Keyword: espionageact

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  • Report: Obama brings chilling effect on journalism

    10/10/2013 7:46:43 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 28 replies
    Associated Press via Drudge ^ | October 10, 2013 | By BRETT ZONGKER
    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The U.S. government's aggressive prosecution of leaks and efforts to control information are having a chilling effect on journalists and government whistle-blowers, according to a report released Thursday on U.S. press freedoms under the Obama administration. The Committee to Protect Journalists conducted its first examination of U.S. press freedoms amid the Obama administration's unprecedented number of prosecutions of government sources and seizures of journalists' records. Usually the group focuses on advocating for press freedoms abroad. Leonard Downie Jr., a former executive editor of The Washington Post, wrote the 30-page analysis entitled "The Obama Administration and the Press."...
  • The Totalitarianism at the Heart of the Obama Scandals

    06/10/2013 7:23:33 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 10 replies
    FrontPageMag.com ^ | June 10, 2013 | Mark Tapson
    The Obama administration’s legs are wobbling under the weight of so many scandals lately that whole chunks of the edifice – the IRS, the NSA, the DOJ – are threatening to implode, particularly without support from the normally adoring media. Even the New York Times – the New York Times! – is no longer willing to bolster an administration whose totalitarian urges have been exposed to the light. Let’s begin with the Internal Revenue Service’s thuggish targeting of conservative groups. From April 2010 to April 2012, the IRS placed on hold the processing of applications for tax-exempt status received from...
  • Obama Uses 1917 Espionage Act to Go After Reporters

    05/27/2013 3:27:18 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 35 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 27, 2013 | Michael Barone
    There is one problem with the entirely justified if self-interested media squawking about the Justice Department snooping into the phone records of multiple Associated Press reporters and Fox News's James Rosen. The problem is that what the AP reporters and Rosen did arguably violates the letter of the law. The search warrant in the Rosen case cites Section 793(d) of Title 18 of the U.S. Code. Section 793(d) says that a person lawfully in possession of information that the government has classified as secret who turns it over to someone not lawfully entitled to posses it has committed a crime....
  • Obama Orders Eric Holder To Investigate Himself

    05/24/2013 4:02:34 PM PDT · by raptor22 · 35 replies
    Investor's Business Daily ^ | May 24, 2013 | IBD EDITORIALS
    Press Freedom: The president worries about the "chilling effect" of leak investigations as his attorney general signs the warrant labeling a Fox News reporter as a violator of the Espionage Act. The hypocrisy is breathtaking. 'I am troubled by the possibility that leak investigations may chill the investigative journalism that holds government accountable," President Obama said with a straight face in a speech Thursday at the National Defense University. "Journalists should not be at legal risk for doing their jobs." Indeed, investigative reporting should not be a criminal offense — just ask Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, whose digging unearthed...
  • Holder OK'd search warrant for Fox News reporter's private emails, official says

    05/23/2013 2:56:05 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 109 replies
    NBC News ^ | 5/23/13 | Michael Isikoff
    Attorney General Eric Holder signed off on a controversial search warrant that identified Fox News reporter James Rosen as a “possible co-conspirator” in violations of the Espionage Act and authorized seizure of his private emails, a law enforcement official told NBC News on Thursday.
  • DOJ invoked Espionage Act in calling Fox News reporter criminal 'co-conspirator'

    05/22/2013 6:11:34 PM PDT · by markomalley · 33 replies
    Fox News ^ | 5/22/2013 | Judson Berger
    The Justice Department did more than seize a Fox News reporter's emails while suggesting he was a criminal "co-conspirator" in a leak case -- it did so under one of the most serious wartime laws in America, the Espionage Act. It's the same law used by the Nixon administration to go after The New York Times and Daniel Ellsberg over the leak of the Pentagon Papers. It's the law used to charge the Rosenbergs, American communists, for allegedly passing secret information to the Soviet Union -- they were executed for the offense in 1953. One Washington attorney, who represents two...
  • Obama DOJ formally accuses journalist in leak case of committing crimes

