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Keyword: literature

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  • Poetic Allegory -- "The Swamp"

    10/07/2017 11:35:33 PM PDT · by txnativegop · 20 replies
    8 October 2017 | txnativegop
    An area covered in still water The smell of stagnation will overwhelm Even the strongest of sweet fragrances Diversity of life easy to see It is a swamp its denizens harmful to all life save for native residents Its water riddled with bacteria Its bottom - vile, sticky trapping the lax Various denizens like mosquitoes and snakes will create disease, suffering that will spread to locales very distant unless decisive action is taken to check the contagion of the swamp Pesticides will control it for a short time But disease will very quickly return Teeming diversity hides great evil of...
  • Jerry Pournelle has passed away

    09/08/2017 5:01:44 PM PDT · by buwaya · 75 replies
    Instapundit ^ | 9/8/2017 | Buwaya
    Being reported in several places, Jerry Pournelle has passed away. Noted Science Fiction author, strategic analyst, early popularizer of personal computers, one of the original bloggers. In his own way he was one of the more influential Americans of the 20th century. As per Instapundit in a comment to his own post, "I just talked to Alex. Basically, Jerry just laid down for a nap and passed in his sleep this afternoon. It was nice that he, Alex, and Larry Niven got to hang out and have such a good time at DragonCon. It's as easy a death as one...
  • 24 Novels That Are Crying Out To Be Turned Into A TV Series

    08/15/2017 10:03:49 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 98 replies
    BuzzFeed ^ | August 14, 2017 | Jamie Jones
    We recently asked members of the BuzzFeed Community which books need to be turned into TV Shows. Here are some of the best responses...
  • ‘Make It So’: ‘Star Trek’ and Its Debt to Revolutionary Socialism

    07/27/2017 5:14:39 AM PDT · by C19fan · 19 replies
    NY Times ^ | July 24, 2017 | A.M. Gittlitz
    H. G. Wells’s foundational work of political science fiction, “The Time Machine,” predicted a future in which a small utopia of sprightly elites is kept running by a subclass that lives below the ground and is reduced to bestial violence. This prediction, carried to a horrifically logical extent, represented the intense wealth disparity of the Victorian England in which Wells wrote the novel. Judging from the major political narratives of the fictions of our era, films like “The Hunger Games,” “Elysium” and “Snowpiercer,” the certainty of a future rendered increasingly barbarous by class division remains essentially the same.
  • Jane Austen's Correspondence to Be Offered at Sotheby's

    07/08/2017 2:52:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    http://www.panarmenian.net/eng/news/243794/ ^ | July 8, 2017 | July 8, 2017
    Almost exactly 200 years to the day of Jane Austen’s death in 1817, a masterly comic letter written by the author to her favourite niece will come to sale for the very first time at Sotheby’s London on 11th July with an estimate of £80,000-100,000. The celebrated novelist, whose own literature has remained the subject of critique for over two centuries, is here seen exercising her own critical opinion of another writer’s work in a light-hearted jeu d’espirit which exudes not only Austen’s supreme intellect, but also her comic charm, Art Daily said. Dating from 29-30 October 1812, a critical...
  • Why a 19th Century Russian Poet Is Going Viral on Facebook

    06/28/2017 10:10:39 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    BBC ^ | 6/29
    A comment by a prominent campaigner has touched off a fevered debate over Russian influence in a former Soviet republic. It's not so often that Romantic poets set social media alight. But that's exactly what happened when the subject of Alexander Pushkin came up on a Russian TV programme. The interviewee, Alexei Navalny, is an anti-corruption campaigner who has long been one of the leading figures opposing Russian President Vladimir Putin. In a conversation on the independent Russian Dozhd TV channel, Navalny and presenter Ksenia Sobchak suggested that Pushkin - one of Russia's great cultural figures - was largely unknown...
  • London School Asks Pupils to Write A Suicide Notes for Homework (literary exercise)

