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Keyword: greeks

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  • Greek socialists reluctantly accept IMF ‘meddling’ in deal to save the country they ruined

    07/13/2015 4:36:24 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 11 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 07/13/15 | Dan Calabrese
    If I were negotiating this deal on behalf of the IMF and the EU, one term I would demand is the resignation of the socialist government It’s the third bailout of Greece in five years. Heck, even Chrysler must be appalled at a performance like that. And while we’re still waiting for the details, early reports indicate that Greece’s socialist government had to accept much more stringent terms than the ones they told Greek voters to reject just last week. It’s easy just telling everyone yes to whatever they want until you run out of stuff to give them. That’s...
  • Defiant Greeks reject EU demands as Syriza readies IOU currency

    07/05/2015 9:10:39 PM PDT · by catnipman · 41 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 7/5/15 | Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
    "If necessary, we will issue parallel liquidity and California-style IOU's, in an electronic form. We should have done it a week ago," said Yanis Varoufakis, the finance minister. ... Syriza sources say the Greek ministry of finance is examining options to take direct control of the banking system ... They want a new team installed, one that is willing to draw on the central bank's secret reserves, and to take the provocative step in extremis of creating euros. "We have to restore stability to the system, with or without the help of the ECB. We have the capacity to print...
  • Ancient tomb of Celtic prince found in France

    03/05/2015 6:35:29 PM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 19 replies
    The Local (France) ^ | 05 Mar 2015 08:21 GMT+01:00
    An "exceptional" tomb from the fifth century BC, likely that of a Celtic prince, has been unearthed in a small French town, shedding light on Iron Age European trade, researchers said Wednesday. The grave, crammed with Greek and possibly Etruscan artefacts, was discovered in a business zone on the outskirts of Lavau in France's Champagne region, said the National Archaeological Research Institute, Inrap. A team from the institute has been excavating the site since October last year, and have dated it to the end of the First Iron Age -- a period characterised by the widespread use of the metal....
  • 2500-Year-Old 'Wonder Woman' Found on Vase

    06/08/2015 2:22:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jun 5, 2015 11:24 AM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    A 2,500-year-old predecessor of DC Comics’ Wonder Woman super heroine has emerged on a vase painting kept at a small American museum. Drawn on a white-ground pyxis (a lidded cylindrical box that was used for cosmetics, jewelry, or ointments) the image shows an Amazon on horseback in a battle against a Greek warrior. Much like the fictional warrior princess of the Amazons, the horsewoman is twirling a lasso. “It is the only ancient artistic image of an Amazon using a lariat in battle,” Adrienne Mayor, a research scholar at Stanford University’s departments of classics and history of science, told Discovery...
  • How some Armenians are reclaiming their Christian faith

    06/02/2015 2:39:09 AM PDT · by markomalley · 2 replies
    Al Monitor ^ | 6/1/15 | Sibel Hurtas
    Armenians in Turkey who opted to live as Muslims to avoid mistreatment are recovering their true identities in collective baptisms. The latest such baptism came in May when 12 Armenians from Dersim (Tunceli) recovered their identities. The saga of Armenians who were compelled to live as Muslims goes back to 1915 massacres. Armenian children were adopted by Muslim families, women married Muslim men and some families converted to Islam to save their lives. These Armenians, who for a century were forced to conceal their identities, are trying to return to their roots. This activity is more prevalent among Anatolian Armenians,...
  • Turkey’s quiet Christian genocide

    06/04/2015 2:09:36 AM PDT · by iowamark · 2 replies
    RedState ^ | 6/3/2015 | Streiff
    Nearly everyone but the Obama administration has heard of the genocide of TurkeyÂ’s Armenian minority in which as many as 1.5 million Armenians were deliberately murdered by the Turkish government. While the Armenians were targeted for their ethnicity, what is widely overlooked is the fact that the Armenians were Orthodox Christians who inconveniently enjoyed conspicuous success in an Islamic nation. Now that the Turks have essentially finished off the Armenians, they have been hard at work eliminating the remaining Christians. On the eve of World War I, over 20% of Turkey was Christian. Now it is less than 2%. This...
  • Medicine's Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript

