Keyword: infections

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • 'Brute force' can overcome antibiotic resistance

    02/06/2017 4:23:08 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    University College London ^ | February 3, 2017
    Antibiotics can still kill drug-resistant bacteria if they 'push' hard enough into bacterial cells, finds new UCL-led research funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, opens up a promising new way of overcoming antibiotic resistance and could help scientists to design even more effective drugs. "Antibiotics work in different ways, but they all need to bind to bacterial cells in order to kill them," explains lead author Dr Joseph Ndieyira (UCL Medicine). "Antibiotics have 'keys' that fit 'locks' on bacterial cell surfaces, allowing them to latch on. When a bacterium becomes...
  • Get Your Children Good and Dirty [WSJ Saturday Essay]

    09/16/2016 4:42:21 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 15 replies
    Wall Street Journal / WSJ.COM ^ | 09/15/16 | B. BRETT FINLAY and MARIE-CLAIRE ARRIETA
    Never before in human history have babies and children grown up so cleanly, and our diets have lost many of the elements most crucial to the health of our guts. We have become very bad hosts to our microbes. [snip] Babies and toddlers often aren’t allowed to play in the dirt or sand, and when they are, they are wiped clean immediately. Phrases like, “Yuck! Don’t play in the mud!” or “Don’t touch that bug, it’s dirty!” have become second nature. We need to unlearn these habits. By preventing babies and children from following their innate impulse to get dirty,...
  • Florida confirms 10 new Zika infections, most in single day

    Statewide total climbs to 246 confirmed Zika cases in Florida this year No cases of local transmission by mosquitoes, health department says First child born in Florida with Zika-related birth defect reported this week ====== Florida health officials confirmed the largest number of new Zika infections in a single day on Friday with 10 people affected, raising the statewide total to 246 cases this year, including 43 pregnant women. The new cases were announced on the same week that state officials reported Florida’s first baby born with a Zika-related birth defect. The baby is at least the fifth child born...
  • Doctors astonished after ViroCap test detects all viruses lurking in a human body

    10/01/2015 9:26:57 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    World Tech Today ^ | October 1, 2015 | Dan Taylor
    Researchers have successfully created a new test that could eliminate the need for needles in testing for viruses — and dramatically increase the success rate of doctors trying to diagnose an illness. It’s called ViroCap, and while the test is not ready for use in patients just yet, it has passed a big clinical trial that is paving the way for its eventual entry into the market, according to a UPI report. ViroCap supposedly can detect any virus known to man — and animals — and it could help doctors who don’t know what they’re looking for spot a virus...
  • Judge Orders Release of Immigrant Children Detained by U.S. (Mothers to be released, too)

    07/26/2015 8:09:57 AM PDT · by jimbo123 · 18 replies
    NY Times ^ | 7/25/15 | JULIA PRESTON
    A federal judge in California has ruled that the Obama administration’s detention of children and their mothers who were caught crossing the border illegally is a serious violation of a longstanding court settlement, and that the families should be released as quickly as possible. In a decision late Friday roundly rejecting the administration’s arguments for holding the families, Judge Dolly M. Gee of Federal District Court for the Central District of California found that two detention centers in Texas that the administration opened last summer fail to meet minimum legal requirements of the 1997 settlement for facilities housing children. -snip-...
  • More On The Endoscope-Related CRE Outbreaks

    03/10/2015 10:36:35 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 3 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 3/10/15 | Michael D. Shaw
    on this topic generated plenty of interest (despite the small number of posted comments), so we continue our coverage… Yet another prestigious hospital joins the ranks of those reporting Carbapenem resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections, linked to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) endoscopes. On March 4th, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles discovered that four patients were infected with CRE, and 67 others may have been exposed. Lisa McGiffert, director of the Safe Patient Project at Consumers Union, and a longtime activist regarding hospital-acquired infections, said that “It’s highly likely many hospitals around the country have had outbreaks, and they haven’t been...
  • Infected and undocumented: Thousands of Canadians dying from hospital-acquired bugs ( Canada)

    01/19/2015 6:01:48 AM PST · by george76 · 10 replies
    National Post ^ | January 19, 2015 | Tom Blackwell
    Ms. Smith’s tragic demise was more dramatic than many cases of hospital-acquired infection (HAI). Necrotizing fasciitis is a frightening, but rare, complication. Still, about 8,000 Canadians a year die from bugs they contract in facilities meant to make them better, while many more see their hospital stay prolonged by such illness. Yet after years of well-intentioned work and millions of dollars spent on combatting the scourge, the details and extent of the problem remain murky. No national statistics, for instance, document the number of surgical-wound infections like Ms. Smith’s, one of the most common types of hospital-acquired pathogens. A federal...
  • Two Mystery Illnesses Linked to 12 Child Deaths; 94 Paralysis Cases Since August

