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Keyword: greeks

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  • Is This Ancient Greek 'Laptop' Proof That Time Travel Is Real? [in short, no]

    02/06/2016 2:35:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 105 replies
    Yahoo -- ABC News Network ^ | February 5, 2016 | some wackadoodle
    A statue showing a young girl holding up what appears to be a laptop -- complete with USB ports -- has sparked a frenzy among conspiracy theorists. The statue, 'Grave Naiskos of an Enthroned Woman with an Attendant' is in The J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. 'I am not saying that this is depicting an ancient laptop computer,' said YouTuber StillSpeakingOut. 'But when I look at the sculpture I can't help but think about the Oracle of Delphi, which was supposed to allow the priests to connect with the gods to retrieve advanced information and various aspects.' In...
  • Archaeologists Discover Large Ancient Theater on Greek Island of Lefkada

    01/22/2016 3:43:30 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Greek Reporter [Source: ANA-MPA] ^ | Jan 21, 2016 | Ioanna Zikakou
    Archaeological excavations on the Ionian island of Lefkada have brought to light a previously undiscovered and sizeable ancient theater, the culture minister announced on Wednesday. It said the find was made on Koulmou hill toward the end of 2015. Test "sections" were cut in an area on the northeast flank of Koulmou's middle hill, which forms an amphitheatrical downward hollow ending in a lengthy flat section, the ministry announcement said. It noted that archaeologists knew very little about the city's ancient theater, which was not mentioned in any ancient sources, though the logs of an early 20th-century archaeological excavation under...
  • Ancient Tomb Found On Greek Island

    03/05/2008 7:15:50 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 310+ views
    The Charlotte Observer ^ | 3-5-2008 | NICHOLAS PAPHITIS
    Ancient tomb found on Greek island By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS Associated Press WriterA partly demolished, 3,000-year-old tomb recently discovered on the western Greek island of Lefkada is seen in this undated hand out photo released by Greek Culture Ministry on Wednesday, March 5, 2008. Archaeologists said the beehive-shaped tomb, which contained several human skeletons and grave offerings, was the first major Mycenaean-era monument to be found on the island.ATHENS, Greece --Road construction on the western Greek island of Lefkada has uncovered and partially destroyed an important tomb with artifacts dating back more than 3,000 years, officials said on Wednesday. The find...
  • Powerful quake hits western Greek island

    08/14/2003 12:07:46 AM PDT · by HAL9000 · 3 replies · 162+ views
    Associated Press | August 14, 2003
    ATHENS (AP) -- A powerful earthquake Thursday struck islands in western Greece, sending panicked residents and tourists into the streets and causing some injuries and damage, officials said. The quake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.4, occurred at 8:15 a.m. (0515 GMT) near the Ionian Sea island of Lefkada, about 290 kilometers (175 miles) northwest of Athens, said the Athens' Geodynamic Institute. Rescue officials said the main hospital on the island treated at least 10 people for minor injuries. A fire official, Panayiotis Fourlas, said there did not appear to be widespread serious damage to buildings, but authorities had...
  • Greece sells 110 of its best beaches in the name of ďdevelopmentĒ

    05/26/2014 8:48:07 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 9 replies
    Keep Talkin Greece ^ | 21 May 2014
    One hundred and ten of Greeceís best beaches are on sale by Greeceís privatization agency, the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund (TAIPED) in the name of supposed ďdevelopmentĒ and ďutilization of public assetsĒ. In fact a sale off of Greece best beaches for cash so that the debt-ridden country can pay back its lenders. The beaches plots are to be on sale with ď50 years of utilization by the new owners.Ē In the list of TAIPED are featured among others Myrto Beach in Kato Achaia, Vasiliki Beach in Lefkada, Kalmitsi beach in Chalkidiki and Ė what a shame Ė two...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 10:22:47 AM PST · by presidio9 · 14 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 29 February 2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow. Now, George Ferentinos of...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 7:31:23 AM PST · by Renfield · 55 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 2-29-2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow....
  • A precious remnant of Magna Graecia

