Keyword: neanderthal

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  • Iberia’s Neolithic Farmers Linked to Modern-Day Basques

    09/08/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Tuesday, September 08, 2015
    DNA samples were obtained from eight early Iberian farmers whose remains were discovered in Spain’s El Portalón cave in Atapuerca. Like populations in central and northern Europe, the Iberian farmers had traveled from the south and mixed with local hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetic variation observed in modern-day Basques is significantly closer to the newly sequenced early farmers than to older Iberian hunter-gatherer samples,” “Parts of that early farmer population probably remained relatively isolated since then (which we can still see in the distinct culture and language of Basques)
  • History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud

    02/21/2005 9:44:35 AM PST · by FNU LNU · 106 replies · 1,858+ views
    The Guardian ^ | February 19, 2005 | Luke Harding
    History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud Flamboyant anthropologist falsified dating of key discoveries Luke Harding in Berlin Saturday February 19, 2005 The Guardian It appeared to be one of archaeology's most sensational finds. The skull fragment discovered in a peat bog near Hamburg was more than 36,000 years old - and was the vital missing link between modern humans and Neanderthals. This, at least, is what Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten - a distinguished, cigar-smoking German anthropologist - told his scientific colleagues, to global acclaim, after being invited to date the extremely rare skull....
  • Ancient Italian Skeletons Had Hemp In Their Teeth, Archaeologists Discover

    09/04/2018 4:51:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Forbes ^ | August 30, 2018 | Kristina Killgrove
    In a new analysis of thousands of teeth from ancient skeletons buried at a site near Naples, Italy, archaeologists have discovered that people were using their mouths to help with their work -- occupations that likely involved processing hemp into string and fabric. We all use our teeth as tools -- to open bottles, hold pieces of paper, or even smoke a pipe. When we do this, we open ourselves up to the possibility of cracking our teeth but also create microscopic grooves and injuries to the enamel surface. Since teeth don't remodel like bones do, these tiny insults remain...
  • Study: Climate Change Contributed to Neanderthal Demise

    08/31/2018 12:18:13 PM PDT · by ETL · 47 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 30, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Neanderthals were skilled hunters and had learned how to control fire, but they had a less diverse diet than modern humans, living largely on meat from the animals they had successfully pursued. These food sources would naturally become scarce during colder periods, making Neanderthals more vulnerable to rapid environmental change. In comparison, modern humans had incorporated fish and plants into their diet alongside meat, which supplemented their food intake and potentially enabled their survival. ..." Dr. Ersek and colleagues examined stalagmites in two caves in the Carpathian Mountains, which revealed more detailed records of climate change in continental Europe than...
  • Climate change killed off Neanderthals, study says

    08/31/2018 11:13:35 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    Fox ^ | Chris Ciaccia |
    The evidence is there that Europe experienced stark cold and dry spells, putting a strain on Neanderthals' food supply and ability to survive. Thanks to a group of researchers looking at stalagmites in Romania, we may have proof this was indeed the case. Dr. Ersek and his team looked at the stalagmites—rocks that gather in caves for long stretches of time —to look at the climate. Stalagmites contain rings, similar to trees, which can give an indication of how extreme weather patterns, occurring over thousands of years, impacted Neanderthals. The study was published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the...
  • ‘Denisova 11’ Had Neanderthal Mother and Denisovan Father

    08/27/2018 6:30:25 AM PDT · by ETL · 14 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 23, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    “An interesting aspect of the Denisova 11 genome is that it allows us to learn things about two populations — the Neanderthals from the mother’s side, and the Denisovans from the father’s side,” said co-author Dr. Fabrizio Mafessoni, from the Department of Evolutionary Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.The researchers found that Denisova 11’s father, whose genome bears traces of Neanderthal ancestry, came from a population related to a later Denisovan found in the cave.The mother came from a population more closely related to Neanderthals who lived later in Europe than to an earlier Neanderthal found in...
  • Found the oldest Neanderthal wooden tools in the Iberian Peninsula

    08/24/2018 3:34:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 4, 2018 | Centro Nacional de Investigacion sobre la Evolucion Humana
    The detailed analysis of this tool and the luminescence dating of the sediment that bears the wooden remains indicate that the objects were deposited around 90,000 years ago, and thus were made by neandertals. The Micro-CT analysis and a close examination of the surface have shown that a yew trunk was cut longitudinally into two halves. One of this halves was scraped with a stone tool and treated with fire to harden it and to facilitate the scraping to obtain a pointed morphology. Use-wear analysis revealed that it was used for digging in search of food, flint, or simply to...
  • This ancient bone belonged to a child of two extinct human species [Denisovan, Neandertal]

