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Keyword: graphene

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  • Graphene and other carbon nanomaterials can replace scarce metals

    09/30/2017 9:41:20 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    Phys Org ^ | September 19, 2017
    Scarce metals are found in a wide range of everyday objects around us. They are complicated to extract, difficult to recycle and so rare that several of them have become "conflict minerals" which can promote conflicts and oppression. A survey at Chalmers University of Technology now shows that there are potential technology-based solutions that can replace many of the metals with carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene. They can be found in your computer, in your mobile phone, in almost all other electronic equipment and in many of the plastics around you. Society is highly dependent on scarce metals, and this...
  • Confirmed: Electrons Flowing Like Liquid in Graphene Are Insanely Superconductive

    08/23/2017 12:13:26 AM PDT · by Enchante · 43 replies
    Science Alert ^ | August 23, 2017 | Fiona MacDonald
    Electrons have been caught flowing through graphene like a liquid, reaching limits physicists thought were fundamentally impossible. This type of conductance is known as 'superballistic' flow, and this new experiment suggests it could revolutionise the way we conduct electricity. If that's not crazy enough, the super-fast flows actually occur as a result of electrons bouncing off each other, something that high school physics tells us should slow conductivity down.
  • NanoGraphene Inc. Presents A Cutting-Edge Graphene Application

    07/22/2017 1:17:38 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    Cision PR Newswire ^ | July 21, 2017
    NEW YORK, July 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The introduction of nanotechnology in the cement industry has a lot of benefits, some of which include reduced emission, improved crack resistance, reduced water absorption, improved strength and ductility. NanoGraphene Inc. is putting construction industries at the forefront of graphene concrete application with its high quality, environmentally clean and waterless graphene. Graphene is a thin layer of pure carbon derived from graphite. It is a unique material which has a wide array of applications and possesses some distinct properties. It is strong, flexible and a good conductor of electricity, hence widely used in...
  • Graphene set to enable terahertz technology, says team

    07/02/2017 11:48:37 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    New Electronics ^ | June 28, 2017 | Graham Pitcher
    Terahertz technology enabled via graphene could boost the capacity of future data networks, according to researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. Andrei Vorobiev, pictured, senior researcher, said: “One of graphene’s special features is that electrons move much faster than in most semiconductors used today. Thanks to this, we can access the high frequencies that constitute the terahertz range. Data communication then has the potential of becoming up to ten times faster and can transmit much larger amounts of data than is currently possible.” Researchers at Chalmers have shown that graphene based transistor devices could receive and convert terahertz...
  • Chemists create 3D printed graphene foam

    06/26/2017 1:38:56 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 1 replies
    Nanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to fabricate centimeter-sized objects of atomically thin graphene. The research could yield industrially useful quantities of bulk graphene and is described online in a new study in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano. "This study is a first of its kind," said Rice chemist James Tour, co-corresponding author of the paper. "We have shown how to make 3-D graphene foams from nongraphene starting materials, and the method lends itself to being scaled to graphene foams for additive manufacturing applications with pore-size control." Graphene, one of the...
  • New Graphene-Based Transistors Could Make Computers 1000 Times Faster

    06/22/2017 11:18:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 38 replies
    Wall Street Pit ^ | June 19, 2017
    As reported recently in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers from the University of Central Florida (UCF), CREOL and the University of Texas have developed a graphene-based transistor that could one day lead to super-fast and super energy-efficient computers. By super-fast we mean a thousand times faster and by super energy-efficient we mean it will only use a hundredth of the power. Right now, the world of electronics relies on silicon-based transistors to power its devices. And while their invention made it possible for devices to be reduced to smaller sizes as the transistors allowed the flow of...
  • New chemical method could revolutionize graphene

    06/18/2017 10:55:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    Phys. Org. ^ | June 15, 2017
    University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics. Graphene, a lightweight, thin, flexible material, can be used to enhance the strength and speed of computer display screens, electric/photonics circuits, solar cells and various medical, chemical and industrial processes, among other things. It is comprised of a single layer of carbon atoms bonded together in a repeating pattern of hexagons. Isolated for the first time 15 years ago by a physics professor at the University of Manchester in England, it...
  • Reusable Carbon Nanotubes: Water Filter of the Future?