    07/08/2005 12:53:38 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies · 387+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | Antonis Karkayiannis
    The Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice is the continuation of a Greek fraternity founded in 1498 The story began in 1498, a few decades after the fall of Constantinople, when the Greeks in Venice ó la nazione greca (or the Greek nation) ó gained permission from the Serene Republic to create a fraternity. Merchants and simple migrants from Western Greece, refugees from Constantinople, artists and others from Venetian-ruled Crete ó all were Orthodox Christians who spoke Greek. The Most Serene Republic of Venice ó the Serenissima ó which ruled the Eastern Mediterranean, willingly offered them asylum; first,...
  • Power and Pathos in Sculpture: Ancient bronzes come to life at the National Gallery of Art in DC

    12/12/2015 9:50:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | December 11, 2015 | Robin Ngo
    In 1964, Italian fishermen off the coast of the Adriatic Sea pulled out of international waters a nearly complete, life-size ancient bronze statue of an athlete. Standing with his weight on his right leg, the nude athlete reaches with his right arm toward the wreath on his head. Victorious in his competition, he will take off his crown and dedicate it to the gods. "The round face, with wide-set eyes, small nose, motionless cheeks, and petite, pointed chin appears somewhat vacuous," writes Jens M. Daehner of the Victorious Athlete. "The face subtly conveys a state of exhaustion, a situational realism...
  • Poles study ancient Greek colony of Tanais

    12/08/2015 12:09:53 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | December 7, 2015 | unattributed
    ...located in today’s Russia at the mouth of the River Don to the Azov Sea... said Dr. Marcin Matera from the Institute of Archaeology of the University of Warsaw... that the embankment was built after the conquest of Tanais by Polemon". Polemon was a king of Bosphorus, who ruled in the late first century BC... University of Warsaw expedition conducts excavations in the western part of the ancient Tanais since 1996... The most important discoveries made by Polish archaeologists include a unique defence system of the western gates of the city, established in the Hellenistic period and rebuilt, probably at...
  • The first inter-cultural ‚Äėparty‚Äô in Europe?

    12/07/2015 10:44:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 6, 2015 | Francesco Iacono
    The sharing of food and alcoholic beverages is extremely important today as in the past because provides a wealth of information on societies where this occurred. So far however, most of these practices known through archaeology have been primarily those undertaken by people from the same individual community or regional district. The Bronze Age site of Roca (2) in Southern Italy, has produced clear evidence for the existence at this place of one of the earliest inter-cultural feasting 'party' in Mediterranean Europe, dating to c.a. 1200 BC. This small (about 3 hectares nowadays, although it was larger in the past)...
  • BOMBSHELL: Amazing Biblical Archeological Discovery In Jerusalem...

    11/10/2015 8:09:42 AM PST · by amorphous · 64 replies
    Shoebat.com ^ | 9 Nov 2015 | Walid Shoebat
    The discovery of the Acra last week is "a dream come true" for archaeologists, who have been speculating on the citadel's location for 100 years, the IAA said. The discovery of Acra comes at a delicate time, for it reveals the story of the Maccabees, Antiochus and the coming Antichrist. All this is understood once we connect the dots and see the parallels between the Grecian Empire at the time of the Maccabees harassing God's people and the Antichrist who is also from the same empire (Asia Minor) harassing God's people today.
  • The ancient Greeks in Ukraine

    11/16/2015 12:17:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | November 13, 2015 | unattributed
    By using aerial photographs and geophysical surveys, Warsaw archaeologists not only confirmed the location of settlement dating back more than two thousand years in Respublikaniec (Kherson Oblast), but also discovered previously unknown structures in its area... Archaeologists determined that the settlement was probably founded in the 2nd century BC. Researchers also discovered the exact outline of its fortifications -- defensive walls and ditches. In addition to defensive functions, the place also served as a venue of trade between residents of the Dnieper steppes and the ancient world, represented by the nearby Greek colony -- Olbia. The settlement could also have...
  • Fortress of Antiochus Epiphanes Uncovered in Jerusalem

