Keyword: neanderthals

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  • How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

    02/28/2015 7:20:56 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 80 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 02/28/2015
    Dogs are humanity’s oldest friends, renowned for their loyalty and abilities to guard, hunt and chase. But modern humans may owe even more to them than we previously realised. We may have to thank them for helping us eradicate our caveman rivals, the Neanderthals.
  • Zigzags on a Shell From Java Are the Oldest Human Engravings

    02/24/2015 1:44:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | December 3, 2014 | Helen Thompson
    Perhaps even more intriguing is a single shell with what appears to be a geometric pattern—zigzagged grooves carved into the center of the outer shell. Analysis points to the patterns being carved on purpose. Again the team turned to modern mussels; they tried carving similar patterns into Potamida littoralis with a shark tooth and compared that to weathering and natural abrasions. Sure enough, their carvings were the closest matches to the ancient pattern. “That must have been an appealing thing for Homo erectus,” says Joordens. “You can imagine sitting there with a shell in one hand and a tool in...
  • A New Theory on How Neanderthal DNA Spread in Asia

    02/21/2015 9:25:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    NY Slimes ^ | February 19, 2015 | Carl Zimmer
    In 2010, scientists made a startling discovery about our past: About 50,000 years ago, Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of living Europeans and Asians. Now two teams of researchers have come to another intriguing conclusion: Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of Asians at a second point in history, giving them an extra infusion of Neanderthal DNA. The findings are further evidence that our genomes contain secrets about our evolution that we might have missed by looking at fossils alone. "We're learning new, big-picture things from the genetic data, rather than just filling in details," said Kirk E. Lohmueller, a geneticist...
  • Neanderthal groups based part of the their lifestyle on the sexual division of labor

    02/19/2015 1:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | February 18, 2015 | Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Marta Garcia
    Neanderthal communities divided some of their tasks according to their sex. This is one of the main conclusions reached by a study performed by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)... which analyzed 99 incisors and canine teeth of 19 individuals from three different sites (El Sidron, in Asturias - Spain, L'Hortus in France, and Spy in Belgium), reveals that the dental grooves present in the female fossils follow the same pattern, which is different to that found in male individuals. Analyses show that all Neanderthal individuals, regardless of age, had dental grooves. According to Antonio Rosas, CSIC researcher at the...
  • People from Tuscany are most similar to Neanderthals

    02/15/2015 1:54:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Abroad in the Yard ^ | February 9, 2012 | AITY
    In a series of histograms (graphs showing the distribution of genome and population data), Hawks shows that Asian and European genomes have significantly more Neanderthal DNA than African genomes. The averages for Asian and European samples are around 3% higher than the average for African samples. Whatever gave Africans some degree of similarity to Neanderthals, non-Africans seem to have received around 3% more of it. Europeans average a bit more Neanderthal DNA than Asians, showing that Europeans probably mixed with Neanderthals as they moved into Europe, adding a secondary mix of Neanderthal DNA into their genome beyond the primary mix...
  • Modern Y-Chromosome Variation Surpasses Archaic Humans (article)

    05/07/2013 7:58:39 AM PDT · by fishtank · 25 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 5-6-2013 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Modern Y-Chromosome Variation Surpasses Archaic Humans by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * The human Y-chromosome has been a sore point among secular scientists in recent years because of its many anti-evolutionary surprises. Adding to the Darwinian grief, is yet one more shocking Y-chromosome study that more clearly illustrates the boundaries of human genetic diversity. Much controversy has brewed during the past few years over the genomic sequences of what have been termed "archaic" humans. This so-called "ancient DNA" was extracted from bone fragments of "Neandertal" and "Denisovan" specimens and then sequenced, providing draft blue prints of these respective genomes.1, 2 While...
  • Ancient Etruscans Were Immigrants From Anatolia (Turkey)