    08/23/2018 3:42:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Science mag ^ | August 22, 2018 | Gretchen Vogel
    The woman may have been just a teenager when she died more than 50,000 years ago, too young to have left much of a mark on her world. But a piece of one of her bones, unearthed in a cave in Russia's Denisova valley in 2012, may make her famous. Enough ancient DNA lingered within the 2-centimeter fragment to reveal her startling ancestry: She was the direct offspring of two different species of ancient humans -- neither of them ours. An analysis of the woman's genome, reported in this week's issue of Nature, indicates her mother was Neanderthal and her...
  • Cave girl was half Neanderthal, half Denisovan

    08/22/2018 1:34:01 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    bbc ^ | 08/22/2018 | Helen Briggs
    DNA extracted from bone fragments found in the cave show the girl was the offspring of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father. The discovery, reported in Nature, gives a rare insight into the lives of our closest ancient human relatives. Neanderthals and Denisovans were humans like us, but belonged to different species. "We knew from previous studies that Neanderthals and Denisovans must have occasionally had children together," says Viviane Slon, researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA) in Leipzig, Germany. "But I never thought we would be so lucky as to find an actual offspring of...
  • No evidence of 'hobbit' ancestry in genomes of Flores Island pygmies

    08/06/2018 11:51:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    The University of California Santa Cruz ^ | August 2, 2018 | Tim Stephens
    Pygmy population near cave where Homo floresiensis fossils were found appears to have evolved short stature independently from the mysterious ancient hominins A fossil skeleton found in a cave on Flores Island, Indonesia, in 2004 turned out to be a previously unknown, very small species of human. Nicknamed the "hobbit" (officially Homo floresiensis), it remains a mysterious species with an unknown relationship to modern humans. Intriguingly, the current inhabitants of Flores include a pygmy population living in a village near the Liang Bua cave where the fossils were found. An international team of scientists has now sequenced and analyzed the...
  • Genetic analysis of 40,000-year-old jawbone reveals early modern humans interbred with Neandertals

    06/22/2015 8:57:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 43 replies
    PHYS.Org ^ | 06-22-2015 | Provided by Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    In 2002, archaeologists discovered the jawbone of a human who lived in Europe about 40,000 years ago. Geneticists have now analyzed ancient DNA from that jawbone and learned that it belonged to a modern human whose recent ancestors included Neanderthals. Neanderthals lived in Europe until about 35,000 years ago, disappearing at the same time modern humans were spreading across the continent. The new study, co-led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator David Reich at Harvard Medical School and Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, provides the first genetic evidence that humans interbred with Neanderthals in Europe....
  • Homo sapiens developed a new ecological niche that separated it from other hominins

    07/30/2018 12:14:44 PM PDT · by Simon Green · 9 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 07/30/18
    Critical review of growing archaeological and palaeoenvironmental datasets relating to the Middle and Late Pleistocene (300-12 thousand years ago) hominin dispersals within and beyond Africa, published today in Nature Human Behaviour, demonstrates unique environmental settings and adaptations for Homo sapiens relative to previous and coexisting hominins such as Homo neanderthalensis and Homo erectus. Our species' ability to occupy diverse and 'extreme' settings around the world stands in stark contrast to the ecological adaptations of other hominin taxa, and may explain how our species became the last surviving hominin on the planet. The paper, by scientists from the Max Planck...
  • Why tiny Neanderthal brains are now growing in petri dishes

    06/27/2018 1:36:25 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 42 replies
    NBC ^ | June 27, 2018 | by Laura Geggel
    Scientists hope the pea-sized blobs can help explain the rise of modern humans. Neanderthals went extinct about 40,000 years ago, but thanks to cutting-edge science, there is now a lab in California that has petri dishes filled with pea-sized versions of the cavemen's brains. Why are researchers cultivating and studying these minibrains? The reason, they say, is that these small neural lumps may reveal why Neanderthals died out and Homo sapiens went on to conquer much of the planet. "Neanderthals are fascinating because they shared Earth with us, and there is now genetic evidence we actually bred with them," study...
  • A human fossil species in western Europe could be close to a million years old

    06/07/2018 7:13:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 7, 2018 | CORDIS
    Credit: Mathieu Duval ========================================================================= First direct dating of an early human tooth confirms the antiquity of Homo antecessor, western Europe's oldest known human fossil species. A previous find from the unit TD6 of Atapuerca Gran Dolina archaeological site in northern Spain has yielded more information about our early human lineage. An international team of researchers from Australia, China, France and Spain has conducted the first direct dating study of a fossil tooth belonging to Homo antecessor (H. antecessor), the earliest known hominin species identified in Europe. The study shows that H. antecessor probably lived somewhere between 772 000 and 949...
  • Are these Neanderthal etchings a long-lost message?

