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas crude each year Gory refuse, from a Butterball Turkey plant in Carthage, Missouri, will no longer go to waste. Each day 200 tons of turkey offal will be carted to the first industrial-scale thermal depolymerization plant, recently completed in an adjacent lot, and be transformed into various useful products, including 600 barrels of light oil. In an industrial park in Philadelphia sits a new machine that can change almost anything into oil. Really. "This is a solution to three of...
  • Anything into Oil

    04/23/2003 7:20:48 PM PDT · by Bobber58 · 13 replies · 212+ views
    discovery magazine ^ | May 2003 | Brad Lemley
    DISCOVER Vol. 24 No. 5 (May 2003) Table of Contents Anything into Oil Technological savvy could turn 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas crude each year By Brad Lemley Photography by Tony Law Gory refuse, from a Butterball Turkey plant in Carthage, Missouri, will no longer go to waste. Each day 200 tons of turkey offal will be carted to the first industrial-scale thermal depolymerization plant, recently completed in an adjacent lot, and be transformed into various useful products, including 600 barrels of light oil. In an industrial park...
  • Anything into oil!

    04/21/2003 8:40:46 PM PDT · by AlextheWise1 · 24 replies · 407+ views
    Discover magazine online ^ | May 2003 | Brad Lemley
    Anything into Oil Technological savvy could turn 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas crude each year By Brad Lemley Photography by Tony Law Gory refuse, from a Butterball Turkey plant in Carthage, Missouri, will no longer go to waste. Each day 200 tons of turkey offal will be carted to the first industrial-scale thermal depolymerization plant, recently completed in an adjacent lot, and be transformed into various useful products, including 600 barrels of light oil. In an industrial park in Philadelphia sits a new machine that can change almost...
  • Anything into Oil (Change trash & sewage to oil for $15@barrel)

    08/20/2003 6:34:41 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 51 replies · 6,055+ views
    DISCOVER Vol. 24 No. 5 ^ | May 2003 | Brad Lemley
    DISCOVER Vol. 24 No. 5 (May 2003) Table of Contents Anything into Oil Technological savvy could turn 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas crude each year By Brad Lemley Photography by Tony Law Gory refuse, from a Butterball Turkey plant in Carthage, Missouri, will no longer go to waste. Each day 200 tons of turkey offal will be carted to the first industrial-scale thermal depolymerization plant, recently completed in an adjacent lot, and be transformed into various useful products, including 600 barrels of light oil. In an industrial park in...
  • Anything into Oil(solution to dependence on foregn oil?)

    04/21/2003 5:57:41 AM PDT · by honway · 142 replies · 19,080+ views
    DISCOVER Vol. 24 No. 5 ^ | May 2003 | Brad Lemley
    In an industrial park in Philadelphia sits a new machine that can change almost anything into oil. Really. "This is a solution to three of the biggest problems facing mankind," says Brian Appel, chairman and CEO of Changing World Technologies, the company that built this pilot plant and has just completed its first industrial-size installation in Missouri. "This process can deal with the world's waste. It can supplement our dwindling supplies of oil. And it can slow down global warming." Pardon me, says a reporter, shivering in the frigid dawn, but that sounds too good to be true. "Everybody says...
  • Anything into oil.

    09/22/2003 3:33:57 PM PDT · by pcx99 · 31 replies · 1,749+ views
    Discover ^ | May 2003 | Brad Lemley
    DISCOVER Vol. 24 No. 5 (May 2003) Table of Contents Anything into Oil Technological savvy could turn 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas crude each year By Brad Lemley Photography by Tony Law Gory refuse, from a Butterball Turkey plant in Carthage, Missouri, will no longer go to waste. Each day 200 tons of turkey offal will be carted to the first industrial-scale thermal depolymerization plant, recently completed in an adjacent lot, and be transformed into various useful products, including 600 barrels of light oil. In an industrial park in...
  • Israelis Developing Alternatives To Arab Oil

    11/08/2005 4:32:03 PM PST · by FunkyChicken · 22 replies · 742+ views
    Arutz-7 News Service ^ | 8NOV05 | Ezra HaLevi
    Arutz Sheva News Service - http://www.IsraelNationalNews.com ------------------------------------------------ Tuesday, November 08, 2005, 6 Cheshvan 5766 4. ISRAELIS DEVELOPING ALTERNATIVES TO ARAB OIL By Ezra HaLevi An Israeli inventor and company are trying to use garbage and leftover olive pulp from olive-oil factories, respectively, to replace oil in providing fuel and electricity to the Jewish State. From one ton of garbage, half a ton of oil, 300 kg of gas or 150 kg of green coal, from which electricity is produced, can be extracted, according to inventor Dr. Sergei Rosenberg. Dr. Rosenberg spoke with Arutz-7 about the development of his invention that...
  • Making Gasoline from Carbon Dioxide

