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Keyword: neandertal

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  • Science rebuilds DNA of Neanderthals

    07/29/2006 8:51:52 PM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 61 replies · 1,347+ views
    The Sunday Times - Britain ^ | July 30, 2006 | Maurice Chittenden
    HE is 38,000 years old and nothing but a pile of bones, but one day we may be able to rebuild him. Scientists are planning to reconstruct the genetic code of Neanderthal man. Anthropologists plan to apply the forensic techniques used to map the human genome to chart all 3 billion chemical “base-pairs” in the DNA of man’s close but long-dead relative. The researchers believe the DNA of the two species is 99.96% the same, but will not attempt to recreate a living Neanderthal in the laboratory. Once all the genes and their correct order are known, cloning would theoretically...
  • Scientists Create Neanderthal Genome

    11/08/2006 11:15:23 PM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 50 replies · 1,152+ views
    Life Style Extra ^ | 08 Nov 2006 | National News
    Scientists are reconstructing the genome of Neanderthals - the close relations of modern man. The ambitious project involves isolating genetic fragments from fossils of the prehistoric beings who originally inhabited Europe to map their complete DNA. The Neanderthal people were believed to have died out about 35,000 years ago - at a time when modern humans were advancing across the continent. Lead researcher Dr Svante Paabo, an evolutionary geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, said: "This would be the first time we have sequenced the entire genome of an extinct organism." But the prospect...
  • Neanderthal Women Joined Men in the Hunt (Eat your heart out, feminists)

    12/07/2006 5:42:12 AM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 101 replies · 2,229+ views
    The New York Times ^ | December 5, 2006 | NICHOLAS WADE
    A new explanation for the demise of the Neanderthals, the stockily built human species that occupied Europe until the arrival of modern humans 45,000 years ago, has been proposed by two anthropologists at the University of Arizona. Unlike modern humans, who had developed a versatile division of labor between men and women, the entire Neanderthal population seems to have been engaged in a single main occupation, the hunting of large game, the scientists, Steven L. Kuhn and Mary C. Stiner, say in an article posted online yesterday in Current Anthropology. Because modern humans exploited the environment more efficiently, by having...
  • Researchers May Remake Neanderthal DNA

    06/25/2007 8:51:04 PM PDT · by anymouse · 52 replies · 1,194+ views
    Associated Press ^ | 6-25-07 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
    Researchers studying Neanderthal DNA say it should be possible to construct a complete genome of the ancient hominid despite the degradation of the DNA over time. There is also hope for reconstructing the genome of the mammoth and cave bear, according to a research team led by Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Their findings are published in this week's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Debate has raged for years about whether there is any relationship between Neanderthals and modern humans. Some researchers believe that Neanderthals were simply...
  • Inconsistencies With Neanderthal Genomic DNA Sequences

    10/15/2007 10:45:59 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies · 53+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-14-2007 | Public Library of Science
    Source: Public Library of Science Date: October 14, 2007 Inconsistencies With Neanderthal Genomic DNA Sequences Science Daily — Were Neanderthals direct ancestors of contemporary humans or an evolutionary side branch that eventually died out? This is one of the enduring questions in human evolution as scientists explore the relationship of fossil groups, such as Neanderthals, with people alive today. Two recent papers describing the sequencing of Neanderthal nuclear DNA from fossil bone held promise for finally answering this question [1, 2]. However, the two studies came to very different conclusions regarding the ancestral role of Neanderthals. Jeffrey D. Wall and...
  • Neanderthals At Mealtime: Pass The Meat

    04/25/2008 6:58:54 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 102+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 4-23-2008 | Jennifer Viegas
    Neanderthals at Mealtime: Pass the Meat Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Pass the Auroch, Please April 23, 2008 -- Neanderthals living in southwestern France 55,000 to 40,000 years ago mostly ate red meat from extinct ancestors of modern bison, cattle and horses, according to a new study on a large, worn Neanderthal tooth. The extinct hominids were not above eating every edible bit of an animal, since they were dining for survival, explained Teresa Steele, one of the study's co-authors. While a steak dinner "is probably the closest modern comparison," Steele said, "remember too that they were consuming all parts of...
  • Modern man had sex with Neanderthals

