Keyword: invasivespecies

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  • Durbin Statement On Discovery Of Asian Carp Near Lake Michigan

    06/24/2017 3:10:09 PM PDT · by mdittmar · 72 replies
    U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) ^ | 6/23/2017 | U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL)
    CHICAGO – U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) released the following statement after the discovery of an adult Silver Carp near the T.J. O’Brien Lock and Dam in the Calumet River:“I’m deeply concerned by today’s announcement that an adult Silver Carp was discovered a mere nine miles from Lake Michigan.  If this invasive species reaches the Great Lakes, it could cause significant economic losses and irreversible damage to the ecosystem, and threaten the drinking water of 30 million Americans.  Now more than ever, we must redouble our efforts to prevent their spread by ensuring strong federal funding for the Great Lakes...
  • Growing Spuds on Mars

    03/29/2017 9:48:35 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 28 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 03/29/17 | Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser
    Invasive Species, Biological Control, Where do Potatoes come from? Yours truly has a preference for spuds over rice as the dietary “carb.” So, you may forgive me for being interested in news about this tuber-kind being potentially feeding the future colonists on planet Mars. Surely now, our venerable Canadian Broadcasting Service (CBC) would not lie! As the report says “The [potato growing] experiment was conducted in soil in the Atacama Desert in Peru, which is most similar to what is found on Mars.”
  • Australia Has a Serious Cat Problem

    01/08/2017 2:50:49 PM PST · by Trump20162020 · 80 replies
    Time ^ | Jan. 6, 2017 | Kate Samuelson
    Australia has a serious cat problem, with feral cats covering 99.8% of the country according to new research published in the journal Biological Conservation. The exact number of cats fluctuates from roughly 1.4 million after continent-wide droughts cramp food sources to about 5.6 million after extensive wet periods, which result in plenty of available prey. An additional 700,000 feral cats are estimated to live in other environments, including Australia’s urban areas, rubbish dumps and intensive farms. Despite this, researchers say that the cats’ impact on Australia’s fauna is still severe, and that reducing this impact is of critical importance. The...
  • Killer Nile crocodiles in Florida? Experts say it's possible

    05/19/2016 7:09:04 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 40 replies
    AP ^ | May 19, 2016 | Terry Spencer
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Step aside, Burmese python — you may no longer be Florida's scariest invasive species. Researchers have confirmed that three Nile crocodiles were captured near Miami, and they say it's possible more of the man-eating reptiles are still out there, although no one can say for sure. The big question now: How did they get to Florida? "They didn't swim from Africa," University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko said. "But we really don't know how they got into the wild."
  • Florida’s Dragon Problem

    04/20/2016 7:20:59 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 55 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 20 Apr, 2016 | ED YONG
    The speckled body of the Nile monitor lizard can reach up to 2 meters in length. At one end is a powerful tail that propels the animal through water and whips attackers with surprising force. At the other is a sinuous head that will devour rodents, birds, fish, crocodile eggs, and pretty much anything else within range of its fearsome, recurved teeth. The monitor isn’t fussy. It’s a formidable animal, and the largest lizard in Africa. It’s also the largest lizard in Florida. No one knows exactly when the monitor arrived in Florida, but it was first spotted in 1990....
  • Snail as Big as a Tennis Shoe Running Amok in Florida

    07/31/2015 8:43:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 98 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 31, 2015 09:30 AM ET | by Kerry Sheridan
    The giant African land snail is causing problems for Floridians. Wikimedia Commons/Sonel.SA ========================================================================================================================= Florida plant detectives are on the trail of a slippery foe, an invasive African land snail that is wily, potentially infectious, and can grow as big as a tennis shoe. Play Video 8 Animals That Can Regrow Their Body Parts While humans are working on robotic arms and new limb technology, some animals can regrow their limbs on their own. How do they do this? DCI In the four years since Giant African Snails were discovered in Miami, they have slowly but surely spread to new territory,...
  • The Case For Invasive Species

    06/03/2015 5:04:20 PM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 18 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 06/03/15 | Jack Dini
    Water hyacinth in Africa, Zebra mussels in Lake Erie, Estuary of the San Francisco Bay For a long time, veteran environmental journalist Fred Pearce thought in stark terms about invasive species: they were evil interlopers spoiling pristine ‘natural’ ecosystems. Most conservationists and environmentalists share this view. But what if the traditional view of ecology is wrong—what if true environmentalists should be applauding the invaders? Fred Pearce acknowledges that there are horror stories about alien species disrupting ecosystems but most of the time the tens of thousands of introduced species usually swiftly die out or settle down and become model eco-citizens....
  • Our American Ecosystems Need Gardeners to Weed Them (Responsibly, of Course)!