    05/20/2013 6:54:21 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 99 replies
    It is now well known that the Obama justice department has prosecuted more government leakers under the 1917 Espionage Act than all prior administrations combined - in fact, double the number of all such prior prosecutions. But as last week's controversy over the DOJ's pursuit of the phone records of AP reporters illustrated, this obsessive fixation in defense of secrecy also targets, and severely damages, journalists specifically and the newsgathering process in general.
  • Protecting Our Protectors (Oliver North)

    12/09/2010 5:08:53 PM PST · by jazusamo · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Creators Syndicate ^ | December 9, 2010 | Oliver North
          WASHINGTON — It's a tough time to be a member of the U.S. armed forces. Those serving in our all-volunteer military — and their families — are stretched and stressed by more than nine years of war. Unfortunately, our commander in chief — supposedly the champion of our soldiers, sailors, airmen, guardsmen and Marines — isn't doing anything to make serving in uniform any easier. President Barack Obama — fresh from his 3 1/2-hour "visit" to Afghanistan — continues to insist that the U.S. Senate act immediately to allow active homosexuals to serve in the military....
  • DOJ:Journalists Can Be Prosecuted for Publishing Classified Information

    08/01/2007 3:07:21 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 30 replies · 837+ views
    American Thinker ^ | August 1, 2007 | Clarice Feldman
    The Department of Justice has concluded that, while its emphasis is on prosecuting leakers of classified information, the Espionage Act does permit the prosecution of journalists who publish such information without authorization: The espionage statutes concerning classified information could be employed against journalists who publish such information without authorization, a Justice Department official told Congress recently, elaborating on remarks made last year by Attorney General Gonzales. Those statutes, "on their face, do not provide an exemption for any particular profession or class of persons, including journalists," wrote Matthew W. Friedrich, DoJ Criminal Division Chief of Staff, in a March 2007...
  • Attorney General Gonzales: Indict the New York Times

    06/24/2006 3:50:38 PM PDT · by oldtimer2 · 74 replies · 3,480+ views
    The American Thinker ^ | June 24, 2006 | William Lalor
    Attorney General Gonzales: Indict the New York Times June 24th, 2006 Within days of the September 11th attacks, the head of Reuters’ worldwide news division, explaining the agency’s refusal to use the word “terrorist,” made the famous fatuous remark that “one man’s freedom terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.” Reuters, it seemed, wouldn’t be taking sides in America’s war on Islamic jihad, because as journalists, Reuters didn’t believe the American people and our allies are any “better” than our putrid enemies. Such is the repulsive state of the “moral equivalence” mongers in what passes for news journalism, even among those...
  • Leaks and the Law [The case for prosecuting the New York Times]

    06/23/2006 11:04:09 PM PDT · by bnelson44 · 81 replies · 2,176+ views
    Weekly Standard ^ | 6/23/06 | Gabriel Schoenfeld
    CAN JOURNALISTS REALLY BE PROSECUTED for publishing national security secrets? In the wake of a series of New York Times stories revealing highly sensitive counterterrorism programs, that question is increasingly the talk of newsrooms across the country, and especially one newsroom located on West 43rd Street in Manhattan. Last December, in the face of a presidential warning that they would compromise ongoing investigations of al Qaeda, the Times revealed the existence of an ultrasecret terrorist surveillance program of the National Security Agency and provided details of how it operated. Now, once again in the face of a presidential warning, the...
  • Eastman Testifies at House Intelligence Hearing

    05/27/2006 8:59:11 PM PDT · by tbird5 · 8 replies · 381+ views
    Claremont ^ | May 26, 2006 | Matthew J. Peterson
    Dr. John Eastman, Director of the Claremont Institute's Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence, testified today at 10:00 a.m. Eastern at a U.S. House Intelligence Committee hearing addressing whether the media can be prosecuted for publishing classified information about ongoing intelligence operations designed to prevent another terrorist attack. Eastman argued that the First Amendment's Freedom of Press clause does not provide the institutional media a special exemption from the Espionage Act and other laws, and that enforcement of those laws is particularly important in the present assymetrical war against international terrorist organizations. A copy of his prepared testimony is available here. More...
  • Attorney General Says Reporters Can Be Prosecuted for Publishing Classified Leaks

