Keyword: neandertals

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  • New evidence we all have the same ancestors Cal student's discovery should resolve dispute

    03/22/2002 2:24:28 AM PST · by Phil V. · 41 replies · 1,267+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Thursday, March 21, 2002 | David Perlman, Chronicle Science Editor
    <p>Fossil hunters say they have found the strongest evidence yet that mankind's direct ancestors were members of a single unique species of skilled tool-using creatures who thrived a million years ago across much of the world from China and Java to Africa and Europe.</p>
  • Modern analysis of ancient hearths reveals Neanderthal settlement patterns

    04/29/2019 7:39:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 24, 2019 | PLOS
    Most paleolithic household activities are thought to have taken place around hearths or fires. The author of the present study chose to examine the Middle Paleolithic site El Salt in Spain, which contains eleven well-preserved and overlapping open-air hearth structures. It was previously unclear whether these hearths were formed during successive short-term site occupations or fewer, longer term occupations. The authors examined the micromorphology of the different layers within the hearth structures to assess occupation timings within the study unit and conducted both a lipid biomarker analysis and isotope analysis to gain information about potential food and fuel. The results...
  • Warm weather pushed Neanderthals into cannibalism

    04/23/2019 11:16:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | March 29, 2019 | Dyani Lewis
    In the 1990s, the remains of six Neanderthals -- two adults, two adolescents and two children -- were found in a small cave at Baume Moula-Guercy in the Rhône valley in southern France. The bones bear many of the hallmarks of cannibalism: cut marks made by stone tools, complete dismemberment of the individuals, and finger bones that look as if they've been gnawed by Neanderthal teeth, rather than by other carnivores. Remains from other sites in Croatia, Spain and Belgium also show evidence of cannibalism. But in each case, there has been a lack of evidence to answer the question...
  • The first known fossil of a Denisovan skull has been found in a Siberian cave

    04/08/2019 12:15:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Science News ^ | March 29, 2019 | Bruce Bower
    Such evidence is tough to interpret at this point, paleoanthropologist María Martinón-Torres of University College London said at the meeting. Interbreeding of closely related populations, such as Denisovans, Neandertals and H. sapiens, generates novel skeletal features that can obscure what started out as, say, a distinctive Denisovan look, she suggested. Whatever evolutionary niche these mysterious hominids occupied, at least three separate Denisovan populations interbred with ancient humans, population geneticist Murray Cox of Massey University in Palmerston North, New Zealand, also reported at the meeting. Genetic remnants of two of those populations appear in modern aboriginal groups in Papua New Guinea,...
  • Neanderthal Used Early Version of Penicillin and Aspirin

    03/09/2017 8:23:10 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    NBC News ^ | MAR 8 2017
    Eating like a caveman meant chowing down on woolly rhinos and sheep in Belgium, but munching on mushrooms, pine nuts and moss in Spain. It all depended on where they lived, new research shows. Scientists got a sneak peek into the kitchen of three Neanderthals by scraping off the plaque stuck on their teeth and examining the DNA. What they found smashes a common public misconception that the caveman diet was mostly meat. They also found hints that one sickly teen used primitive versions of penicillin and aspirin to help ease his pain. The dental plaque provides a lifelong record...
  • Neanderthals' Tough Stone AgeLives

    12/15/2006 3:28:42 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 672+ views
    Science News ^ | 12-16-2006 | Bruce Bower
    Neandertals' tough Stone Age lives Bruce Bower Neandertals that 43,000 years ago inhabited what's now northern Spain faced periodic food shortages and possibly resorted to cannibalism to survive, according to a new investigation. CAVE FINDS. A block of sand and clay from El Sidrón cave in Spain holds Neandertal foot bones (left) and ribs and a backbone (right). Rosas These Neandertals evolved shorter, broader faces with a less pronounced slope than northern European Neandertals did, say Antonio Rosas of the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Madrid and his colleagues. Since 2000, the researchers have recovered more than 1,300 Neandertal...
  • Family of three die after falling into boiling mud as sink hole opens up in volcanic area in Italy