    02/03/2015 5:06:08 PM PST · by Ulmius · 37 replies
    February 3, 2015 | Ulmius
    I'm writing on a story I heard about the spread of the Burmese python in Florida. This is also my first post on this site. Despite all our objections against the dangers of blind and excessive "green" regulations by the federal government, conservationism SHOULD NOT be seen as a strictly progressive movement. In the context of invasive species, these types of pests infest an area the size of Delaware every year in this country (according to the Audubon Society). Pythons roam the Everglades. Chinese privet chokes out vital understory species in the Southern uplands. Zebra mussels crust the surface of...
  • Giant African Land Snails Return To South Florida

    09/15/2011 2:26:53 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 91 replies
    http://miami.cbslocal.com ^ | 09-15-2011 | Staff
    CORAL GABLES (CBS4) – They’re back. Giant African land snails which once took a decade to eradicate from South Florida have returned. Giant African land snails, considered to be one of the most damaging snails in the world, have been found in the Coral Gables area of Miami-Dade County, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The Giant African land snail is one of the most damaging snails in the world because they consume at least 500 different types of plants, can cause structural damage to plaster and stucco on houses, and can carry a parasitic worm...
  • Probe: Smuggled snails eaten for religion

    03/11/2010 2:13:15 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 15 replies · 480+ views
    upi ^ | March 11
    MIAMI, - Authorities in Florida said they are investigating the alleged illegal importing of giant African snails for use in a religious healing ritual. A search warrant filed in Miami-Dade Circuit Court said state and federal investigators raided the home of Charles Stewart, 48, in January after receiving information that he was keeping a large box full of the snails, which are only allowed in the United States with special permits for scientific research, the Miami Herald reported Thursday. Federal authorities said they began investigating Stewart in November after receiving complaints that he was feeding the juices from the snails...
  • Giant, Hungry Snails Overrunning Caribbean Island of Barbados

    11/08/2006 10:07:29 AM PST · by gobucks · 57 replies · 2,215+ views
    Foxnews ^ | 8 Nov 2006 | AP`
    BRIDGETOWN, Barbados — A breed of giant, ravenous snails that first appeared in Barbados five years ago has thrived on the tropical island, destroying crops and prompting calls for the government to eliminate the slimy pests. A nocturnal "snail hunt" last weekend reported finding hundreds of thousands of giant African snails swarming the central parish of St. George, the country's agricultural heartland, where farmers had complained of damage to crops including sugar cane, bananas and papayas. "We saw snails riding on each other's backs and moving in clusters," said David Walrond, chairman of the local emergency response office, which organized...
  • Science Takes On a Silent Invader (quagga mussels and zebra mussels)

    02/28/2014 1:51:59 PM PST · by neverdem · 22 replies
    NY Times ^ | FEB. 24, 2014 | ROBERT H. BOYLE
    Since they arrived in the Great Lakes in the 1980s, two species of mussels the size of pistachios have spread to hundreds of lakes and rivers in 34 states and have done vast economic and ecological damage. These silent invaders, the quagga and zebra mussels, have disrupted ecosystems by devouring phytoplankton, the foundation of the aquatic food web, and have clogged the water intakes and pipes of cities and towns, power plants, factories and even irrigated golf courses. Now the mussels may have met their match: Daniel P. Molloy, an emeritus biologist at the New York State Museum in Albany...
  • Florida's 'Python Challenge' draws adrenaline junkies, eco-warriors

    01/12/2013 4:07:33 PM PST · by george76 · 61 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 10, 2013 | Perry Chiaramonte
    The chance to traipse through Florida's Everglades in search of wild pythons up to 15 feet long has attracted nearly 700 thrill-seekers from throughout the county. The Sunshine State is offering cash prizes in the month-long “Python Challenge,” which begins tomorrow and is aimed at helping to control the exploding population of the non-native Burmese pythons, which have devastated Florida's eco-system. Anyone is eligible for the hunt ... cash prizes of up to $1,500 will be given to hunters who catch the largest and most pythons. The pythons that have nearly eradicated entire native species such as deer, bobcats and...
  • Cookout aims to tip scales against snakehead in Maryland

