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Keyword: mammoths

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  • Prehistoric animal remains discovered in U.S.

    08/09/2014 12:18:58 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 12 replies
    abc 25 wpbf ^ | 8-9-2014 | By Jareen Imam
    The cave is cool and damp -- prefect for preserving prehistoric remains, Meachen says. "It's like a refrigerator in there, and probably has been for 20,000 years," she said. "Some of the bones we're finding there have collagen in them. That is where you could get the ancient DNA." The scientists saw bones falling out of a part of the cave, and decided to start digging there. "That was the fossil layer," she said. "There is so much to dig. We have two more years for funding that we can be out there, so we are going to try to...
  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • West US cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    07/27/2014 1:48:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 24, 2014 | unattributed
    For the first time in three decades, paleontologists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: The bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave. Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming is 85 feet (25 meters) deep and almost impossible to see until you're standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals—including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahs—shared the misfortune of not noticing the 15-foot-wide (4 meters) opening until they were plunging to their deaths. Now, the U.S. Bureau...
  • The Mammoth Cometh

    02/27/2014 11:44:06 AM PST · by Theoria · 67 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 27 Feb 2014 | NATHANIEL RICH
    Bringing extinct animals back to life is really happening — and it’s going to be very, very cool. Unless it ends up being very, very bad. The first time Ben Novak saw a passenger pigeon, he fell to his knees and remained in that position, speechless, for 20 minutes. He was 16. At 13, Novak vowed to devote his life to resurrecting extinct animals. At 14, he saw a photograph of a passenger pigeon in an Audubon Society book and “fell in love.” But he didn’t know that the Science Museum of Minnesota, which he was then visiting with a...
  • Ancient dung reveals a picture of the past

    04/23/2003 9:41:25 AM PDT · by SteveH · 37 replies · 814+ views
    ABC Science Online (Australia) ^ | 4/18/03 | Abbie Thomas
    News in Science 18/4/2003 Ancient dung reveals a picture of the past [This is the print version of story http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s833847.htm] An arctic mound of soil covering a core of solid ice in northeastern Siberia (Pic: Science) The successful dating of the most ancient genetic material yet may allow scientists to use preserved DNA from sources such as mammoth dung to help paint a picture of past environments. An international research effort led by Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark reports in today?s issue of the journal Science it has extracted well preserved animal and plant DNA from...
  • Mammoth Herds 'Roamed Fertile Bering Strait In Ice Age'

    06/04/2003 3:39:25 PM PDT · by blam · 96 replies · 2,902+ views
    Ananova ^ | 6-5-2003
    Mammoth herds 'roamed fertile Bering Strait in Ice Age' Huge herds of mammoth, wild horses and bison once roamed the land bridge between North America and Siberia, new evidence suggests. Plant fossils have shown that 24,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, dry grassland covered much of region. The vegetation would have allowed large populations of mammals to survive all year round on the now-submerged landmass known as Beringia or the Bering Strait. Scientists writing in the journal Nature said the animals would have been sustained by a diet rich in prairie sage, bunch grasses, and other grass-like plants....
  • Mammoth meals helped early tribes thrive

    04/17/2006 7:13:44 PM PDT · by george76 · 49 replies · 1,199+ views
    The Times ^ | April 18, 2006 | Mark Henderson
    REGULAR meals of mammoth meat helped some early human tribes to expand more quickly than their largely vegetarian contemporaries, according to a genetic study. Human populations in east Asia about 30,000 years ago developed at dramatically different rates, following a pattern that appears to reflect the availability of mammoths and other large game. In the part of the region covering what is now northern China, Mongolia and southern Siberia, vast plains teemed with mammals such as mammoths, mastodons and woolly rhinoceroses and the number of early human beings grew between 34,000 and 20,000 years ago. Further south, where the terrain...
  • Mammoth Skeleton Found In Siberia

    05/23/2006 1:17:52 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,229+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-23-2006 | James Rodgers
    Mammoth skeleton found in Siberia By James Rodgers BBC News, Moscow It is rare to find mammoth remains in such good condition Fishermen in Siberia have discovered the complete skeleton of a mammoth - a find which Russian experts have described as very rare. The remains appeared when flood waters receded in Russia's Krasnoyarsk region. The mammoth's backbone, skull, teeth and tusks all survived intact. It appears to have died aged about 50. Mammoths lived in Africa, Europe, Asia and North America between about 1.6 million years ago and 10,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch. Alexander Kerzhayev, deputy director...
  • Woolly Mammoths Are Coming Back, Say Cloning Scientists

