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Keyword: mastodons

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  • Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake

    05/09/2015 8:12:29 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 31 replies
    Alaska Dispatch ^ | Yereth Rosen
    Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake. When an aquatic ecologist was surveying shallow lakes in Northwest Alaska three years ago, she and the pilot who traveled with her came upon an unusual sight in the treeless Arctic region: a pair of terns that kept flying around and perching on what appeared to be a log sticking out of a muddy area. The protruding object, it turns out, was no log. It was the large and well-preserved leg bone of a woolly mammoth. Right by it was another bone, perfectly articulated, that was clearly from the...
  • Russian Hunters Discover 10,000-year-old Frozen Woolly Rhino in River

    04/09/2015 10:06:56 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 41 replies
    OutdoorHub ^ | 2/27/15 | Daniel Xu
    Paleontologists are calling a recent find in the Russian region of Yakutia a “sensation.” Last September, Aleksandr Banderov and his hunting party were traveling near the Semyulyakh River when they uncovered the preserved carcass of an adolescent wholly rhinoceros, a species that roamed the frozen landscapes of Europe and northern Asia during the last Ice Age. The hunters initially thought it was a reindeer frozen in the ice, but quickly realized it was something much older. “We were sailing past a ravine and noticed hair hanging on the top of it,’ Alexander told The Siberian Times. “At first we thought...
  • Scientists Take DNA Sample From Woolly Mammoth Leg for Cloning Project

    03/17/2015 10:56:20 AM PDT · by C19fan · 66 replies
    NBC News ^ | March 16, 2015 | Devin Coldewey
    A group of Russian and South Korean researchers has begun their attempt to clone a woolly mammoth, starting by extracting DNA from a spectacularly well-preserved specimen discovered in the Siberian permafrot in 2013. The project is led by Hwang Woo-Suk, a Korean cloning scientist who was the focus of a scandal in 2006 involving fraudulent research on human stem cells. Hwang has had success with animals, however, reportedly creating the world's first cloned dog and several cloned coyotes.
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 29 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...
  • Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds

    02/13/2015 12:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Western Digs ^ | February 12, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    They're probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were. But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are "definite" evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study. The bones were originally discovered in the late 1970s by Canadian archaeologist Dr. Jacques Cinq-Mars at a site known as Bluefish Caves, high in northwestern Yukon Territory. In one of the caves, dubbed Cave 2, archaeologists found more than 18,000 fragments of bones from...
  • Indian DNA Links To 6 'Founding Mothers'

    03/13/2008 2:04:39 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies · 1,801+ views
    Yahoo News/AP ^ | 3-13-2008 | Malcom Ritter
    Indian DNA links to 6 'founding mothers' By MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer NEW YORK - Nearly all of today's Native Americans in North, Central and South America can trace part of their ancestry to six women whose descendants immigrated around 20,000 years ago, a DNA study suggests. Those women left a particular DNA legacy that persists to today in about 95 percent of Native Americans, researchers said. The finding does not mean that only these six women gave rise to the migrants who crossed into North America from Asia in the initial populating of the continent, said study co-author...
  • Mastodons Disappeared From Ancient Beringia Before Humans Arrived

    12/04/2014 6:03:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 1, 2014 | press releases
    A re-dating of mastodon bones reveals that the extinct mammals, related to the modern day elephant, disappeared from the area during a glacial period more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought. Existing age estimates of American mastodon fossils indicate that these extinct relatives of elephants lived in the Arctic and Subarctic when the area was covered by ice caps—a chronology that is at odds with what scientists know about the massive animals' preferred habitat: forests and wetlands abundant with leafy food... Over the course of the late Pleistocene, between about 10,000 and 125,000 years ago, the American mastodon (Mammut...
  • Boy discovers almost complete woolly mammoth carcass

    10/04/2012 12:47:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10-4-2012 | Joanna Carver
    An 11-year-old Russian boy stumbled across the 30,000-year-old remains of a woolly mammoth, an experience that was surely either incredibly exciting or permanently traumatising. According to the Moscow News, Yevgeny Salinder found the 500-kilogram beast in the tundra of the Taymyr peninsula in northern Russia. Scientists laboured for a week with axes and steam to dig it out of the permafrost it's been encased in for centuries. Woolly mammoths have been found in the permafrost in Siberia since at least 1929, but this is one of the best preserved. Its tusks, mouth and rib cage are clearly visible....
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Gene Reveals Mammoth Coat Colour

    07/06/2006 12:43:11 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,370+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-6-2006 | Rebecca Morelle
    Gene reveals mammoth coat colour By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC News Woolly mammoths had both dark and light coats The coat colour of mammoths that roamed the Earth thousands of years ago has been determined by scientists. Some of the curly tusked animals would have sported dark brown coats, while others had pale ginger or blond hair. The information was extracted from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth bone from Siberia using the latest genetic techniques. Writing in the journal Science, the researchers said a gene called Mc1r was controlling the beasts' coat colours. This gene is responsible for hair-colour in...
  • Well preserved mammoth from Siberia shows signs of early man stealing from lions

    04/05/2012 7:24:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 04-05-2012 | Bob Yirka
    An exceedingly well preserved juvenile mammoth carcass has been found in Siberia near the Arctic Ocean and it shows signs of having been attacked by a cave lion and then partially butchered by humans. Dubbed Yuka by the Mammuthus organization, which is studying the remains, the six foot long creature was believed to have been a year and a half to perhaps three or four years old at the time of its death. The mammoth was found by tusk hunters in Northern Siberia, who then turned it over to scientists with the Mammuthus organization. The BBC and Discovery have been...
  • Preserved in the ice for 10,000 years: Ginger-haired baby mammoth shows signs of death struggle