    06/02/2015 10:45:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2015 | Mark Schrope
    A Syriac scholar at Philipps University in Marburg, Germany, Dr. Kessel was sitting in the library of the manuscript's owner, a wealthy collector of rare scientific material in Baltimore. At that moment, Dr. Kessel realized that just three weeks earlier, in a library at Harvard University, he had seen a single orphaned page that was too similar to these pages to be coincidence. The manuscript he held contained a hidden translation of an ancient, influential medical text by Galen of Pergamon, a Greco-Roman physician and philosopher who died in 200 A.D. It was missing pages and Dr. Kessel was suddenly...
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 67 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • Black Sea Starts to Yield a Rich Ancient History

    04/12/2006 7:36:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 219+ views
    Washington Post ^ | Monday 20 January 2003 | Guy Gugliotta
    The ship had a cargo hold filled with ceramic jars, some -- and perhaps all -- of them filled with salt fish. It probably left from a seaport in what is now Turkey and sailed northwest through the Black Sea to the Crimea to pick up its load. Then, for unknown reasons, it sank in 275 feet of water off the present-day Bulgarian coast, coming softly to rest on a carpet of mud. Last week, archaeologists announced they had found the long-lost vessel. Sunk sometime between 490 B.C. and 280 B.C., it is the oldest wreck ever found in the...
  • Underwater archaeology: Hunt for the ancient mariner

    01/26/2012 9:06:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | Jo Marchant
    Foley, a marine archaeologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, and his colleagues at Greece's Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in Athens have spent the day diving near the cliffs of the tiny island of Dia in the eastern Mediterranean. They have identified two clusters of pottery dating from the first century BC and fifth century AD. Together with other remains that the team has discovered on the island's submerged slopes, the pots reveal that for centuries Greek, Roman and Byzantine traders used Dia as a refuge during storms, when they couldn't safely reach Crete. It is a nice...
  • Two Underrated Peoples

    05/02/2015 2:13:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    American Thinker ^ | May 2, 2015 | Mike Konrad
    In looking over the history of the past 500 years, four nations stand out for having completely and massively altered world civilization in a way that no others have, before or after: England, Spain, France, and Portugal. No other empires even come close. The Muslim conquests were landbound except for island hopping. Chinese and Mongolian conquests were landbound. Even in ancient times, Greek, Roman, and Persian conquests were essentially land operations, except for river fording. Yes, they all had navies, but were not defined by them. What separates the English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish was that these nations had vast...
  • Turkish Minister: Muslims Discovered the Earth is Round

    11/30/2014 3:19:26 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 74 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 30/11/14 | Tova Dvorin
    The Turkish Science Minister has become the latest public figure to make outrageous claims over Islam's hand in science and technology, the Hurriyet Daily News reported Friday - this time, claiming that Muslims discovered that the world is round. "Some 700-800 years before Galileo, 71 Muslim scientists led by al-Khwarizmi convened by the order of the Caliph Al-Ma'mun and revealed that the Earth is a sphere," Minister Fikri stated on Thursday. Fikri further claimed that a copy of the original document proving Islam's role in astronomy is currently in the Museum of Islamic Science and Technology in Istanbul. The Earth...
  • In Search of the Real Troy

    02/20/2005 2:33:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 1,322+ views
    Saudi Aramco World ^ | January/February 2005 Volume 56, Number 1 | Graham Chandler, Photographed by Ergun Cagata
    It was then that Swiss scholar Emil Forrer deciphered newly discovered writings from the Hittite Empire to the east, finding two place-names—Wilusa and Taruisa—that sounded convincingly like the Hittite way of writing "Wilios" (the Greek name for the site was "Ilion") and "Troia" (Troy). He also found a treaty, from the early 13th century BC, between the Hittite king Muwatalli and a king of "Wilusa" named Alaksandu. The king’s name, Forrer added, recalls the name of the Trojan prince Alexander—called Paris in Homer’s Iliad. Critics pooh-poohed, conceding that a place named Wilusa may have existed, but where was it on...
  • Amazon Warriors Did Indeed Fight and Die Like Men