    03/16/2014 10:39:35 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 80 replies
    DVICE ^ | March 14, 2014 | Michael Trei
    Woolly mammoths are coming back, say cloning scientists In what sounds like it could be the plot for the next Jurassic Park movie, a team of scientists in Siberia says there's a 'high chance' that they will be able to clone a woolly mammoth. The breakthrough comes as a result of last year's discovery of an incredibly well-preserved mammoth carcass, frozen in the permafrost of Siberia's Malolyakhovskiy island. The scientists estimate that the animal is about 43,000 years old, and was 50-60 years old when it died in distress after getting stuck in the ice. In the ten months since...
  • DNA study suggests hunting did not kill off mammoth

    09/11/2013 3:59:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 54 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9-10-2013 | Pallab Ghosh
    Researchers have found evidence to suggest that climate change, rather than humans, was the main factor that drove the woolly mammoth to extinction. A DNA analysis shows that the number of creatures began to decrease much earlier than previously thought as the world's climate changed. It also shows that there was a distinct population of mammoth in Europe that died out around 30,000 years ago. The results have published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The view many researchers had about woolly mammoths is that they were a hardy, abundant species that thrived during their time on the...
  • Produce mammoth stem cells, says creator of Dolly the sheep

    08/04/2013 8:27:25 AM PDT · by Renfield · 8 replies
    The Conversation ^ | 7-31-2013 | Ian Wilmut
    t is unlikely that a mammoth could be cloned in the way we created Dolly the sheep, as has been proposed following the discovery of mammoth bones in northern Siberia. However, the idea prompts us to consider the feasibility of other avenues. Even if the Dolly method is not possible, there are other ways in which it would be biologically interesting to work with viable mammoth cells if they can be found. In order for a Dolly-like clone to be born it is necessary to have females of a closely related species to provide unfertilised eggs, and, if cloned embryos...
  • The quest is to clone a mammoth. The question is: should we do it?

    07/14/2013 8:08:58 AM PDT · by Renfield · 45 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 7-13-2013 | Robin McKie
    The idea would make headlines around the world and bring tears of joy to the planet's journalists. An adorable baby woolly mammoth, tottering on its newborn legs, is introduced to the media. Cloned from a few cells scraped from the permafrost of Siberia, the little creature provides the latest proof of the might of modern science and demonstrates the fact that extinction has at long last lost its sting. It is a fascinating prospect, one that was raised again last week when the most recently discovered carcass of a mammoth was revealed to the public in Yokohama, Japan. The female,...
  • Ancient Siberians may have rarely hunted mammoths

    06/15/2013 9:54:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | Wednesday, June 12, 2013 | Bruce Bower
    Contrary to their hunting reputation, Stone Age Siberians killed mammoths only every few years when they needed tusks for toolmaking, a new study finds. People living between roughly 33,500 and 31,500 years ago hunted the animals mainly for ivory, say paleontologist Pavel Nikolskiy and archaeologist Vladimir Pitulko of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Hunting could not have driven mammoths to extinction, the researchers report June 5 in the Journal of Archaeological Science. On frigid tundra with few trees, mammoth tusks substituted for wood as a raw material for tools, they propose. Siberian people ate mammoth meat after hunts, but food...
  • Mammoths may have died after impact from space

    06/02/2013 10:13:01 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 22 replies
    World Science ^ | 20 May 2013 | University of Cincinnati
    New re­search sug­gests wooly mam­moths, the gi­gantic cousins of mod­ern ele­phants, al­so died out as a re­sult of cli­mate change fol­low­ing a cos­mic im­pact—and that blast may have shocked hu­man popula­t­ions as well. Ei­ther a com­et scrap­ing the at­mos­phere or a me­te­or­ite slam­ming in­to the Earth caused glob­al-scale com­bus­tion, scorch­ing the air, melt­ing bed­rock and al­tered the course of Earth’s his­to­ry, ac­cord­ing to re­searcher Ken­neth Tanker­s­ley of the Uni­vers­ity of Cin­cin­nati. Tanker­s­ley said while the cos­mic strike had an im­me­di­ate and deadly ef­fect, the long-term side ef­fects were far more dev­as­tat­ing – si­m­i­lar to Kra­ka­to­a’s af­termath but many times worse...
  • Russian scientists make rare find of 'blood' in mammoth

    05/29/2013 4:21:52 PM PDT · by dsrtsage · 32 replies
    AP ^ | 5/29/2013
    Russian scientists claimed Wednesday they have discovered blood in the carcass of a woolly mammoth, adding that the rare find could boost their chances of cloning the prehistoric animal. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-russian-scientists-rare-blood-mammoth.html
  • Reviving the Woolly Mammoth: Will De-Extinction Become Reality?