    05/31/2007 8:47:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies · 1,431+ views
    www.technologyreview.com (MIT) ^ | 04/25/2007 | Kevin Bullis
    A solar-powered reaction turns a greenhouse gas into a valuable raw material.Solar splitter: An amber-colored semiconductor (gallium phosphide), together with metal contacts, is part of a new device that uses solar energy to split carbon dioxide to make carbon monoxide. Credit: Aaron Sathrum, UCSD Chemists have shown that it is possible to use solar energy, paired with the right catalyst, to convert carbon dioxide into a raw material for making a wide range of products, including plastics and gasoline. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), recently demonstrated that light absorbed and converted into electricity by a silicon...
  • Startup turns carbon dioxide into fuels

    06/15/2012 11:16:18 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 15, 2012 | By Catherine Zandonella
    Ask Andrew Bocarsly about the innovation behind Liquid Light, a New Jersey startup company that turns carbon dioxide into fuels and industrial chemicals, and the Princeton University chemistry professor smiles ruefully. "The project goes back to the early '90s," he said. "But nobody cared about carbon dioxide at that time." Today, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a hot topic. Scientists around the globe are searching for ways to store, dispose of, or prevent the formation of the greenhouse gas, which is a major driver of global climate change. Liquid Light hopes to take this concept one step further and harness waste...
  • Soybean catalyst for hydrogen evolution

    05/30/2013 7:07:36 PM PDT · by neverdem · 50 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 30 May 2013 | Helen Potter
    A catalyst made from soybeans could overcome a major barrier to cheap hydrogen fuel by replacing the platinum catalyst used in the electrocatalytic production of hydrogen, claim scientists in the US.For hydrogen to be competitive with petroleum fuels, the US Department of Energy has estimated that its cost must be reduced from $4–5/kg to $2–3/kg. The platinum catalyst used to make hydrogen via water electrolysis is a significant part of the cost, so the search is on for cheaper catalysts that are just as efficient.Now, James Muckerman, Wei-Fu Chen and colleagues at Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, have produced...
  • MIT Chemist Announces Artificial Photosynthesis, Signs with Tata

    03/28/2011 5:36:18 AM PDT · by Normandy · 26 replies
    Free Energy Times ^ | March 27, 2011
    At a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim, California, MIT Professor Dr. Daniel Nocera announced that a research team had achieved a long -sought-after for goal of artificially copying photosynthesis, the process by which plants turn sunlight into energy, to create electricity easily and cheaply.
  • Urine turned into hydrogen fuel

    07/07/2009 8:23:59 PM PDT · by neverdem · 71 replies · 2,305+ views
    Chemistry World ^ | 02 July 2009 | Matt Wilkinson
    US researchers have developed an efficient way of producing hydrogen from urine - a feat that could not only fuel the cars of the future, but could also help clean up municipal wastewater. Using hydrogen to power cars has become an increasingly attractive transportation fuel, as the only emission produced is water - but a major stumbling block is the lack of a cheap, renewable source of the fuel. Gerardine Botte of Ohio University may now have found the answer, using an electrolytic approach to produce hydrogen from urine - the most abundant waste on Earth - at a fraction of the cost...
  • Hydrogen power system unveiled in Maine

    08/30/2006 5:50:43 PM PDT · by neverdem · 36 replies · 1,254+ views
    Seattle Post-Intelligencer ^ | August 30, 2006 | JERRY HARKAVY
    ASSOCIATED PRESS WISCASSET, Maine -- A $250,000 demonstration project that produces hydrogen energy to provide backup lighting and warmth at the Chewonki Foundation's environmental education center was hailed at its unveiling Monday as the first of its kind in the nation. The nonprofit foundation teamed up with the Portland-based Hydrogen Energy Center to develop the system that was touted as an example of the kind of cutting-edge technology that can reduce dependence on fossil fuels and help ease global warming. "Hydrogen represents a huge growth industry, and the creation of this partnership will put Maine on the leading edge as...