    12/15/2014 8:21:50 AM PST · by george76 · 28 replies
    Sharyl Attkisson ^ | December 14, 2014 | Sharyl Attkisson
    In the span of four months, at least 94 children in 33 U.S. states have developed a devastating form of paralysis with symptoms similar to polio. Some require a ventilator to breathe. And some of the greatest government health minds in the country say they have no idea what’s causing it. At the same time, during the past four months, at least 12 children have died after falling ill with a respiratory virus called Enterovirus D-68 (EV-D68). Again, federal health officials are at a loss to explain the origin of the epidemic. Are the mysterious outbreaks linked? The Centers for...
  • why we must suffer "progressives" (actually, they're communists)!

    09/07/2014 12:17:25 PM PDT · by Dick Bachert · 21 replies
    Vanity | 9/7/2014 | Dick Bachert
    I accidentally discovered why we have so-called "progressives" (actually, they're communists!) in our midst. In the interest of preserving and expanding my reputation as being something of a Renaissance Man, I periodically surf the Net and YouTube for new terms and subjects. As a member of my cat's "staff" (if you didn't know, dogs have owners and cats have staff), a few years ago, I investigated a strange little parasite called Toxoplasma gondii. It causes toxoplasmosis and scientists tell us that it affects up to half the population. Once infected, a human will live with it for his or her...
  • Health Care Summertime Blues

    08/01/2014 9:22:24 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 4 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 8/1/14 | Michael D. Shaw
    Readers of a certain age will remember the hit song referenced above from 1958, performed and co-written by the late rock legend Eddie Cochran. Like Eddie, “I’m gonna raise a fuss, I’m gonna raise a holler” about a two recent events in our wonderful world of health care. Johns Hopkins Ob-Gyn Scandal Among physicians, men who specialize in Obstetrics and Gynecology how long been viewed with some suspicion. This story, coming recently out of vaunted Johns Hopkins will do nothing to quell such thoughts. As reported by multiple media outlets, Johns Hopkins Hospital has agreed to pay $190 million to...
  • Flesh-eating bacteria killed Maine teenager after oral surgery

    06/20/2014 4:27:45 PM PDT · by george76 · 33 replies
    Portland Press Herald ^ | June 20, 2014 | Matt Byrne
    Benjamin LaMontagne, who died at his home in February four days after wisdom tooth extraction, was killed by a tissue infection of his gums, neck and jaw... after routine oral surgery, was killed by a rare, aggressive bacterial infection that caused swelling of his jaw and neck, according to the state Medical Examiner’s Office. The medical examiner’s report, released Thursday to the Portland Press Herald in response to a public records request, lists the cause of death as cervical necrotizing fasciitis, commonly called “flesh-eating bacteria.” The infection is caused by a powerful strain of streptococcus A, a group of pathogens...
  • Cranberries Stop Bacteria In Their Tracks

    11/27/2013 1:13:29 PM PST · by Dysart · 83 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 11-27-13 | Sara Suchy
    For over a century cranberries have been more than a Thanksgiving staple; they've also been heralded for their reported ability to prevent and even treat urinary tract infections.But clinical research attempting to link cranberry consumption to a reduction in urinary tract infections remains somewhat inconsistent. A 2012 study by a team from Taiwan and the U.S., published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that consuming cranberries did seem to prevent urinary tract infections in certain populations, but qualified the findings with a strong word of caution against using the "folk remedy" as a treatment. Most research on the cranberry's...
  • Women are more vulnerable to infections

    07/26/2013 11:17:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 60 replies
    Nature News ^ | 26 July 2013 | Brendan Maher
    Public-health officials discount role of sex in people's response to flu and other infections. Sabra Klein came to the annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Reproduction this week armed with a message that might seem obvious to scientists who obsess over sex: men and women are different. But it is a fact often overlooked by health researchers, says Klein, an immunologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. Her research on influenza viruses in mice, presented at the meeting in Montreal, Canada, helps explain why women are more susceptible to death and...
  • Majority of pools are contaminated by poop, CDC says