    03/16/2013 2:32:30 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Yahoo News | Live Science ^ | 3/15/13 | Megan Gannon
    Biologists briefly brought the extinct Pyrenean ibex back to life in 2003 by creating a clone from a frozen tissue sample harvested before the goat's entire population vanished in 2000. The clone survived just seven minutes after birth, but it gave scientists hope that "de-extinction," once a pipedream, could become a reality. Ten years later, a group of researchers and conservationists gathered in Washington, D.C., today (March 15) for a forum called TEDxDeExtinction, hosted by the National Geographic Society, to talk about how to revive extinct animals, from the Tasmanian tiger and the saber-toothed tiger to the woolly mammoth and...
  • Vodka 'saved' elephants in Siberian freeze

    12/15/2012 6:28:15 PM PST · by MinorityRepublican · 8 replies
    BBC News ^ | 14 December 2012
    Alcohol can lower an elephant's core body temperature Two elephants have been saved from the deadly Siberian cold by drinking vodka, Russian officials say. They say the animals had to be taken out into the bitter cold after the wooden trailer they were travelling in caught fire in the Novosibirsk region. The elephants, aged 45 and 48, suffered frostbite to the tips of their ears amid temperatures of -40C (-40F) But they were warmed up by two cases of vodka mixed with warm water, one official was quoted as saying. "They started roaring like if they were in the jungle!...
  • Boy discovers almost complete woolly mammoth carcass

    10/04/2012 12:47:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10-4-2012 | Joanna Carver
    An 11-year-old Russian boy stumbled across the 30,000-year-old remains of a woolly mammoth, an experience that was surely either incredibly exciting or permanently traumatising. According to the Moscow News, Yevgeny Salinder found the 500-kilogram beast in the tundra of the Taymyr peninsula in northern Russia. Scientists laboured for a week with axes and steam to dig it out of the permafrost it's been encased in for centuries. Woolly mammoths have been found in the permafrost in Siberia since at least 1929, but this is one of the best preserved. Its tusks, mouth and rib cage are clearly visible....
  • Mammoth fragments raise cloning hopes

    09/15/2012 11:44:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | Tuesday, September 11, 2012 | AP
    Well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth fragments have been discovered deep in Siberia that may contain living cells, edging a tad closer to the possibility of cloning a prehistoric animal, the mission's organiser has said. Russia's North-Eastern Federal University said an international team of researchers had discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow some 328 feet (100 meters) underground during a summer expedition in the northeastern province of Yakutia. Expedition chief Semyon Grigoryev said Korean scientists with the team had set a goal of finding living cells in the hope of cloning a mammoth. Scientists have previously found bones and fragments...
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Well preserved mammoth from Siberia shows signs of early man stealing from lions

    04/05/2012 7:24:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 04-05-2012 | Bob Yirka
    An exceedingly well preserved juvenile mammoth carcass has been found in Siberia near the Arctic Ocean and it shows signs of having been attacked by a cave lion and then partially butchered by humans. Dubbed Yuka by the Mammuthus organization, which is studying the remains, the six foot long creature was believed to have been a year and a half to perhaps three or four years old at the time of its death. The mammoth was found by tusk hunters in Northern Siberia, who then turned it over to scientists with the Mammuthus organization. The BBC and Discovery have been...
  • Preserved in the ice for 10,000 years: Ginger-haired baby mammoth shows signs of death struggle

    04/04/2012 2:45:19 PM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    A ginger-haired mammoth baby found in Siberia could have been snatched by hungry human hunters from the jaws of a lion 10,000 years ago. The body of the beast - the first ever found with its distinctive 'strawberry blonde' hair - has been described as being of 'huge' significance. It's could be evidence that ancient humans attacked and fed on mammoths in Siberia, with the body of 'Yuka' showing wounds consistent with an attack by lions AND people.
  • Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth Discovered in Siberia