    06/17/2007 4:55:52 PM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 1,903+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 6-17-2007 | Mary Rice
    Contact: Mary Rice mary@mrcommunication.org European Society of Human Genetics Ancient Etruscans were immigrants from Anatolia, or what is now TurkeyGeneticists find the final piece in the puzzle Nice, France: The long-running controversy about the origins of the Etruscan people appears to be very close to being settled once and for all, a geneticist will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today. Professor Alberto Piazza, from the University of Turin, Italy, will say that there is overwhelming evidence that the Etruscans, whose brilliant civilisation flourished 3000 years ago in what is now Tuscany, were settlers from...
  • DNA Traces Roots Back To Stone Age

    03/25/2002 5:34:27 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 369+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 3-24-2002 | Paul Lashmar
    26 March 2002 01:46 GMT DNA traces roots back to Stone Age By Paul Lashmar 24 March 2002 Are you a Viking, Saxon, Pict, Celt, or descendant of an ancient African tribe? New DNA testing methods will enable us to trace our family tree right back to the Stone Age. Until recently, researching your ancestry meant hours of painstaking digging through fusty old files in public record offices or asking older relatives about their family memories. When the 1901 census was released online, demand was so great that the system crashed. The new scientific technique for tracing relatives allows individuals...
  • The Neanderthal Nose Enigma: Why So Big?

    01/14/2011 4:16:53 PM PST · by decimon · 60 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 14, 2011 | Charles Q. Choi
    A mystery of Neanderthals for more than a century is one that's literally as plain as the noses on their faces - why did they have such big schnozes? One common answer suggests their faces somehow helped our extinct relatives deal with the extreme cold they faced. Now, however, scientists find that Neanderthal faces were not built for the cold - meaning that no one still knows why Neanderthals had such noses. The enigma that such a large nose poses is that it seems like an excellent way to lose heat - a paradox, given that Neanderthals lived when glaciers...
  • Climate Change, Not Humans, Trounced Neanderthals

    05/06/2007 6:22:23 AM PDT · by Toddsterpatriot · 32 replies · 865+ views
    Yahoo! News ^ | May 4, 2007 | Dave Mosher
    Neanderthals disappeared from Earth more than 20,000 years ago, but figuring out why continues to challenge anthropologists. One team of scientists, however, now says they have evidence to back climate change as the main culprit. The Iberian Peninsula, better known as present-day Spain and Portugal, was one of the last Neanderthal refuges. Many scientists have thought that out-hunting by Homo sapiens and interbreeding with them brought Neanderthals to their demise, but climate change has also been proposed. Francisco Jiménez-Espejo, a paleoclimatologist at the University of Granada in Spain, says a lack of evidence has left climate change weakly supported—until now....
  • Big chill killed off the Neanderthals

    09/21/2005 12:22:31 PM PDT · by george76 · 77 replies · 1,872+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 24 January 2004 | Douglas Palmer
    IT IS possibly the longest-running murder mystery of them all. What, or even who, killed humankind's nearest relatives, the Neanderthals who once roamed Europe before dying out almost 30,000 years ago? Suspects have ranged from the climate to humans themselves, and the mystery has deeply divided experts. Now 30 scientists have come together to publish the most definitive answer yet to this enigma. They say Neanderthals simply did not have the technological know-how to survive the increasingly harsh winters. And intriguingly, rather than being Neanderthal killers, the original human settlers of Europe almost suffered the same fate. Ice cores recovered...
  • Humans and Neandertals likely interbred in Middle East

    01/29/2015 1:26:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies
    Science ^ | 28 January 2015 | Michael Balter
    The discovery of a 55,000-year-old partial skull of a modern human in an Israeli cave, the first sighting of Homo sapiens in this time and place, offers skeletal evidence to support the idea that Neandertals and moderns mated in the Middle East between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago. What's more, the skull could belong to an ancestor of the modern humans who later swept across Europe and Asia and replaced the Neandertals. The find supports a raft of recent genetic studies. A 2010 analysis, for example, found that up to 2% of the genomes of today's Europeans and Asians consist...
  • Fossil Found In Asia Could Be A New Species Of Human

    01/28/2015 10:26:09 AM PST · by blam · 77 replies
    BI - Livescience ^ | 1-28-2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience January 27, 2015An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. These findings suggest that multiple lineages of extinct humans may have coexisted in Asia before the arrival of modern humans in the region about 40,000 years ago, the scientists added. Although modern humans, Homo sapiens, are the only surviving human lineage, others once walked the globe. Extinct human lineages once found in Asia include Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans; Denisovans, whose genetic legacy may...
  • Starch grains found on Neandertal teeth debunks theory that dietary deficiencies caused their ext...

