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Keyword: literature

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  • 2016 Hugo Awards

    08/21/2016 2:34:41 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 20 replies
    The Hugo Awards ^ | August 20, 2016
    The 2016 Hugo Awards were presented on the evening of Saturday, August 20, 2016 at a ceremony at MidAmeriCon II, the 74th World Science Fiction Convention. Administration of the 2016 Hugo Awards is exclusively the responsibility of MidAmeriCon II. The Hugo Awards are not administered by the Hugo Awards Web Site. 3,130 valid final ballots were cast by the members of MidAmeriCon II. Per the WSFS Constitution, each category must have at least 25% (1,488 ballots) participation; otherwise “No Award” must be presented in this category. This did not happen in any category. In the list below, we show the...
  • Children's character Curious George observes Ramadan

    07/07/2016 9:42:48 AM PDT · by simpson96 · 54 replies
    Agence France Press ^ | 7/7/2016 | Staff
    The beloved American children's book character Curious George is breaking fast for Ramadan this year -- with chocolate-covered bananas, of course.The just-released children's book "It's Ramadan, Curious George" celebrates the Muslim holiday, teaching kids about the sacred month.It comes amid rising tensions fueled by worries about Islamist extremism and a heated presidential campaign during which Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump has called for a ban on all Muslims entering the United States.US author Hena Khan "wanted to focus on the celebratory aspects" of Ramadan, so George attends family gatherings and accompanies his friend Kareem to a mosque to put together...
  • Indian Valley Collective Library no longer a dream, but a reality

    07/02/2016 8:33:51 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 4 replies
    Plumas News ^ | Last updated 07/1/2016 at 12:39pm | Maggie Wells
    As a writer, editor, mother, and book lover for as long as I can remember, every time I stepped foot in the room called "Library Media Center" at Greenville High School, a little bit of my heart was broken. I began to think of the space as a giant metaphor for everything wrong with education. As a former educator, it gave me insight into where students in rural America are often coming from in terms of literacy. It has always been part of my teaching philosophy that you meet the student where he or she is and you build from...
  • The Unsolved Mystery of Mr. (Charles) Dickens

    06/28/2016 3:39:07 PM PDT · by NYer · 22 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | June 27, 2016 | SEAN FITZPATRICK
    June 9, 1870. Charles Dickens sat writing at his desk. He had been laboring more than was his custom on his latest book. Though the story was progressing well, Mr. Dickens was not feeling well. His left hand clawed at the air. His left foot dragged on the ground. And though he had recently retired from public performances with a final reading from Pickwick, his pen scarcely ceased its scratching. A profound and perplexing mystery was unfolding beneath that pen and Mr. Dickens’ knew it well. If only his readers might know it as well.It had been five years...
  • US assists Cuba in preservation of Ernest Hemingway’s house

    06/22/2016 4:29:29 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 16 replies
    Finca Vigia, the house where Ernest Hemingway lived in Cuba, is now a museum restored to its original state with help from a foundation in the United States. Much of the funding came from major U.S. corporations including Caterpillar, Ford, AT&T and American Express. ... For more than half a century, his works have been stored in hot, humid conditions at risk from damp, mold and termites. This new conservation building is the first construction project in Cuba using modern U.S. building materials since 1950’s.
  • Borges and $: The Parable of the Literary Master and the Coin

    06/18/2016 5:41:35 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 8 replies
    Longreads ^ | June 14, 2016 | Elizabeth Hyde Stevens
    Nothing is less material than money. . . . Money is abstract, I repeated, money is future time. It can be an evening in the suburbs, it can be the music of Brahms, it can be maps, it can be chess, it can be coffee, it can be the words of Epictetus teaching us to despise gold. Money is a Proteus more versatile than the one on the island of Pharos. —Jorge Luis Borges, “The Zahir” I fell in love with Jorge Luis Borges when I was a freshman in college. That year, full of hope and confusion, I left...
  • Yale Students Tell English Profs to Stop Teaching English: Too Many White Male Poets