    03/30/2017 9:32:52 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Technology Networks ^ | March 30, 2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology
    Enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials—silicon gels and activated carbon—according to a paper published in the March issue of Environmental Science Water: Research and Technology. RIT researchers John-David Rocha and Reginald Rogers, authors of the study, demonstrate the potential of this emerging technology to clean polluted water. Their work applies carbon nanotubes to environmental problems in a specific new way that builds on a nearly two decades of nanomaterial research. Nanotubes are more commonly associated with fuel-cell research. “This aspect is new—taking knowledge of carbon...
  • Critical Flaw In Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Has Been Solved

    03/26/2017 6:31:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    Wall Street Pit ^ | March 26, 2017
    Anyone who has a portable device — including smartphones, tablets, laptops, smartwatches and fitness trackers — is obviously familiar with a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery because most (if not all) of these devices are powered by this kind of battery. We’ve been okay with the rechargeable for a while, but as lithium-ion batteries are now close to reaching their maximum storage capacity (in other words, battery life can’t be extended any more), and with the horror stories about phone batteries that explode or burn, the search is on for an alternative battery that can meet our demands better and safer. So...
  • Ten year plan for Graphene commercialisation on track

    03/20/2017 8:45:05 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Business Weekly ^ | March 21, 2017 | Kate Sweeney
    University of Cambridge scientists, in conjunction with tech industry experts, have developed a novel graphene-based infrared (IR) detector with record high sensitivity for thermal detection. The technology paves the way for high-performance IR imaging and spectroscopy. The work was undertaken as part of a collaboration within the Graphene Flagship – the European research consortium aiming to bring graphene technologies to commercial markets within ten years. Collaborators included the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona and the University of Ioannina in Greece, as well as Nokia UK and Emberion, who are local industrial partners of the Cambridge Graphene Centre. Published in...
  • Satellite powering technology makes power stations more efficient (Graphene finally being used)

    03/11/2017 2:54:39 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Digital Journal ^ | March 11, 2017 | Tim Sandle
    Researchers have successfully used graphene to reinvent abandoned heat energy converter technology and to make it more efficient. This will be used to boost the output from older power stations. Power station efficiency has been substantially increased by utilizing satellite-powering technology that was abandoned many years ago. The technology has been reconfigured to function with traditional power stations to aid the conversion of heat to electricity (what’s called thermionic energy conversion) more efficiently. In better news for the environment, this means lower amounts of fossil fuel will be needed to be burnt to produce equivalent amounts of power. Much of...
  • Physicists accidentally discover explosive way to make graphene

    01/26/2017 1:15:03 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Silicon Republic ^ | January 26, 2017 | Colm Gorey
    It seems that on a monthly basis, there is a new development in the speed and quality of graphene production, be it with copper substrates, or using it to create the strongest material known to humankind. Yet despite these regular developments, little progress has been made in producing the so-called wonder material faster and cheaper to the point that it can be mass-produced. However, the latest development from Kansas State University (KSU) is certainly taking graphene to a new, explosive level of development. Unlike current production methods that rely on large industrial-scale equipment, the KSU team led by Prof Chris...
  • Graphene Able to Transport Huge Currents on the Nano Scale

    01/12/2017 2:33:20 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 37 replies
    I-Connect007 ^ | January 12, 2017
    Once again, graphene has proven itself to be a rather special material: an international research team led by Professor Fritz Aumayr from the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien was able to demonstrate that the electrons in graphene are extremely mobile and react very quickly. Impacting xenon ions with a particularly high electric charge on a graphene film causes a large number of electrons to be torn away from the graphene in a very precise spot. However, the material was able to replace the electrons within some femtoseconds. This resulted in extremely high currents, which would not be maintained...
  • Making the strongest material ever: 3D printing graphene at MIT