    03/03/2012 2:32:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 1+ views
    Smithsonian Science ^ | 3 January 2011 | unattributed
    Researchers from George Washington University and the Smithsonian Institution have discovered evidence to debunk the theory that Neandertals' disappearance was caused in part by a deficient diet -- one that lacked variety and was overly reliant on meat. After discovering starch granules from plant food trapped in the dental calculus on 40-thousand-year-old Neandertal teeth, the scientists believe that Neandertals ate a wide variety of plants and included cooked grains as part of a more sophisticated, diverse diet similar to early modern humans... The discovery of starch granules in the calculus on Neandertal teeth provides direct evidence that they made sophisticated,...
  • Yabba dabba d'oh! Stone Age man wasn't necessarily more advanced than the Neanderthals

    01/17/2015 4:01:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | January 14, 2015 | University of Montreal
    A multi-purpose bone tool dating from the Neanderthal era has been discovered by University of Montreal researchers, throwing into question our current understanding of the evolution of human behaviour. It was found at an archaeological site in France... Neanderthals lived in Europe and western Asia in the Middle Paleolithic between around 250,000 to 28,000 years ago. Homo sapiens is the scientific term for modern man. The production of bone tools by Neanderthals is open to debate. For much of the twentieth century, prehistoric experts were reluctant to recognize the ability of this species to incorporate materials like bone into their...
  • 2008: A good year for Neanderthals

    12/27/2008 4:56:53 AM PST · by CE2949BB · 26 replies · 1,152+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 24 December 2008 | Ewen Callaway
    For a species that went extinct more than 25,000 years ago, 2008 has been a hell of a year for Neanderthals. The ancient humans got their first complete mitochondrial genome sequence, their stone tools turned out every bit as efficient as ours, and we even heard them speak. Here are some of our favourite Neanderthal discoveries of 2008. Genome secrets revealedBig nose strikes againOur brainy cousinsMore DNA revelationsA voice from the pastMaking themselves prettyMaster tool makersThe butchers of Gibraltar
  • Neanderthals in Color

    05/06/2012 7:48:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Archaeology, v65, n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Zach Zorich
    In 1981, when Wil Roebroeks of Leiden University was beginning his archaeological career, he ran across some red stains in the grayish sediments on the floodplain of the Maas River where his team was excavating. The site, called Maastricht-Belvèdère, in The Netherlands, was occupied by Neanderthals at least 200,000 years ago. Roebroeks collected and stored samples of the red stains, and 30 years later he received funding to analyze them. It became apparent that he and his team had discovered the earliest evidence of hominins using the mineral iron oxide, also known as ocher. Until now, the use of...
  • History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud [2005]

    01/14/2015 9:55:35 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 47 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 01/14/2015 | Luke Harding in Berlin
    It appeared to be one of archaeology's most sensational finds. The skull fragment discovered in a peat bog near Hamburg was more than 36,000 years old - and was the vital missing link between modern humans and Neanderthals. This, at least, is what Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten - a distinguished, cigar-smoking German anthropologist - told his scientific colleagues, to global acclaim, after being invited to date the extremely rare skull. However, the professor's 30-year-old academic career has now ended in disgrace after the revelation that he systematically falsified the dates on this and numerous other "stone age" relics. Yesterday...
  • About Belgrade

    03/17/2010 4:43:47 AM PDT · by Stilmat · 9 replies · 279+ views
    Infostar ^ | 17.03.2010 | Aleksandar
    Belgrade, city of very tumultuous history, one of the oldest in Europe. Its history has lasted for 7000 years. The area around the large rivers was inhabited in the Paleolithic period. From the older stone age, came the remains of human bones and skulls of Neanderthals, found in a quarry near Leštane, in a cave in the vicinity of the Cukarica Bajloni market. Remains of late Stone Age culture were found in Vinca, Zarkovo and Upper Town, above the confluence of the Sava and Danube. This indicates that the area of Belgrade has been continually inhabited and that the intensity...
  • French find puts humans in Europe 200,000 years earlier