    06/02/2016 6:24:22 AM PDT · by C19fan · 71 replies
    Reason ^ | June 1, 2016 | Robby Soave
    Some Yale University students are demanding changes to the English Department curriculum: specifically, they don't think it should feature so many English poets who were straight, white, wealthy, and male. "It is your responsibility as educators to listen to student voices," the students wrote in a petition to the faculty. "We have spoken. We are speaking. Pay attention."
  • Filming begins on BBC's lavish new Bronte drama To Walk Invisible as cast take over York in [tr]

    05/19/2016 11:52:01 AM PDT · by C19fan · 14 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 19, 2016 | Joanna Crawley
    Fresh from the huge success of their adaptation of War & Peace, work has begun on the BBC's latest literary drama. To Walk Invisible: The Bronte Sisters, written and directed by the award winning Sally Wainwright (Happy Valley, Last Tango In Halifax), has begun shooting, with the streets of York transformed this week for the one off, two hour drama. Finn Atkins, who plays Charlotte Bronte and Charlie Murphy, who has been cast as her younger sister Anne, were both spotted on set on Thursday in their elaborate 19th century costumes.
  • Brad Torgersen on H. P. Lovecraft's cultural Marxist critics

    05/11/2016 10:33:36 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 25 replies
    Facebook ^ | May 11, 2016 | Brad Torgersen
    I am not a Lovecraft devotee, since horror is not really my niche. I've been tangentially aware of the surge in Lovecraft-bashing, ever since World Fantasy Convention caved in on their trophy squabble. Now that the man's literary works are falling into the public domain, it seems there are a heap of people who want to re-do, un-do, re-work, or otherwise "colonize" the man's fiction legacy. Ah, cultural Marxism: same as it ever was. Here's the rub, though. Seeing people who are literally babies in the field, already planting their flags as "historic" persons, come to overturn the smelly...
  • 100 books to change your life

    04/29/2016 9:05:38 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 40 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 28 Apr, 2016 | Martin Chilton
    e all have memories of books that have ignited our imaginations but is there one special book that has changed your life? That's the premise behind a fascinating new collection of essays featuring contributions from writers, politicians and actors, who discuss the book that holds a special place in their hearts. Among the contributors are Sofia Coppola, Margaret Atwood, Dave Eggers and Jodi Picoult. The entry I particularly liked was from the country music singer and songwriter Rosanne Cash, who seemed to capture what Marcel Proust said about there being no days of our childhood we live so fully as...
  • University Students Are Unable to Read a Whole Book

    04/18/2016 3:18:12 PM PDT · by daisy12 · 121 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 17 April 2016 | Donna Rachel Edmunds
    University students are increasingly unable to read a whole book as they simply don’t have the concentration spans required, nor are they able to understand complex, nuanced arguments, academics have said. Lecturers at leading British universities are having to actively encourage students to read beyond the set texts, and have noticed that students are increasingly unwilling to read whole texts. They say they believe internet culture is to blame, as young people nowadays are used to receiving arguments in the form of 800-1000 word articles. Anything beyond that, they say, is now proving too challenging. “Incoming undergraduates have had their...
  • FR Book Club: April - "Run to the Phantom"

    03/26/2016 12:51:40 PM PDT · by ctdonath2 · 8 replies
    1pitech's father ^ | March 26, 2014 | R. Ibbetson
    During a national emergency, a liberal Marxist-leaning political leadership takes absolute control of the United States. Martial law is declared and elections are suspended. This leadership morphs into a complete Communist-style government. All dissent is brutally repulsed. Two young university students, Peter Blake and Natalie Biriukova, become active leaders in the resistance movement. They soon fall in love. In time they are targeted by the government and forced to go on the run. A feared and notorious Compliance Officer, Nicholas Snoopczech, is hot on their trail. He is hated and feared by Americans, especially those who are brave enough to...
  • These Are the 100 Most-Read Female Writers in College Classes

