Keyword: neanderthals

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  • ...Flintstone Workshop of Neanderthals in... Poland... approx. 60,000 years old

    03/20/2019 9:37:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Science in Poland ^ | March 13, 2019 | Szymon Zdzieblowski
    They probably appeared in Poland approximately 300,000 years ago. The oldest stone tools they used, discovered on the Vistula, are over 200,000 years old, and the remains are over 100,000 years old. "On the bank of the river in Pietraszyno, we discovered an unprecedented amount of flint products - 17,000 - abandoned by Neanderthals approximately 60,000 years ago" - says Dr. Andrzej Wisniewski from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw. Since 2018, the researcher has been conducting joint excavations with researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig in the framework of a National Science Centre...
  • Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today

    02/25/2019 6:22:19 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Monday, February 25, 2019 | University of Zurich
    Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that Neanderthals walked upright just like modern humans - thanks to a virtual reconstruction of the pelvis and spine of a very well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton found in France... Since the 1950s, scientists have known that the image of the Neanderthal as a hunched over caveman is not an accurate one. Their similarities to ourselves - both in evolutionary and behavioral terms - have also long been known, but in recent years...
  • Neandertals' Main Food Source Was Definitely Meat

    02/20/2019 10:17:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 86 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | February 18, 2019 | Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    Neandertals' ...are traditionally considered carnivores and hunters of large mammals, but this hypothesis has recently been challenged by numerous pieces of evidence of plant consumption. Ancient diets are often reconstructed using nitrogen isotope ratios, a tracer of the trophic level, the position an organism occupies in a food chain. Neandertals are apparently occupying a high position in terrestrial food chains, exhibiting slightly higher ratios than carnivores (like hyenas, wolves or foxes) found at the same sites. It has been suggested that these slightly higher values were due to the consumption of mammoth or putrid meat. And we also know some...
  • 'Cave of forgotten dreams' may hold earliest painting of volcanic eruption

    01/16/2016 11:37:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Nature ^ | January 15, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Chauvet-Pont D'Arc cave, in southern France, is one of the world's oldest and most impressive cave-art sites. Discovered in 1994 and popularized in the Werner Herzog documentary 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams', Chauvet contains hundreds of paintings that were made as early as 37,000 years ago. Fearsome animals such as woolly rhinoceroses, cave lions and bears dominate Chauvet's imagery. But one of its innermost galleries -- named after a giant deer species, Megaloceros, that is depicted there -- also contains a series of mysterious spray-shaped drawings, partly covered by the Megaloceros painting. A nearby gallery holds similar spray imagery, as does...
  • Down to the last detail: How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age art

    06/03/2018 10:16:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    University of York ^ | Tuesday, May 15, 2018 | Department of Archaeology
    The ability to focus on detail, a common trait among people with autism, allowed realism to flourish in Ice Age art, according to researchers at the University of York. Around 30,000 years ago realistic art suddenly flourished in Europe. Extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions decorate the walls of Ice Age archaeological sites such as Chauvet Cave in southern France. Why our ice age ancestors created exceptionally realistic art rather than the very simple or stylised art of earlier modern humans has long perplexed researchers. Many have argued that psychotropic drugs were behind the detailed illustrations. The...
  • We should gene-sequence cave paintings to find out more about who made them

    02/16/2019 5:29:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Technology Review ^ | February 14, 2019 | Emerging Technology from the arXiv
    ...the origin of these artworks is shrouded in mystery. Nobody is quite sure what the artists used for paint or binder, how the pigmentation has been preserved for so long, and -- most controversial of all -- exactly when the images were made... Today we get a unique insight into this question thanks to the work of Clodoaldo Roldán at the University of Valencia in Spain and colleagues... One way to date ancient artifacts is with carbon dating. But this works only with pigments that have a biological origin, and with the exception of black, most of them do not....
  • How Art Began with Antony Gormley

    01/27/2019 11:39:20 PM PST · by Oshkalaboomboom · 31 replies
    BBC Two ^ | Jan. 28, 2019 | BBC
    Why do humans make art? When did we begin to make our mark on the world? And where? In this major new film, Britain’s most celebrated sculptor, Antony Gormley, is setting out on a journey to see for himself the very beginnings of art.
  • Extinct human species lived together in Siberian cave, new research shows