    04/05/2012 10:22:55 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 11 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | April 5, 2012 | Melissa Knowles
    Scientists in search of ancient tusks made a startling discovery. They uncovered the nearly perfectly preserved remains of a woolly mammoth in northern Siberia. The juvenile mammoth is believed to be more than 10,000 years old, but was only 3 to 4 years old when it died. It is unlike any other mammoth that has been unearthed before. The scientists reveal their discovery, which they named "Yuka," in a BBC documentary. Yuka has strawberry blond hair, unlike the dark hair that other mammoths have been found to have. Plus, Yuka's footpads are incredibly well preserved, but some of his bones...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Pterosaur-like Creatures Reported in Papua New Guinea

    07/20/2006 7:42:59 PM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 309 replies · 16,006+ views
    E-Media Newswire ^ | July 20, 2006 | Staff
    Intermittent expeditions on Umboi Island, Papua New Guinea, from 1994 through 2004, resulted in the compilation of eyewitness testimonies that substantiated a hypothesis that pterosaurs may not be extinct. Long Beach, Calif. (PRWEB) July 20, 2006 -- The conflict between evolution and creation took a new form with an investigation of reports of a pterosaur-like creature in Papua New Guinea. According to standard models of science, all pterosaurs became extinct by about 65-million years ago, but traditional interpretations of the Bible suggest that they lived in human times. According to Jonathan Whitcomb, a forensic videographer who interviewed native islanders in...
  • Gene Reveals Mammoth Coat Colour

    07/06/2006 12:43:11 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,370+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-6-2006 | Rebecca Morelle
    Gene reveals mammoth coat colour By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC News Woolly mammoths had both dark and light coats The coat colour of mammoths that roamed the Earth thousands of years ago has been determined by scientists. Some of the curly tusked animals would have sported dark brown coats, while others had pale ginger or blond hair. The information was extracted from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth bone from Siberia using the latest genetic techniques. Writing in the journal Science, the researchers said a gene called Mc1r was controlling the beasts' coat colours. This gene is responsible for hair-colour in...
  • A Real-Life Jurassic Park

    01/31/2006 8:22:33 AM PST · by Calpernia · 31 replies · 1,333+ views
    MSNBC ^ | Jan. 30, 2006 | Mac Margolis
    (snip) Most scholars now agree that hunters—more than climate change or a mystery epidemic—are what doomed the mammoths. Whatever the cause, by 11,000 years ago the king of the Pleistocene was a goner. (snip) If a group of devotees has its way, this shaggy ice-age mascot—and a host of other bygone megafauna besides—may yet walk again. (snip) The scientists, in other words, had managed to assemble half the woolly-mammoth genome; they claimed that in three years they could finish the job. That would put scientists within striking distance of an even greater feat: repopulating the earth with creatures that vanished...
  • Woolly mammoth genome comes to life (Jurassic Park, here we come)

    12/22/2005 9:33:04 PM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 65 replies · 3,289+ views
    EurekAlert! ^ | December 22, 2005 | Staff
    Decoding extinct genomes now possible, says geneticist A McMaster University geneticist, in collaboration with genome researchers from Penn State University and the American Museum of Natural History has made history by mapping a portion of the woolly mammoth's genome. The discovery, which has astounded the scientific world, surpasses an earlier study released today by Nature that also concerns the woolly mammoth. Hendrik Poinar, a molecular evolutionary geneticist in the department of anthropology and pathology at McMaster University, says his study involves the vital nuclear DNA within a Mammoth rather than the lesser mitochondria, on which the Nature study is based....
  • Mammoth plan for giant comeback

    12/20/2005 5:56:21 AM PST · by Grendel9 · 30 replies · 1,126+ views
    news.Telegraph.uk
    (Filed: 20/12/2005) The first serious possibility that the woolly mammoth, or something like it, could walk on Earth again was raised yesterday by an international team of scientists. Woolly mammoths died out approximately 10,000 years ago A portion of the genetic code of the mammoth has been reconstructed and, to the surprise of scientists, the team that carried out the feat believes that it will be possible to decode the entire genetic make-up. The tusked beast stood 12-feet tall, weighed up to seven tons and had a shaggy dark brown coat that hung from its belly. DNA was extracted from...
  • Pleistocene Park? On the reintroduction of species