    05/16/2018 10:21:01 AM PDT · by ETL · 79 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | May 8, 2018 | Laura Geggel, Senior Writer | LiveScience
    A Neanderthal seems to have left a message etched in stone about 35,000 years ago, a new study finds. An analysis of the slanted, zigzag lines — engraved on a piece of flint discovered at a Neanderthal site in Crimea — reveals that they likely weren't made willy-nilly. Rather, the Neanderthal artist would have needed excellent fine motor skills and attention to detail to etch the lines, which may carry symbolic meaning, the researchers said. If this new interpretation is correct, the engraved piece of flint will join a growing list of artifacts showing that Neanderthals were likely complex beings...
  • Neandertals, Stone Age people may have voyaged the Mediterranean

    05/05/2018 9:08:13 PM PDT · by Theoria · 55 replies
    Science ^ | 24 April 2018 | Andrew Lawler
    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Odysseus, who voyaged across the wine-dark seas of the Mediterranean in Homer’s epic, may have had some astonishingly ancient forerunners. A decade ago, when excavators claimed to have found stone tools on the Greek island of Crete dating back at least 130,000 years, other archaeologists were stunned—and skeptical. But since then, at that site and others, researchers have quietly built up a convincing case for Stone Age seafarers—and for the even more remarkable possibility that they were Neandertals, the extinct cousins of modern humans. The finds strongly suggest that the urge to go to sea, and the cognitive and...
  • Found the oldest Neanderthal wooden tools in the Iberian Peninsula

    04/06/2018 4:46:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 4, 2018 | Centro Nacional de Investigacion sobre la Evolucion Humana
    Archaeological excavations at the Aranbaltza site in the Basque Country coast (Northern Spain) have revealed several episodes of neandertal occupations with preserved wooden remains... In 2015, the excavation revealed two very well preserved wooden tools, one of which is a 15 cm-long digging stick... The detailed analysis of this tool and the luminescence dating of the sediment that bears the wooden remains indicate that the objects were deposited around 90,000 years ago, and thus were made by neandertals. The Micro-CT analysis and a close examination of the surface have shown that a yew trunk was cut longitudinally into two halves....
  • A New Batch of Neanderthal Genome Provides Insights Into Their Complex History

    03/26/2018 3:35:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Seeker ^ | Wednesday, March 21, 2018 | Jen Viegas
    People today of Native American, European, Asian, and North African heritage have Neanderthal DNA in their genomes, with percentages estimated between 1-4 percent. As a result, the majority of people alive today are related to these humans that, as a distinct population, are thought to have gone extinct 39,000-41,000 years ago. An international team of researchers led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has just overcome the problem, allowing for whole genome sequencing of five Neanderthals who lived 39,000-47,000 years ago. The findings, reported in the journal Nature, provide important insights into Neanderthal history before and...
  • Compassion Helped Neanderthals To Survive, Study Reveals

    03/13/2018 11:05:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    University of York ^ | Tuesday, March 13, 2018 | Alistair Keely
    They have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was. The study, by the University of York, reveals that Neanderthal healthcare was uncalculated and highly effective -- challenging our notions that they were brutish compared to modern humans. The researchers argue that the care provided was widespread and should be seen as a "compassionate and knowledgeable response to injury and illness." It is well known that Neanderthals sometimes provided care for the injured, but new analysis by the team at York suggest they were genuinely caring of their...
  • Neanderthals Were Artistic Like Modern Humans, Study Indicates

    03/13/2018 10:41:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | February 22, 2018 | University of Southampton
    A new study led by the University of Southampton and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology shows that paintings in three caves in Spain were created more than 64,000 years ago - 20,000 years before modern humans arrived in Europe. This means that the Palaeolithic (Ice Age) cave art - including pictures of animals, dots and geometric signs - must have been made by Neanderthals, a 'sister' species to Homo sapiens, and Europe's sole human inhabitants at the time. It also indicates that they thought symbolically, like modern humans. Published today in the journal Science, the study reveals how...