    10/26/2009 3:33:00 PM PDT · by Dysart · 168 replies · 4,347+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 10-25-09 | Amy Willis
    Modern man and Neanderthals had sex across the species barrier, according to leading geneticist Professor Svante Paabo.Professor Paabo, who is director of genetics at the renowned Max Planck Institution for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, made the claim at a conference in the Cold Springs Laboratory in New York. But Prof Paabo said he was unclear if the couplings had led to children, of if they were capable of producing offspring. "What I'm really interested in is, did we have children back then and did those children contribute to our variation today?" he said in an article in The Sunday Times....
  • Was great-great-great-great gramps Neanderthal? (DNA falls within variation of present-day humans)

    05/20/2010 11:03:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 24 replies · 641+ views
    Worldnetdaily ^ | 05/20/2010 | Bob Unruh
    A newly released study published in Science magazine raises new questions about ancient life by concluding much of the DNA from Neanderthal specimens is "within the variation of present-day humans for many regions of the genome." The scientific team that came up with the result, published in a recent issue of Science, included dozens of members of the research community and was led by ancient-DNA expert Svante Paabo, who works at Germany's Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. According to a report in Time magazine, the team reconstructed almost two-thirds of the Neanderthal genome – only some 10 years after...
  • You May Be Part Neanderthal, Scientists Say

    07/18/2011 11:42:37 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 49 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 18 2011 | Nick Patterson
    Is there a little Fred Flintstone in you? According to a new genetic analysis, some of the human X chromosome originates from Neanderthals -- but it's found exclusively in people outside Africa. The ancestors of Neanderthals left Africa about 400,000 to 800,000 years ago. They evolved over the millennia mostly in what are now France, Spain, Germany and Russia, and went extinct (or were simply absorbed into the modern human population) about 30,000 years ago. The ancestors of early modern humans left Africa about 80,000 to 50,000 years ago, according to DiscoveryNews.com. Despite that wide spread in time, genetic material...
  • Genetic research confirms that non-Africans are part Neanderthal

    07/19/2011 8:40:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 107 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 07-18-2011 | Staff + University of Montreal
    Some of the human X chromosome originates from Neanderthals and is found exclusively in people outside Africa, according to an international team of researchers led by Damian Labuda of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Montreal and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center. The research was published in the July issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. "This confirms recent findings suggesting that the two populations interbred," says Dr. Labuda. His team places the timing of such intimate contacts and/or family ties early on, probably at the crossroads of the Middle East. Neanderthals, whose ancestors left Africa about 400,000 to...
  • DNA Reveals Neanderthal Redheads

    05/20/2008 6:22:40 PM PDT · by blam · 63 replies · 5,967+ views
    Harvard Gazette ^ | 2007 | Steve Bradt
    DNA reveals Neanderthal redheadsNeanderthals’ pigmentation possibly as varied as humans’, scientists say By Steve BradtWith Neanderthals’ surviving bones providing few clues, scientists have long sought to flesh out the appearance of this hominid species. Illustration created by Knut Finstermeier, Neanderthal reconstruction by the Reiss-Engelhorn-Museum Mannheim Ancient DNA retrieved from the bones of two Neanderthals suggests that at least some of them had red hair and pale skin, scientists report this week in the journal Science. The international team says that Neanderthals’ pigmentation may even have been as varied as that of modern humans, and that at least 1 percent of...
  • Neanderthals Roamed As Far As Siberia

    09/30/2007 3:03:36 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 239+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 9-30-2007 | Roxanne Khamsi
    Neanderthals roamed as far as Siberia 18:00 30 September 2007 NewScientist.com news service Roxanne Khamsi DNA extracted from skeletal remains has shown that Neanderthals roamed some 2000 kilometres further east than previously thought. Researchers say the genetic sequence of an adolescent Neanderthal found in southern Siberia closely matches that of Neanderthals found in western Europe, suggesting that this close relative of modern humans migrated very long distances. Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues examined skeletal remains found in the Okladnikov cave in the Altai Mountains and dated as between 30,000 and...
  • Siberian Graveyard's Secret (More Redheads)