    02/16/2019 12:59:45 PM PST · by ETL · 20 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Feb 15, 2019 | Walt Bonner | Fox News
    Bones recently found in a Siberian cave have given researchers a new glimpse into the timeline of an extinct human species. The species – known as Denisovans – at one time lived alongside Neanderthals in the same cave, the evidence showed. The only fossil evidence of the Denisovans was uncovered in Denisova Cave in the Russian Altai Mountains back in 1980, and amount to three teeth and bone fragments. “Denisovans are a sister group to Neanderthals – that is, they are closer in terms of shared ancestry to Neanderthals than they are to modern humans,” study leader and geochronologist Dr. Richard...
  • Following the last Neanderthals: Mammal tracks in Late Pleistocene coastal dunes of Gibraltar

    02/16/2019 12:18:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Gibraltar National Museum ^ | February 12, 2019 | admin
    The prestigious international journal Quaternary Science Reviews has just published a paper which has involved the participation of Gibraltarian scientists from the Gibraltar National Museum alongside colleagues from Spain, Portugal and Japan. The results which have been published come from an area of the Catalan Bay Sand Dune. This work started ten years ago, when the first dates using the OSL method were obtained. It is then that the first traces of footprints left by vertebrates were found. In subsequent years the successive natural collapse of sand has revealed further material and has permitted a detailed study including new dates....
  • Neanderthals on the Hunt

    02/18/2007 9:48:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 539+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 60 Number 2, March/April 2007 | unattributed (probably Mark Rose)
    The Neanderthals didn't disappear because they were slouches when it came to hunting. According to a new study based on material from the Republic of Georgia, Neanderthals were as good at hunting as early modern humans. But it may have been gender equality that put them at a disadvantage to their Homo sapien neighbors. Anthropologists observed that Neanderthals focused primarily on large game for food, while the frequency of healed fractures present in both genders and all ages suggests everyone participated in the hunt. Neanderthal shelters lacked evidence of gathered foods, such as seeds, as well as signs of skilled...
  • New Thoughts on Neanderthals' Diet

    01/04/2019 1:38:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 2, 2019 | editors
    The levels of nitrogen-15 in Neanderthal bones are so high that they suggest the early human relatives ate more meat than do carnivores such as hyenas. According to a Science News report, paleobiologist Kimberly Foecke of George Washington University thinks those high levels of nitrogen-15 might be due to the condition of the meat that Neanderthals consumed. To check the levels of nitrogen in rotting meat, Foecke left steaks cut from animals that had been raised without hormones or antibiotics outside in a box covered with mesh, and sampled them daily for 16 days. Preliminary results suggest that the levels...
  • Do you carry Neanderthal DNA? The shape of your skull may tell

    12/15/2018 7:51:23 AM PST · by ETL · 88 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Dec 14, 2018 | Charles Q. Choi Live Science Contributor | LiveScience
    The shape of your brain may say a lot about the Neanderthal in you. New research has found that modern humans carrying certain genetic fragments from our closest extinct relatives may have more oblong brains and skulls than other people. Modern humans possess unique, relatively globular skulls and brains. In contrast, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans, Neanderthals, have the elongated skulls and brains that are typical of most primates. Previous research had suggested these contrasting skull shapes might reflect differences in the size of various brain regions in modern humans and Neanderthals, and how these brain areas were...
  • Why modern humans have round heads

    12/13/2018 8:50:37 AM PST · by ETL · 52 replies
    ScienceMag.org ^ | Dec 13, 2018 | Ann Gibbons
    Ever since researchers first got a good look at a Neanderthal skull in the 1860s, they were struck by its strange shape: stretched from front to back like a football rather than round like a basketball, as in living people. But why our heads and those of our ice age cousins looked different remained a mystery. Now, researchers have found an ingenious way to identify genes that help explain the contrast. By analyzing traces of Neanderthal DNA that linger in Europeans from their ancestors' trysts, researchers have identified two Neanderthal gene variants linked to slightly less globular head shape in...
  • Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much

    12/02/2018 1:29:38 PM PST · by ETL · 11 replies
    phys.org/news ^ | Nov 30, 2018 | Katherine Unger Baillie, University of Pennsylvania
    The English idiom "highbrow," derived from a physical description of a skull barely able to contain the brain inside of it, comes from a long-held belief in the existence of a link between brain size and intelligence. For more than 200 years, scientists have looked for such an association. Begun using rough measures, such as estimated skull volume or head circumference, the investigation became more sophisticated in the last few decades when MRIs offered a highly accurate accounting of brain volume.Yet the connection has remained hazy and fraught, with many studies failing to account for confounding variables, such as height...
  • Neanderthals and humans were hooking up way more than anyone thought