    02/25/2016 12:44:36 PM PST · by C19fan · 48 replies
    Time ^ | February 25, 2016 | David Johnson
    Toni Morrison and Jane Austen are among the most-read female writers on college campuses, a new TIME analysis found.
  • Umberto Eco, author of 'The Name of the Rose,' dead at 84

    02/20/2016 8:00:11 AM PST · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    AP via Yahoo ^ | February 20, 2016 | Colleen Barry
    Umberto Eco started working a novel that set the world's imagination on fire "prodded by a seminal idea: I felt like poisoning a monk." The Italian author and academic who intrigued, puzzled and delighted readers worldwide with his best-selling medieval thriller, "The Name of the Rose," died at home in Milan on Friday evening after a battle with cancer, according to a family member who asked not to be identified.
  • Any Jerry Pournelle fans?

    01/24/2016 2:57:47 AM PST · by Fhios · 31 replies
    WWW ^ | 1/24/2016 | Vanity
    I was a big fan in the early 80's. I had a week long correspondence with him in the mid 90's. I loved reading his Chaos Manner column in Byte magazine along with Garcia s circuit cellar. It was a great mag. I've been rereading some of his works lately and just reminiscing. Jerry Pournelle s Iron law: ...in any bureaucratic organization there will be two kinds of people: those who work to further the actual goals of the organization, and those who work for the organization itself. Examples in education would be teachers who work and sacrifice to teach...
  • Who was Charles Perrault? Why the fairy tales you know may not be as they seem

    01/12/2016 10:00:58 AM PST · by beaversmom · 14 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | January 12, 2016 | Rhiannon Williams
    Charles Perrault, author of Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella was born 388 years ago, and has been commemorated with a Google Doodle. Perrault was born in Paris in 1628, and was a lawyer before turning his hand to the written word. While the Brothers Grimm are widely credited with creating the fairy tale as we know it, Perrault actually wrote stories called Le Petit Chaperon Rouge, La Belle au bois dormant and Cendrillon a full 200 years before. In 1695, aged 67, he wrote Tales and Stories of the Past with Morals, a series of moral tales...
  • I stopped reading white male authors last year. Here's what I learned.

    01/05/2016 6:35:11 AM PST · by C19fan · 62 replies
    The Week ^ | January 5, 2015 | Jeva Lange
    A funny thing happens when you spend the better part of a year reading and watching stories by people other than white, Western men — you start to notice who is in charge. Last April, my frustration with the homogeneity of easily accessible art made me swear off reading or watching anything by white men until 2016. Instead, I chose to spend the year immersing myself in stories by anyone but white, Western directors and authors (you can read the rules I had to follow here and see the list of books I read here).
  • The politically correct crowd just got a great American novel banned

    12/15/2015 3:55:46 AM PST · by GrandJediMasterYoda · 82 replies
    NY Post.com ^ | 12/15/15 | By David K. Li
    The politically correct crowd just got a great American novel banned By David K. Li A suburban Philadelphia school expelled “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” from its curriculum over the book’s overuse of the N-word. The Friends’ Central School removed the Mark Twain classic from the 11th-grade American literature class last week after students said it made them feel uncomfortable, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. “We have all come to the conclusion that the community costs of reading this book in 11th grade outweigh the literary benefits,” principal Art Hall said in a letter to parents.
  • The 100 greatest British Novels

    12/08/2015 7:18:15 AM PST · by C19fan · 46 replies
    BBC ^ | December 7, 2015 | Jane Ciabattari
    What does the rest of the world see as the greatest British novels? In search of a collective critical assessment, BBC Culture contributor Jane Ciabattari polled 82 book critics, from Australia to Zimbabwe – but none from the UK. This list includes no nonfiction, no plays, no narrative or epic poems (no Paradise Lost or Beowulf), no short story collections (no Morte D’Arthur) – novels only, by British authors (which means no James Joyce).
  • The Death of Ivan Ilyich and the Importance of a Rightly Ordered Life