    01/08/2004 9:41:32 AM PST · by blam · 102 replies · 4,042+ views
    Siberian Graveyard's Secrets YEKATERINBURG, Russia In a medieval Siberian graveyard a few miles south of the Arctic Circle, Russian scientists have unearthed mummies roughly 1,000 years old, clad in copper masks, hoops and plates - burial rites that archaeologists say they have never seen before. . Among 34 shallow graves were five mummies shrouded in copper and blankets of reindeer, beaver, wolverine or bear fur. Unlike the remains of Egyptian pharaohs, the scientists say, the Siberian bodies were mummified by accident. The cold, dry permafrost preserved the remains, and the copper may have helped prevent oxidation. . The discovery adds...
  • Researchers Say Neanderthals Were Attentive, Loving Parents

    04/12/2014 10:34:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    BioNews ^ | April 11, 2014 | Charles Moore
    ...archaeologists at the University of York are challenging the traditional view that Neanderthal childhood was, in Hobbesian terms, difficult, nasty, brutish and short, fraught with continual fear and danger of violent death... The research team say there is evidence that Neanderthals cared for their sick and injured children for months and often years. A study of child burials, meanwhile, reveals that the young may have been given particular attention when they died, with generally more elaborate graves than older individuals. Neanderthal groups, believed based on fossil findings to have ranged throughout Europe, Asia Minor and into central Asia, were typically...
  • Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals

    02/16/2014 8:28:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Gazetta Delsud ^ | 3/06/2013 | unattributed
    'Catastrophic' event at Campi Flegrei 39,000 years ago Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals Some researchers are suggesting that Neanderthals were driven to extinction by a massive volcanic eruption near Naples. The suggestion is one of the topics under debate this week at a conference at London's British Museum examining what forces led to the destruction of the Neanderthals and what led to the triumph of the homo sapiens. One new theory holds that a gigantic eruption of the volcano in the Campi Flegrei area near Naples 39,000 years ago was catastrophic for the Neanderthals. That was the...
  • Dating the Uluzzian

    02/15/2014 6:08:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | February 09, 2014 | Journal of Human Evolution
    Researchers have securely dated a prehistoric human stone tool industry that is thought to have been used by early modern humans, or possibly late Neanderthals, around the time when early modern humans were beginning to emerge in Europe, arguably sometime between 40,000 to 50,000 years B.P... The Uluzzian, a prehistoric stone tool techno-tradition represented by lithic artifacts unearthed by archaeologists at cave locations primarily in Italy and Greece, has been a central contender as a possible "transitional" industry between the typical stone tool types (the Mousterian) used by late European Neanderthals and those (Aurignacian, Châtelperronian) of the earliest modern human...
  • Scientists find 800,000-year-old footprints in UK

    02/08/2014 10:55:20 AM PST · by artichokegrower · 29 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | February 7, 2014 | JILL LAWLESS
    LONDON (AP) — They were a British family on a day out — almost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years old — the most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in northern Europe.
  • Disgraced Anthropologist Drinks 40,000-Year-Old Milk (Humerus break)

    02/19/2005 7:28:21 AM PST · by InvisibleChurch · 28 replies · 2,007+ views
    Disgraced Anthropologist Drinks 40,000-Year-Old Milk by Scott Ott (2005-02-19) -- A disgraced German anthropology professor, who pretended to use carbon dating to establish a link between Neanderthals and modern man, told reporters today that he regularly drinks 40,000-year-old milk and drives a Porsche Carrera made in 736 BC. Frankfurt Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten resigned this week from a 30-year career as one of the world's leading anthropologists, when a panel concluded his carbon dating of human bones was incorrect by thousands of years. The inquiry found that one skull, which Mr. Protsch claimed came from a 27,400-year-old human fossil,...
  • Early Humans Settled India Before Europe, Study Suggests

    11/15/2005 11:47:13 AM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 2,915+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 11-14-2005 | Brian Vastag
    Early Humans Settled India Before Europe, Study Suggests Brian Vastag for National Geographic News November 14, 2005 Modern humans migrated out of Africa and into India much earlier than once believed, driving older hominids in present-day India to extinction and creating some of the earliest art and architecture, a new study suggests. The research places modern humans in India tens of thousands of years before their arrival in Europe. University of Cambridge researchers Michael Petraglia and Hannah James developed the new theory after analyzing decades' worth of existing fieldwork in India. They outline their research in the journal Current Anthropology....
  • American Neanderthal?