    05/31/2012 8:13:01 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 29 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | May 30, 2012 | Meredith Somers
    If Maryland has its way, an invasive enemy could become a nontraditional entree. Ten years after the northern snakehead was first caught in a local pond, the animal once dubbed “Frankenfish” has established a habitat and lived up to its reputation as an adaptable, aggressive and all-consuming predator. But unlike the protections afforded to the other mascots of Maryland’s waterways, the sacred blue crab and the beloved rockfish, environmental officials are encouraging area anglers to kill and cook as many of the scaly monsters as possible — a prospect local chefs say is surprisingly palatable. “The big difference between snakehead...
  • Giant, Toxic Weed Poses Health Risk

    07/19/2011 1:01:57 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 87 replies · 1+ views
    http://news.discovery.com ^ | Tue Jul 19, 2011 07:48 AM ET | By Emily Sohn
    It's exotic and beautiful, a 15-foot tall plant with clusters of dainty white flowers and human-sized leaves -- resembling, it is often said, Queen Anne's Lace on steroids. But giant hogweed is an invasive species that is spreading around much of the northern United States. Even worse, its sap is extremely poisonous, with the potential to cause blistering burns and even blindness. Now that the giant hogweed's flowering season is here again, experts are taking the opportunity to draw people's attention to the plant -- for the sake of human health as well as for the health of the environment....
  • Mother Nature’s Melting Pot

    04/03/2011 9:05:40 AM PDT · by Oratam · 25 replies
    The New York Times ^ | April 2, 2011 | Hugh Raffles
    THE anti-immigrant sentiment sweeping the country, from draconian laws in Arizona to armed militias along the Mexican border, has taken many Americans by surprise. It shouldn’t — nativism runs deep in the United States. Just ask our non-native animals and plants: they too are commonly labeled as aliens, even though they also provide significant benefits to their new home.
  • Smelly kudzu-eating bug invades Alabama

    01/17/2011 10:49:04 AM PST · by Red Badger · 54 replies · 1+ views
    An invasive kudzu-eating bug that swept across Georgia last year has now been detected in Alabama. Though you might be tempted to celebrate the arrival of a bug that eats The Vine That Ate the South, this kudzu bug stinks. Both literally and figuratively. When temperatures drop, the pea-sized bugs -- also known as the lablab bug or the globular stink bug -- invades homes in hordes. When threatened or crushed, they emit a foul odor. University of Georgia entomology Professor Wayne A. Gardner said he's found them 30 stories high, coating the window sills of Atlanta condo high rises,...
  • Brown marmorated stink bug latest invasive pest threat to U.S. crops

    12/16/2010 7:03:24 AM PST · by Dominic L. Fottfoy · 56 replies
    Western Farm Press ^ | 12/16/2010 | Harry Cline
    The dirty dozen have become the stinking 13 with the latest invasive pest alert by USDA-APHIS and university entomologists across the U.S. for growers to be on the lookout for the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB).
  • Crop-chomping snails seized at Dulles

    09/11/2010 7:24:13 AM PDT · by ExGeeEye · 16 replies
    WTOP.com ^ | 9/9/10 | Staff
    ...A traveler from Ghana tried to bring 14 Giant African Land Snails into the US...one of the worst invasive species...could have been devastating to crops.
  • Destruction of Giant Algae Doughnut Threatens Lake Michigan (Quagga mussels eating phytoplankton)

    09/08/2010 11:17:11 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 33 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | 9/8/10 | Andrea Leontiou
    An invasive species of mussel called quagga has recently begun eating its way through the phytoplankton population of Lake Michigan, which could have dire effects on the lake's ecosystem, scientists now warn. A giant ring of phytoplankton (microscopic plants such as algae) was discovered in Lake Michigan in 1998 by Michigan Technological Universitybiologist W. Charles Kerfoot and his research team. The "phytoplankton doughnut" is formed when winter storms kick up nutrient-rich sediment along the southeastern shore of the lake. The disturbed sediments begin circulating in a slow-moving circle with the lake's currents, which provides a massive supply of food for...