    11/01/2014 3:18:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 44 replies
    National Geographic's Book Talk ^ | October 29, 2014 | Simon Worrall
    Archaeology shows that these fierce women also smoked pot, got tattoos, killed—and loved—men. The Amazons got a bum rap in antiquity. They wore trousers. They smoked pot, covered their skin with tattoos, rode horses, and fought as hard as the guys. Legends sprang up like weeds. They cut off their breasts to fire their bows better! They mutilated or killed their boy children! Modern (mostly male) scholars continued the confabulations. The Amazons were hard-core feminists. Man haters. Delinquent mothers. Lesbians. Drawing on a wealth of textual, artistic, and archaeological evidence, Adrienne Mayor, author of The Amazons, dispels these myths and...
  • Greek paper: World Jewish plutocracy behind Gaza strife, global financial crisis

    12/29/2008 11:02:55 AM PST · by SmithL · 28 replies · 981+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 12/29/8 | Haaretz Service
    A daily newspaper in Greece has blamed Jews both for the world financial crisis and the Israeli operation in Gaza, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency reported this week. "After the American Jews acquired once again the world's wealth and plunged the planet into an unprecedented financial crisis, they started rehearsing for WWIII," JTA quoted the Avriani newspaper's front-page headline as reading Sunday. "Midway through the paper's story on Israel's operation in Gaza, the story, under the heading 'The Plan,' explains that a Jewish plutocracy, having made the 'wealth of the century at the expense of the economies of the world,' is...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Have archaeologists discovered the grave of Alexander the Great?

    08/23/2013 7:47:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | August 23, 2013
    Experts find enormous marble tomb fit for a king under a massive mound in Greece Archaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis, 370 miles north of Athens The warrior king was thought to be buried in Egypt but experts have discovered a marble-faced wall dating from the 4th century BC Site archaeologist Aikaterini Peristeri has voiced hopes of finding 'a significant individual or individuals' withinArchaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis. The warrior king - who ruled in...
  • Mystery over massive Alexander-era tomb unearthed in Greece

    08/13/2014 1:25:20 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 14 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Aug 12, 2014
    Archaeologists have unearthed a funeral mound dating from the time of Alexander the Great and believed to be the largest ever discovered in Greece, but are stumped about who was buried in it. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on Tuesday described the find as "unique" after he visited the site, which dates to the era following Alexander's death, at the ancient town of Amphipolis in northern Greece. "It is certain that we stand before an exceptionally important find," Samaras said in a statement. "This is a monument with unique characteristics." Hidden under a hill at the ancient town, the Hellenistic-era mound...
  • Greek tomb at Amphipolis is 'important discovery'

    08/13/2014 10:23:09 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13th August 2014 | BBC News
    'Archaeologists unearthing a burial site at Amphipolis in northern Greece have made an "extremely important find", says Greek PM Antonis Samaras. Experts believe the tomb belonged to an important figure dating back to the last quarter of the Fourth Century BC. A large mound complex has been unearthed at the Kasta hill site in the past two years. Lead archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said it certainly dated from after the death of Alexander the Great.'
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monument’s interior won’t be intact. “At the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.—two years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • Ancient Love Inscriptions in Astypalea

    06/14/2014 6:21:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | June 4, 2014 | Evdokia Fourkioti
    According to Ethnos, ancient love inscriptions dating back to the early 6th and the late 5th centuries B.C., were recently discovered in Astypalea. Spirals, shapes of ships, tools in triangular shapes were mostly drawn by the Neolithic inhabitants of Astypalea. One of the first findings of the Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, Andreas Vlachopoulos, was rock paintings located in Vathi at the Pirgos Peninsula and date back to 4th-3rd millennium B.C. In 2013, more unexpected findings were discovered, which present an aspect of privacy of the ancient Greek inhabitants in the early 6th and late 5th centuries B.C. The Secretary General...
  • Armenian Genocide: 99 Years of Remembrance

    04/25/2014 7:58:46 AM PDT · by george76 · 24 replies
    la fox ^ | Apr 24, 2014 | Araksya Karapetyan
    Wednesday April 24th marks the 99th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. That day also marks another year that’s gone by where the Turkish government has not recognized the slaughter of 1.5 million Armenians as a genocide. ... The Armenian Genocide was one of the most compelling human rights crises of World War I. Many historians talk about how what happened in 1915 perhaps helped inspire Adolf Hitler, three decades later, to carry out the atrocities of World War II. In a speech where Hitler was preparing to invade Poland, he is quoted saying: “Who, after all, speaks of the annihilation...
  • The Greek Age of Bronze -- Middle Helmets