    05/24/2006 10:12:48 PM PDT · by STARWISE · 25 replies · 742+ views
    AP/Fox News ^ | 5-22-06
    Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said Sunday he believes journalists can be prosecuted for publishing classified information, citing an obligation to national security. The nation's top law enforcer also said the government will not hesitate to track telephone calls made by reporters as part of a criminal leak investigation, but officials would not do so routinely and randomly. "There are some statutes on the book which, if you read the language carefully, would seem to indicate that that is a possibility," Gonzales said, referring to prosecutions. "We have an obligation to enforce those laws. We have an obligation to ensure that...
  • Attorney Gen.: Reporters Can Be Prosecuted

    05/21/2006 8:13:48 AM PDT · by frankjr · 105 replies · 1,818+ views
    AP ^ | 05/21/06 | AP
    Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said Sunday he believes journalists can be prosecuted for publishing classified information, citing an obligation to national security. The nation's top law enforcer also said the government will not hesitate to track telephone calls made by reporters as part of a criminal leak investigation, but officials would not do so routinely and randomly. "There are some statutes on the book which, if you read the language carefully, would seem to indicate that that is a possibility," Gonzales said, referring to prosecutions. "We have an obligation to enforce those laws. We have an obligation to ensure that...
  • US could prosecute reporters for leaks: Gonzales

    05/21/2006 10:41:16 AM PDT · by 1066AD · 31 replies · 1,063+ views
    Reuters via Yahoo! ^ | 5/21/2006 | Unattributed
    Back to Story - Help US could prosecute reporters for leaks: Gonzales 18 minutes ago The federal government appears to have the authority to prosecute journalists or newspapers for publishing classified information, U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said on Sunday. The Justice Department is investigating who disclosed the government's secret domestic surveillance program to The New York Times, which broke the story in December. "There are some statutes on the book which, if you read the language carefully, would seem to indicate that that is a possibility," Gonzales said told ABC's "This Week," when asked if the government could prosecute...
  • The Espionage Act and the "New York Times"

    05/16/2006 1:13:03 AM PDT · by croak · 8 replies · 530+ views
    If counterterrorism were a parlor game—and that is how, in their recent cavalier treatment of sensitive intelligence secrets, the Washington Post and the New York Times seem to regard it—Goss’s fretting could be easily dismissed. But every American was made aware on September 11 of the price of an intelligence shortfall. This is no game, but a matter of life and death.
  • In Leak Cases, New Pressure on Journalists [criminal prosecution of journalists?]

    04/29/2006 10:14:41 AM PDT · by 68skylark · 19 replies · 845+ views
    New York Times ^ | April 30, 2006 | ADAM LIPTAK
    Earlier administrations have fired and prosecuted government officials who provided classified information to the press. They have also tried to force reporters to identify their sources. But the Bush administration is exploring a more radical measure to protect information it says is vital to national security: the criminal prosecution of reporters under the espionage laws. Such an approach would signal a thorough revision of the informal rules of engagement that have governed the relationship between the press and the government for many decades. Leaking in Washington is commonplace and typically entails tolerable risks for government officials and, at worst, the...
  • Bennett: Pulitzer Winners Risen, Lichtblau, Priest 'Worthy of Jail'

    04/18/2006 4:43:16 PM PDT · by Laverne · 23 replies · 783+ views
    E&P ^ | April 18, 2006 | By E&P Staff
    NEW YORK On his national radio program today, William Bennett, the former Reagan and George H.W. Bush administration official and now a CNN commentator, said that three reporters who won Pulitzer Prizes yesterday were not "worthy of an award" but rather "worthy of jail." He identified them as Dana Priest of The Washington Post, who wrote about the CIA's "secret prisons" in Europe, and James Risen and Eric Lichtblau of The New York Times, who exposed the National Security Agency's domestic (a.k.a. terrorist) spy program. Scott Johnson of the popular Powerline blog also weighed in today, under the heading "The...
  • Has the "New York Times" Violated the Espionage Act?