    01/21/2002 5:30:59 AM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 3,888+ views
    ABC News ^ | 02-18-2000
    American Neanderthal? Unearthed Native American Could Help Solve Mystery W A S H I N G T O N, Feb. 18 —The baffling 9,300-year-old Kennewick Man, whose skeleton was unearthed in 1996 in Washington state, looks so “European” because he had Neanderthal roots, a scientist said today. The National Park Service said earlier this month it would allow a genetic analysis of the skeleton, which some Native American groups claim as an ancestor and want buried. It has intrigued researchers because the features seem to suggest a more Caucasian than Asian origin. Others say he looks like an Ainu — ...
  • Britain’s last Neanderthals were more sophisticated than we thought

    06/23/2008 9:58:11 AM PDT · by decimon · 41 replies · 86+ views
    University College London ^ | Jun 23, 2008 | Unknown
    23 June 2008 An archaeological excavation at a site near Pulborough, West Sussex, has thrown remarkable new light on the life of northern Europe’s last Neanderthals. It provides a snapshot of a thriving, developing population – rather than communities on the verge of extinction. “The tools we’ve found at the site are technologically advanced and potentially older than tools in Britain belonging to our own species, Homo sapiens,” says Dr Matthew Pope of Archaeology South East based at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. “It’s exciting to think that there’s a real possibility these were left by some of the last...
  • Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints In UK

    02/07/2014 3:10:44 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies
    phys.org/news ^ | 2-7-2014 | Jill Lawless
    Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints Inn UK (Update) Jill LawlessFebuary 7, 2014Undated handout photo issued by the British Museum Friday Feb. 7, 2014 of some of the human footprints, thought to be more than 800,000 years old, found in silt on the beach at Happisburgh on the Norfolk coast of England, with a camera lens …They were a British family on a day out—almost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years old—the most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in...
  • Is this the first man with blue eyes?

    01/26/2014 9:44:28 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 41 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 1-26-14 | DAILY MAIL REPORTER
    Full headline: Is this the first man with blue eyes? Experts astonished that 7,000-year-old DNA reveals caveman with African and European genes Remains discovered 5000ft up mountains of north-west Spain Findings suggest racial transformation happened later than thought Man, dubbed La Brana 1, also shows similarity to Scandinavian DNA His piercing blue eyes are in striking contrast to his dark complexion and hair. It means this 7,000-year-old caveman holds the clue to man’s genetic evolution. His remains were discovered 5,000ft up in the mountains of north-west Spain in 2006. Experts were astonished to find the ancient hunter-gatherer, given the name...
  • European Hunter-Gatherers, Blue Eyes and Dark Skin?

    01/27/2014 8:44:03 AM PST · by Theoria · 39 replies
    The Unz Review ^ | 26 Jan 2014 | Razib Khan
    The headlines about this individual having dark skin are well founded, like the Luxembourg hunter-gatherer the sample has ancestral “non-European” copies of most of the major loci which are known to have large effect sizes (SLC24A5, which is now fixed in Europeans, SLC45A2, which is present at frequencies north of 80% in most of Europe, and KITLG, a lower frequency variant known to have a major impact on skin and hair). Additionally, this individual is related to the Ma’lta individual, just like the Swedish hunter-gatherers, but unlike the Luxembourg male (which did predate the Spanish samples by 1,000 years). Lots...
  • Paleolithic Handaxes From The North Sea (Neanderthals)

    03/10/2008 3:20:24 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 702+ views
    Palaeolithic Handaxes from the North Sea What are handaxes? Handaxes are stone tools that were used in the Ice Age. They were multi purpose tools, a bit like a modern Swiss army knife. Twenty-eight handaxes and some smaller pieces of flint (known as flakes) were found. The remains of mammoth, including tusk fragments and teeth, and fragments of deer antler were discovered at the same time. The discovery of the handaxes was reported through a scheme set up to report archaeological finds from the sea; the BMAPA Protocol. How old are they? We know that handaxes date to the Ice...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 10:22:47 AM PST · by presidio9 · 14 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 29 February 2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow. Now, George Ferentinos of...
  • Neanderthal Bone Could Push Back Evolution of Complex Speech