    12/16/2009 6:22:20 AM PST · by decimon · 15 replies · 649+ views
    AFP ^ | Dec 15, 2009 | Unknown
    PARIS (AFP) – Experts on prehistoric man are rethinking their dates after a find in a southern French valley suggested our ancestors may have reached Europe 1.57 million years ago: 200,000 years earlier than we thought. What provoked the recount was a pile of fossilised bones and teeth uncovered 15 years ago by local man Jean Rouvier in a basalt quarry at Lezignan la Cebe, in the Herault valley, Languedoc. In the summer of 2008, Rouvier mentioned his find to Jerome Ivorra, an archaeological researcher at France's National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). The subsequent dig uncovered a large variety...
  • Human Ancestor Fossil Found in Europe (Spain)

    03/26/2008 12:10:28 PM PDT · by decimon · 50 replies · 1,050+ views
    Associated Press ^ | March 26, 2008 | DANIEL WOOLLS
    MADRID, Spain - A small piece of jawbone unearthed in a cave in Spain is the oldest known fossil of a human ancestor in Europe and suggests that people lived on the continent much earlier than previously believed, scientists say. The researchers said the fossil found last year at Atapuerca in northern Spain, along with stone tools and animal bones, is up to 1.3 million years old. That would be 500,000 years older than remains from a 1997 find that prompted the naming of a new species: Homo antecessor, or Pioneer Man, possibly a common ancestor to Neanderthals and modern...
  • Earliest music instruments found (42,000 year-old flutes)

    05/25/2012 6:43:09 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    BBC ^ | 5/25/12
    Researchers have identified what they say are the oldest-known musical instruments in the world.The flutes, made from bird bone and mammoth ivory, come from a cave in southern Germany which contains early evidence for the occupation of Europe by modern humans - Homo sapiens. Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old. The findings are described in the Journal of Human Evolution. A team led by Prof Tom Higham at Oxford University dated animal bones in the same ground layers as the flutes at Geissenkloesterle Cave in Germany's Swabian Jura. Prof Nick...
  • Ancient flutes more than 35,000 years old - world's oldest instrument

    06/24/2009 5:20:09 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 24 replies · 1,364+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 6/24/2009
    Found in a German cave, suggesting humans were piping tunes from bone and ivory flutes more than 35,000 years ago, new research has shown. Scientists discovered remains of the instruments in a German cave once populated by some of the first modern humans to settle in Europe after leaving Africa. Instrument has five finger holes and two deep V-shaped notches at one end The finds suggest that our oldest ancestors in Europe had a well-established musical tradition. The most significant discovery was a complete flute made from a griffon vulture bone. Measuring 21.8cm, with a diameter of about 8mm, the...
  • Prehistoric flute in Germany is oldest known

    06/24/2009 12:40:02 PM PDT · by decimon · 42 replies · 1,615+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 24, 2009 | Patrick McGroarty
    AP Photo/Daniel Maurer A bird-bone flute unearthed in a German cave was carved some 35,000 years ago and is the oldest handcrafted musical instrument yet discovered, archaeologists say, offering the latest evidence that early modern humans in Europe had established a complex and creative culture.
  • Neanderthal Flute

    09/11/2005 9:12:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 563+ views
    Bob Fink ^ | updated March 1998 | Bob Fink
    That we would have a scale virtually unique to that flute (possibly matching some other obscure scale in some parts of the world, but not matching any known historically widespread scale in use). The problem with this non-conclusion is that since the hole-spacings discussed in this essay have only a one-in-hundreds chance to match a pattern of 4 notes in the diatonic major/minor scales, then this conclusion would require accepting a remarkable against-the-odds coincidence of spacings.
  • Possible Neanderthal rock engraving in Gorham's Cave