    Outside the Greek mainland and Aegean Island a possible representation of Achaean warriors equipped with boar tusks helmets is from an Egyptian papyrus fragments from Tell el-Amarna, home of Amenhotep III's son, dated around 1350 BC (*2). In this papyrus some warriors are depicted with conical pale-yellow helmets which remaind in general design the typical Aegean boar tusks helmet. This identification is strengthened by the find of a piece of boar’s tusk, with perforations for attaching it to a leather frame, during excavations at Qantir, the site of the Ramesside capital Pi-ramesse in the eastern delta. It appears likely that...
  • Old Egypt investigator identifies to mysterious Hyksos kings [sic]

    03/28/2006 10:58:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 705+ views
    Rowley Regis Online ^ | Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:47 pm | mariafvp
    Georgeos Diaz-Montexano, scriptologist and Egyptologist amateur, has been able to identify the names of the Hyksos kings like pertaining to the group of languages and proto-Greek or Mycenaean's dialects. The true ethnic origin of the mysterious Hyksos that were able to take control of the power of a considerable part of Old Egypt, during centuries XVII to the XVI before Christ, has been always a true challenge for the Egyptologists. However, the generalized opinion more for a long time has been that the Hyksos would be Semitic towns, fundamentally coastal inhabitants of the strip Syrian-Palestine, that is, Canaanites or proto-Phoenicians....
  • The Apollo found that divides Gaza

    02/17/2014 1:54:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Fai di Repubblica ^ | October 10, 2013 | Fabio Scuto
    ...Mounir with that metal finger shown around Gaza has attracted the attentions of Hamas' spies, always well introduced in every environment. Within a few hours the fisherman is arrested and the statue, which could date back to the fourth century B. C., is seized. It would be a great achievement for Hamas to show the world this wonder of Greek art - comparable to the Riace Bronzes - but for those who have it in their hands it soon becomes clear that the Apollo must remain a secret. Islam forbids the reproduction of the human figure in art and accepts...
  • Ancient Palace's Painted Floors Display Bronze-Age Creativity

    01/06/2014 7:43:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 06, 2014 | Denise Chow
    Emily Catherine Egan, a doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, studied the floor of the Throne Room at the Palace of Nestor, one of the best-preserved palaces of Mycenaean Greece, a civilization from the late Bronze Age. She found that the floors of the palace, located in the present-day Greek town of Pylos, were made of plaster, and were often painted with grids of bright patterns or marine animals. The creative decorations show how ancient Mycenaean artists used floors — together with painted ceilings and walls — to impress palace visitors, Egan said. "Mycenaean palatial floor paintings...
  • Themistocles decree -- 480 B.C.

    12/25/2013 4:36:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Ancient Greek Battles ^ | unknown | unattributed
    Gods.Resolved by the Boule and the People.Themistocles son of Neocles of Phrearrhioi made the motion. The city shall be entrusted to Athena, Athens' protectress, and to the other gods, all of them, for protection and defense against the Barbarian on behalf of the country. The Athenians in their entirety and the aliens who live in Athens shall place their children and their women in Troezen, [to be entrusted to Theseus ?] the founder of the land. The elderly and movable property shall for safety be deposited at Salamis. The treasurers and the priestesses are to remain on the Acropolis and...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 6

    07/25/2013 2:39:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 6, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    Geological testing was done at the site in 2005, for the purpose of placing pillars in solid ground so that the stability of the roof would not be an issue in the event of an earthquake. What they found while using high resolution travel time tomography, a method of getting images from under the surface of the earth using waves of energy, were underground cavities. These were both man made and natural. The man made gaps in the earth were filled with rocks, ceramics, and other items of interest to archeologists. Before drilling the new shafts and setting the pillars...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 5

    07/22/2013 8:06:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 6, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    Although ancient ruins in Akrotiri were discovered in 1860 by workers quarrying volcanic rock for the Suez Canal, large scale excavations there didn't begin until 1967. An archeologist by the name of Spyridon Marinatos suspected there were extensive ruins beneath the farmlands at Akrotiri and wrote about his theory in 1936. Due to the outbreak of World War II and the Greek Civil War, he had to postpone his explorations. Earlier digs in the area had been destroyed by plowing of the fields and there were no written records of where they had taken place or what the findings were....
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii -- part 4