    01/02/2014 8:44:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology mag`` ^ | January 02, 2014 | editors
    The near-complete skeleton of a 60,000 year-old adult male Neanderthal found in a cave in Israel contains a bone in the area of the throat whose shape and relation to other bones suggest it provided modern human's extinct relatives with the capability for complex speech. The Neanderthal's horseshoe-shaped hyoid bone has a similar appearance to that of modern humans. It is wider than in non-human primates, like chimpanzees, that cannot make human-like vocalizations. An international team of scientists created a computer model of the Neanderthal hyoid and showed that its positioning would have likely allowed the hominins to speak. Further,...
  • New Early Human Site Discovered in Israel

    01/01/2014 8:08:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Saturday, December 28, 2013 | Journal of Human Evolution
    A team of Israeli scientists have reported the discovery of a hominin (early human) occupation site near Nesher Ramla, Israel. The site, according to archaeologist Yossi Zaidner of the Zinman Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa and colleagues, presents evidence for human occupation or use during Middle Paleolithic times (about 300,000 to 40 - 50,000 years ago). Unearthed were numerous finds that comprised an 8-meter deep sequence of "rich and well-preserved lithic [worked stone tool artifacts] and faunal assemblages [animal and early human bones], combustion features [features evidencing use or presence of fire], hundreds of manuports [natural objects...
  • Gene clue to Latin American risk for diabetes

    12/25/2013 6:05:05 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 20 replies
    Malay Mail Online ^ | 12-2513 | Anon.
    Paris — Scientists on Wednesday said they had found a variant of a gene to explain why Latin Americans are at higher risk of Type 2 diabetes, and pointed to a possible DNA legacy from the Neanderthals. The variant lies on a gene called SLC16A11, which plays a part in breaking down fatty molecules called lipids, they said in the journal Nature. A research consortium called SIGMA -- for the Slim Initiative in Genomic Medicine for the Americans -- sought to understand why Type 2 diabetes in Mexicans and other Latin American populations is roughly twice as great as among...
  • The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

    12/19/2013 12:22:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 56 replies
    The Scientist ^ | December 18, 2013 | Ruth Williams
    A high-quality genome sequence obtained from a female Neanderthal toe bone reveals that the individual’s parents were close relatives and that such inbreeding was prevalent among her recent ancestors, according to a paper published today (December 18) in Nature. But the sequence also reveals that interbreeding occurred between Neanderthals and other hominin groups, including early modern humans. “Did humans evolve like a constantly branching tree? A lot of people think so,” said Milford Wolpoff, a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, who was not involved in the study. “But there’s also been this thread of thought, by some...
  • Baffling 400,000-Year-Old Clue to Human Origins

    12/05/2013 11:46:56 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 37 replies
    The New York Times ^ | December 4, 2013 | Carl Zimmer
    An artist's interpretation of the hominins that lived near the Sima de los Huesos cave in Spain. Scientists have found the oldest DNA evidence yet of humans’ biological history. But instead of neatly clarifying human evolution, the finding is adding new mysteries. In a paper in the journal Nature, scientists reported Wednesday that they had retrieved ancient human DNA from a fossil dating back about 400,000 years, shattering the previous record of 100,000 years. The fossil, a thigh bone found in Spain, had previously seemed to many experts to belong to a forerunner of Neanderthals. But its DNA tells a...
  • Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species (Not Neanderthals Or Denisovans)

    12/05/2013 6:33:43 AM PST · by blam · 129 replies
    BI/Live Science ^ | 12-4-2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species Stephanie Pappas Live Science Dec. 4, 2013, 3:33 PM A new, improved sequencing of ancient human relative genomes reveals that Homo sapiens didn't only have sex with Neanderthals and a little-understood line of humans called Denisovans. A fourth, mystery lineage of humans was in the mix, too. As reported by the news arm of the journal Nature, new genetic evidence suggests that several hominids — human relatives closer than humans' current living cousin, the chimpanzee — interbred more than 30,000 years ago. This group of kissing cousins included an unknown human ancestor...
  • At 400,000 Years, Oldest Human DNA Yet Found Raises New Mysteries

