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Keyword: literature

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  • Finding Humanity in Gone With the Wind

    07/18/2015 3:27:50 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 68 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | July 16, 2015 | Cass R. Sunstein
    When Americans think about the Confederacy, they often think about Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 classic, Gone With the Wind. Inspired by recent debates over the Confederate flag, I decided to give the book a try. I confess that I did not have high hopes. I expected to be appalled by its politics and racism, and to be bored by the melodrama. (Scarlett O’Hara, Rhett Butler, and Ashley Wilkes? Really?) About twenty pages, I thought, would be enough. I could not have been more wrong. The book is enthralling, and it casts a spell. Does it make a plausible argument for continuing...
  • Harper Lee Receives Copy of ‘Go Set a Watchman’ as Release Nears

    07/08/2015 9:50:57 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 16 replies
    New York Times ^ | July 7, 2015 | By ALEXANDRA ALTER and SERGE F. KOVALESKI
    Nearly 60 years after Harper Lee wrote “Go Set a Watchman,” the novel she hoped would be her literary debut, the 89-year-old author was handed a finished copy of the book at a private lunch in Monroeville, Ala., last week. Despite the manuscript’s long and uncertain journey to publication, Ms. Lee seemed breezily self-assured about the book’s highly anticipated release next week, people who attended said. After her publishers gave her the first copies off the presses of the American and British versions of “Watchman,” Ms. Lee was asked if she ever expected the novel to be published. “Of course...
  • Countdown to Mecca by Michael Savage, a book review

    07/04/2015 7:49:31 PM PDT · by tbw2 · 17 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 07/04/2015 | Tamara Wilhite
    Michael Savage has written his third and final book in the Jack Hatfield series.
  • The Great War Novelist America Forgot (Herman Wouk turns 100 today)

    05/27/2015 10:26:24 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | May 17, 2015 | David Frum
    On May 27, the American novelist Herman Wouk will attain the prodigious age of 100. Over his long career, Wouk has achieved all the wealth and fame a writer could desire, or even imagine. His first great success, The Caine Mutiny (1951), occupied bestseller lists for two consecutive years, sold millions of copies, and inspired a film adaptation that became the second highest-grossing movie of 1954. Wouk’s grand pair of novels, The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, likewise found a global audience, both in print, and then as two television miniseries in the 1980s. Wouk won a Pulitzer...
  • THE PASSION OF “TESS”

    05/01/2015 6:17:22 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Powerline ^ | May 1, 2015 | Scott Johnson
    We’re finishing the Victorian novel class I have been taking at a college in St. Paul with Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. I want to offer a few notes on the novel in the hope that some readers may share their thoughts and others may take up the novel if they haven’t read it before. It is an essential novel. Our great young teacher has structured the course with four novels that evoke the plight of women in Victorian fiction. With Tess we reach the summit (or a summit) of this plight. Tess is an extraordinarily lovable woman who...
  • Galatians: Selections from Martin Luther [Free e-book!]

    04/07/2015 2:01:07 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 17 replies
    rjgrune.com ^ | 4/5/15 | RJ Grunewald
    Today, I’m excited to announce the launch of a new eBook that I’ve been designing and editing in order to share for free with the world – Galatians: Selections from Martin Luther. Martin Luther is a theologian whose writing has changed my life. Luther, in a day when the Church hijacked the message of the Gospel, stood boldly for the proclamation of Christ alone. In a world that literally sold people forgiveness for a few bucks, Martin Luther came onto the scene recovering the message of the scriptures that said, “The price has already been paid.” But here’s the thing...
  • Photographer aims to prove Peak District is home to Britain's most majestic landscapes [tr]