    12/09/2014 5:04:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | September 3, 2014 | Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    A study of a rock engraving discovered within Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar finds that the cross-hatched impression was likely created by Neanderthals and excluding the possibility of an unintentional or utilitarian origin, would represent Neanderthals' capacity for abstract expression. Previously-discovered cave art has been exclusively attributed to modern humans, who arrived in Western Europe around 40,000 years ago. In July 2012, researchers discovered the abstract pattern engraved in the rock of Gorham's Cave which is located on the southeast face of the Rock of Gibraltar. The cross-hatched pattern was overlain by undisturbed sediment in which Neanderthal artefacts had previously been...
  • Ancient and Modern Europeans Have Surprising Genetic Connection

    11/08/2014 4:01:30 PM PST · by robowombat · 24 replies
    Live Science ^ | November 06, 2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Ancient and Modern Europeans Have Surprising Genetic Connection by Charles Q. Choi, Live Science Contributor | November 06, 2014 There is a surprising genetic unity between the earliest known Europeans and contemporary Europeans, ancient DNA reveals. This finding suggests that a complex network of sexual exchange may have existed across Europe over the past 50,000 years, and also helps to pinpoint when modern humans interbred with Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans, the researchers said. The origin of contemporary Europeans continues to be debated. The modern human ancestors of contemporary Eurasians are believed to have left Africa about...
  • Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age

    11/07/2014 1:36:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | Nov 06, 2014
    The study also uncovers a more accurate timescale for when humans and Neanderthals interbred, and finds evidence for an early contact between the European hunter-gatherers and those in the Middle East – who would later develop agriculture and disperse into Europe about 8,000 years ago, transforming the European gene pool. Scientists now believe Eurasians separated into at least three populations earlier than 36,000 years ago: Western Eurasians, East Asians and a mystery third lineage, all of whose descendants would develop the unique features of most non-African peoples - but not before some interbreeding with Neanderthals took place. Led by the...
  • 30-year New York Times Science Writer Out After Writing Book About Genetics, Race

    05/11/2014 10:16:48 AM PDT · by mojito · 65 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 5/10/2014 | Chris Reed
    Nicholas Wade, a British-born science reporter and editor for more than 30 years with The New York Times, is no longer with the newspaper — just days after the release of his latest book, in which he depicts blacks with roots in sub-Saharan Africa as genetically less adapted to modern life than whites and Asians. Was The New York Times uncomfortable with Wade’s science or his conclusions? It’s unclear. Neither Wade nor his former employer returned requests for comment. Wade’s last Times article appeared April 24. His Penguin Press book “A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History” arrived in...
  • Book Review: 'A Troublesome Inheritance' by Nicholas Wade

    05/03/2014 1:51:51 PM PDT · by globelamp · 82 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | 050214 | Charles Murray
    ".. The orthodoxy's equivalent of the Nicene Creed has two scientific tenets. The first, promulgated by geneticist Richard Lewontin in "The Apportionment of Human Diversity" (1972), is that the races are so close to genetically identical that "racial classification is now seen to be of virtually no genetic or taxonomic significance." The second, popularized by the late paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould, is that human evolution in everything but cosmetic differences stopped before humans left Africa, meaning that "human equality is a contingent fact of history," as he put it in an essay of that title in 1984." "Since the sequencing...
  • Oldest DNA ever found sheds light on humans' global trek

    10/22/2014 2:15:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    www.centnews.com ^ | 2014-10-22 18:00:08 | Richard INGHAM
    France - Scientists said Wednesday they had unravelled the oldest DNA ever retrieved from a Homo sapiens bone, a feat that sheds light on modern humans' colonisation of the planet. A femur found by chance on the banks of a west Siberian river in 2008 is that of a man who died around 45,000 years ago, they said. Teased out of collagen in the ancient bone, the genome contains traces from Neanderthals -- a cousin species who lived in Eurasia alongside H. sapiens before mysteriously disappearing. Previous research has found that Neanderthals and H. sapiens interbred, leaving a tiny Neanderthal...
  • Oldest complete human genome sequenced

    10/23/2014 4:19:36 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 17 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 23 October 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    Scientists have sequenced the oldest complete human genome. The DNA comes from an anatomically modern man who roamed Western Siberia 45,000 years ago. It provides experts with a more accurate timeline of when modern humans mated with their Neanderthal cousins as they moved from Africa into Europe, between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago. Scientists have sequenced the oldest complete human genome. The DNA comes from an anatomically modern man who roamed Western Siberia 45,000 years ago. His remains were fund near the settlement of Ust’-Ishim in western Siberia in 2008. The male lived around the time the populations of Europe...
  • What does a 45,000-year-old femur mean for the Neanderthal in you?