    03/26/2006 3:27:26 PM PST · by YOUGOTIT · 9 replies · 813+ views
    Commentary Magazine ^ | March 2006 | Gabriel Schoenfeld
    "In disclosing a classified surveillance program, the newspaper scored a journalistic coup; it may also have committed a crime, and compromised our security."
  • New York Times About To Reveal Even More Top Secret Operational Data! Big Benefit To Terrorists

    03/07/2006 7:27:01 PM PST · by MindBender26 · 326 replies · 9,538+ views
    Breaking – Proven reliable sources tell me that in tomorrow morning's edition of the NYT, the leftist paper will reveal that DOD has embedded military rapid reaction teams at a number of US embassies abroad. The Times is again giving our enemies hard intel they need to be more effective on the worldwide terrorism battlefield. The concept was very simple; When we got intel that known terrs were operating in a specific area, the US team already in place would be able to snatch them quickly. Because the team is already there, entry problems would be eliminated and reaction time...
  • Expect Journalistic Tongues to Loosen (Durbin, Rockefeller tied to NSA Leak?)

    03/07/2006 3:12:39 AM PST · by KCRW · 40 replies · 2,409+ views
    Real Clear Politics ^ | 03/07/06 | Jack Kelly
    Journalists will be paying rapt attention when Steven Rosen and Keith Weissman go on trial next month for violation of the Espionage Act of 1917. Mr. Rosen and Mr. Weissman were officials of the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee. They received classified information from Lawrence Franklin, an analyst at the Department of Defense, which they passed on to an Israeli diplomat, and to journalists. They are the first private citizens ever to be prosecuted under the Espionage Act. ..... But it's more likely prosecutors will use the Plame precedent to get journalists to disclose their sources. The NSA leak investigation issaid...
  • Expect Journalistic Tongues to Loosen (Jack Kelly)

    03/06/2006 9:41:50 PM PST · by smoothsailing · 28 replies · 1,254+ views
    Real Clear Politics ^ | 3-7-06 | Jack Kelly - Commentary
    March 7, 2006 Expect Journalistic Tongues to Loosen By Jack Kelly Journalists will be paying rapt attention when Steven Rosen and Keith Weissman go on trial next month for violation of the Espionage Act of 1917. Mr. Rosen and Mr. Weissman were officials of the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee. They received classified information from Lawrence Franklin, an analyst at the Department of Defense, which they passed on to an Israeli diplomat, and to journalists. They are the first private citizens ever to be prosecuted under the Espionage Act. Mr. Franklin pled guilty Jan. 20th and was sentenced to more than...
  • Has the "New York Times" Violated the Espionage Act?

    03/01/2006 4:20:10 PM PST · by SJackson · 19 replies · 929+ views
    Commentary ^ | March, 2006 | Gabriel Schoenfeld
    COMMENTARYMarch 2006 Has the New York Times Violated the Espionage Act?Gabriel Schoenfeld“Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts.” Thus ran the headline of a front-page news story whose repercussions have roiled American politics ever since its publication last December 16 in the New York Times. The article, signed by James Risen and Eric Lichtblau, was adapted from Risen’s then-forthcoming book, State of War.1 In it, the Times reported that shortly after September 11, 2001, President Bush had “authorized the National Security Agency [NSA] to eavesdrop on Americans and others inside the United States . . . without the court-approved warrants...
  • Jane Harmon: NY Times Should be Prosecuted

    02/12/2006 9:44:59 AM PST · by Sub-Driver · 100 replies · 6,525+ views
    Jane Harmon: NY Times Should be Prosecuted In a stunning break with her party, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee said Sunday that the New York Times should be prosecuted for damaging national security by revealing the National Security Agency's top secret terrorist surveillance program authorized by President Bush. "If the press was part of the process of delivering classified information, there have to be some limits on press immunity," Harmon told NBC's "Meet the Press." Moderator Tim Russert then pressed: "But if [the NSA leak] came from a whistleblower, should the New York Times reporter be prosecuted?"...
  • The New York Times breaks silence

    02/12/2006 6:39:05 AM PST · by tsmith130 · 70 replies · 2,651+ views
    Powerline ^ | 02/12/2006 | John Hinderaker
    In today's article on the investigation of the leaks underlying the New York Times's December 16 disclosure of the NSA terrorist surveillance program, the Times finally acknowledges its own legal jeopardy: [C]onservatives have attacked the disclosure of classified information as an illegal act, demanding a vigorous investigative effort to find and prosecute whoever disclosed classified information. An upcoming article in Commentary magazine suggests that the newspaper may be prosecuted for violations of the Espionage Act and says, "What The New York Times has done is nothing less than to compromise the centerpiece of our defensive efforts in the war on...
  • Fitzgerald leaves some key questions unanswered