    03/13/2015 8:38:26 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 13, 2015 | Michael Gadd
    Whether at sunrise, sunset or the heart of the day, in the height of summer or engulfed by snow, photographer James Grant is convinced that the Peak District offers some of the most spectacular landscapes Great Britain has to offer. The parochial landscape photographer has a passion for hills and mountains, in particular those surrounding his home town of Matlock on the south eastern edge of the Peak District, although he also has a soft spot for the Lake District, Snowdonia and Scotland. These images of rolling hills bathed in light and mist show the breadth of an already formidable...
  • NOTES ON “MIDDLEMARCH” (2)

    03/13/2015 7:58:48 AM PDT · by C19fan · 5 replies
    Powerline Blog ^ | March 13, 2015 | Scott Johnson
    Though Middlemarch has a large cast of characters involved in intricately related plots, Dorothea Brooke stands out as the book’s heroine. The narrative begins and ends with her. Book I of the novel’s eight Books is “Miss Brooke.” She is a young woman of simple beauty and surpassing decency. She yearns idealistically to benefit humanity, or subordinate herself as the helpmate of a great man like John Milton in his blindness. Yet she is exceedingly foolish.
  • NOTES ON “MIDDLEMARCH”

    03/12/2015 6:23:10 AM PDT · by C19fan · 12 replies
    Powerline Blog ^ | March 12, 2015 | Scott Johnson
    On Monday I finished reading George Eliot’s great Victorian novel Middlemarch for the first time. I have tried and failed to finish it several times; it’s not easy reading. At a few points it is, briefly, a slog. Although it remains a subject of debate, I believe the novel lacks a happy ending. Nevertheless, for me, the ending was happy. I finished the book. What did it take? I sought permission to audit an undergraduate class in the Victorian novel at a local college and paid for the privilege. I needed a structure within which to read the book. Like...
  • Did Mr Darcy make his fortune from the slave trade? Romantic hero profited from the [tr]

    03/11/2015 11:51:33 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 11, 2015 | Tahira Yaqoob
    It has sold more than 20 million copies since it was written two centuries ago and has had generations of schoolgirls swooning over the ultimate romantic hero. But the great unspoken background of Jane Austen's world is that both Mr Darcy and Mr Bingley in Pride and Prejudice got rich from the slave trade, says author Joanna Trollope. The novelist, speaking at the Festival of Literature in Dubai, dispelled the myth about Mr Darcy and Mr Bingley being the perfect men and described the 'very dark underbelly' to Austen's books. She said: 'Why does Mr Bingley in Pride and Prejudice...
  • Ishmael's New Testament: Salvation in Moby Dick

    12/28/2003 4:02:24 PM PST · by Cvengr · 2 replies · 1,264+ views
    http://pages.cthome.net/jbair/mobydick.htm ^ | 8/19/98 11:38:49 PM | James Bair
    Moby Dick is full of allusions to the Bible. A major theme in the Bible is salvation and (in the New Testament) new birth. This essay will summarize what the Bible says on the subject and then show ways in which this applies to Moby Dick. Moby Dick depends a lot on the Old Testament. Job and Jonah, Ahab and Noah stalk its pages. (Originally I had thought of doing a paper contrasting Melville's Ahab with Job, but I was overwhelmed at the magnitude of references and allusions--anyone willing to stake me for a two-year sabbatical?). Moby Dick does also...
  • Downton Abbey's Laura Carmichael transforms from Lady Edith Crawley to a maid in new Madame Bovary

    01/31/2015 10:07:52 AM PST · by C19fan · 9 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 30, 2015 | Nola Ojomu
    She is famous for her role as Downton Abbey’s Lady Edith Crawley. But fans of Laura Carmichael will see the actress playing the help in her new film, Madame Bovary. The 28-year-old can be seen alongside Mia Wasikowska and other stars in the new trailer for the film which is based on Gustave Flaubert’s 1856 French classic.
  • Atticus Finch: American literature's most celebrated rape apologist