    11/29/2018 2:49:48 PM PST · by ETL · 64 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Nov 29, 2018 | Charles Q. Choi Live Science Contributor
    Way more sex happened between Neanderthals and the ancestors of modern humans across Europe and Asia than scientists originally thought, a new study finds. Scientists initially thought that interbreeding among the two groups was more isolated to a particular place and time — specifically, when they encountered each other in western Eurasia shortly after modern humans left Africa. This idea stemmed from the fact that the genomes of modern humans from outside Africa are only about 2 percent Neanderthal, on average. Subsequent research, however, has found that Neanderthal ancestry is 12 to 20 percent higher in modern East Asians compared...
  • In praise of… Neanderthal man (we have all been guilty of defaming them as half-wits)

    01/15/2010 6:13:45 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 20 replies · 778+ views
    The Guardian ^ | 01/15/2010
    It seems we have all been guilty of defaming Neanderthal man. Research by a team based at the University of Bristol suggests that, far from being a lumbering, witless no-hoper, he was capable, 50,000 years ago, of producing forms of cosmetic adornment and even of primitive jewellery. In 1985, finds in Murcia, Spain, had suggested that this might be so; and now an expedition led by Professor João Zilhão of Bristol has uncovered a shell which shows "a symbolic dimension in behaviour and thinking that cannot be denied". All of which suggests some decent equivalence with the hitherto far more...
  • Human ancestors interbred with related species

    09/08/2011 5:17:24 PM PDT · by Renfield · 70 replies · 2+ views
    Naturenews ^ | 09-05-2011 | Matt Kaplan
    Our ancestors bred with other species in the Homo genus, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1. The authors say that up to 2% of the genomes of some modern African populations may originally come from a closely related species. Palaeontologists have long wondered whether modern humans came from a single, genetically isolated population of hominins or whether we are a genetic mix of various hominin species. Last year, an analysis comparing the Neanderthal genome sequence to that of modern H. sapiens showed that some interbreeding did take place between the two...
  • New Virtual Reconstruction Of A Neanderthal Thorax Suggests Another Breathing Mechanism

    11/18/2018 1:56:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | November 14, 2018 | University of the Basque Country
    While some of the anatomical regions of these extinct humans are well known, others, such as the vertebral column and the ribs, are less well known because these elements are more fragile and not well preserved in the fossil record. In 1983 a partial Neanderthal skeleton (known officially as Kebara 2, and nicknamed "Moshe") belonging to a young male Neanderthal individual who died some 60,000 years ago was found in the Kebara site (Mount Carmel, Israel). While this skeleton does not preserve the cranium because some time after burial the cranium was removed, probably as a consequence of a funerary...
  • 115,000-Year-Old Bones Found In Poland Reveal Neanderthal Child Eaten By Gigantic Prehistoric Bird

    11/12/2018 8:17:05 AM PST · by Gamecock · 26 replies
    Hasan Jasmin ^ | 11/9/2018
    A few years ago, a team of researchers in Poland came across a pair of Neanderthal bones that held a grisly secret: Their owner had been eaten by a giant bird. The two finger bones belonged to a Neanderthal child who had died roughly 115,000 years before, making those bones the oldest known human remains from Poland, according to Science In Poland. Once the bones were analyzed, the scientists concluded that the hand bones were porous because they had passed through the digestive system of a large bird. It is unclear if the bird killed the child and then ate...
  • Anthropologists Hail Romania Fossil Find (35K Y.O. Humans)

    03/07/2004 12:49:38 PM PST · by blam · 18 replies · 1,414+ views
    AP/Yahoo ^ | 3-6-2004 | Alison Mutler
    Anthropologists Hail Romania Fossil Find Sat Mar 6,11:27 AM ET By ALISON MUTLER, Associated Press Writer BUCHAREST, Romania - Experts analyzing remains of a man, woman and teenage boy unearthed in Romania last year are convinced that the 35,000 year-old fossils are the most complete ever of modern humans of that era, a U.S. scientist said Saturday. International scientists have been carrying out further analysis to get a clearer picture on the find, said anthropologist Erik Trinkaus, of Washington University in St. Louis. But it's already clear that, "this is the most complete collection of modern humans in Europe older...