    11/04/2015 8:29:09 AM PST · by dutchdingo · 4 replies
    thetrumpet.com ^ | November 3, 2015 | Brent Nagtegaal
    On Monday afternoon, the Israeli Antiquities Authority (IAA) sent a newsbrief to reporters in Jerusalem, calling for a press conference the following day to announce the ‚Äúsolution to one of the greatest questions in the history of Jerusalem.‚ÄĚ Tuesday‚Äôs announcement did not disappoint: On site, in Jerusalem‚Äôs City of David, archaeologist Doron Ben-Ami announced that the famed Akra (citadel) of Antiochus Epiphanes had been discovered. Up until that announcement, little had been found testifying to the massive Hellenistic intrusion into the city early in the second century B.C. Yet here, at the northwestern portion of the City of David, a...
  • Terracotta Warriors Inspired by Ancient Greek Art

    12/14/2013 5:36:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 10 December 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Nickel's evidence includes newly translated ancient records that tell a fantastic tale of giant statues that "appeared" in the far west, inspiring the first emperor of China to duplicate them in front of his palace. This story offers evidence of early contact between China and the West, contacts that Nickel says inspired the First Emperor (which is what Qin Shi Huangdi called himself) to not only duplicate the 12 giant statues but to build the massive Terracotta Army along with other life-size sculptures. Before the First Emperor's time, life-size sculptures were not built in China, and Nickel argues the idea...
  • Archaeological find in Jerusalem's City of David may answer ancient mystery [2 Thess 2]

    11/03/2015 7:50:50 AM PST · by Jan_Sobieski · 12 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 11/03/2015 | DANIEL K. EISENBUD
    A recent discovery by the Israel Antiquities Authority in Jerusalem’s City of David may reveal the answer to one of archaeology's most enduring mysteries: the location of the Greek Acra citadel. The exact location of the famous stronghold built by Antiochus IV, to control Jerusalem and monitor activity on the Temple Mount, has long been unknown due to the paucity of architectural remains that can be traced to the Greek presence in Jerusalem. Over the past 100 years of archaeological research in Jerusalem, numerous theories have been put forth identifying the location of the Acra, which was eventually overtaken by...
  • Excavation of Ancient Greek healing temple at Feneos site reveals god statues and garden

    10/25/2015 6:12:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    International Business Times ^ | October 20, 2015 | Hannah Osborne
    An ancient Greek healing temple has been excavated by archaeologists, who recovered huge statues and were able to reconstruct the architecture at the site. The acropolis at the Feneos site in the eastern foothills sits at an altitude of 750m. The asclepion (a healing temple sacred to the god Asclepius) was first discovered in 1958 and between 2007 and 2014, archaeologists gradually surveyed and documented the site. In September this year, the Corinth Archaeological Service completed the first excavation programme, and the findings were announced by the Greek Culture Ministry. The team found the main part of the sanctuary dates...
  • The Earliest Known Abecedary

    10/24/2015 5:58:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    A flake of limestone (ostracon) inscribed with an ancient Egyptian word list of the fifteenth century BC turns out to be the world's oldest known abecedary. The words have been arranged according to their initial sounds, and the order followed here is one that is still known today. This discovery by Ben Haring (Leiden University) with funding from Free Competition Humanities has been published in the October issue of the 'Journal of Near Eastern Studies'. The order is not the ABC of modern western alphabets, but Halaham (HLHM), the order known from the Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Arabian and Classical Ethiopian...
  • Experiential Archaeology Class Recreates Ancient Ceramics

    10/08/2015 2:01:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, October 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Johns Hopkins University has released Mysteries of the Kylix, a film that follows 13 undergraduate students who worked with a conservator and two potters to recreate the red-figure pottery drinking bowls crafted by Greek artisans between the sixth and fourth centuries B.C. The students practiced throwing pots, decorated them with images and slip, and fired the clay in a kiln that they constructed. They then examined their pottery under a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument. "The idea is to be thoughtful at every stage. To look at clay, make shapes, to choose images and paint, to go through the fire and...
  • A scholar in the desert {Hagarism: the origins of Islam} - Patricia Crone