    12/17/2014 6:43:55 AM PST · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Washington Times ^ | December 16, 2014 | Ashe Schow
    Atticus Finch is a monster. Sure, he’s one of history’s most beloved literary characters (he was even played by Gregory Peck in a film adaptation) but he’s also, to use the parlance of our time, history’s greatest rape apologist. Glenn Reynolds, a law professor at the University of Tennessee and pundit, first observed Finch’s new standing in the world on Twitter in early December:
  • Philip K. Dick would have been 86 today: Some thoughts on his legacy

    12/16/2014 2:51:19 PM PST · by EveningStar · 26 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | December 16, 2014 | David L. Ulin
    The late Philip K. Dick, born 86 years ago today in Chicago, is something of a cautionary figure in American literature: brilliant, prolific, often sloppy, and woefully underappreciated during his lifetime. It was only with the 1982 release of the film "Blade Runner" (loosely based on his 1968 novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?") that Dick's work truly began to saturate the mainstream; by that point, he had been dead for four months. In the ensuing three decades, Dick's novels and stories have served as fodder for dozens of Hollywood movies; they have been reissued again and again. In...
  • [Vanity] Suggestions on reading Ulysses

    11/30/2014 3:59:51 PM PST · by re_nortex · 100 replies
    NOV-30-2014 | Self
    I'm well into my 70s and checking off an item on my bucket list is finally getting around to reading Ulysses by James Joyce. It was never assigned reading in high school or college (I went to a Christian school, which may be one of the reasons). So, at my advanced age, I'm attempting at long last to tackle this work.I have a long attention span and am not easily bored nor discouraged. I've read long, involved books and have found most of them gripping, such as The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann, Faust by Goethe and Crime and Punishment...
  • The moor the merrier: More than 200 acres of 'magical' heathland that inspired Thomas Hardy saved

    11/06/2014 6:35:02 AM PST · by C19fan · 5 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | November 5, 2014 | Paul Donnelley
    More than 200 acres of the wild and 'magical' heathland that inspired author Thomas Hardy have been bought for the nation by the National Trust. The £650,000 acquisition of Slepe Heath, Dorset, will connect existing protected heathland areas as part of efforts to conserve the landscapes of Hardy's novels. Slepe Heath, whose windswept landscape was immortalised as fictional Egdon Heath in Hardy's Return Of The Native, is an important site for wildlife, including rare birds such as Dartford warblers, nightjars and woodlarks, the National Trust said.
  • FROM ATHEIST PROFESSOR TO CATHOLIC: AN INTERVIEW WITH DR. HOLLY ORDWAY

    11/05/2014 8:33:42 AM PST · by NYer · 14 replies
    wordonfire ^ | November 6, 2014 | Brandon Vogt
    Dr. Holly Ordway Growing up, Holly Ordway was convinced God was little more than superstition, completely unsupported by evidence or reason. She later attained a PhD in literature, traveled the country as a competitive fencer, and became a college English professor, none of which left room for God.But one day a smart and respected friend surprisingly revealed he was a Christian. That sent Holly on a search for the truth about God, one that weaved through literature, aesthetics, imagination, and history. It culminated in 2012 when she entered the Catholic Church.Holly recounts her probing journey in a new memoir, Not God's Type:...
  • OMG: Limbaugh's 'Jesus' banished from NYT best seller list

    09/19/2014 4:47:44 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 15 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | 9-18-14 | Paul Bedard
    There they go again. The New York Times Book Review, which has a history of belatedly recognizing conservative bestsellers, has banished conservative legal author David Limbaugh’s latest, Jesus on Trial, from its upcoming best seller list despite having sales better than 17 other books on the list. According to publishing sources, Limbaugh’s probe into the accuracy of the Bible sold 9,660 in its first week out, according to Nielsen BookScan. That should have made it No. 4 on the NYT print hardcover sales list. Instead, Henry Kissinger’s World Order, praised by Hillary Clinton in the Washington Post, is No. 4...
  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/12/2014 5:32:37 PM PDT · by Fzob · 201 replies
    Popsugar ^ | 09/06/2014 | NICOLE NGUYEN
    Happy National Read a Book Day! Celebrate with these essential sci-fi classics. Space, dystopian futures, robots, technology, aliens . . . what is there not to love about science fiction, a genre that stretches the imagination and offers a glimpse into what lies in a galaxy and time far, far away? Now that you've indulged on the most compelling, classic epic fantasy series, it's time to switch gears. Onward, futurists! We recruited our own POPSUGAR editors to help compile the ultimate list of geeky reads. And this week, we're showcasing the best sci-fi narratives, with all the traditional elements of...
  • Honoring Ray Bradbury the goal of Waukegan group