    09/12/2017 9:20:16 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12 September 2017 • 4:18pm | Nick Squires, Rome
    An Italian couple and their 11-year-old son died in a freak accident on Tuesday when they fell into a 10ft-deep hole that suddenly opened up in a highly active volcanic area near Naples. Police said the child strayed beyond safety barriers and was swallowed up by the pit, plunging into boiling hot mud at the Solfatara Crater in Pozzuoli, part of a huge volcanic area known as the Campi Flegrei or Phlegrean Fields. His father, 45, reportedly rushed to his rescue but also fell into the sink-hole. The boy’s mother, 42, then went to their aid, but she too was...
  • Europe’s Most Dangerous Supervolcano Is Waking Up; 500,000 Lives At Risk

    01/10/2017 5:16:20 AM PST · by gaggs · 49 replies
    When Mount Vesuvius erupted and buried the Italian city of Pompeii in ash, killing 2,000 people, it was regarded as one of the most catastrophic natural disasters and is still studied heavily today. By comparison, a nearby supervolcano called Campi Flegrei, which means “burning fields,” would put the lives of 500,000 Italians at risk and cause damage that would extend to the surrounding nations.
  • Massive Volcano Near Naples Begins Rumbling

    12/23/2016 2:45:57 PM PST · by marshmallow · 45 replies
    A volcanic field off the shore of Sicily, near Naples, has become active, scientists report. The Campi Flegrei volcano is much larger than nearby Mt. Vesuvius, the volcano whose eruption destroyed the ancient city of Pompei. An eruption of this “supervolcano” could endanger much of Europe. News of the volcanic activity was made public less than a week after the blood of St. Januarius failed to liquefy when displayed in the Naples cathedral. Sicilians have long believed that when the miracle of St. Januarius does not occur, disaster will follow for the people of Naples. A supervolcano caused the largest...
  • The Supervolcano That Caused One Of The Biggest Eruptions In History Has Started To Stir

    12/22/2016 11:17:19 AM PST · by blam · 56 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 12-22-2016 | BEC Crew
    BEC CREW 22 DEC 2016 It's dangerously close to hitting a critical pressure point. A 12-km wide cauldron that forms a vast supervolcano on the coast of Italy is showing signs of reawakening after almost 500 years of inactivity. Not only is this site rumoured to be responsible for the extinction of the Neanderthals, it’s got 500,000 people living around it right now, and researchers say it appears to be approaching a critical pressure point that could lead to an eruption. You might imagine a supervolcano as like a regular volcano, only supersized, rising up out of the ground and...
  • Naples astride a rumbling mega-volcano

    12/21/2016 7:32:05 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    phys.org ^ | 12/20/2016
    A slumbering Campi Flegrei volcano under the Italian city of Naples shows signs of "reawakening" and may be nearing a critical pressure point, according to a study published Tuesday. Italian and French scientists have for the first time identified a threshold beyond which rising magma under the Earth's surface could trigger the release of fluids and gases at a 10-fold increased rate. This would cause the injection of high-temperature steam into surrounding rocks, said lead author Giovanni Chiodini, a researcher at Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Bologna. "Hydrothermal rocks, if heated, can ultimately lose their mechanical resistance,...
  • Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans

    03/24/2019 10:18:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 20, 2019 | University of Huddersfield
    The migration signal makes good sense in terms of climate. For most of the last few hundred years, different parts of Africa have been out of step with each other in terms of the aridity of the climate. Only for a brief period at 60,000-70,000 years ago was there a window during which the continent as a whole experienced sufficient moisture to open up a corridor between the south and the east. And intriguingly, it was around 65,000 years ago that some of the signs of symbolism and technological complexity seen earlier in South Africa start to appear in the...
  • ...Flintstone Workshop of Neanderthals in... Poland... approx. 60,000 years old

    03/20/2019 9:37:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Science in Poland ^ | March 13, 2019 | Szymon Zdzieblowski
    They probably appeared in Poland approximately 300,000 years ago. The oldest stone tools they used, discovered on the Vistula, are over 200,000 years old, and the remains are over 100,000 years old. "On the bank of the river in Pietraszyno, we discovered an unprecedented amount of flint products - 17,000 - abandoned by Neanderthals approximately 60,000 years ago" - says Dr. Andrzej Wisniewski from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw. Since 2018, the researcher has been conducting joint excavations with researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig in the framework of a National Science Centre...
  • Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