    08/20/2005 2:15:44 PM PDT · by sociotard · 30 replies · 796+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 17 August 2005 | Kurt Kleiner
    Sorry if this is a repost. Elephants and lions unleashed on North America? 18:00 17 August 2005 NewScientist.com news service Kurt Kleiner Elephants, lions, cheetahs and camels could one day roam the western US under a proposal to recreate North American landscapes as they existed more than 13,000 years ago, when humans first encountered them. The plan, proposed in a commentary in Nature and co-authored by 13 ecologists and conservation biologists, would help enrich a North American ecosystem that was left almost devoid of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene period. It would also help preserve wildlife that...
  • Call to restock North America’s large mammals (Lions, Tigers,Bears Alert)

    08/17/2005 10:56:34 AM PDT · by 11th_VA · 109 replies · 1,897+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 18:00 17 August 2005 | Kurt Kleiner
    Elephants, lions, cheetahs and camels could one day roam the western US under a proposal to recreate North American landscapes as they existed more than 13,000 years ago, when humans first encountered them. The plan, proposed in a commentary in Nature and co-authored by 13 ecologists and conservation biologists, would help enrich a North American ecosystem that was left almost devoid of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene period. It would also help preserve wildlife that faces the threat of extinction in Africa and Asia. Between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, 97 of 150 genera of large mammals...
  • Ice age bacteria brought back to life

    02/25/2005 12:57:59 PM PST · by aimhigh · 108 replies · 2,309+ views
    www.NewScientist.com ^ | 2/25/2005 | Kelly Young
    A bacterium that sat dormant in a frozen pond in Alaska for 32,000 years has been revived by NASA scientists. Once scientists thawed the ice, the previously undiscovered bacteria started swimming around on the microscope slide. The researchers say it is the first new species of microbe found alive in ancient ice. Now named Carnobacterium pleistocenium, it is thought to have lived in the Pleistocene epoch, a time when woolly mammoths still roamed the Earth. NASA astrobiologist Richard Hoover, who led the team, said the find bolsters the case for finding life elsewhere in the universe, particularly given this week's...
  • Uncovering Ice Age Archaeology In Jordan

    08/24/2004 8:05:50 AM PDT · by blam · 11 replies · 506+ views
    Daily Star ^ | 8-24-2004 | Staff
    Uncovering Ice Age archaeology in JordanEarly humans hunted large game near now-vanished lakes By Daily Star Staff Tuesday, August 24, 2004 AMMAN: The early prehistory and archaeology of the Middle Pleistocene, or Ice Age, is being revealed in remarkable detail in studies in southern Jordan. The work, begun in the late 1990s, has documented the presence of Homo erectus, our ancient ancestor, at a series of archaeological sites at Ayoun Qedim in the al-Jafr Basin. Today al-Jafr Basin is one of the most arid places in the Middle East. During the Pleistocene, the basin was filled with an enormous freshwater...
  • Volunteers uncovers 58th Mammoth at the Mammoth Site (Hot Springs, SD)

    07/29/2008 1:28:53 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 16 replies · 139+ views
    RapidCityJournal ^ | Friday, July 25, 2008 | Mary Garrigan
    HOT SPRINGS -- Joanne Bugel is happy to be the Earthwatch volunteer who uncovered the 115th tusk at the Mammoth Site and moved the popular Hot Springs tourist site’s mammoth tally to 58. [snip] This group has been a particularly productive bunch, said crew chief Don Morris. [snip] Bones unearthed by 2008 Earthwatch volunteers include: three tusks, a tooth, a patella, six ribs, a fibula, four vertebra and assorted other bones. Neteal Graves, 18, of Kaycee, Wyo., also unearthed some coprolite – [snip] Graves has the Mammoth Site in her bloodline. In 1974, her mother, Cheri Graves, was a college...
  • Frozen baby mammoth to be sent to Japan for research(near-perfect preservation: photo)

    07/10/2007 1:48:34 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 84 replies · 4,449+ views
    Kyodo News ^ | 07/06/07
    Frozen baby mammoth to be sent to Japan for research (Kyodo) _ A frozen mammoth found recently in Russia in unprecedented good condition is set to be sent to a Japanese university for examination, several experts told Kyodo News on Friday. The mammoth, thought to be a six-month-old female, was found in the best state of preservation among all frozen mammoths ever recovered, said the experts. "The mammoth has no defects except that its tail was bit off," said Alexei Tikhonov, vice director of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. "In terms of its state of preservation,...
  • Mammoths stranded on Bering Sea island delayed extinction