    11/25/2015 6:06:46 PM PST · by Kaslin · 7 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | November 25, 2015 | Erica Wanis
    Leo Tolstoy's classic story, The Death of Ivan Ilyich, is a tale about a man's journey towards death: the denial, the alienation, the terror, and the awful recognition that life has not been lived as it ought to have been. Stricken by a mysterious ailment in the prime of his life, Ivan Ilyich finds himself struggling to make sense of his situation as he witnesses all those closest to him struggle to navigate the unpleasantness of his condition and its impact on their lives. In his hour of greatest vulnerability, Ilyich finds himself isolated and alone, save for the faithful...
  • "Finding Home": Poems In Search Of A Lost America

    11/20/2015 3:21:10 AM PST · by Biggirl · 8 replies
    Frontpagemag.com ^ | November 20, 2015 | Mark Tapson
    Considering the Freedom Center’s aggressive political work, poetry may not be something one would expect to find as part of its intellectual arsenal. But as many conservative writers such as Andrew Klavan and myself have noted for years, reclaiming America means reclaiming the culture, and that means engaging in the arts. As Finch writes in his introduction, “[I]f as a people, and a nation, we can return to something lost, recovering something from our culture that has been torn, then it can only happen through art.” The art of Finding Home is Michael Finch’s deeply personal contribution to the culture...
  • New self-portrait by Charlotte Bronte is discovered and she drew it by looking in the mirror [tr]

    10/27/2015 6:30:04 AM PDT · by C19fan · 14 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 27, 2015 | Dayla Alberge
    It is hardly the most flattering of likenesses, but a pencil sketch of a woman's head has been identified as a rare self-portrait by Charlotte Brontë. It dates from 1843, four years before she was to publish Jane Eyre, one of English literature's great masterpieces, and when she was suffering the acute agony of unrequited love. The discovery has been made by the acclaimed literary biographer, Claire Harman, who describes it as 'massively significant' as there are only two other known lifetime portraits.
  • The Raven

    10/15/2015 5:11:32 PM PDT · by Mr. K · 13 replies
    Edgar Allen ^ | 1/1/1111 | Poe
  • Donald Trump gave his new book a 'nasty title' (Crippled America)

    10/07/2015 5:30:49 PM PDT · by springwater13 · 48 replies
    Real-estate tycoon Donald Trump has a new book coming out: "Crippled America." The Republican presidential candidate discussed how he named the book at a Wednesday campaign rally in Iowa. "I was going to say the 'Make America Great Again Book.' Eh, it's too nice, because our country's in trouble," Trump recalled thinking. "Then I was going to say 'Greatness in America.' Then I said, 'It's too nice.'" But then the business mogul said an angry photo of himself inspired a harsher title. "Then I had a photographer come up. Then I said, 'Do you think I should be smiling?'" Trump...
  • Disproportionately gay: An alarming trend in youth literature

    10/07/2015 4:28:01 PM PDT · by NetAddicted · 31 replies
    LifeSiteNews ^ | 10/5/2015 | Eric Metaxas
    October 5, 2015 (BreakPoint) -- The way to win over a culture is to capture the minds and hearts of its young people. The gay-rights movement has certainly learned that lesson, which helps explain a current trend in youth literature. Anyone who reads books for teens these days will tell you that portrayals of gay relationships and characters are rapidly increasing.
  • Author Lemony Snicket to give $1 million to Planned Parenthood

    10/01/2015 5:40:53 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 22 replies
    WSLS-TV ^ | 10/1/15
    The children’s author known as Lemony Snicket says he’s donating $1 million to Planned Parenthood. Daniel Handler made the announcement this week on his Twitter feed, @DanielHandler. He notes the donation to the women’s health care provider is on behalf of him and his wife, illustrator Lisa Brown. He says they’ve been very fortunate and “good fortune should be shared with noble causes.”
  • The Decline of English Departments