    08/07/2015 12:18:56 AM PDT · by Cronos · 25 replies
    The Economist ^ | 1 August 2015 | the Economist
    ISLAM arose with remarkable speed and mystery. Patricia Croneís well-stocked mind, clear prose and unflinching intellectual honesty were devoted to explaining why. She had little time for Islamís own accounts of its origins: ďdebrisĒ as far as historians were concerned, and hopelessly inconsistent. Far better, she reckoned, to fill the gap with contemporary sources and knowledge of other cultures, from messianic Maoris to Icelanders. That required both personal and intellectual bravery. The central beliefs of Islam, such as the way the Koran took shape, the life of Muhammad and Islamís relations with other religions, are sensitive subjects. Outside scrutiny can...
  • Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

    05/14/2012 3:27:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 19, 2012 | Nan Broadbent
    In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village. New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues. The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and...
  • Ancient Greek City Uncovered in Russia [Temple of Demeter]

    05/23/2011 9:09:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1+ views
    EU Greek Reporter ^ | May 8, 2011 | Tania Mourtzila
    What is considered to be a unique discovery has been made in Taman, South Russia, at the Black Sea. The ruins of an ancient Greek city, dated around the 6th century BC, came to light. Archeologists are stunned both by the number of the findingsand the condition they were found in. The excavations are proceeding with extreme caution, in order to avoid damaging the city's ancient fortress. According to historians, it is assumed that the ruins are the temple of Dimitra, the ancient goddess of fertility and agriculture, while they were able to determine the very spot of the altar....
  • What if the Persian Empire of King Xerxes had conquered Greece?

    04/07/2011 5:34:56 AM PDT · by Cronos · 90 replies · 3+ views
    hub pages ^ | 2009 | Asp52
    ...With Greece a Persian province what would have happened next? Forward into the Balkans and be met by Eastern Europe's barbaric tribes. It is likely on the evidence of the Romans occupation of that area that the Persians would struggle so far away from their own lands to subdue the Balkan and Italian areas even with the support of its Macedonian allies. But their incursion into this area of Europe would have stopped the formation of the Roman Empire as we know it, The Germanic tribes may have spread further and the migration of the peoples of the Steppes( Maygars...
  • Greek socialists reluctantly accept IMF Ďmeddlingí in deal to save the country they ruined

    07/13/2015 4:36:24 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 11 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 07/13/15 | Dan Calabrese
    If I were negotiating this deal on behalf of the IMF and the EU, one term I would demand is the resignation of the socialist government Itís the third bailout of Greece in five years. Heck, even Chrysler must be appalled at a performance like that. And while weíre still waiting for the details, early reports indicate that Greeceís socialist government had to accept much more stringent terms than the ones they told Greek voters to reject just last week. Itís easy just telling everyone yes to whatever they want until you run out of stuff to give them. Thatís...
  • Defiant Greeks reject EU demands as Syriza readies IOU currency

    07/05/2015 9:10:39 PM PDT · by catnipman · 41 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 7/5/15 | Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
    "If necessary, we will issue parallel liquidity and California-style IOU's, in an electronic form. We should have done it a week ago," said Yanis Varoufakis, the finance minister. ... Syriza sources say the Greek ministry of finance is examining options to take direct control of the banking system ... They want a new team installed, one that is willing to draw on the central bank's secret reserves, and to take the provocative step in extremis of creating euros. "We have to restore stability to the system, with or without the help of the ECB. We have the capacity to print...
  • Ancient tomb of Celtic prince found in France

    03/05/2015 6:35:29 PM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 19 replies
    The Local (France) ^ | 05 Mar 2015 08:21 GMT+01:00
    An "exceptional" tomb from the fifth century BC, likely that of a Celtic prince, has been unearthed in a small French town, shedding light on Iron Age European trade, researchers said Wednesday. The grave, crammed with Greek and possibly Etruscan artefacts, was discovered in a business zone on the outskirts of Lavau in France's Champagne region, said the National Archaeological Research Institute, Inrap. A team from the institute has been excavating the site since October last year, and have dated it to the end of the First Iron Age -- a period characterised by the widespread use of the metal....
  • 2500-Year-Old 'Wonder Woman' Found on Vase