    08/15/2014 12:26:04 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 4 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | August 12, 2014 | Dan Hinkel
    An effort is underway to honor one of Waukegan's favorite sons, the late science fiction pioneer Ray Bradbury. Waukegan Public Library Executive Director Richard Lee said nearly all the details remain to be worked out beyond the basic idea -- a realistic statue or bust of Bradbury, who wrote evocatively of the fictional Green Town, a recognizable stand-in for his hometown. lRelated A history of Waukegan The effort echoes the push for a statue memorializing another Waukegan legend, comedian Jack Benny, a radio and early TV star honored with a downtown statue in 2001.
  • Clever Barbarians? (College summer reading)

    08/07/2014 4:22:22 PM PDT · by NYer · 5 replies
    The Catholic Thing ^ | August 7, 2014 | ANTHONY ESOLEN
    Lately I’ve been asked to write a couple of essays for the National Association of Scholars on the newest fad in freshman fall fashions. Colleges send to students enjoying their summer farewell to home and family a book that they are all supposed to read, usually something in pop sociology or psychology. When they arrive on campus, they discuss the book during freshman orientation, or they attend a seminar or two, before they settle in to professional training, or the usual disintegrative round of courses that have nothing to do with one another, chosen ad libitum. That’s supposed to give...
  • My Newest Novel is Out Today (Complete Vanity)

    07/20/2014 11:03:54 AM PDT · by Anitius Severinus Boethius · 25 replies
    ASB | 07/20/2014 | ASB
    This is nothing more or less than a complete vanity. My sixth book is out today and I am thrilled with it. I started my journey as a self-published writer just over two years ago and look forward to doing this as a career for the next few decades. My latest novel is called 'EMP': In a flash of searing light, the world changed. A massive solar flare has crippled the modern world and brought chaos and destruction. David Hartsman is stuck in the remote farm town of his youth on what was expected to be a short visit to...
  • Mildred Lewis Rutherford: Southern Educator and Historian

    07/16/2014 1:35:14 PM PDT · by BigReb555 · 1 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | July 16, 2014 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.
    Miss Rutherford lived during a time when people were closer and the pace was slower! “Miss Rutherford writes often about the Confederacy, and Southern traditions, and was overall a champion of all things Southern. While her writings may not be politically correct in today’s world, they are an important look into her era and document views and events from someone who lived through them and knew people who did.”---Kenneth H. Thomas, Jr., Genealogy Columnist, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
  • Costco Keeps Twisting the Truth about D'Souza and Hillary Books (Vanity)

    07/11/2014 6:23:08 AM PDT · by illiac · 18 replies
    Self | 7/11/14 | Self
    In response to why Hillary's book was not taken off the shelf...here is the reply: Dear XXXX, The decision to keep her book in stock in our locations is purely sales based as well. The books that are currently stocked in our stores have met our sales threshold, and so we continue to carry them. I might suggest visiting Costco.com for further information from our CEO regarding this matter. Thank you, Sarah S. Member Service Center Costco Wholesale Corporation I do know that there hare many copies of her books in the local Costco - habe neen since published....does not...
  • Reply from Costco Regarding D'Souza Book Vanity)

