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Keyword: lakeyoa

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  • Fish Swam the Sahara, Bolstering Out of Africa Theory

    12/29/2010 11:42:33 AM PST · by decimon · 30 replies · 4+ views
    Live Science ^ | December 29, 2010 | Charles Q. Choi
    Fish may have once swum across the Sahara, a finding that could shed light on how humanity made its way out of Africa, researchers said. The cradle of humanity lies south of the Sahara, which begs the question as to how our species made its way past it. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, and would seem a major barrier for any humans striving to migrate off the continent. Scientists have often focused on the Nile Valley as the corridor by which humans left Africa. However, considerable research efforts have failed to uncover evidence for its...
  • How Earth's orbital shift shaped the Sahara

    12/21/2010 10:03:52 AM PST · by LucyT · 36 replies · 4+ views
    Physorg Earth Sciences ^ | December 21, 2010 | Anuradha K. Herath
    The Sahara, the world's largest desert, was once fertile grassland. This fact has been common knowledge in the scientific community for some time, but scientists are still grappling with historic data to determine whether that transition took place abruptly or gradually. At the European Geosciences Union General Assembly held in Vienna, Austria earlier this year, researchers presented new evidence showing that the eastern region of the Sahara desert, particularly the area near Lake Yoa in Chad, dried up slowly and progressively since the mid-Holocene period.