    06/08/2015 2:22:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jun 5, 2015 11:24 AM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    A 2,500-year-old predecessor of DC Comicsí Wonder Woman super heroine has emerged on a vase painting kept at a small American museum. Drawn on a white-ground pyxis (a lidded cylindrical box that was used for cosmetics, jewelry, or ointments) the image shows an Amazon on horseback in a battle against a Greek warrior. Much like the fictional warrior princess of the Amazons, the horsewoman is twirling a lasso. ďIt is the only ancient artistic image of an Amazon using a lariat in battle,Ē Adrienne Mayor, a research scholar at Stanford Universityís departments of classics and history of science, told Discovery...
  • How some Armenians are reclaiming their Christian faith

    06/02/2015 2:39:09 AM PDT · by markomalley · 2 replies
    Al Monitor ^ | 6/1/15 | Sibel Hurtas
    Armenians in Turkey who opted to live as Muslims to avoid mistreatment are recovering their true identities in collective baptisms. The latest such baptism came in May when 12 Armenians from Dersim (Tunceli) recovered their identities. The saga of Armenians who were compelled to live as Muslims goes back to 1915 massacres. Armenian children were adopted by Muslim families, women married Muslim men and some families converted to Islam to save their lives. These Armenians, who for a century were forced to conceal their identities, are trying to return to their roots. This activity is more prevalent among Anatolian Armenians,...
  • Turkeyís quiet Christian genocide

    06/04/2015 2:09:36 AM PDT · by iowamark · 2 replies
    RedState ^ | 6/3/2015 | Streiff
    Nearly everyone but the Obama administration has heard of the genocide of Turkey’s Armenian minority in which as many as 1.5 million Armenians were deliberately murdered by the Turkish government. While the Armenians were targeted for their ethnicity, what is widely overlooked is the fact that the Armenians were Orthodox Christians who inconveniently enjoyed conspicuous success in an Islamic nation. Now that the Turks have essentially finished off the Armenians, they have been hard at work eliminating the remaining Christians. On the eve of World War I, over 20% of Turkey was Christian. Now it is less than 2%. This...
  • Medicine's Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript

    06/02/2015 10:45:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2015 | Mark Schrope
    A Syriac scholar at Philipps University in Marburg, Germany, Dr. Kessel was sitting in the library of the manuscript's owner, a wealthy collector of rare scientific material in Baltimore. At that moment, Dr. Kessel realized that just three weeks earlier, in a library at Harvard University, he had seen a single orphaned page that was too similar to these pages to be coincidence. The manuscript he held contained a hidden translation of an ancient, influential medical text by Galen of Pergamon, a Greco-Roman physician and philosopher who died in 200 A.D. It was missing pages and Dr. Kessel was suddenly...
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • Black Sea Starts to Yield a Rich Ancient History

    04/12/2006 7:36:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 219+ views
    Washington Post ^ | Monday 20 January 2003 | Guy Gugliotta
    The ship had a cargo hold filled with ceramic jars, some -- and perhaps all -- of them filled with salt fish. It probably left from a seaport in what is now Turkey and sailed northwest through the Black Sea to the Crimea to pick up its load. Then, for unknown reasons, it sank in 275 feet of water off the present-day Bulgarian coast, coming softly to rest on a carpet of mud. Last week, archaeologists announced they had found the long-lost vessel. Sunk sometime between 490 B.C. and 280 B.C., it is the oldest wreck ever found in the...
  • Underwater archaeology: Hunt for the ancient mariner

    01/26/2012 9:06:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | Jo Marchant
    Foley, a marine archaeologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, and his colleagues at Greece's Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in Athens have spent the day diving near the cliffs of the tiny island of Dia in the eastern Mediterranean. They have identified two clusters of pottery dating from the first century BC and fifth century AD. Together with other remains that the team has discovered on the island's submerged slopes, the pots reveal that for centuries Greek, Roman and Byzantine traders used Dia as a refuge during storms, when they couldn't safely reach Crete. It is a nice...
  • Two Underrated Peoples

    05/02/2015 2:13:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    American Thinker ^ | May 2, 2015 | Mike Konrad
    In looking over the history of the past 500 years, four nations stand out for having completely and massively altered world civilization in a way that no others have, before or after: England, Spain, France, and Portugal. No other empires even come close. The Muslim conquests were landbound except for island hopping. Chinese and Mongolian conquests were landbound. Even in ancient times, Greek, Roman, and Persian conquests were essentially land operations, except for river fording. Yes, they all had navies, but were not defined by them. What separates the English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish was that these nations had vast...
  • Turkish Minister: Muslims Discovered the Earth is Round