    07/10/2014 7:19:40 AM PDT · by illiac · 25 replies
    Self | 7/10/14 | Self
    Dear XXXX, We appreciate you taking the time to email Costco Wholesale. Costco is not influenced by political considerations in selecting product for sale in our warehouses or on Costco.com. This includes our selection of books. Our book buyers are solely interested in book sales, and do not favor any political persuasion over another. Recently, after deciding to sell the book "America: Imagine the World Without Her", beginning on June 1, a decision was made to pull the book from sale on July 1. This decision was based solely on the number of copies sold during that month, and had...
  • The books many start, but few ever finish: Survey reveals the reads nobody reads (HRC 1.9%)

    07/08/2014 6:44:44 AM PDT · by InvisibleChurch · 87 replies
    ukmail ^ | 7-8-14
    It's the cultural crime we don't dare admit - starting that big, high-brow book with the best intentions before leaving it half-read down the back of the sofa. So those who give up on tough reads will be relieved to hear they're not alone. A mathematics professor has singled out which books are our most 'unread' - and intellectual big-hitters are far and away the worst culprits. Readers in their droves gave up on Hillary Clinton's memoirs, Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time and Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century before they were even a tenth of the...
  • What Are You Reading?

    06/27/2014 8:33:15 AM PDT · by Tax-chick · 274 replies
    Vanity | June 27, 2014 | Tax-chick
    What are you reading? There used to be a quarterly "What are you reading?" thread, but I haven't seen it for a long time. I got a lot of good book suggestions that way, and I miss it. So here's a thread! If you're reading something interesting you think others would like, or something boring you'd recommend we all avoid, jump in! If you have a ping list of FReepers who might be interested, ping them!
  • 23 Books You Didn't Read In High School But Actually Should

    05/30/2014 12:34:14 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 127 replies
    BuzzFeed ^ | July 5, 2013 | Spencer Althouse
    You probably SparkNoted these books before, but now's your chance to read them.
  • Harlan Ellison turns 80 today

    05/27/2014 10:57:16 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 40 replies
    Multiple links in body of thread | May 27, 2014
    The great writer Harlan Ellison turns 80 today. Ellison has won eight Hugo Awards, a shared award for the screenplay of A Boy and his Dog that he counts as "half an Hugo" and two special awards from annual World SF Conventions; four Nebula Awards of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA); five Bram Stoker Awards of the Horror Writers Association (HWA); two Edgar Awards of the Mystery Writers of America; two World Fantasy Award from annual conventions; and two Georges Méliès fantasy film awards. -- Wikipedia Ellison is known primarily to television viewers as the author...
  • 18 Famous Literary First Lines Perfectly Paired With Rap Lyrics

    05/24/2014 8:32:03 AM PDT · by workerbee · 5 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | 3/24/14 | Arika Okrent
    Are you an aspiring rap lyricist? Have I got the tool for you! RapPad is a site where you can compose your raps with the help of rhyme lookups, syllable counters, and a library of beats. It also puts you in touch with a community for discussion, feedback, and online rap battles. But even if you’re not planning on writing raps, it offers a unique kind of linguistic fun. With the “Generate Line” feature, you can give RapPad a line, and it will write the next line for you by pulling from a library of successful rap songs. I entered...
  • Plan to name cove after Mark Twain scrapped after tribe complains (He was Racist)

    05/19/2014 7:55:43 PM PDT · by equalator · 33 replies
    Fox News ^ | Joshua Miller
    "Samuel Clemens had racist views on the native people of this country and has captured those views in his literature," Cruz wrote in a letter to the board. He also took exception to a Twain quote about Lake Tahoe: "People say that Tahoe means 'Silver Lake' — 'Limpid Water' — 'Falling Leaf.' Bosh! It means grasshopper soup, the favorite dish of the digger tribe — and of the Pi-utes as well."
  • Warning: The Literary Canon Could Make Students Squirm