    09/14/2015 8:24:21 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 20 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | September 13, 2015 | Spencer Irvine
    The John William Pope Center’s Jay Schalin recently published a report detailing the decline of America’s college English departments. More and more, traditional English literature classes and other similar icons of the English language in academia are disappearing. Many of them are replaced, or supplemented by, “digital humanities,” “media studies” and the like. Schalin used the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as an example, where requirements have vastly changed between 1988 and 2014. Four specific literature courses were mandatory prior to graduation, ranging from studying T.S. Eliot to Chaucer to William Shakespeare in the 1988-89 school year. But,...
  • How a Volcanic Eruption in 1815 Darkened the World but Colored the Arts

    08/25/2015 11:30:14 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    NY Times ^ | August 24, 2015 | William J. Broad
    In April 1815, the most powerful volcanic blast in recorded history shook the planet in a catastrophe so vast that 200 years later, investigators are still struggling to grasp its repercussions. It played a role, they now understand, in icy weather, agricultural collapse and global pandemics — and even gave rise to celebrated monsters. Around the lush isles of the Dutch East Indies — modern-day Indonesia — the eruption of Mount Tambora killed tens of thousands of people. They were burned alive or killed by flying rocks, or they died later of starvation because the heavy ash smothered crops.
  • Finding Humanity in Gone With the Wind

    07/18/2015 3:27:50 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | July 16, 2015 | Cass R. Sunstein
    When Americans think about the Confederacy, they often think about Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 classic, Gone With the Wind. Inspired by recent debates over the Confederate flag, I decided to give the book a try. I confess that I did not have high hopes. I expected to be appalled by its politics and racism, and to be bored by the melodrama. (Scarlett O’Hara, Rhett Butler, and Ashley Wilkes? Really?) About twenty pages, I thought, would be enough. I could not have been more wrong. The book is enthralling, and it casts a spell. Does it make a plausible argument for continuing...
  • Harper Lee Receives Copy of ‘Go Set a Watchman’ as Release Nears

    07/08/2015 9:50:57 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 16 replies
    New York Times ^ | July 7, 2015 | By ALEXANDRA ALTER and SERGE F. KOVALESKI
    Nearly 60 years after Harper Lee wrote “Go Set a Watchman,” the novel she hoped would be her literary debut, the 89-year-old author was handed a finished copy of the book at a private lunch in Monroeville, Ala., last week. Despite the manuscript’s long and uncertain journey to publication, Ms. Lee seemed breezily self-assured about the book’s highly anticipated release next week, people who attended said. After her publishers gave her the first copies off the presses of the American and British versions of “Watchman,” Ms. Lee was asked if she ever expected the novel to be published. “Of course...
  • Countdown to Mecca by Michael Savage, a book review

    07/04/2015 7:49:31 PM PDT · by tbw2 · 17 replies
    Hubpages ^ | 07/04/2015 | Tamara Wilhite
    Michael Savage has written his third and final book in the Jack Hatfield series.
  • The Great War Novelist America Forgot (Herman Wouk turns 100 today)

    05/27/2015 10:26:24 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | May 17, 2015 | David Frum
    On May 27, the American novelist Herman Wouk will attain the prodigious age of 100. Over his long career, Wouk has achieved all the wealth and fame a writer could desire, or even imagine. His first great success, The Caine Mutiny (1951), occupied bestseller lists for two consecutive years, sold millions of copies, and inspired a film adaptation that became the second highest-grossing movie of 1954. Wouk’s grand pair of novels, The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, likewise found a global audience, both in print, and then as two television miniseries in the 1980s. Wouk won a Pulitzer...
  • THE PASSION OF “TESS”

    05/01/2015 6:17:22 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Powerline ^ | May 1, 2015 | Scott Johnson
    We’re finishing the Victorian novel class I have been taking at a college in St. Paul with Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. I want to offer a few notes on the novel in the hope that some readers may share their thoughts and others may take up the novel if they haven’t read it before. It is an essential novel. Our great young teacher has structured the course with four novels that evoke the plight of women in Victorian fiction. With Tess we reach the summit (or a summit) of this plight. Tess is an extraordinarily lovable woman who...
  • Galatians: Selections from Martin Luther [Free e-book!]