    10/23/2014 9:01:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 52 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor's Science Blog ^ | October 23, 2014 | Anne Steele
    A genetic analysis of a 45,000-year-old thigh bone narrows down the time when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred.A 45,000-year-old leg bone is raising questions about just how close modern-day humans are to our thick-browed Stone Age ancestors. DNA from the femur of a Siberian man is helping to pinpoint when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred, researchers say. But what does this mean for the human connection to a species that disappeared nearly 30,000 years ago? The thigh bone, spotted six years ago on the banks of the Irtysh River in Siberia by a Russian artist who carves jewelry...
  • Bones discovered could reveal behaviour of extinct relatives

    10/11/2014 9:09:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Telegraph ^ | Friday, October 10, 2014 | Leon Siciliano
    Pre neanderthal bones 200,000 years old have been discovered on a building site, and could shed light on every day behaviour of our extinct relatives It is thought that these pre neanderthal bones could shed light on the everyday behaviour of our closest extinct relative. They were discovered in Northern France by chance on a building site and it is though the arm bones could be as much as 200,000 years old. It is a rare find, only 12 other sites in Europe have discovered such significant archeological remains. The bones are of particular scientific interest because they hint at...
  • Study claims cave art made by Neanderthals

    09/03/2014 12:51:29 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 01 SEP 2014 | by Frank Jordans
    A series of lines scratched into rock in a cave near the southwestern tip of Europe could be proof that Neanderthals were more intelligent and creative than previously thought. The cross-hatched engravings inside Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar are the first known examples of Neanderthal rock art, according to a team of scientists who studied the site. The find is significant because it indicates that modern humans and their extinct cousins shared the capacity for abstract expression. The study, released Monday by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined grooves in a rock that had been covered with...
  • Study Claims Cave Art Made By Neanderthals

    09/01/2014 10:46:10 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies
    SF Gate - AP ^ | 9-1-2014 | FRANK JORDANS, Associated Press
    FRANK JORDANS, Associated PressMonday, September 1, 2014 BERLIN (AP) — A series of lines scratched into rock in a cave near the southwestern tip of Europe could be proof that Neanderthals were more intelligent and creative than previously thought. The cross-hatched engravings inside Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar are the first known examples of Neanderthal rock art, according to a team of scientists who studied the site. The find is significant because it indicates that modern humans and their extinct cousins shared the capacity for abstract expression. The study, released Monday by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,...
  • Modern Humans Arrived in Europe Earlier Than Previously Thought, Study Finds

    08/20/2014 2:50:07 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 55 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 20 August 2014 | GAUTAM NAIK
    A new study concludes that modern humans arrived in Europe much earlier than previously believed, and clarifies more specifically the long time period they overlapped with Neanderthals. The significant overlap bolsters a theory that the two species met, bred and possibly exchanged or copied vital toolmaking techniques. It represents another twist in an enduring puzzle about human origins: why we triumphed while the better adapted and similarly intelligent Neanderthals died out. The study was published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Neanderthals are our closest known extinct relatives, with about 99.5% of DNA in common with humans. They had a brain...
  • Neanderthals Died Out 10,000 Years Earlier Than Thought, With Help From Modern Humans

    08/21/2014 10:35:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 50 replies
    Nationalgeographic.com ^ | 08-20-2014 | Dan Vergano
    New fossil dates show our ancient cousins disappeared 40,000 years ago. The Neanderthals died out about 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new fossil dating suggests, adding to evidence that the arrival of modern humans in Europe pushed our ancient Stone Age cousins into extinction. (Read "Last of the Neanderthals" in National Geographic magazine.) Neanderthals' mysterious disappearance from the fossil record has long puzzled scholars who wondered whether the species went extinct on its own or was helped on its way out by Europe's first modern human migrants. "When did the Neanderthals disappear, and why?" says Tom Higham of the...
  • Fowl play: Neanderthals were first bird eaters (Update)