    05/18/2014 5:44:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 38 replies
    The New York Times ^ | May 17, 2014 | Jennifer Medina
    SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — Should students about to read “The Great Gatsby” be forewarned about “a variety of scenes that reference gory, abusive and misogynistic violence,” as one Rutgers student proposed? Would any book that addresses racism — like “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” or “Things Fall Apart” — have to be preceded by a note of caution? Do sexual images from Greek mythology need to come with a viewer-beware label? Colleges across the country this spring have been wrestling with student requests for what are known as “trigger warnings,” explicit alerts that the material they are about to read...
  • 45 Hamlets for Shakespeare's 450th Birthday - in Pictures

    04/23/2014 9:30:51 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    On the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, Michael Billington has picked the best Hamlets he's seen in each decade of his theatregoing life. To help you choose your own favourite Prince of Denmark, here are 45 actors who've found a method for the character's madness
  • The Loss of Mystery and the Loss of Childhood

    04/17/2014 3:51:40 AM PDT · by NYer · 10 replies
    ZNA ^ | April 17, 2014 | Mitchell Kalpakgian
    In the aftermath of the sexual revolution of 1960s — which espoused sex education, the contraceptive mentality, no-fault divorce, and legalized abortion on demand — an anti-life and anti-child philosophy has prevailed over much of Western civilization, where European nations are barely replacing their populations or suffering a decline in birth rate. In a culture of death that slaughters 1.5 million pre-born babies in the womb each year, permits infanticide in the procedure known as partial-birth abortion, and tolerates physician-assisted suicide in the name of mercy and a quality of life ethic, life is cheap and loses its sacredness. Whenever...
  • English Professors' Moral Panic

    04/15/2014 7:12:24 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 13 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | April 14, 2014 | Malcolm A. Kline
    If you love literature, you might find it easier to actually buy it than take a course in it. “According to the most recent comprehensive report on staffing by the Modern Language Association and the Association of Departments of English, published in 2008, English lost 3,000 tenure-track positions from 1993 to 2004, roughly 10 percent of the total,” Marc Bousquet writes in The Chronicle of Higher Education. “Even that understates the case, since more than a third of the new tenurable hires have not been in traditional literary fields but in composition, rhetoric, theory, cultural studies, new media, and digital...
  • Garcia Marquez Leaves Hospital, in 'Delicate' State

    04/08/2014 5:24:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies
    Straits Times ^ | Apr 9, 2014
    Nobel literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez returned to his Mexico City home on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, after a week-long hospitalisation for a lung infection, but officials said he remains in "delicate" condition.
  • Rush Limbaugh selection in children’s book competition causes a stir

    03/21/2014 8:04:13 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 41 replies
    CNN Politics ^ | March 20,2014 | CNN's Dana Davidsen
    Rush Limbaugh - radio host, conservative firebrand and... children's book author of the year? The Children’s Book Council and its Every Child a Reader program released on Thursday their author-of-the-year finalists for their annual Children’s and Teen Choice Book Awards. Limbaugh is one of the four finalists, and his nomination has prompted outrage on social media, given the host’s often-incendiary nature. Limbaugh's book is titled, "Rush Revere and The Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Adventures with Exceptional Americans" – a time-traveling tale of colonial America and the latest of two books in the "Rush Revere Series" published last year by Simon &...
  • Tales of Futures Past: Soviet Science Fiction of the Cold War

    03/16/2014 7:35:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 12 replies
    Space.com ^ | March 14, 2014 | Jill Scharr,
    In 1898, British writer H. G. Wells wrote "The War of the Worlds," a science-fiction novel in which Martians invade the Earth and nearly decimate humanity. A decade later, in what was then the Russian Empire, writer and Marxist revolutionary Alexander Bogdanov wrote his novel "Red Star," also about Martians landing on Earth. But in Bogdanov's novel, the Martians are not violent or monstrous. Instead, they invite the main character, a young Russian student named Leonid, back to the Red Planet to see the Martians' civilization: a thriving, peaceful — and communist — utopia. The optimism of "Red Star" was...
  • The Top Ten Books People Lie About Reading