    04/07/2015 2:01:07 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 17 replies
    rjgrune.com ^ | 4/5/15 | RJ Grunewald
    Today, I’m excited to announce the launch of a new eBook that I’ve been designing and editing in order to share for free with the world – Galatians: Selections from Martin Luther. Martin Luther is a theologian whose writing has changed my life. Luther, in a day when the Church hijacked the message of the Gospel, stood boldly for the proclamation of Christ alone. In a world that literally sold people forgiveness for a few bucks, Martin Luther came onto the scene recovering the message of the scriptures that said, “The price has already been paid.” But here’s the thing...
  • Photographer aims to prove Peak District is home to Britain's most majestic landscapes [tr]

    03/13/2015 8:38:26 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 13, 2015 | Michael Gadd
    Whether at sunrise, sunset or the heart of the day, in the height of summer or engulfed by snow, photographer James Grant is convinced that the Peak District offers some of the most spectacular landscapes Great Britain has to offer. The parochial landscape photographer has a passion for hills and mountains, in particular those surrounding his home town of Matlock on the south eastern edge of the Peak District, although he also has a soft spot for the Lake District, Snowdonia and Scotland. These images of rolling hills bathed in light and mist show the breadth of an already formidable...
  • NOTES ON “MIDDLEMARCH” (2)

    03/13/2015 7:58:48 AM PDT · by C19fan · 5 replies
    Powerline Blog ^ | March 13, 2015 | Scott Johnson
    Though Middlemarch has a large cast of characters involved in intricately related plots, Dorothea Brooke stands out as the book’s heroine. The narrative begins and ends with her. Book I of the novel’s eight Books is “Miss Brooke.” She is a young woman of simple beauty and surpassing decency. She yearns idealistically to benefit humanity, or subordinate herself as the helpmate of a great man like John Milton in his blindness. Yet she is exceedingly foolish.
  • NOTES ON “MIDDLEMARCH”

    03/12/2015 6:23:10 AM PDT · by C19fan · 12 replies
    Powerline Blog ^ | March 12, 2015 | Scott Johnson
    On Monday I finished reading George Eliot’s great Victorian novel Middlemarch for the first time. I have tried and failed to finish it several times; it’s not easy reading. At a few points it is, briefly, a slog. Although it remains a subject of debate, I believe the novel lacks a happy ending. Nevertheless, for me, the ending was happy. I finished the book. What did it take? I sought permission to audit an undergraduate class in the Victorian novel at a local college and paid for the privilege. I needed a structure within which to read the book. Like...
  • Did Mr Darcy make his fortune from the slave trade? Romantic hero profited from the [tr]

    03/11/2015 11:51:33 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 11, 2015 | Tahira Yaqoob
    It has sold more than 20 million copies since it was written two centuries ago and has had generations of schoolgirls swooning over the ultimate romantic hero. But the great unspoken background of Jane Austen's world is that both Mr Darcy and Mr Bingley in Pride and Prejudice got rich from the slave trade, says author Joanna Trollope. The novelist, speaking at the Festival of Literature in Dubai, dispelled the myth about Mr Darcy and Mr Bingley being the perfect men and described the 'very dark underbelly' to Austen's books. She said: 'Why does Mr Bingley in Pride and Prejudice...
  • Ishmael's New Testament: Salvation in Moby Dick