    05/17/2013 7:02:49 AM PDT · by AngelesCrestHighway · 111 replies
    Fox News ^ | 05/17/13 | Karen Rowan
    There's poop in public pools, according to a new report. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found genetic material from E. coli bacteria in 58 percent of public pools they tested during the summer of 2012. This shows that "swimmers frequently introduced fecal material into pools," which could spread germs to other people, the researchers wrote in their report. E. coli bacteria are normally found in the human gut and feces. They also found genetic material from bacteria called Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whichcan cause skin rashes and ear infections, in 59 percent of pools. The fecal material...
  • Circumcision Benefits Outweigh Risks, Doctors Say

    08/27/2012 7:29:51 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    AP ^ | August 27, 2012 () | LINDSEY TANNER
    The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it. In its latest policy statement on circumcision, a procedure that has been declining nationwide, the American Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to an endorsement but says the decision should be up to parents. "It's not a verdict from on high," said policy co-author Dr. Andrew Freedman. "There's not a one-size-fits-all-answer." But from a medical standpoint, circumcision's benefits in reducing risk of disease outweigh its small risks, said Freedman, a pediatric urologist in Los Angeles. Recent...
  • NIH superbug outbreak highlights lack of new antibiotics

    08/25/2012 10:31:56 PM PDT · by null and void · 38 replies
    Washington Post ^ | August 24 | Brian Vastag
    As doctors battled a deadly, drug-resistant superbug at the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center last year, they turned to an antibiotic of last resort. But colistin, is not a fancy new creation of modern biotechnology. It was discovered in a beaker of fermenting bacteria in Japan — in 1949. That doctors have resorted to such an old, dangerous drug — colistin causes kidney damage — highlights the lack of new antibiotics coming out of the pharmaceutical pipeline ... Experts point to three reasons pharmaceutical companies have pulled back from antibiotics ... There is not much money in it; inventing...
  • Dangerous TB spreading at alarming rate in Europe: WHO

    09/14/2011 1:10:09 PM PDT · by george76 · 16 replies
    Reuters ^ | September 14, 2011 | Kate Kelland
    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis (TB) are spreading at an alarming rate in Europe and will kill thousands unless health authorities halt the pandemic... "TB is an old disease that never went away, and now it is evolving with a vengeance," said Zsuzsanna Jakab, the WHO's Regional Director for Europe... TB is currently a worldwide pandemic that kills around 1.7 million people a year. The infection is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis and destroys patients' lung tissue, causing them to cough up the bacteria, which then spreads through the air and can be inhaled by others. Cases...
  • New HIV infections up 50percent in gay black men

    08/03/2011 3:48:24 PM PDT · by Nachum · 39 replies
    Reuters ^ | 8/3/11 | Julie Steenhuysen
    Chicago - The number of Americans newly infected with HIV remained stable between 2006 and 2009, but infections rose nearly 50 percent among young black gay and bisexual men, U.S. experts said on Wednesday. New data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal progress since the peak of the HIV epidemic in the 1980s. But the sharp increases in infection rates among young black men who have sex with men show there is much more work to do, they said.(Snip) While blacks represent 14 percent of the U.S. population, they accounted for 44 percent of new HIV
  • Needless, deadly peril at US hospitals

    04/16/2011 2:51:15 AM PDT · by Scanian · 37 replies
    NY Post ^ | April 15, 2011 | Betsy McCaughey
    Hospital infections kill more Americans each year than AIDS, car accidents and breast cancer combined -- and researchers are searching for solutions. This week, a study of 153 Veterans Affairs hospitals shows that doing a simple swab test to identify and isolate the few patients carrying infection-causing bacteria can save lives. It's called screening, but even more important is cleaning. Studies are rolling in that hospitals need to be cleaner. In fact, if you're visiting a friend or relative in the hospital, don't bring flowers or candy -- take gloves and a canister of bleach wipes. Hospitals do an inadequate...
  • High HIV Rates for Black Women Frighten Health Reporter

    10/22/2010 7:03:24 AM PDT · by flowerplough · 63 replies
    Henry Louis Gates' "The Root" ^ | 20 Oct | Tomika Anderson
    How a new report on HIV infection in the Big Apple scared a health reporter into getting tested and having a frank discussion with her "boo." By Tomika Anderson My longtime lover and I were driving through Harlem when we passed a billboard that made me want to slam on the brakes and pull the car over. On it were two women -- one black and one Latina -- their pretty, youthful faces in lights. But under their pictures was a statistic that sucker-punched me: 93.4 percent. As in, 93.4 of all new HIV cases among women in NYC occur...