    02/03/2014 2:13:32 PM PST · by jocon307 · 396 replies
    The Federalist ^ | 01/16/2014 | Ben Domenech
    Have you ever lied about reading a book? Maybe you didn’t want to seem stupid in front of someone you respected. Maybe you rationalized it by reasoning that you had a familiarity with the book, or knew who the author was, or what the story was about, or had glanced at its Wikipedia page. Or maybe you had tried to read the book, even bought it and set it by your bed for months unopened, hoping that it would impart what was in it merely via proximity (if that worked, please email me).
  • Stand up for true English!

    01/14/2014 9:28:06 AM PST · by WesternCulture · 15 replies
    01-14-2014 | WesternCulture
    What was so great about Chaucer? Some people seem to think he more or less invented the English language. Well, did he? By no means. Discussing authors, should anyone ever compare Chaucer to the likes of Hamlet, Petrarch or Dante? Never. Geoffrey's major source of influence, Giovanni Boccaccio, was a pretty good writer of short stories, but on the other hand, Western literature really could've done without him. In style as well as content, Chaucer was an unaccomplished Boccaccio impersonator. There are plenty of good reasons to admire Britain, but contrary to what is regarded as an axiomatic truth in...
  • 43 Books About War Every Man Should Read

    01/10/2014 5:48:26 PM PST · by dynachrome · 141 replies
    Art of Manliness ^ | 12-2-13 | Ryan Holiday.
    War is unquestionably mankind at his worst. Yet, paradoxically, it is in war that men — individual men — often show the very best of themselves. War is often the result of greed, stupidity, or depravity. But in it, men are often brave, loyal, and selfless. I am not a soldier. I have no plans to become one. But I’ve studied war for a long time. I am not alone in this. The greats have been writing and reading about war — its causes, its effects, its heroes, its victims — since the beginning of written text. Some of our...
  • America's Knockout Novel: The Adventures of Huck Finn

    12/10/2013 3:45:54 PM PST · by Kaslin · 22 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | December 10, 2013 | Lee Culpepper
    With recent footage of black teenagers cold-cocking random strangers in a deadly game known as “Knockout,” Americans should recognize how badly our country needs a selfless voice of leadership heard in all of our homes. But until the dignified message of someone like Dr. Ben Carson becomes mainstream, Mark Twain’s classic punch to the face has always packed the power to knock some sense in to people who need it the most. Nearly 130 years after The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published, Twain’s timeless lessons on race and humanity continue to offer America a remedy to racial bigotry --...
  • Socialist, Communist authors make Obama administration reading list

    11/25/2013 12:15:42 PM PST · by markomalley · 4 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 11/25/2013 | Patrick Howley
    Socialist, Communist, and McCarthy-era blacklisted writers appear on the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new “Books That Shaped Work in America” list celebrating the department’s 100th anniversary.A Socialist leader, two Stalin apologists, two blacklisted ’50s screenwriters, and a suspected Marxist are included on the list, which DOL compiled based on recommendations from various figures in the community. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez described the program as an “online book club.”Better not invite Tailgunner Joe McCarthy.The first two reds on the list are Sidney and Beatrice Webb, who made it for their 1897 work “Industrial Democracy,” recommended by Carter administration Labor Secretary...
  • Cornell vs. Literature

    11/25/2013 8:26:40 AM PST · by Academiadotorg · 7 replies
    Accuracy in Academia | November 25, 2013 | Malcolm A. Kline
    Malcolm A. Kline, Share/Save If you love literature and go to Cornell, you’re probably in the wrong place. The poets, playwrights and novelists you might not seek out on your own who would, conversely, enrich your life or at least your vocabulary, make but cameo appearances. Rather, as an English major, you can expect to be exposed to: ENGL 2090 – Introduction to Cultural Studies ENGL 2100 – Medieval Romance: Voyage to the Otherworld ENGL 2150 – The American Musical ENGL 2160 – Television ENGL 2511 – Introduction to Women Writers ENGL 2620 – Introduction to Asian American Literature ENGL...
  • Who Was C.S. Lewis?