    02/25/2019 6:22:19 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Monday, February 25, 2019 | University of Zurich
    Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans - thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France... Since the 1950s, scientists have known that the image of the Neanderthal as a hunched over caveman is not an accurate one. Their similarities to ourselves - both in evolutionary and behavioral terms - have also long been known, but in recent years...
  • Neandertals' Main Food Source Was Definitely Meat

    02/20/2019 10:17:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 86 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | February 18, 2019 | Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    Neandertals' ...are traditionally considered carnivores and hunters of large mammals, but this hypothesis has recently been challenged by numerous pieces of evidence of plant consumption. Ancient diets are often reconstructed using nitrogen isotope ratios, a tracer of the trophic level, the position an organism occupies in a food chain. Neandertals are apparently occupying a high position in terrestrial food chains, exhibiting slightly higher ratios than carnivores (like hyenas, wolves or foxes) found at the same sites. It has been suggested that these slightly higher values were due to the consumption of mammoth or putrid meat. And we also know some...
  • 'Cave of forgotten dreams' may hold earliest painting of volcanic eruption

    01/16/2016 11:37:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Nature ^ | January 15, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Chauvet-Pont D'Arc cave, in southern France, is one of the world's oldest and most impressive cave-art sites. Discovered in 1994 and popularized in the Werner Herzog documentary 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams', Chauvet contains hundreds of paintings that were made as early as 37,000 years ago. Fearsome animals such as woolly rhinoceroses, cave lions and bears dominate Chauvet's imagery. But one of its innermost galleries -- named after a giant deer species, Megaloceros, that is depicted there -- also contains a series of mysterious spray-shaped drawings, partly covered by the Megaloceros painting. A nearby gallery holds similar spray imagery, as does...
  • Down to the last detail: How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age art

    06/03/2018 10:16:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    University of York ^ | Tuesday, May 15, 2018 | Department of Archaeology
    The ability to focus on detail, a common trait among people with autism, allowed realism to flourish in Ice Age art, according to researchers at the University of York. Around 30,000 years ago realistic art suddenly flourished in Europe. Extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions decorate the walls of Ice Age archaeological sites such as Chauvet Cave in southern France. Why our ice age ancestors created exceptionally realistic art rather than the very simple or stylised art of earlier modern humans has long perplexed researchers. Many have argued that psychotropic drugs were behind the detailed illustrations. The...
  • We should gene-sequence cave paintings to find out more about who made them

    02/16/2019 5:29:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Technology Review ^ | February 14, 2019 | Emerging Technology from the arXiv
    ...the origin of these artworks is shrouded in mystery. Nobody is quite sure what the artists used for paint or binder, how the pigmentation has been preserved for so long, and -- most controversial of all -- exactly when the images were made... Today we get a unique insight into this question thanks to the work of Clodoaldo Roldán at the University of Valencia in Spain and colleagues... One way to date ancient artifacts is with carbon dating. But this works only with pigments that have a biological origin, and with the exception of black, most of them do not....
  • How Art Began with Antony Gormley

    01/27/2019 11:39:20 PM PST · by Oshkalaboomboom · 31 replies
    BBC Two ^ | Jan. 28, 2019 | BBC
    Why do humans make art? When did we begin to make our mark on the world? And where? In this major new film, Britain’s most celebrated sculptor, Antony Gormley, is setting out on a journey to see for himself the very beginnings of art.
  • Extinct human species lived together in Siberian cave, new research shows

    02/16/2019 12:59:45 PM PST · by ETL · 20 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Feb 15, 2019 | Walt Bonner | Fox News
    Bones recently found in a Siberian cave have given researchers a new glimpse into the timeline of an extinct human species. The species – known as Denisovans – at one time lived alongside Neanderthals in the same cave, the evidence showed. The only fossil evidence of the Denisovans was uncovered in Denisova Cave in the Russian Altai Mountains back in 1980, and amount to three teeth and bone fragments. “Denisovans are a sister group to Neanderthals – that is, they are closer in terms of shared ancestry to Neanderthals than they are to modern humans,” study leader and geochronologist Dr. Richard...