    07/21/2013 11:27:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 4, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    While approximately forty buildings have been uncovered at Akrotiri, there are six that have been given more attention than the others. The architecture and function of each building is different. The largest building uncovered so far, Xeste 4, is three stories high and believed to be a public building because of its dimensions. The staircase had fragments of frescoes on either side depicting males ascending in a procession. The second largest building, Xeste 3, was at least two stories high, with fourteen rooms on each floor. The rooms were decorated with paintings and some had more than one door. One...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 3

    07/20/2013 10:28:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 3, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    With the archeological site at Akrotiri closed, and no firm date set for it to reopen, many visitors to the island of Santorini have been disappointed not to see what is inside the Akrotiri enclosure. Although it doesn't replace seeing the amazing number of buildings that have been uncovered, around 40 so far, the museums on the island hold a fair amount of artifacts and photographs of wall paintings. If archeology is at the top of your list of reasons for visiting Santorini, here are some helpful phone numbers to call and confirm hours and days they are open. The...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 2

    07/07/2013 6:45:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | August 29, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    The excavations at the archeological site at Akrotiri in Santorini are ongoing, so there is scaffolding everywhere and supports in place to stabilize walls, windows and doorways that might otherwise collapse. You need to use your imagination to put yourself back in prehistoric times, but with the help of guides or signs posted along the walkways, you can get a fair idea of what life was like. An excavated toilet, pictured in the slide show, has been left in view for the amusement of the tourists and to demonstrate how advanced the plumbing and drainage system was. The inhabitants had...
  • Euros discarded as impoverished Greeks resort to bartering

    02/05/2013 6:39:25 PM PST · by Lorianne · 30 replies
    Guradian UK ^ | 02 January 2013 | Helena Smith
    It's been a busy day at the market in downtown Volos. Angeliki Ioanitou has sold a decent quantity of olive oil and soap, while her friend Maria has done good business with her fresh pies. But not a single euro has changed hands – none of the customers on this drizzly Saturday morning has bothered carrying money at all. For many, browsing through the racks of second-hand clothes, electrical appliances and homemade jams, the need to survive means money has been usurped. "It's all about exchange and solidarity, helping one another out in these very hard times," enthused Ioanitou, her...
  • Sick Rams Used As Ancient Bioweapons

    11/29/2007 2:53:57 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies · 143+ views
    Discovery Channel ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sick Rams Used as Ancient Bioweapons Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Once, a Weapon Nov. 28, 2007 -- Infected rams and donkeys were the earliest bioweapons, according to a new study which dates the use of biological warfare back more than 3,300 years. According to a review published in the Journal of Medical Hypotheses, two ancient populations, the Arzawans and the Hittites, engaged "in mutual use of contaminated animals" during the 1320-1318 B.C. Anatolian war. "The animals were carriers of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia," author Siro Trevisanato, a molecular biologist based in Oakville, Ontario, Canada told Discovery News....
  • Bio Warfare Rears Its Head- The Ancient world USED IT!!!(MUST READ!)

    01/30/2004 7:18:50 AM PST · by vannrox · 32 replies · 1,062+ views
    Newsday ^ | January 13, 2004 | By Bryn Nelson
    The following ARE exerpts... "...From Hercules' poisoned arrows to early germ warfare and attacks with scorpion bombs and red-hot sand, she contends, cultures around the world have grappled with the revulsion and justification of using these unconventional weapons ever since they began creating their own myths and recording their histories. Mayor has compiled a slew of examples in her new book, "Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs: Biological and Chemical Warfare in the Ancient World" (Overlook Press)..." "...The early dilemmas posed in mythic form would be recorded eventually in the annals of historians as combatants put their growing knowledge...
  • Bees, snakes, germs - any weapon in a pinch

    11/30/2003 7:12:18 AM PST · by TrebleRebel · 23 replies · 428+ views
    The Vancouver Sun | 11/29/2003 | Jay Currie
    If you are under Roman siege in the middle of a desert, a scorpion bomb seems like a very good idea. Collect a bunch of lethal scorpions and, very carefully, seal them in clay pots. Hurl the pots at the attackers as needed. That's exactly what the defenders of Hatra, just south of Mosul in today's Iraq, did in 198 AD. The siege was lifted in 20 days. As Adrienne Mayor writes in her intriguing book Greek Fire, Poison Arrows and Scorpion Bombs, scorpions weren't the only stinging animals pressed into service in the ancient world. A clay pot full...
  • Bust of Memnon: Images of Blacks in Ancient Greece

