Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $48,266
54%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 54%!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: harappan

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Indus cities dried up with monsoon

    05/02/2006 7:20:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 714+ views
    India Telegraph ^ | Sunday, April 30, 2006 | G.S. Mudur
    The earliest settlement in the subcontinent with evidence of agriculture and domestication at Mehrgarh — now in Pakistan — is about 9,000 years old. This coincides with the peak intensification of the monsoon, the study said... The Arabian Sea sediments and other geological studies show that the monsoon began to weaken about 5,000 years ago. The dry spell, lasting several hundred years, might have led people to abandon the Indus cities and move eastward into the Gangetic plain, which has been an area of higher rainfall than the northwestern part of the subcontinent... About 1,700 years ago, the monsoon began...
  • Harappan Workshops Excavated in Northwest India

    07/07/2016 8:14:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, July 06, 2016 | editors
    A 5,000-year-old industrial production center featuring furnaces, hearths, and mud-brick structures has been found in northwest India between two channels of the Ghaggar River. According to a report in Frontline, the settlement, occupied for more than 1,000 years, lacked the fortification walls, streets at right angles, citadel, and area for traders and craftsmen usually seen in Harappan sites. One of the furnaces, used for smelting gold and copper, had a platform where the smith could sit and blow through an underground tube to the fire pit. Nearby hearths were used to produce gold jewelry and copper fish hooks and spear...
  • Indus Valley civilisation may pre-date Egypt's pharoahs: Ancient society is 2,500 years older [tr]

    06/02/2016 6:41:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 2, 2016 | Sarah Griffiths
    With its impressive pyramids and complex rules, Ancient Egypt may seem to many the epitome of an advanced early civilisation. But new evidence suggests the Indus Valley Civilisation in India and Pakistan, famed for its well-planned cities and impressive crafts, predates Egypt and Mesopotamia. Already considered one of the oldest civilisations in the world, experts now believe it is 8,000 years old - 2,500 years older than previously thought.
  • A Turkish origin for Indo-European languages

    08/24/2012 8:04:40 AM PDT · by Renfield · 43 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 8-23-2012 | Alyssa Joyce
    Languages as diverse as English, Russian and Hindi can trace their roots back more than 8,000 years to Anatolia — now in modern-day Turkey. That's the conclusion of a study1 that assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique normally used to study the evolution and spread of disease. The researchers hope that their findings can settle a long-running debate about the origins of the Indo-European language group...
  • New Discoveries In Syria Confirm Theory On Spread Of Early Civilization

    06/03/2002 1:42:03 PM PDT · by blam · 47 replies · 4,088+ views
    Newswise.com ^ | 6-2-2002 | Carrie Golus
    Contact: Carrie Golus (773) 702-8359 cgolus@uchicago.edu New discoveries in Syria confirm theory on spread of early civilization Unique artifacts unearthed this season in Syria will force historians and archaeologists to rewrite the history books, because the traditional view of how civilization developed is looking increasingly wrong. A cooperative expedition between the University of Chicago and the Syrian Directorate of Antiquities has uncovered the hallmarks of urban life in Syria a little after 4,000 B.C., a time when civilization was thought to be restricted to Mesopotamia. Already during initial excavations in 1999, discoveries at Hamoukar in northeastern Syria began to suggest...
  • Computers to translate world's 'lost' languages after program deciphers ancient text

    07/21/2010 12:27:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 7/20/2010 | Niall Firth
    Scientists have used a computer program to decipher a written language that is more than three thousand years old. The program automatically translated the ancient written language of Ugaritic within just a few hours. Scientists hope the breakthrough could help them decipher the few ancient languages that they have been unable to translate so far. Ugaritic was last used around 1200 B.C. in western Syria and consists of dots on clay tablets. It was first discovered in 1920 but was not deciphered until 1932. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told the program that the language was related to...
  • Ancient civilization: Cracking the Indus script