    06/26/2017 1:25:04 PM PDT · by johnk · 41 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 23 JUNE 2017 • 5:28PM | Harry Yorke
    A secondary school has been forced to apologize to parents after an English teacher asked students to draft a suicide note for homework as part of a module on Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth. More than 60 pupils at Thomas Tallis school, Kidbrooke, London were asked to pen an imaginary final note after reading one of the play’s most celebrated scenes, when Lady Macbeth takes her own life. Having conspired with her husband to murder King Duncan, Lady Macbeth commits suicide by “self and violent hands” after being driven mad by guilt and violent imagery of his murder. The pupils were asked...
  • Word for the Day - DOGGEREL

    06/02/2017 6:22:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 43 replies
    www.dictionary.com ^ | 06-02-2017 | Red Badger
    WORD FOR THE DAY! ======================================================================== In order that we might all raise the level of discourse and expand our language abilities, here is the daily post of “Word for the Day”. Rules: Everyone must leave a post using the Word for the Day in a sentence. The sentence must, in some way, relate to the news of the day........ DOGGEREL [daw-ger-uh l, dog-er-] adjective 1. comic or burlesque, and usually loose or irregular in measure. rude; crude; poor. noun 2. doggerel verse. Origin of doggerel: 1350-1400; Middle English; see dog, -rel; cf. dog Latin British Dictionary definitions for doggerel: noun...
  • How Did John Steinbeck And An Obama Staffer Get The Bible So Wrong?

    05/09/2017 1:46:00 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    The Forward ^ | May 8, 2017 | Aviya Kushner
    Working for Barack Obama can be a career maker, but Hebrew readers have been puzzled by the explanation for the path that one former staffer took. The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Michael Slaby, whom the newspaper described as “among the key tech gurus for Barack Obama’s two presidential campaigns,” has founded a startup called Timshel that helps not-for-profits and activist groups use digital tools to increase their analytic capabilities. Sounds good. But where, exactly, does the name Timshel come from? “It’s a reference to [Steinbeck’s] ‘East of Eden’ — the Hebrew word for “Thou mayest” from the Bible [in the...
  • Bill Clinton and James Patterson are writing a book together

    05/08/2017 11:30:11 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 36 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | May 8, 2017 | Michael Schaub
    Meet James Patterson's newest co-author: former President Clinton. Patterson and Clinton are co-writing a thriller titled "The President Is Missing," which is scheduled for release in June 2018. The book is about the disappearance of a sitting president.
  • Forbidden Thoughts, a Book Review

    05/07/2017 3:11:30 PM PDT · by tbw2 · 20 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 02/05/2017 | Tamara Wilhite
    "Forbidden Thoughts" is a conservative and libertarian science fiction anthology. What are the pros and cons of this book most notable for Milo Yianapolis writing the foreword?
  • Finding Frank Norris in the Santa Cruz Mountains

    04/28/2017 6:09:02 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies
    Hill Tromper ^ | Ryan Masters
    A gargantuan spiderweb hangs across the steep dirt road. It shimmers, translucent in the sunlight, slack lines nearly imperceptible. As I duck the web and trudge further up the road's corkscrew turn, the thick brush, thistle, weeds and poison oak part, revealing an ancient looking stone bench on the shoulder above the road. Finally. More than a year after I first searched for it, I have found the mysterious, nearly forgotten memorial to legendary California novelist Frank Norris in this far corner of the Santa Cruz Mountains. A simple cross and a crooked, barren flag holder crown the semicircular, mission-style...
  • Cadain’s Watch by Daniella Bova, a Book Review

    04/01/2017 9:00:24 AM PDT · by tbw2 · 72 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 03/30/2017 | Tamara Wilhite
    Cadain's Watch is the last book in the Storms of Transformation series, tracing the journey of a family fleeing an oppressive state to save their illegally born daughter. What are the strengths and weaknesses of this Christian fiction book?
  • Raymond Arroyo's books are having an astounding impact on at-risk kids