    04/04/2012 2:45:19 PM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    A ginger-haired mammoth baby found in Siberia could have been snatched by hungry human hunters from the jaws of a lion 10,000 years ago. The body of the beast - the first ever found with its distinctive 'strawberry blonde' hair - has been described as being of 'huge' significance. It's could be evidence that ancient humans attacked and fed on mammoths in Siberia, with the body of 'Yuka' showing wounds consistent with an attack by lions AND people.
  • Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth Discovered in Siberia

    04/05/2012 10:22:55 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 11 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | April 5, 2012 | Melissa Knowles
    Scientists in search of ancient tusks made a startling discovery. They uncovered the nearly perfectly preserved remains of a woolly mammoth in northern Siberia. The juvenile mammoth is believed to be more than 10,000 years old, but was only 3 to 4 years old when it died. It is unlike any other mammoth that has been unearthed before. The scientists reveal their discovery, which they named "Yuka," in a BBC documentary. Yuka has strawberry blond hair, unlike the dark hair that other mammoths have been found to have. Plus, Yuka's footpads are incredibly well preserved, but some of his bones...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Dozer Driver Makes Fossil Discovery of the Century

    11/23/2010 9:21:20 AM PST · by Squidpup · 63 replies · 2+ views
    FoxNews ^ | November 20, 2010 | Loren Grush
    An accidental discovery by a bulldozer driver has led to what may be the find of the century: an ice-age burial ground that could rival the famed La Brea tar pits. After two weeks of excavating ancient fossils at the Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado, scientists from the Denver Museum of Natural Science returned home Wednesday with their unearthed treasures in tow -- a wide array of fossils, insects and plant life that they say give a stunningly realistic view of what life was like when ancient, giant beasts lumbered across the Earth. Since the team’s arrival in mid-October,...
  • Site Provides Evidence For Ancient Comet Explosion (Topper - SC)

    10/07/2007 10:07:52 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,601+ views
    The News Tribune ^ | 10-7-2007 | Joey Holleman
    Site provides evidence for ancient comet explosion JOEY HOLLEMAN; McClatchy Newspapers Published: October 7th, 2007 01:00 AM COLUMBIA, S.C. – For the second time in less than a decade, a South Carolina river bluff holds evidence pointing to a theory with history-rewriting potential. Microscopic soil particles from the Topper site near Allendale might hold a tiny key to a big theory: that comet-caused explosions wiped out the mammoths and mastodons, prompted the last ice age and decimated the first human culture in North America about 12,900 years ago. The comet theory first began generating a buzz at an international meeting...
  • Fla. teen stumbles upon mammoth tooth

    02/21/2007 8:03:15 PM PST · by george76 · 73 replies · 2,109+ views
    yahoo ^ | Feb 20 | ap
    archaeologists say could be the biggest fossil find in Pinellas County in nearly a century... The jaw and tooth weigh 65 pounds and are about a yard long. Sarti-Sweeney took the bones home and, after some online research with her older brother, determined the football-sized rock was actually the tooth of a long-extinct mammoth. Paleontology and archaeology experts have confirmed the find, and recent digging at the site has turned up teeth and bones from a second mammoth, giant sloths, camels, turtles with shells up to 6-feet-long, saber-toothed cats and giant armadillos the size of Volkswagen Beetles. Scientists believe the...
  • Experts doubt Clovis people were first in Americas

    02/23/2007 9:34:17 AM PST · by george76 · 100 replies · 1,975+ views
    yahoo...Reuters ^ | Feb 22 | Will Dunham
    The Clovis people, known for their distinctive spear points, likely were not the first humans in the Americas, according to research placing their presence as more recent than previously believed. Using advanced radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers writing in the journal Science on Thursday said the Clovis people, hunters of large Ice Age animals like mammoths and mastodons, dated from about 13,100 to 12,900 years ago. That would make the Clovis culture, known from artifacts discovered at various sites including the town of Clovis, New Mexico, both younger and shorter-lived than previously thought. Previous estimates had dated the culture to about...
  • Mastodons Driven To Extinction By Tuberculosis, Fossils Suggest

    10/03/2006 3:01:37 PM PDT · by blam · 93 replies · 1,673+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 10-3-2006 | Kimberly Johnson
    Mastodons Driven to Extinction by Tuberculosis, Fossils Suggest Kimberly Johnson for National Geographic News October 3, 2006 Tuberculosis was rampant in North American mastodons during the late Ice Age and may have led to their extinction, researchers say. Mastodons lived in North America starting about 2 million years ago and thrived until 11,000 years ago—around the time humans arrived on the continent—when the last of the 7-ton (6.35-metric-ton) elephantlike creatures died off. Scientists Bruce Rothschild and Richard Laub pieced together clues to the animals' widespread die-off by studying unearthed mastodon foot bones. Rothschild first noticed a telltale tuberculosis lesion on...
  • Mammoth meals helped early tribes thrive

    04/17/2006 7:13:44 PM PDT · by george76 · 49 replies · 1,199+ views
    The Times ^ | April 18, 2006 | Mark Henderson
    REGULAR meals of mammoth meat helped some early human tribes to expand more quickly than their largely vegetarian contemporaries, according to a genetic study. Human populations in east Asia about 30,000 years ago developed at dramatically different rates, following a pattern that appears to reflect the availability of mammoths and other large game. In the part of the region covering what is now northern China, Mongolia and southern Siberia, vast plains teemed with mammals such as mammoths, mastodons and woolly rhinoceroses and the number of early human beings grew between 34,000 and 20,000 years ago. Further south, where the terrain...