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Keyword: magneticfield

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  • NASA: Earth's Last Full Magnetic-Pole Reversal Occurred 780,000 Years Ago --"We Are Over Due"

    02/01/2017 9:05:34 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 53 replies
    The Daily Galaxy ^ | 1 Feb, 2016
    The Earth’s continuously changing magnetic field surrounds the planet like an invisible force field – deflecting highly charged solar particles. Reversals are the rule, not the exception. Earth has settled in the last 20 million years into a pattern of a pole reversal about every 200,000 to 300,000 years, although it has been more than twice that long since the last reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama, that occurred around 780,000 years ago. A temporary reversal, the Laschamp event, occurred around 41,000 years ago, and lasted less than 1,000 years with the actual change of polarity lasting around 250 years. Our planet’s history...
  • Earth on track for hottest year ever as warming speeds up ("EXTRAORDINARY YEAR")

    07/21/2016 7:25:40 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 57 replies
    Reuters on Yahoo News ^ | 7/21/16 | Stephanie Nebehay
    GENEVA (Reuters) - The earth is on track for its hottest year on record and warming at a faster rate than expected, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said on Thursday. Temperatures recorded mainly in the northern hemisphere in the first six months of the year, coupled with an early and fast Arctic sea ice melt and "new highs" in heat-trapping carbon dioxide levels, point to quickening climate change, it said. June marked the 14th straight month of record heat, the United Nations agency said. It called for speedy implementation of a global pact reached in Paris last December to limit...
  • Earth's inner core was formed 1-1.5 billion years ago

    10/11/2015 12:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 38 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/7/2015 | University of Liverpool
    There have been many estimates for when the earth's inner core was formed, but scientists from the University of Liverpool have used new data which indicates that the Earth's inner core was formed 1 -- 1.5 billion years ago as it "froze" from the surrounding molten iron outer core. . . . . In a new study published in Nature, researchers from the University's School of Environmental Sciences analysed magnetic records from ancient igneous rocks and found that there was a sharp increase in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field between 1 and 1.5 billion years ago. This increased...
  • Number of volcanoes erupting right now greater than 20th century YEARLY average

    08/16/2015 12:16:41 PM PDT · by Jack Hydrazine · 99 replies
    IceAgeNow ^ | 4AUG2015 | Robert Felix
    “Is the number of volcanic eruptions worldwide increasing? “Yes,” answers Michael Snyder in this startling article.“ During the 20th century, there were a total of 3,542 volcanic eruptions globally. That works out to approximately 35 eruptions per year. That may sound like a lot, but according to Volcano Discovery there are 36 volcanoes erupting around the world right now. In other words, the number of volcanoes erupting as you read this article is greater than the 20th century’s yearly average.“ And all of this is part of a larger trend. In 2013, we witnessed the most volcanic eruptions worldwide that...
  • Messenger’s Last Gallant Effort – Unravels...Oldest Magnetic Field in the Solar System

    05/12/2015 4:03:11 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 3 replies
    Before the spacecraft ended its mission, it captured almost 100,000 images of the planet mapping its gravitational field. As scientists study the data, they found that it ages about 4 billion years old. Furthermore, the spacecraft was able to collect sufficient information for scientists to conclude that Mercury’s crust is thicker in low latitudes and thinner at both poles. This kind of distribution highly suggests that the planet is made of liquid or molten outer core, which comprises 85% Mercury’s radius and bigger than Earth’s core. Also, the layer below the crust of the planet is made up of liquid...
  • Ice age polarity reversal was global event:

    04/06/2015 5:26:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 67 replies
    scienceheathen.com ^ | October 16, 2012 | Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
    Ice Age Magnetic Reversal Was Global Event And Linked With Super Volcano Eruption And Rapid Climate Variability, Says New Research October 17, 2012 in Geology & Climate During the last ice age, around 41,000 years ago, there was a very rapid and complete reversal of the Earth’s geomagnetic field, according to new research. There was already localized evidence of polarity reversals during this time, but with the new research, the theory that it was a global event is now strongly supported. And very interestingly, it is one that nearly coincided with the very fast, short-term climate variability of the last...
  • Earth's Magnetic Field Could Flip in Our Lifetime

    10/18/2014 7:44:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    livescience.com ^ | October 17, 2014 01:20pm ET | Kelly Dickerson,
    A magnetic field shift is old news. Around 800,000 years ago, magnetic north hovered over Antarctica and reindeer lived in magnetic south. The poles have flipped several times throughout Earth's history. Scientists have estimated that a flip cycle starts with the magnetic field weakening over the span of a few thousand years, then the poles flip and the field springs back up to full strength again. However, a new study shows that the last time the Earth's poles flipped, it only took 100 years for the reversal to happen. The Earth's magnetic field is in a weakening stage right now....
  • Earth's Inner Fort Knox [Earth's core has 1.6 quadrillion tons of gold]