    12/28/2003 4:02:24 PM PST · by Cvengr · 2 replies · 1,264+ views
    http://pages.cthome.net/jbair/mobydick.htm ^ | 8/19/98 11:38:49 PM | James Bair
    Moby Dick is full of allusions to the Bible. A major theme in the Bible is salvation and (in the New Testament) new birth. This essay will summarize what the Bible says on the subject and then show ways in which this applies to Moby Dick. Moby Dick depends a lot on the Old Testament. Job and Jonah, Ahab and Noah stalk its pages. (Originally I had thought of doing a paper contrasting Melville's Ahab with Job, but I was overwhelmed at the magnitude of references and allusions--anyone willing to stake me for a two-year sabbatical?). Moby Dick does also...
  • Downton Abbey's Laura Carmichael transforms from Lady Edith Crawley to a maid in new Madame Bovary

    01/31/2015 10:07:52 AM PST · by C19fan · 9 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 30, 2015 | Nola Ojomu
    She is famous for her role as Downton Abbey’s Lady Edith Crawley. But fans of Laura Carmichael will see the actress playing the help in her new film, Madame Bovary. The 28-year-old can be seen alongside Mia Wasikowska and other stars in the new trailer for the film which is based on Gustave Flaubert’s 1856 French classic.
  • Atticus Finch: American literature's most celebrated rape apologist

    12/17/2014 6:43:55 AM PST · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Washington Times ^ | December 16, 2014 | Ashe Schow
    Atticus Finch is a monster. Sure, he’s one of history’s most beloved literary characters (he was even played by Gregory Peck in a film adaptation) but he’s also, to use the parlance of our time, history’s greatest rape apologist. Glenn Reynolds, a law professor at the University of Tennessee and pundit, first observed Finch’s new standing in the world on Twitter in early December:
  • Philip K. Dick would have been 86 today: Some thoughts on his legacy

    12/16/2014 2:51:19 PM PST · by EveningStar · 26 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | December 16, 2014 | David L. Ulin
    The late Philip K. Dick, born 86 years ago today in Chicago, is something of a cautionary figure in American literature: brilliant, prolific, often sloppy, and woefully underappreciated during his lifetime. It was only with the 1982 release of the film "Blade Runner" (loosely based on his 1968 novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?") that Dick's work truly began to saturate the mainstream; by that point, he had been dead for four months. In the ensuing three decades, Dick's novels and stories have served as fodder for dozens of Hollywood movies; they have been reissued again and again. In...
  • [Vanity] Suggestions on reading Ulysses

    11/30/2014 3:59:51 PM PST · by re_nortex · 100 replies
    NOV-30-2014 | Self
    I'm well into my 70s and checking off an item on my bucket list is finally getting around to reading Ulysses by James Joyce. It was never assigned reading in high school or college (I went to a Christian school, which may be one of the reasons). So, at my advanced age, I'm attempting at long last to tackle this work.I have a long attention span and am not easily bored nor discouraged. I've read long, involved books and have found most of them gripping, such as The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann, Faust by Goethe and Crime and Punishment...
  • The moor the merrier: More than 200 acres of 'magical' heathland that inspired Thomas Hardy saved

    11/06/2014 6:35:02 AM PST · by C19fan · 5 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | November 5, 2014 | Paul Donnelley
    More than 200 acres of the wild and 'magical' heathland that inspired author Thomas Hardy have been bought for the nation by the National Trust. The Ł650,000 acquisition of Slepe Heath, Dorset, will connect existing protected heathland areas as part of efforts to conserve the landscapes of Hardy's novels. Slepe Heath, whose windswept landscape was immortalised as fictional Egdon Heath in Hardy's Return Of The Native, is an important site for wildlife, including rare birds such as Dartford warblers, nightjars and woodlarks, the National Trust said.
  • FROM ATHEIST PROFESSOR TO CATHOLIC: AN INTERVIEW WITH DR. HOLLY ORDWAY