    10/21/2015 3:47:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Andrew Robinson
    Whatever their differences, all Indus researchers agree that there is no consensus on the meaning of the script. There are three main problems. First, no firm information is available about its underlying language. Was this an ancestor of Sanskrit or Dravidian, or of some other Indian language family, such as Munda, or was it a language that has disappeared? Linear B was deciphered because the tablets turned out to be in an archaic form of Greek; Mayan glyphs because Mayan languages are still spoken. Second, no names of Indus rulers or personages are known from myths or historical records: no...
  • Drowned Indian city could be world's oldest

    01/18/2002 9:59:20 AM PST · by Oxylus · 26 replies · 304+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 18 January 02 | Emma Young
    Evidence of an ancient "lost river civilisation" has been uncovered off the west coast of India, the country's minister for science and technology has announced. Local archaeologists claim the find could push back currently accepted dates of the emergence of the world's first cities. Underwater archaeologists at the National Institute of Ocean Technology first detected signs of an ancient submerged settlement in the Gulf of Cambray, off Gujarat, in May 2001. They have now conducted further acoustic imaging surveys and have carbon dated one of the finds. The acoustic imaging has identified a nine-kilometre-long stretch of what was once a ...
  • Lost Civilisation From 7,500 BC Discovered Off Indian Coast

    01/16/2002 5:18:59 AM PST · by blam · 113 replies · 8,270+ views
    Ananova ^ | 1-16-2002
    Lost civilisation from 7,500 BC discovered off Indian coast Archaeologists have found a civilisation dating back to 7,500 BC off India's western coast. The find is 5,000 years older than any previously unearthed civilisation in the subcontinent. Researchers uncovered pottery, beads, sculptures, a fossilised jaw bone and human teeth at the Gulf of Cambay site.(DNA tests?) Previously, the oldest known civilisations were the Harrapan and Indus Valley communities - which date from around 2,500BC. Murli Manohar Joshi, minister for human resources and ocean development, told The Times of India: "The findings buried 40 metres below the sea reveal some ...
  • 'Farming in India began much earlier'

    12/05/2006 10:59:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 403+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 3, 2006 | HT Correspondent
    Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed. This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture... Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due...
  • Huge Ancient Civilization’s Collapse Explained

    05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 5-28-2012 | Charles Choi
    The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit — ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...
  • Tales teeth can tell: Dental enamel reveals surprising migration patterns in ancient Indus civ...

    05/09/2015 6:20:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    University of Florida ^ | April 29, 2015 | Gigi Marino [Sources: John Krigbaum, George Kamenov]
    When tooth enamel forms, it incorporates elements from the local environment -- the food one eats, the water one drinks, the dust one breathes. When the researchers looked at remains from the ancient city of Harappa, located in what is known today as the Punjab Province of Pakistan, individuals' early molars told a very different story than their later ones, meaning they hadn't been born in the city where they were found... The text of the Indus Valley Civilization remains undeciphered, and known and excavated burial sites are rare. A new study, published in today's PLOS ONE, illuminates the lives...
  • The ancient city that's crumbling away

    03/23/2015 11:43:41 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 10 replies
    BBC Magazine ^ | 22nd March 2015 | BBC Correspondent
    'The ancient city of Mohenjo Daro was one of the world's earliest major urban settlements - but as Razia Iqbal found on a recent visit to Pakistan, its remains are in danger of crumbling away. As a lover of language, I am convinced that certain combinations of letters have in them some innate magic - like Kubla Khan, or Xanadu, or Nineveh. So allow the words Mohenjo Daro to roll slowly off your tongue. And let me tell you about this ancient city, rediscovered nearly 100 years ago, but which had its heyday 4,000 years ago. It lies on the...
  • 4,000-Year-Old Copper Crown Found in India