    06/17/2004 8:07:34 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 27 replies · 457+ views
    University of Alaska Fairbanks ^ | 16-Jun-2004 | Contact: Marie Gilbert
    Public release date: 16-Jun-2004 Contact: Marie Gilbert marie.gilbert@uaf.edu 907-474-7412 University of Alaska Fairbanks Mammoths stranded on Bering Sea island delayed extinction Fossil is first record in the Americas of a mammoth population to have survived the Pleistocene Woolly mammoths stranded on Pribilofs delayed extinction Fossil is first record in the Americas of a mammoth population to have survived the Pleistocene St. Paul, one of the five islands in the Bering Sea Pribilofs, was home to mammoths that survived the extinctions that wiped out mainland and other Bering Sea island mammoth populations. In an article in the June 17, 2004 edition...
  • LIVE Woolly Mammoth Spotted in Siberia (video/pic)

    02/10/2012 1:56:59 AM PST · by Reaganite Republican · 36 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | February 10, 2012 | Reaganite Republican
    Scepitical? Look at the clip and you tell me Red furry coat, giant tusks... elephants of any sort not native to the region, either! The Siberian Woolly Mammoth -which we are taught disappeared abruptly at the end of the last Ice Age (~8000 B.C.)- has long been a source of fascination, as on occasion examples are found in a highly-preserved, mummified state under the Arctic territory's thick layer of permafrost.  Similar in appearance to a modern elephant, the Mammoth was actually only slightly larger (~3m at the shoulder) yet with a shorter trunk, longer tusks, ears only 10% the size of their contemporary brethren,...
  • 'Woolly mammoth' spotted in Siberia

    02/08/2012 2:52:34 PM PST · by Red Badger · 139 replies
    The Sun - UK ^ | Wed Feb 08, 2012 | Staff
    A BEAST lurches through icy waters in a sighting a paranormal investigator thinks could prove woolly mammoths are not extinct after all. The animal – thought to have mostly died out roughly 4,000 years ago – was apparently filmed wading through a river in the freezing wilds of Siberia. The jaw-dropping footage was caught by a government-employed engineer last summer in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug region of Siberia, it is claimed. He filmed the elephant-sized creature as it struggled against the racing water. Its hair matches samples recovered from mammoth remains regularly dug up from the permafrost in frozen Russia....
  • Mammoth Mystery: The Beasts' Final Years

    09/04/2008 10:42:29 AM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies · 304+ views
    Live Science ^ | Sep 4, 2008 | Charles Q. Choi
    Woolly mammoths' last stand before extinction in Siberia wasn't made by natives - rather, the beasts had American roots, researchers have discovered. Woolly mammoths once roamed the Earth for more than a half-million years, ranging from Europe to Asia to North America. These Ice Age giants vanished from mainland Siberia by 9,000 years ago, although mammoths survived on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean until roughly 3,700 years ago. "Scientists have always thought that because mammoths roamed such a huge territory - from Western Europe to Central North America - that North American woolly mammoths were a sideshow of no...
  • Mammoth Mummies Mysteries

    12/10/2011 8:32:01 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American 'blogs ^ | December 8, 2011 | David Bressan
    Natural mummies can be preserved in bog deposits, in tar pits, deep inside caves, glacier ice or permafrost -- an environment too cold for an effective decomposition of organic matter. At least 16 species of ice age mammals have been found mummified complete or partially: woolly mammoth, Shasta-, Jefferson´s- and Patagonian ground sloth, woolly rhinoceros, Yukon horse, steppe bison, helmeted muskox, Harrington´s mountain goat, caribou, giant moose, black-footed ferret, collared pika, snowshoe hare, arctic ground squirrel and vole. The ground sloths and mountain goats were found inside of caves. The woolly rhinoceros and mammoth of Starunia (Ukraine) became "pickled" in...
  • Neandertals' mammoth building project: Extinct hominids may have been first to build with bones

    12/07/2011 8:13:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 1+ views
    Science News ^ | Friday, December 2nd, 2011 | Bruce Bower
    Neandertals... constructed a large, ring-shaped enclosure out of 116 mammoth bones and tusks at least 44,000 years ago in West Asia, say archaeologist Laëtitia Demay of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and her colleagues. The bone edifice, which encircles a 40-square-meter area in which mammoths and other animals were butchered, cooked and eaten, served either to keep out cold winds or as a base for a wooden building... Mammoth-bone huts previously discovered at Homo sapiens sites in West Asia date to between 27,500 and 15,000 years ago. The new discovery comes from Molodova, a Ukrainian site first...
  • Woolly Mammoth to Be Cloned