    12/13/2006 10:58:55 PM PST · by grundle · 56 replies · 1,851+ views
    Discover magazine ^ | September 2006 | Anne Wootton
    Searching for a pot of gold? Try the center of the Earth. More than 99 percent of Earth's gold is missing—it all sank to the center of the planet billions of years ago. In fact, says geologist Bernard Wood of Macquarie University in Australia, there's enough gold in Earth's core to coat its surface in 1.5 feet of the stuff. How did it get there? Earth formed from a series of smaller planetesimals that crashed together over the course of 30 million to 40 million years. Wood deduced how much gold ought to be present in Earth's crust by comparing...
  • The Sun: A Great Ball of Iron?

    07/17/2002 11:33:32 PM PDT · by per loin · 66 replies · 680+ views
    Science Daily
    Source:   University Of Missouri-Rolla (http://www.umr.edu) Date:   Posted 7/17/2002 The Sun: A Great Ball Of Iron? For years, scientists have assumed that the sun is an enormous mass of hydrogen. But in a paper presented before the American Astronomical Society, Dr. Oliver Manuel, a professor of nuclear chemistry at UMR, says iron, not hydrogen, is the sun's most abundant element. Manuel claims that hydrogen fusion creates some of the sun's heat, as hydrogen -- the lightest of all elements -- moves to the sun's surface. But most of the heat comes from the core of an exploded supernova...
  • Primordial Nukes (Prehistoric Nukes Found)

    03/14/2005 5:37:24 PM PST · by blam · 17 replies · 1,548+ views
    Science News Magazine ^ | 3-14-2005 | Peter Weiss
    Primordial NukesThe 2-billion-year-old tale of Earth's natural nuclear reactors Peter Weiss For more than a decade, Alexander P. Meshik has kept close tabs on a fleck of black rock no larger than an infant's fingernail. It's so unassuming that most people would sweep it into a dustpan without a second thought. Yet to Meshik, a nuclear physicist originally from Russia, this little scrap of mineral is a scientific gem. E. Roell The fleck, with its clues to believe-it-or-not geophysical events, emerged from the bowels of Earth decades ago. It was unearthed in the early 1970s at the Oklo uranium mine...
  • Earth's magnetic field 'boosts gravity'

    09/23/2002 11:11:32 AM PDT · by VadeRetro · 134 replies · 1,680+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 09:20 22 September 02 | Michael Brooks
    Exclusive from New Scientist Hidden extra dimensions are causing measurements of the strength of gravity at different locations on Earth to be affected by the planet's magnetic field, French researchers say. This is a controversial claim because no one has ever provided experimental evidence to support either the existence of extra dimensions or any interaction between gravity and electromagnetism. But lab measurements of Newton's gravitational constant G suggest that both are real. Newton's constant, which describes the strength of the gravitational pull that bodies exert on each other, is the most poorly determined of the constants of nature. The two...
  • Earth Loses Magnetism

    01/01/2004 9:49:40 AM PST · by blam · 87 replies · 548+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-1-2004 | Molly Bently
    Earth loses its magnetism By Molly Bentley in San Francisco Scientists have known for some time that the Earth's magnetic field is fading. The field is mainly dipolar - but there are anomalies Like a Kryptonite-challenged Superman, its strength has steadily and mysteriously waned, leaving parts of the planet vulnerable to increased radiation from space. Some satellites already feel the effects. What is uncertain is whether the weakened field is on the way to a complete collapse and a reversal that would flip the North and South Poles. Compasses pointing North would then point South. It is not a matter...
  • Magnetic effects seen in water

    12/07/2004 2:12:48 PM PST · by rotstan · 13 replies · 724+ views
    Physics Web News ^ | 12/6/04 | Staff
    Physicists in Japan have discovered that the melting point of water increases slightly in a strong magnetic field. Hideaki Inaba and colleagues at Chiba University found that it increases by 5.6 millikelvin for ordinary water in a field of 6 Tesla, and by 21.8 millikelvin for heavy water (J. Appl. Phys. 96 6127). Water has many unusual properties: it has relatively high melting and boiling points for a small molecule, and the liquid state can also be denser than the solid state. These properties are thought to arise from the 3D network of hydrogen bonds in the molecule. Recently, it...
  • Magnetic Stars