    11/30/2014 3:19:26 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 74 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 30/11/14 | Tova Dvorin
    The Turkish Science Minister has become the latest public figure to make outrageous claims over Islam's hand in science and technology, the Hurriyet Daily News reported Friday - this time, claiming that Muslims discovered that the world is round. "Some 700-800 years before Galileo, 71 Muslim scientists led by al-Khwarizmi convened by the order of the Caliph Al-Ma'mun and revealed that the Earth is a sphere," Minister Fikri stated on Thursday. Fikri further claimed that a copy of the original document proving Islam's role in astronomy is currently in the Museum of Islamic Science and Technology in Istanbul. The Earth...
  • In Search of the Real Troy

    02/20/2005 2:33:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 1,322+ views
    Saudi Aramco World ^ | January/February 2005 Volume 56, Number 1 | Graham Chandler, Photographed by Ergun Cagata
    It was then that Swiss scholar Emil Forrer deciphered newly discovered writings from the Hittite Empire to the east, finding two place-namesóWilusa and Taruisaóthat sounded convincingly like the Hittite way of writing "Wilios" (the Greek name for the site was "Ilion") and "Troia" (Troy). He also found a treaty, from the early 13th century BC, between the Hittite king Muwatalli and a king of "Wilusa" named Alaksandu. The kingís name, Forrer added, recalls the name of the Trojan prince Alexanderócalled Paris in Homerís Iliad. Critics pooh-poohed, conceding that a place named Wilusa may have existed, but where was it on...
  • Amazon Warriors Did Indeed Fight and Die Like Men

    11/01/2014 3:18:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 44 replies
    National Geographic's Book Talk ^ | October 29, 2014 | Simon Worrall
    Archaeology shows that these fierce women also smoked pot, got tattoos, killedóand lovedómen. The Amazons got a bum rap in antiquity. They wore trousers. They smoked pot, covered their skin with tattoos, rode horses, and fought as hard as the guys. Legends sprang up like weeds. They cut off their breasts to fire their bows better! They mutilated or killed their boy children! Modern (mostly male) scholars continued the confabulations. The Amazons were hard-core feminists. Man haters. Delinquent mothers. Lesbians. Drawing on a wealth of textual, artistic, and archaeological evidence, Adrienne Mayor, author of The Amazons, dispels these myths and...
  • Greek paper: World Jewish plutocracy behind Gaza strife, global financial crisis

    12/29/2008 11:02:55 AM PST · by SmithL · 28 replies · 981+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 12/29/8 | Haaretz Service
    A daily newspaper in Greece has blamed Jews both for the world financial crisis and the Israeli operation in Gaza, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency reported this week. "After the American Jews acquired once again the world's wealth and plunged the planet into an unprecedented financial crisis, they started rehearsing for WWIII," JTA quoted the Avriani newspaper's front-page headline as reading Sunday. "Midway through the paper's story on Israel's operation in Gaza, the story, under the heading 'The Plan,' explains that a Jewish plutocracy, having made the 'wealth of the century at the expense of the economies of the world,' is...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Have archaeologists discovered the grave of Alexander the Great?

    08/23/2013 7:47:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | August 23, 2013
    Experts find enormous marble tomb fit for a king under a massive mound in Greece Archaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis, 370 miles north of Athens The warrior king was thought to be buried in Egypt but experts have discovered a marble-faced wall dating from the 4th century BC Site archaeologist Aikaterini Peristeri has voiced hopes of finding 'a significant individual or individuals' withinArchaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis. The warrior king - who ruled in...
  • Mystery over massive Alexander-era tomb unearthed in Greece

    08/13/2014 1:25:20 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 14 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Aug 12, 2014
    Archaeologists have unearthed a funeral mound dating from the time of Alexander the Great and believed to be the largest ever discovered in Greece, but are stumped about who was buried in it. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on Tuesday described the find as "unique" after he visited the site, which dates to the era following Alexander's death, at the ancient town of Amphipolis in northern Greece. "It is certain that we stand before an exceptionally important find," Samaras said in a statement. "This is a monument with unique characteristics." Hidden under a hill at the ancient town, the Hellenistic-era mound...
  • Greek tomb at Amphipolis is 'important discovery'