    04/01/2017 5:42:22 AM PDT · by NYer · 18 replies
    cna ^ | March 19, 2017 | Michelle Bauman
    Washington D.C., Mar 19, 2017 / 04:21 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Raymond Arroyo has an impressive resume.He’s a New York Times bestselling author several times over. He’s an award-winning journalist and producer. And his weekly EWTN show, The World Over Live, reaches more than 350 million global households and 500 U.S. radio affiliates.So when Arroyo says his Will Wilder series of books for young readers just might be “the most important work I’ve ever done,” it’s quite a statement.What makes these books so important, in his view? The lifelong impact that they can have on kids.“When an adult reads your...
  • Solomon Bull: When the Friction Has Its Machine, a Book Review

    03/28/2017 10:56:13 AM PDT · by tbw2 · 2 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 03/28/2017 | Tamara Wilhite
    Solomon Bull: When the Friction Has Its Machine is a modern mystery/adventure book by conservative author Clayton Lindemuth. The adventure and personal challenges of the main character take center stage, while conveying important messages on self-reliance and survival.
  • Norman Podhoretz Still Picks Fights and Drops Names

    03/18/2017 5:06:07 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    New York Magazine ^ | MARCH 17, 2017 | JOHN LELAND
    Mr. Podhoretz, the former editor at Commentary magazine, looks back at the fierce, argumentative parties of New York’s intelligentsia.“These parties I mentioned,” Norman Podhoretz said the other day, “everybody gave parties. And there was a lot of drinking. Some visiting literary celebrity would show up, Partisan Review would make a party or I would make a party. Everybody came. And it was a really passionate intellectual life. It’s hard to imagine today, but people actually came to blows over literary disagreements.” It was a cold morning, and Mr. Podhoretz, 87, was recently back from the hospital after minor surgery, recuperating...
  • ICYMI: Harvard Thinks Reading Chaucer Together is Lit

    03/18/2017 5:26:22 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    Harvard Crimson ^ | MAR 7 2017 | Brandon J. Dixon
    You ever have one of those days when you can’t quite tell if something is satire or not? That’s what we’re going through right now. Normally you can check the source’s url—if it’s the Onion or some other funny-sounding publication, you can write it off as a joke and move on. But what happens when the source is the most prestigious university in the world? In case you missed it, the College’s Implementation Committee for the Policy on Membership in Single Gender Social Organizations (oh god we’re never writing that again) released its recommendations today. If you’re looking for a...
  • So You've Been Publicly Shamed, a Book Review

    03/06/2017 5:30:31 AM PST · by tbw2 · 18 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 03/05/2017 | Tamara Wilhite
    "So You've Been Publicly Shamed" is a book by Jon Ronson that goes back to visit the victims of various internet shaming scandals, as well as studies the survivors of older scandals, psychologists who discuss the long term impact of seeming rejection by society and recovery methods for individuals and society as a whole.
  • Why Thomas Hardy, Not Jane Austen, Is a Better Guide to Love

    02/16/2017 6:09:46 AM PST · by C19fan · 10 replies
    Accultured ^ | February 14, 2017 | Sarah Gustafson
    Valentine’s Day is here, and with it, the usual slew of literary and pop culture reminders of what love does to us. Pick your poison—Jane Austen, Nicholas Sparks, the Brontes, Old Hollywood, 90s rom coms, BBC bodice rippers—we are saturated by reminders that a rewarding life includes a worthy, rewarding and, above all, romantic relationship. I don’t hate the romantic canon. But I want to convince you that we should broaden it by reviving an underrated masterpiece: Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd. (The novel has also been made into a beautiful movie, although, full disclosure, I’ve not seen...
  • The Library of Babel and the Information Explosion

    02/11/2017 10:34:57 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 1 replies
    Irish Times ^ | Thu, Jan 19, 2017
    That’s Maths: Mathematical concepts influenced the structure and style of many of Jorge Luis Borges’ short stories The world has been transformed by the internet. Google, founded just 20 years ago, is a major force in online information. The company name is a misspelt version of “googol”, the number one followed by one hundred zeros. This name echoes the vast quantities of information available through the search engines of the company. Long before the internet, the renowned Argentine writer, poet, translator and literary critic Jorge Luis Borges envisaged the universe as a vast information bank in the form of a...