    10/15/2004 8:29:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 8 replies · 525+ views
    eurekalert/Nature/Max-Planck-Gesellschaft ^ | October 14th, 2004 | J. Braithwaite and H.C. Spruit
    Magnetic Stars The puzzle of `magnetic stars' solved by astrophysicists of the Max Planck Society How does one explain the enormous magnetic field strengths of the so-called `magnetic stars'? This question concerning magnetic fields in the cosmos, first posed half a century ago, has now been answered by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching. With 3-dimensional numerical simulations they have found the magnetic field configurations that underly the strong magnetic fields observed on the surface of the so-called magnetic A-stars and magnetic White Dwarfs, and how these fields can survive for the life time of these...
  • Biggest stars produce strongest magnets

    01/30/2005 1:17:24 PM PST · by Willie Green · 14 replies · 1,000+ views
    SpaceFlightNow ^ | January 28, 2005 | HARVARD-SMITHSONIAN CENTER FOR ASTROPHYSICS
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. Astronomy is a science of extremes - the biggest, the hottest, and the most massive. Today, astrophysicist Bryan Gaensler (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and colleagues announced that they have linked two of astronomy's extremes, showing that some of the biggest stars in the cosmos become the strongest magnets when they die. "The source of these very powerful magnetic objects has been a mystery since the first one was discovered in 1998. Now, we think we have solved that mystery," says Gaensler. The astronomers base their conclusions on data taken with CSIRO's...
  • Oceans charge up new theory of magnetism

    06/16/2009 9:29:47 AM PDT · by BGHater · 32 replies · 568+ views
    Times Online ^ | 14 June 2009 | Jonathan Leake
    A radical new idea may revolutionise our understanding of one of the most vital forces on Earth Earth's magnetic field, long thought to be generated by molten metals swirling around its core, may instead be produced by ocean currents, according to controversial new research published this week. It suggests that the movements of such volumes of salt water around the world have been seriously underestimated by scientists as a source of magnetism. If proven, the research would revolutionise geophysics, the study of the Earth’s physical properties and behaviour, in which the idea that magnetism originates in a molten core is...
  • Study Peels Back More of the Magnetic Sun

    03/12/2010 11:45:54 PM PST · by neverdem · 12 replies · 730+ views
    ScienceNOW ^ | March 12, 2010 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge Image Turmoil. Magnetism produces much of the sun's surface phenomena, such as these sunspots, seen in ultraviolet light. Credit: NASA/TRACE Researchers have discovered that one of the mysterious forces that sweep the sun's surface shows an unexpectedly strong connection with the number of sunspots, magnetic disturbances that can affect Earth's weather and telecommunications. The findings should improve predictions of the sun's dynamics and might even help scientists develop better climate models. Along with heat and light, the sun emits x-rays and magnetically charged particles that can endanger astronauts, fry circuits aboard satellites orbiting Earth, and overload electric power...
  • Earth's core rotating faster than rest of the planet but slower than previously believed

    02/21/2011 4:47:12 PM PST · by decimon · 29 replies
    University of Cambridge ^ | February 20, 2011 | Unknown
    New research gives the first accurate estimate of how much faster the Earth's core is rotating compared to the rest of the planet. Previous research had shown that the Earth's core rotates faster than the rest of the planet. However, scientists from the University of Cambridge have discovered that earlier estimates of 1 degree every year were inaccurate and that the core is actually moving much slower than previously believed – approximately 1 degree every million years. Their findings are published today, Sunday 20 February, in the journal Nature Geoscience. The inner core grows very slowly over time as material...
  • The Enigma 1,800 Miles Below Us

    05/30/2012 9:29:52 AM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 29 replies
    New York Times ^ | May 28, 2012 | Natalie Angier
    As if the inside story of our planet weren’t already the ultimate potboiler, a host of new findings has just turned the heat up past Stygian. Geologists have long known that Earth’s core, some 1,800 miles beneath our feet, is a dense, chemically doped ball of iron roughly the size of Mars and every bit as alien. It’s a place where pressures bear down with the weight of 3.5 million atmospheres, like 3.5 million skies falling at once on your head, and where temperatures reach 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit — as hot as the surface of the Sun. It’s a place...
  • Ain’t Misbehavin’ – Turbulence, Solar Flares and Magnetism

    05/22/2013 7:11:22 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    UniverseToday ^ | May 22, 2013 | by Tammy Plotner on
    What’s more fun than something that misbehaves? When it comes to solar dynamics, we know a lot, but there are many things we don’t yet understand. For example, when a particle filled solar flare lashes out from the Sun, its magnetic field lines can do some pretty unexpected things – like split apart and then rapidly reconnect. According to the flux-freezing theorem, these magnetic lines should simply “flow away in lock-step” with the particles. They should stay intact, but they don’t. It’s not just a simple rule they break… it’s a law of physics.