    12/04/2013 12:31:08 PM PST · by Theoria · 45 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 04 Dec 2013 | Carl Zimmer
    Scientists have found the oldest DNA evidence yet of humans’ biological history. But instead of neatly clarifying human evolution, the finding is adding new mysteries. In a paper in the journal Nature, scientists reported Wednesday that they had retrieved ancient human DNA from a fossil dating back about 400,000 years, shattering the previous record of 100,000 years. The fossil, a thigh bone found in Spain, had previously seemed to many experts to belong to a forerunner of Neanderthals. But its DNA tells a very different story. It most closely resembles DNA from an enigmatic lineage of humans known as Denisovans....
  • Neanderthal String Theory

    11/21/2013 6:28:04 AM PST · by Renfield · 17 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11-19-2013
    In a further study of Neanderthal occupation at Abri du Maras, Ardèche in France, the evidence is stacking up to support the view that this group was behaviourally flexible and capable of creating a variety of sophisticated tools including projectile points and more importantly, cord and string.Fibrous materials that can be used to create cords are difficult to find in the archaeological record and have usually rotted away, so the oldest known string dated back only 30,000 years. However, perforations in small stone and tooth artefacts as well as shells from other Neanderthal sites in France suggested the pieces had...
  • A Big Butt Is A Healthy Butt: Women With Big Butts Are Smarter And Healthier (Oxford study)

    10/31/2013 4:06:09 PM PDT · by Libloather · 190 replies
    Elite Daily ^ | 10/30/13 | Sean Levinson
    **SNIP** According to ABC News, the results found that women with bigger backsides tend to have lower levels of cholesterol and are more likely to produce hormones to metabolize sugar. Therefore, women with big butts are less likely to have diabetes or heart problems. And having a big butt requires an excess of Omega 3 fats, which have been proven to catalyze brain development. The researchers also found that the children born to women with wider hips are intellectually superior to the children of slimmer, less curvy mothers.
  • New Study Finds No Last Common Ancestor of Modern Humans and Neanderthals

    10/23/2013 1:22:55 PM PDT · by Renfield · 65 replies
    SciNews ^ | 10-22-2013
    A dental study of 1,200 molars and premolars from 13 hominin species shows that no known species matches the expected profile of the last common ancestor of Homo neanderthalensis and anatomically modern Homo sapiens. The study, published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also provides evidence that the lines that led to Neanderthals and modern humans diverged about 1 million years ago – much earlier than previous studies have suggested.“Our results call attention to the strong discrepancies between molecular and paleontological estimates of the divergence time between Neanderthals and modern humans. These discrepancies cannot be simply...
  • 'Asian Neanderthals' may have occupied Australia

    10/22/2013 1:36:15 PM PDT · by Theoria · 19 replies
    The Australian ^ | 18 Oct 2013 | John Ross
    Neanderthal peoples' Asian cousins occupied the islands of our nearest neighbours and possibly Australia itself, scientists believe. Writing today in the journal Science, Adelaide University archaeologist Alan Cooper argues that the Denisovans – Neanderthal-like relatives of ancient humans – crossed Wallace’s Line, one of the world’s most formidable marine barriers, more than 100,000 years ago. Having achieved this feat, it would be “amazing” if they had not made what was then an easy crossing to Australia. “If you cross Wallace’s Line you’ve done all the hard work,” Professor Cooper told The Australian. The Denisovans were unknown before a finger bone...
  • Archaeologists rediscover the lost home of the last Neanderthals

    10/19/2013 6:33:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Natural Environment Research Council ^ | October 17, 2013 | unattributed
    A record of Neanderthal archaeology, thought to be long lost, has been re-discovered by NERC-funded scientists working in the Channel island of Jersey... a key archaeological site has preserved geological deposits which were thought to have been lost through excavation 100 years ago. The discovery was made when the team undertook fieldwork to stabilise and investigate a portion of the La Cotte de St Brelade cave, on Jersey's south eastern coastline. A large portion of the site contains sediments dating to the last Ice Age, preserving 250,000 years of climate change and archaeological evidence. The site, which has produced more...
  • Caveful of Clues About Early Humans: Interbreeding With Neanderthals Among Theories Being Explored