    01/05/2013 9:35:51 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    The Root via Scoop.it ^ | Tuesday, January 1, 2013 | unattributed
    This marvelous bust is one of the very few documents of an actual black person from Greek and Roman antiquity. Memnon was a pupil and protégé of the well-known Athenian entrepreneur and philosopher Herodes Atticus. It was found more than a century ago in one of several villas owned by Herodes, and it adds a face to the name of the person recorded by Philostratus in his Lives of the Sophists, an account of the famous philosophers of the second century. The exact circumstances of Memnon's entry into this celebrated milieu are unknown, but there is no doubt about the...
  • Ottoman Empire carried out the Genocide and the German side provided the ideological support

    10/26/2012 6:04:54 AM PDT · by Righting · 6 replies
    Amenpress ^ | October 25, 2012
    The Ottoman Empire carried out the Genocide and the German side provided the ideological support. Armenpress.am-Oct 25, 2012 The Germans could prevent the Genocide, as the Turkish army was in
  • How Ancient Greeks Named Their Puppies

    07/16/2012 10:00:55 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 46 replies
    Dogs played a special role in ancient Greek society and mythology; Cerberus guarded the gates of Hades, the goddess Artemis used dogs in her hunt, and Greek citizens employed dogs for hunting and protection. To the ancient Greeks, picking your new pup was an important decision, just as it is today. But, according to Stanford University researcher Adrienne Mayor, writing for Wonders & Marvels, the process could have been just a little bit different. Like moderns, the ancients looked for an adventurous and friendly nature, but one test for selecting the pick of the litter seems rather heartless today. Let...
  • Starving Greeks queue for food in their thousands...

    06/21/2012 9:00:12 PM PDT · by Veggie Todd · 52 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | June 19, 2012 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Starving Greeks queued around the block for free food handouts yesterday as the country's politicians managed to end a crippling stalemate to form a coalition government. Young children as well as the elderly waited in line in Athens to collect the parcels of fruit and vegetables donated by farmers from Crete to help ease the devastating austerity faced by many Greeks. But as hungry people collected food, a few miles away a new conservative-led alliance was formed, vowing to renegotiate the country's strict European bailout in a bid to breath economic life back into the debt-stricken country. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2161651/Starving-Greeks-food-thousands-politicians-finally-form-coalition-government--long-last.html#ixzz1yUWLjifR
  • Forget The Election Results - Greece Is Still Doomed And So Is The Rest Of Europe

    06/18/2012 7:30:55 AM PDT · by blam · 26 replies
    TEC ^ | 6-18-2012 | Michael Snyder
    Forget The Election Results - Greece Is Still Doomed And So Is The Rest Of EuropeMichael SnyderJune 18, 2012 The election results from Greece are in and the pro-bailout forces have won, but just barely. It is being projected that the pro-bailout New Democracy party will have about 130 seats in the 300 seat parliament, and Pasok (another pro-bailout party) will have about 33 seats. Those two parties have alternated ruling Greece for decades, and it looks like they are going to form a coalition government which will keep Greece in the euro. On Monday we are likely to see...
  • Graves Found From Sahara’s Green Period

    09/15/2008 4:21:39 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 52 replies · 271+ views
    New York Times Science ^ | August 15, 2008 | By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    When Paul C. Sereno went hunting for dinosaur bones in the Sahara, his career took a sharp turn from paleontology to archaeology. The expedition found what has proved to be the largest known graveyard of Stone Age people who lived there when the desert was green. The first traces of pottery, stone tools and human skeletons were discovered eight years ago at a site in the southern Sahara, in Niger. After preliminary research, Dr. Sereno, a University of Chicago scientist who had previously uncovered remains of the dinosaur Nigersaurus there, organized an international team of archaeologists to investigate what had...
  • The Genocide of the Ottoman Greeks: The First Academic Publication on the Greek Genocide