    01/09/2017 6:01:59 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    3D Printing Industry ^ | January 9, 2017 | Beau Jackson
    Through studying the geometry of strong structures, MIT researchers are now one step closer to 3D printing graphene. By comparison, 2D graphene is better at conducting electricity than copper wires, ten times stronger than steel, and lighter and certainly more transparent than both of them. The problem is that these properties as are all theoretical and scaling the nanomaterial has proved challenging. Furthermore, in order to compete with copper and steel, graphene has to be 3D. 3D graphene – here’s the deal The challenges of making a 3D structure out of a 2D material is that the material’s atomic structure,...
  • How to Turn Graphene’s Defects into Assets

    10/12/2016 8:44:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    Engineering ^ | October 12, 2016 | Staff
    Researchers at Penn State, the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company have developed methods to control defects in two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, that may lead to improved membranes for water desalination, energy storage, sensing or advanced protective coatings. For a two-dimensional, one-atom-thick material like graphene, defects such as small cracks or holes can make a big difference in performance. Usually, these defects are considered undesirable. But if the defects can be controlled, they can be used to engineer new, desirable properties into the material. "As long as you can control defects, you...
  • Microwave Is Used As A Way To Make High-Quality Graphene

    09/05/2016 2:47:08 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    iTech Post ^ | September 5, 2016 | Rodney Rafols
    High-quality graphene would soon be used for the next generation of electronics and energy devices. To produce it a simple method has been done. This method involves only using a microwave oven in order to bake the compound. Researchers at Rutgers' School of Engineering in Rutgers University have found that high-quality graphene could be produced using simple methods. That could potentially mean millions of dollars saved in making the new compound that would be used for new electronic devices. The discovery has been made by students, most of whom are either undergraduates or are post-doctoral associates, as Phys Org reports....
  • Could graphene solve world water shortages? A new exhibition examines the evidence

    08/20/2016 5:36:14 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    The Manchester Evening News ^ | July 24, 2016 | Sarah Walters
    Among Manchester’s proudest scientific developments has to be graphene - it’s very own homegrown wonder material first isolated by scientists at the University of Manchester back in 2004. A material made from a single atom layer of carbon that is super lightweight, super conductive and super strong, it seems to have endless capabilities in the modern world - from smart clothing to intergalactic exploration. Twelve years after its discovery via a sticky tape dispenser - and six years since its developers Andre Geim (pictured below) and Konstantin Novoselov were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics - and interest in graphene...
  • Carbon Nanotube 3D printer filament supports 1,000 times its own weight during amazing strength test

    08/12/2016 5:00:33 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    3Ders ^ | August 9, 2016
    Just how strong is strong? When browsing the web for new and exciting material solutions, you are often bombarded with terms like ‘very high toughness’ and ‘excellent material properties’, but that means little until you see a filament in action. US developer of engineering-grade filaments Avante Technology must have been all too aware of that, because they just exposed their recently released FilaOne Gray Carbon Nanotube filled 3D printer filament to a grueling strength test during which it supported 1,000 times its own weight and easily withstood 90 degree bends. Now that’s strong. This remarkable FilaOne Gray filament was released...
  • Graphene is key in taking manufacturing to next level

    05/23/2016 3:27:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Manchester Evening News ^ | May 12, 2016 | Ben Rooth
    Graphene is widely regarded to be the most important development in the world of advanced manufacturing to date. The world’s thinnest, strongest and most conductive material was isolated at the University of Manchester in 2004. The potential of graphene is vast and research is currently underway into everything from bendable electronics to portable, energy-efficient water filtration plants and corrosion-proof coatings, anti-cancer drugs and even energy sources sewn into people’s skin. Last autumn, the National Graphene Institute received a major boost when China’s largest mobile phone manufacturer Huawei signed a partnership with the university to develop graphene-based technologies. Huawei stated at...
  • Graphene Solar Cells Produce Electricity from Sun and Rain

    04/08/2016 6:43:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    The Green Optimistic ^ | April 8, 2016 | Mila Luleva
    Adding graphene to solar cells makes them generate power from rain. Solar power has been on a continuous rise over the past decade. Rooftop solar is arguably the most common renewable energy source for home use, and solar power plants are arguably the biggest renewable energy large scale generators. But, regardless of all this, there is still something that limits solar power generation, and that is weather. In order for solar cells to produce electricity, there has to be sun. Rain is sometimes welcome (preferably at night), to clean up dust and soil articles that could limit the efficiency of...