    01/04/2015 4:30:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Epoch Times ^ | January 1, 2015 | Venus Upadhayaya
    Indian archaeologists uncovered a 4,000-year-old copper crown in the village of Chandayan, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh this week, from what they believe was the late Indus Valley civilization. According to Dr. Rakesh Tewari, the director general of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), this is only the second crown discovered at an Indus Valley site in either India or Pakistan. Earlier, a silver crown was found at another late Indus Valley site in what is now the Fatehabad district of Haryana state in northeast India... The copper crown, decorated with a Carnelian and a Fiance bead...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • From Indus Valley To Coastal Tamil Nadu

    05/02/2008 8:03:44 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 100+ views
    The Hindu ^ | 5-2-2008 | TS Subramanian
    From Indus Valley to coastal Tamil Nadu T.S. Subramanian Strong resemblances between graffiti symbols in Tamil Nadu and the Indus script Continuity of tradition: Megalithic pots with arrow-work graffiti found at Sembiankandiyur village in Nagapattinam district. CHENNAI: In recent excavations in Nagapattinam district in Tamil Nadu, megalithic pottery with graffiti symbols that have a strong resemblance to a sign in the Indus script have been found. Indus script expert Iravatham Mahadevan says that what is striking about the arrow-mark graffiti on the megalithic pottery found at Sembiyankandiyur and Melaperumpallam villages is that they are always incised twice and together, just...
  • Harappan-era seal found in Rajasthan

    02/05/2014 8:13:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Hindustan Times ^ | February 01, 2014 | Vanita Srivastava
    The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) last week unearthed a Harappan seal from Karanpura in the Hanumangarh district of Rajasthan. “The seal consists of two Harappan characters, with a typical unicorn as the motif and a pipal leaf depicted in front of an animal. There is a knob behind the seal,” says VN Prabhakar, superintending archaeologist, who led the ASI team. Maintaining that the discovery ‘confirms’ that the site belongs to the mature Harappan period, the time when the civilization was at its peak (2600 BC to 1900 BC), he said: “A cubicle chert weight was also unearthed in a...
  • Disease and trauma within collapsing Indus Civilisation

    12/27/2013 3:02:52 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 12-25-2013
    During the third millennium BCE, the Indus Civilisation flourished in what is now northwest India and Pakistan. Between 2200-1900 BCE the culture was characterised by long-distance exchange networks, carefully planned urban settlements such as Harappa and Mohenjo Daro that had sophisticated sanitation facilities, standardised weights and measures, and a sphere of influence that extended over a million square kilometres of territory. The culture was seemingly at its height when the end came (collapse attributed to climatic change) but recent research published in both the open access journal PLoS ONE and an earlier 2012 article in the International Journal of Palaeopathology...
  • Surprising Discoveries From the Indus Civilization

    05/04/2013 3:18:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | April 29, 2013 | Traci Watson
    Researchers examined the chemical composition of teeth from a Harappan cemetery used from roughly 2550 to 2030 B.C. The analysis showed that the city was a cosmopolitan melting pot. Many of the deceased had grown up outside Harappa... Many of the outsiders, surprisingly, are men buried near women native to Harappa. The findings are preliminary, but they suggest men moved in with their brides, even though in South Asia women traditionally move to their husband's homes... Bones from about 1900 to 1700 B.C. -- more than a millennium later than those examined by Kenoyer -- make it clear that at...
  • Is the Harappan civilisation 2000 years older?

    11/14/2012 12:03:35 PM PST · by Renfield · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11/14/2012
    The recent International Conference on Harappan Archaeology produced an unexpected announcement from archaeologists BR Mani and KN Dikshit, both of the Archaeological Survey of India, who claim that new dates from excavations show the Harappan culture began around 2000 years earlier than previously thought.The ruins of the Harrapan city of Mohenjo-daro remained undocumented for over 3,700 years, until their discovery in 1922 by Rakhaldas Bandyopadhyay, an officer of the Archaeological Survey of India. He was led to the mound by a Buddhist monk, who reportedly believed it to be a stupa. Image: Wikimedia commons Redating of Harappan culture Based on...