    10/05/2004 11:59:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 458+ views
    Washington Post ^ | September 20, 2004 | Fredric Heeren
    For the seven-member team, the hazards of reaching the site, accessible only by diving through frigid underwater passages, were worth it. Their finds may help answer some of the most hotly debated questions about early humans: Did they make love or war with Neanderthals? Were Neanderthals intellectually inferior to our human ancestors? ...The team included a Portuguese shipwreck diver and archaeologist, a French Neanderthal specialist, a Romanian cave biologist, and the three Romanian adventurers who discovered the human fossils while exploring submerged caves... [T]he ceiling lowered until they were forced, first, to swim on their backs and, finally, don...
  • Giant Prehistoric Elephant Slaughtered by Early Humans

    09/27/2013 6:10:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    Science News ^ | September 19, 2013 | University of Southampton, via AlphaGalileo
    Dr Francis Wenban-Smith discovered a site containing remains of an extinct straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) in 2003, in an area of land at Ebbsfleet in Kent, during the construction of the High Speed 1 rail link from the Channel Tunnel to London... Excavation revealed a deep sequence of deposits containing the elephant remains, along with numerous flint tools and a range of other species such as; wild aurochs, extinct forms of rhinoceros and lion, Barbary macaque, beaver, rabbit, various forms of vole and shrew, and a diverse assemblage of snails. These remains confirm that the deposits date to a warm...
  • Neandertals Made the First Specialized Bone Tools in Europe

    09/27/2013 6:05:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Science News ^ | August 12, 2013 | Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    ...Dr. Shannon McPherron of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany... and Dr. Michel Lenoir of the University of Bordeaux have been excavating the site of Abri Peyrony where three of the bones were found. "...Modern humans seem to have entered Europe with pointed bone-tools only, and soon after started to make lissoir. This is the first possible evidence for transmission from Neandertals to our direct ancestors," says Dr. Soressi of Leiden University, Netherland. She and her team found the first of four bone-tools during her excavation at the classic Neandertal site of Pech-de-l'Azé I... Microwear analysis...
  • Who Was Eating Salmon 45,000 Years Ago in the Caucasus? Neandertals...

    09/27/2013 5:56:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Science News ^ | September 17, 2013 | Universitaet Tubingen
    In a joint study, Professor Hervé Bocherens of the University of Tübingen, Germany, together with colleagues from the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Saint Petersburg, Russia and the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, Belgium have found at a cave in the Caucasus Mountains indirect hints of fish consumption by Neandertals... Bone analyses ruled out cave bears and cave lions to have consumed the fish whose remains were found at the Caucasian cave... located on the northern slopes of the Caucasus Mountains, called Kudaro 3. There, the bone fragments of large salmon, migrating from...
  • New 10 second sourcing technology set to transform archaeology

    09/15/2013 12:17:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    University of Sheffield ^ | 9 September 2013 | Amy Stone
    Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed a method of sourcing obsidian artefacts that takes only 10 seconds -- dozens of times faster than the current methods -- with a handheld instrument that can be used at archaeological excavations. Obsidian, naturally occurring volcanic glass, is smooth, hard, and far sharper than a surgical scalpel when fractured, making it a highly desirable raw material for crafting stone tools for almost all of human history. The earliest obsidian tools, found in East Africa, are nearly two million years old, and obsidian scalpels are still used today in specialised medical procedures. The...
  • Handaxe design reveals distinct Neanderthal cultures

    08/19/2013 8:43:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | Monday, August 19, 2013 | Peter Franklin
    Dr Ruebens' investigations uncovered new evidence that two separate handaxe traditions or designs existed – one in a region now spanning south-western France and Britain – the other in Germany and further to the East. In addition, she found an area covering modern day Belgium and the Netherlands that demonstrates a transition between the two. She comments: "In Germany and France there appears to be two separate handaxe traditions, with clear boundaries, indicating completely separate, independent developments. "The transition zone in Belgium and Northern France indicates contact between the different groups of Neanderthals, which is generally difficult to identify but...
  • Find helps scientists map waves of migration across the continents