    12/06/2011 12:40:09 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 69 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 5 December 2011 | Jennifer Viegas
    Within five years, a woolly mammoth will likely be cloned, according to scientists who have just recovered well-preserved bone marrow in a mammoth thigh bone. Japan's Kyodo News first reported the find. You can see photos of the thigh bone at this Kyodo page. Russian scientist Semyon Grigoriev, acting director of the Sakha Republic's mammoth museum, and colleagues are now analyzing the marrow, which they extracted from the mammoth's femur, found in Siberian permafrost soil. Grigoriev and his team, along with colleagues from Japan's Kinki University, have announced that they will launch a joint research project next year aimed at...
  • Smithsonian does not dispute authenticity of archaeological find in Vero Beach [13K old]

    10/26/2010 8:40:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Indian River County ^ | Wednesday, October 20, 2010 | Elliott Jones
    The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., has found no reason to dispute the authenticity of an one-of-a-kind archaeological discovery that might help confirm a human presence here up to 13,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age. In early 2009, local fossil collector James Kennedy cleaned off an old bone he found two years earlier and noticed some lines on it -- lines that turned out to be a clear etching of a walking mammoth with tusks. The location where he found it hasn't been disclosed, except that it came from an area north of Vero Beach....
  • Scientists reveal a first in Ice Age art

    06/21/2011 11:16:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 66 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | 06-21-2011 | Provided by Smithsonian
    Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Florida have announced the discovery of a bone fragment, approximately 13,000 years old, in Florida with an incised image of a mammoth or mastodon. This engraving is the oldest and only known example of Ice Age art to depict a proboscidean (the order of animals with trunks) in the Americas. The team's research is published online in the Journal of Archaeological Science. The bone was discovered in Vero Beach, Fla. by James Kennedy, an avocational fossil hunter, who collected the bone and later while cleaning the bone, discovered the engraving. Recognizing...
  • How Mammoths Lost The Extinction Lottery

    11/04/2011 7:25:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Nature ^ | November 2, 2011 | Ewen Callaway
    Woolly mammoths, woolly rhinos and other large animals driven to extinction since the last ice age each succumbed to a different lethal mix of circumstances... Researchers who studied the fate of six species of 'megafauna' over the past 50,000 years found that climate change and habitat loss were involved in many of the extinctions, with humans playing a part in some cases but not others. But there was no clear pattern to explain why the animals died off, and it proved impossible to predict from habitat or genetic diversity which species would go extinct and which would survive. "It almost...
  • Woolly mammoth's secrets for shrugging off cold points toward new artificial blood for humans

    09/14/2011 8:55:20 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies
    American Chemical Society ^ | September 14, 2011 | Unknown
    The blood from woolly mammoths—those extinct elephant-like creatures that roamed the Earth in pre-historic times—is helping scientists develop new blood products for modern medical procedures that involve reducing patients' body temperature. The report appears in ACS' journal Biochemistry. Chien Ho and colleagues note that woolly mammoth ancestors initially evolved in warm climates, where African and Asian elephants live now, but migrated to the cold regions of Eurasia 1.2 million – 2.0 million years ago in the Pleistocene ice age. They adapted to their new environment by growing thick, "woolly" fur and smaller ears, which helped conserve heat, and possibly by...
  • Remains of 60th mammoth found in Hot Springs; Mammoth Site could hold as many as 100

    07/10/2011 9:52:05 PM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 31 replies
    Daily Journal ^ | July 10, 2011 | none listed
    The Mammoth Site in Hot Springs recently yielded the remains of a 60th mammoth, the giant, extinct creatures that once roamed the continent. [just a teaser--AP story]
  • Protein from Bones of 600,000-Year-Old Mammoth Extracted Successfully

    06/14/2011 4:30:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 4, 2011 | University of York
    Using an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer, bio-archaeologists were able to produce a near complete collagen sequence for the West Runton Elephant, a Steppe Mammoth skeleton which was discovered in cliffs in Norfolk in 1990. The remarkable 85 per cent complete skeleton -- the most complete example of its species ever found in the world -- is preserved by Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service in Norwich. Bio-archaeologist Professor Matthew Collins, from the University of York's Department of Archaeology, said: "The time depth is absolutely remarkable... We believe protein lasts in a useful form ten times as long as DNA which is...