    11/05/2014 8:33:42 AM PST · by NYer · 14 replies
    wordonfire ^ | November 6, 2014 | Brandon Vogt
    Dr. Holly Ordway Growing up, Holly Ordway was convinced God was little more than superstition, completely unsupported by evidence or reason. She later attained a PhD in literature, traveled the country as a competitive fencer, and became a college English professor, none of which left room for God.But one day a smart and respected friend surprisingly revealed he was a Christian. That sent Holly on a search for the truth about God, one that weaved through literature, aesthetics, imagination, and history. It culminated in 2012 when she entered the Catholic Church.Holly recounts her probing journey in a new memoir, Not God's Type:...
  • OMG: Limbaugh's 'Jesus' banished from NYT best seller list

    09/19/2014 4:47:44 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 15 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | 9-18-14 | Paul Bedard
    There they go again. The New York Times Book Review, which has a history of belatedly recognizing conservative bestsellers, has banished conservative legal author David Limbaugh’s latest, Jesus on Trial, from its upcoming best seller list despite having sales better than 17 other books on the list. According to publishing sources, Limbaugh’s probe into the accuracy of the Bible sold 9,660 in its first week out, according to Nielsen BookScan. That should have made it No. 4 on the NYT print hardcover sales list. Instead, Henry Kissinger’s World Order, praised by Hillary Clinton in the Washington Post, is No. 4...
  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/12/2014 5:32:37 PM PDT · by Fzob · 201 replies
    Popsugar ^ | 09/06/2014 | NICOLE NGUYEN
    Happy National Read a Book Day! Celebrate with these essential sci-fi classics. Space, dystopian futures, robots, technology, aliens . . . what is there not to love about science fiction, a genre that stretches the imagination and offers a glimpse into what lies in a galaxy and time far, far away? Now that you've indulged on the most compelling, classic epic fantasy series, it's time to switch gears. Onward, futurists! We recruited our own POPSUGAR editors to help compile the ultimate list of geeky reads. And this week, we're showcasing the best sci-fi narratives, with all the traditional elements of...
  • Honoring Ray Bradbury the goal of Waukegan group

    08/15/2014 12:26:04 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 4 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | August 12, 2014 | Dan Hinkel
    An effort is underway to honor one of Waukegan's favorite sons, the late science fiction pioneer Ray Bradbury. Waukegan Public Library Executive Director Richard Lee said nearly all the details remain to be worked out beyond the basic idea -- a realistic statue or bust of Bradbury, who wrote evocatively of the fictional Green Town, a recognizable stand-in for his hometown. lRelated A history of Waukegan The effort echoes the push for a statue memorializing another Waukegan legend, comedian Jack Benny, a radio and early TV star honored with a downtown statue in 2001.
  • Clever Barbarians? (College summer reading)

    08/07/2014 4:22:22 PM PDT · by NYer · 5 replies
    The Catholic Thing ^ | August 7, 2014 | ANTHONY ESOLEN
    Lately I’ve been asked to write a couple of essays for the National Association of Scholars on the newest fad in freshman fall fashions. Colleges send to students enjoying their summer farewell to home and family a book that they are all supposed to read, usually something in pop sociology or psychology. When they arrive on campus, they discuss the book during freshman orientation, or they attend a seminar or two, before they settle in to professional training, or the usual disintegrative round of courses that have nothing to do with one another, chosen ad libitum. That’s supposed to give...
  • My Newest Novel is Out Today (Complete Vanity)

    07/20/2014 11:03:54 AM PDT · by Anitius Severinus Boethius · 25 replies
    ASB | 07/20/2014 | ASB
    This is nothing more or less than a complete vanity. My sixth book is out today and I am thrilled with it. I started my journey as a self-published writer just over two years ago and look forward to doing this as a career for the next few decades. My latest novel is called 'EMP': In a flash of searing light, the world changed. A massive solar flare has crippled the modern world and brought chaos and destruction. David Hartsman is stuck in the remote farm town of his youth on what was expected to be a short visit to...