    08/13/2014 10:23:09 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13th August 2014 | BBC News
    'Archaeologists unearthing a burial site at Amphipolis in northern Greece have made an "extremely important find", says Greek PM Antonis Samaras. Experts believe the tomb belonged to an important figure dating back to the last quarter of the Fourth Century BC. A large mound complex has been unearthed at the Kasta hill site in the past two years. Lead archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said it certainly dated from after the death of Alexander the Great.'
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monumentís interior wonít be intact. ďAt the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.ótwo years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • Ancient Love Inscriptions in Astypalea

    06/14/2014 6:21:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | June 4, 2014 | Evdokia Fourkioti
    According to Ethnos, ancient love inscriptions dating back to the early 6th and the late 5th centuries B.C., were recently discovered in Astypalea. Spirals, shapes of ships, tools in triangular shapes were mostly drawn by the Neolithic inhabitants of Astypalea. One of the first findings of the Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, Andreas Vlachopoulos, was rock paintings located in Vathi at the Pirgos Peninsula and date back to 4th-3rd millennium B.C. In 2013, more unexpected findings were discovered, which present an aspect of privacy of the ancient Greek inhabitants in the early 6th and late 5th centuries B.C. The Secretary General...
  • Armenian Genocide: 99 Years of Remembrance

    04/25/2014 7:58:46 AM PDT · by george76 · 24 replies
    la fox ^ | Apr 24, 2014 | Araksya Karapetyan
    Wednesday April 24th marks the 99th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. That day also marks another year thatís gone by where the Turkish government has not recognized the slaughter of 1.5 million Armenians as a genocide. ... The Armenian Genocide was one of the most compelling human rights crises of World War I. Many historians talk about how what happened in 1915 perhaps helped inspire Adolf Hitler, three decades later, to carry out the atrocities of World War II. In a speech where Hitler was preparing to invade Poland, he is quoted saying: ďWho, after all, speaks of the annihilation...
  • The Greek Age of Bronze -- Middle Helmets

    Outside the Greek mainland and Aegean Island a possible representation of Achaean warriors equipped with boar tusks helmets is from an Egyptian papyrus fragments from Tell el-Amarna, home of Amenhotep III's son, dated around 1350 BC (*2). In this papyrus some warriors are depicted with conical pale-yellow helmets which remaind in general design the typical Aegean boar tusks helmet. This identification is strengthened by the find of a piece of boarís tusk, with perforations for attaching it to a leather frame, during excavations at Qantir, the site of the Ramesside capital Pi-ramesse in the eastern delta. It appears likely that...
  • Old Egypt investigator identifies to mysterious Hyksos kings [sic]

    03/28/2006 10:58:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 705+ views
    Rowley Regis Online ^ | Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:47 pm | mariafvp
    Georgeos Diaz-Montexano, scriptologist and Egyptologist amateur, has been able to identify the names of the Hyksos kings like pertaining to the group of languages and proto-Greek or Mycenaean's dialects. The true ethnic origin of the mysterious Hyksos that were able to take control of the power of a considerable part of Old Egypt, during centuries XVII to the XVI before Christ, has been always a true challenge for the Egyptologists. However, the generalized opinion more for a long time has been that the Hyksos would be Semitic towns, fundamentally coastal inhabitants of the strip Syrian-Palestine, that is, Canaanites or proto-Phoenicians....
  • The Apollo found that divides Gaza

    02/17/2014 1:54:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Fai di Repubblica ^ | October 10, 2013 | Fabio Scuto
    ...Mounir with that metal finger shown around Gaza has attracted the attentions of Hamas' spies, always well introduced in every environment. Within a few hours the fisherman is arrested and the statue, which could date back to the fourth century B. C., is seized. It would be a great achievement for Hamas to show the world this wonder of Greek art - comparable to the Riace Bronzes - but for those who have it in their hands it soon becomes clear that the Apollo must remain a secret. Islam forbids the reproduction of the human figure in art and accepts...