    05/26/2012 2:15:18 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 15 replies
    Modern Tokyo Times ^ | May 6, 2012 | Boutros Hussein and Lee Jay Walker
    Book Review of The Genocide of the Ottoman GreeksStudies on the State Sponsored Campaign of Extermination of the Christians of Asia Minor (1912-1922) and Its Aftermath: History, Law, Memory Edited by Tessa Hofmann, Matthias Bjørnlund and Vasileios Meichanetsidis ORDERS: Caratzas web site: http://www.caratzas.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&product_ID=531 BOOK REVIEW by Modern Tokyo TimesThe Genocide of the Ottoman Greeks (www.caratzas.com) is a book which digs deep into the deplorable actions of the dying embers of the Ottoman Empire and the foundation of the Turkish Republic which systematically annihilated various Christian communities. These various Christian communities were the indigenous people and suffered such brutality because of...
  • Iran,Armenia and the Armenians

    01/14/2012 3:09:34 PM PST · by Cronos · 7 replies
    The Commentator ^ | 14 Jan 2012 | Ziya Meral
    The news that the Iranian Interior Minister Mostafa Mohammad-Najjar will be visiting Armenia mid-January might come as a surprise to some. Yet, Iran has always seen its Armenian population as well as its links with Armenia as an important asset. Armenians are the most favoured and relatively privileged of all non-Muslim communities in Iran today. It is tricky to establish the exact number of ethno-religious minorities in the country since the official numbers are politically shaped and minority communities guard such details and often are not clear themselves. However, various sources estimate that there are around 300,000 Baha'is, 110,000...
  • Festering anger, Nazi war crimes and the £60bn the Greeks believe the Germans owe them

    11/02/2011 2:18:08 AM PDT · by markomalley · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | 2nd November 2011 | David Thomas
    (snip) On March 14, 1942, a team of German and Italian lawyers, in the absence of any Greeks, signed an agreement obliging the Bank of Greece to provide Germany with a ‘war loan’ of 476million Reichsmarks (a currency which preceded the Deutschmark). And 70 years later not one penny of it, let alone any interest, has been repaid. Economists (German ones, as it happens) have calculated that, allowing purely for inflation, Greece’s 1942 loan to Germany would today be worth £9bn. But if one adds even a modest rate of interest of 3 per cent, then that debt increases to...
  • "We Are All Greeks" - SocGen Presents The New World Order

    10/29/2011 7:55:12 PM PDT · by Former Proud Canadian · 19 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 10/29/2011 | Tyler Durden
    "We are all Greeks" - so begins one of the best reports on the unsustainability of the status quo, and on what "the new world order" will look like, created by SocGen's Veronique Riches-Flores. Her overarching observation: "No one can claim immunity from a Greek-style spiral" because "Our economies are mature, with weak potential GDP, especially post the financial crisis" and due to that old standby which everyone chooses so conveniently to forget, yet which is the biggest threat to the world's "welfare-state" stability, in existence since 1860 and which has been responsible for not only the longest period of...
  • Following Napoleon’s trail on Elba

    09/14/2011 3:41:18 PM PDT · by decimon · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | September 14, 2011 | Leif Pettersen
    > Elba has been inhabited since the Iron Age. Ligurian tribes were followed by Etruscans and then Greeks. A rotating cast of residents, refugees and pirates made appearances in subsequent centuries including the Pax Romana, bands of North African raiders, the Spanish and Cosimo I de' Medici, who in the mid-16th Century founded and fortified the port town of Cosmopolis, today's Portoferraio. But none of these occupants did more in so little time as France’s all time greatest military mastermind and badboy, Napoleon Bonaparte. Though the Emperor escaped less than a year after being “banished” to Elba (the penal equivalent...
  • Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin goes in search for Russia's Atlantis

    08/10/2011 8:55:05 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 11 replies
    Herald Sun ^ | 11 Aug 2011 | NewsCore
    HE has flown warplanes, shot at tigers and ridden bare-chested on horseback, but Russia's macho prime minister Vladimir Putin is now preparing for his next challenge - diving for Russia's version of Atlantis. Putin, 58, traveled to the Taman Peninsula in the southwest of the country to publicise archaeological work at the ancient Greek city of Phanagoria, Ria Novosti news agency reported. Putin was expected to put on diving gear and head to the bottom of Taman Bay, part of the Kerch Strait leading into the northern edge of the vast Black Sea. Phanagoria was a major Greek colony in...