    11/22/2013 6:48:42 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 32 replies
    ligonier.org ^ | 11/22/13 | Sinclair Ferguson
    November 22, 1963, the date of President Kennedy’s assassination, was also the day C.S. Lewis died. Seven years earlier he had thus described death: “The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.” The metaphor inherent in these words is striking. It comes from the world of students and pupils, but only a teacher would employ it as a metaphor for death. The words (from The Last Battle) bring down the curtain — or perhaps better, close the wardrobe door — on Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia. But they also open a window into...
  • Doris Lessing, Nobel Prize-winning author, dies aged 94

    11/17/2013 8:29:12 AM PST · by GSWarrior · 9 replies
    BBCNews ^ | 11/17/13
    British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing has died aged 94. A statement from her publisher, Harper Collins, said she "passed away peacefully at her London home in the early hours of this morning". Her best-known works include The Golden Notebook, Memoirs of a Survivor and The Summer Before the Dark.
  • Alice Munro wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature

    10/10/2013 6:03:41 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 19 replies
    www.thelocal.se ^ | 10/10/2013 | TT/The Local/dl
    Munro, 82, was called "The master of the contemporary short story" by Swedish Academy Permanent Secretary Peter Englund when he emerged to make the announcement at 1pm. Before he announced Munro's name, Englund let the room full of journalists know that the winner this year "would be a woman", prompting the room to erupt with cheers. Munro's writing career began when she was a teenager growing up in Ontario. She began studying journalism and English at the University of Western Ontario, but left university when she got married in 1951, eventually moving with her husband to British Columbia where they...
  • Wausau Schools Issue Edict to Limit Religious Music... At Christmas

    10/07/2013 7:35:19 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 24 replies
    Right Wisconsin Perspectives ^ | 10-6-13 | Charlie Sykes
    We’ve seen this play before haven’t we? Wausau’s school district decides that there is way too much Christmas music during "holiday concerts" and issues a directive "to limit religious music in December." Too much Handel, Bach, Mozart for Wausau, apparently. But this edict seems especially petty and, not surprisingly, there is considerable push back. The district's elite and very popular Master Singers choir decided to temporarily disband rather than comply with the religious cleansing order and a Facebook-based petition campaign to reverse the decision has caught fire. From the Wausau Daily Herald: WAUSAU — A local high school’s elite Master...
  • Humble Chinese Village Basks in Legacy of Three Kingdoms Era

    09/23/2013 4:52:17 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | September 22, 2013 | Edward Wong
    In the shadow of a lush mountain and near a slow-moving river in southeast China sits this village, whose name means Dragon Gate. There are narrow alleys and whitewashed homes and the flesh of sliced bamboo drying on the ground. Its humble appearance, though, belies the fact that it played a role in the famous Three Kingdoms era, when kings leading rival states fought in the third century over the right to succeed the Han empire. The blood-drenched stories were immortalized in a 14th-century classic by Luo Guanzhong, “The Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” which in turn has spawned countless...
  • Harper Lee reaches settlement in ‘Mockingbird’ copyright case

    09/07/2013 7:03:10 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    NY Post ^ | 9-6-13 | Rich Colder
    Harper Lee, the aging author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” has reached a settlement in principle on a lawsuit alleging she was scammed into signing over the copyright to her classic novel by an unscrupulous literary agent who took advantage of her failing hearing and eyesight, a lawyer in the case says. Lee had filed suit in May against Samuel Pinkus and others — including disgraced journalist Gerald Posner — to reclaim the copyright. However, dismissal papers were filed in Manhattan federal court today by Lee’s lawyer removing both Posner and Lee Ann Winick, Pinkus’ wife and another defendant, of...