    02/11/2006 6:58:42 PM PST · by Jean S · 110 replies · 3,379+ views
    The Hill ^ | 2/9/06 | Byron York
    Let’s say you’re a federal prosecutor.        You’re investigating officials in the Bush White House, trying to find out whether they violated the Intelligence Identities Protection Act or the Espionage Act when they told reporters that Valerie Wilson, wife of the ardent Bush critic Joseph Wilson, worked for the CIA. Violations of those laws would be a very serious matter indeed. And just to make your investigation a high-pressure affair, you’re dealing with some very prominent figures, including Lewis Libby, the vice president’s chief of staff, and Karl Rove, the president’s top political adviser.Then you run into a problem. You look...
  • Has the New York Times Violated the Espionage Act?

    02/03/2006 1:48:26 AM PST · by mal · 3 replies · 747+ views
    Ever since 9/11, U.S. intelligence and law-enforcement authorities have bent every effort to prevent our being taken once again by surprise. An essential component of that effort, the interception of al-Qaeda electronic communications around the world, has been conducted by the NSA, the government arm responsible for signals intelligence. The particular NSA program now under dispute, which the Times itself has characterized as the U.S. government’s “most closely guarded secret,” was set in motion by executive order of the President shortly after the attacks of September 11. Just as the Times has reported, it was designed to track and listen...
  • CIA chief urges investigation into wiretap leak

    02/02/2006 7:12:40 PM PST · by Dubya · 17 replies · 834+ views
    Associated Press ^ | February 2, 2006 | Associated Press
    WASHINGTON – U.S. intelligence officials told Congress on Thursday that the disclosure of once-classified projects like President Bush's no-warrant eavesdropping program has undermined their work. "The damage has been very severe to our capabilities to carry out our mission," CIA Director Porter Goss told the Senate Intelligence Committee, citing disclosures about a variety of CIA programs that he suggested may have been compromised. Mr. Goss said a federal grand jury should be empaneled to determine "who is leaking this information."
  • Has the New York Times Violated the Espionage Act?

    02/02/2006 3:22:56 PM PST · by Anti-Bubba182 · 64 replies · 2,109+ views
    Commentary Magazine ^ | March 2006 | Gabriel Schoenfeld
    “Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts.” Thus ran the headline of a front-page news story whose repercussions have roiled American politics ever since its publication last December 16 in the New York Times. The article, signed by James Risen and Eric Lichtblau, was adapted from Risen’s then-forthcoming book, State of War.1 In it, the Times reported that shortly after September 11, 2001, President Bush had “authorized the National Security Agency [NSA] to eavesdrop on Americans and others inside the United States . . . without the court-approved warrants ordinarily required for domestic spying.” Not since Richard Nixon’s misuse...
  • NYT: Israel Lobbyists Facing Charges in Secrets Case-Indictment expected, but out of the ordinary

    08/05/2005 1:40:18 PM PDT · by OESY · 3 replies · 418+ views
    New York Times ^ | August 5, 2005 | DAVID JOHNSTON
    Two former officials of a pro-Israel lobbying group were charged in an indictment filed Thursday with illegally conspiring to gather and disclose classified national security information to journalists and an unnamed foreign power that government officials identified as Israel. The indictment accused Steven J. Rosen and Keith Weissman, formerly senior staff members at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, with improperly disclosing national security information beginning in April 1999. The group dismissed the two men last April. As the committee's director of foreign policy issues, Mr. Rosen was a highly visible figure in Washington who helped the organization define its...
  • How to Shut Up the Politicians

    05/12/2004 1:25:44 PM PDT · by gortklattu · 18 replies · 169+ views
    Thotline ^ | 05/05/2004 | My Own
    Several years ago we had a law that prevented the politicians from using our soldiers as political pawns; it's time to re-enact a section of the Espionage Act of June 15, 1917. Here it is: “SECTION 3. Whoever, when the United States is at war, shall willfully make or convey false reports or false statements with intent to interfere with the operation or success of the military or naval forces of the United States, or to promote the success of its enemies, or shall willfully make or convey false reports, or false statements, . . . or incite insubordination, disloyalty,...