    08/16/2013 12:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Phys.org ^ | July 29, 2013 | Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    "The Neanderthal genetic component in the [Tianyuan] early modern human was likely due to interbreeding after early modern humans had left Africa and overlapped with Neanderthals in the Middle East, before splitting into separate groups heading toward what are now Europe and East Asia," explained Fu. Fu and other scientists compared the DNA of the Tianyuan human with the genome of the now-extinct Neanderthal that the Max Planck Institute helped sequence and publish in 2010. The initial decoding of the Neanderthal genome and comparison with present-day populations around the world revealed that all contemporary humans outside of Africa carry a...
  • An Ochered Fossil Marine Shell From the Mousterian of Fumane Cave, Italy

    07/21/2013 11:55:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    PLOSone ^ | July 10, 2013 | see below
    A scanty but varied ensemble of finds challenges the idea that Neandertal material culture was essentially static and did not include symbolic items. In this study we report on a fragmentary Miocene-Pliocene fossil marine shell, Aspa marginata, discovered in a Discoid Mousterian layer of the Fumane Cave, northern Italy, dated to at least 47.6-45.0 Cal ky BP. The shell was collected by Neandertals at a fossil exposure probably located more than 100 kms from the site. Microscopic analysis of the shell surface identifies clusters of striations on the inner lip. A dark red substance, trapped inside micropits produced by bioeroders,...
  • Ancient DNA and Neanderthals

    07/18/2013 7:11:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 21st century | Human Origins
    The FOXP2 gene is involved in speech and language (Lai et al. 2001)... Modern humans and Neanderthals share two changes in FOXP2 compared with the sequence in chimpanzees (Krause et al. 2007). Neanderthals may also have their own unique derived characteristics in the FOXP2 gene that were not tested for in this study... The researchers then tried to determine how the FOXP2 variant came to be found in both Neanderthals and modern humans... Though chimpanzees also have different blood groups, they are not the same as human blood types. While the mutation that causes the human B blood group arose...
  • Neanderthals talked like us half a million years ago and could even have shaped today's language

    07/10/2013 9:30:34 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 45 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10 July 2013 | SARAH GRIFFITHS
    [Note: headline edited slightly in order to fit] Origins of modern language are ten times older than thought and could date back half a million years, according to Dutch researchers It contradicts the popular idea that our modern language began with a sudden emergence of modernity presumably due to one or a few genetic mutations that gave rise to language The scientists claim that far from being slow brutes, Neanderthals' cognitive capacities and culture were comparable to ours Dutch researchers have claimed that our modern language can be traced back to stone age man - ten times older than previously...
  • Oldest Grave Flowers Unearthed in Israel

    07/01/2013 6:55:02 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 20 replies
    livescience.com ^ | 7-1-13 | Tia Ghose
    The oldest example of grave flowers has been discovered in Israel. An ancient burial pit dating to nearly 14,000 years ago contained impressions from stems and flowers of aromatic plants such as mint and sage. The new find "is the oldest example of putting flowers and fresh plants in the grave before burying the dead," said study co-author Dani Nadel, an archaeologist at the University of Haifa in Israel. snip... Past evidence suggested that humans only started using flowers in graves more recently. (A 35,000-year-old Neanderthal burial site called Shanidar Cave in Iraq contained pollen, but subsequent research revealed that...
  • Spoken Language Influenced by Elevation, Say Anthropologists

    06/15/2013 9:59:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, June 12, 2013 | unattributed
    The study, led by Caleb Everett, associate professor of anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Miami, reveals that languages containing ejective consonants are spoken mainly in regions of high elevation. Ejectives are sounds produced with an intensive burst of air. The findings also indicate that as elevation increases, so does the likelihood of languages with ejectives. "Ejectives are produced by creating a pocket of air in the pharynx then compressing it." Everett says. "Since air pressure decreases with altitude and it takes less effort to compress less dense air, I speculate that it's easier...