    08/18/2014 8:00:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 07, 2014 | Brian Reyes
    Neanderthals may have caught, butchered and cooked wild pigeons long before modern humans became regular consumers of bird meat, a study revealed on Thursday. Close examination of 1,724 bones from rock doves, found in a cave in Gibraltar and dated to between 67,000 and 28,000 years ago, revealed cuts, human tooth marks and burns, said a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. This suggested the doves may have been butchered and then roasted, wrote the researchers—the first evidence of hominids eating birds. And the evidence suggested Neanderthals ate much like a latter-day Homo sapiens would tuck into a roast chicken,...
  • Unearthed Neanderthal site rich in horse bones

    08/17/2014 12:02:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Horsetalk ^ | August 15, 2014 | unattributed
    A site in southwestern France found to be rich in the bones of horses and other large herbivores has provided important insights into the hunting and scavenging habits of Neanderthals. A team of archaeologists from the French archaeological agency Inrap have unearthed hundreds of bones at the Middle Paleolithic site in Quincieux dating back 35,000 to 55,000 years. The work was started due to roadworks in the area, with the outstanding discovery prompting local authorities to extend the time available for excavations. The excavation of the prehistoric site, on a hill overlooking the old bed of the Saone River, revealed...
  • ISIS 'orders female genital mutilation' for women in Mosul

    07/24/2014 6:53:52 AM PDT · by Izzy Dunne · 150 replies
    BBC ^ | July 24,2014 | Unknown
    The UN says militant Islamist group Isis has ordered all women and girls in Mosul, northern Iraq, to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM). UN official Jacqueline Badcock said the fatwa, or religious edict, applied to females between the ages of 11 and 46.
  • 'Italy's Ginger Gene Spread From Sicily'

    07/18/2014 1:53:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 33 replies
    Over the centuries, they’ve been scorned, persecuted and marginalized. But it was an example of modern-day disdain towards redheads that prompted an Italian photographer’s mission to safeguard their diversity, The Local has learned. Let’s face it, redheads get a tough time, especially in the early years of their life. I should know, because I am one. But more on that later. Marina Rosso, a 29-year-old fine art photographer and researcher from Udine, is not a redhead as the English translation of her surname might suggest. But after hearing in 2011 that flame-haired men were being rejected from the world’s largest...
  • Lapps, Finns, Cold Winters And Intelligence

    Tuesday, 3 June 2014Dr James Thompson Renée Zellweger cropped.jpg Cold Winter theory is very simple: warm blooded, warm climate adapted humans drifted North in search of game, and perished unless they could hunt, cope with the climate, and plan wisely so as to live from one winter to the next. Hence, survivors had more forethought, more behavioural restraint regarding immediate gratification, and a whole lot of other changes to help them adapt to hunting and later farming in cold climates. If any of this is true, people living in the far North should be very bright. All the short-term-ist, happy...
  • Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes

    07/03/2014 3:43:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    L.A. Times ^ | By Julia Rosen
    orget climbing Mt. Everest — for most humans, just eking out a living on the harsh Tibetan plateau is challenge enough. But Tibetan people have thrived there for thousands of years, and a new study says it's thanks to a genetic adaptation they inherited from an ancient human relative.. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, identifies a long segment of DNA shared by the extinct people known as Denisovans and modern-day Tibetans. The segment contains the gene scientists think gives Tibetans a lung up over lowlanders at high altitudes. No one knew the Denisovans ever roamed the Earth...
  • Neandertals ate their veggies, their feces reveal

    06/28/2014 8:43:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Science ^ | Wednesday, June 25, 2015 | Ann Gibbons
    Scientists excavating an archaeological site in southern Spain have finally gotten the real poop on Neandertals, finding that the Caveman Diet for these quintessential carnivores included substantial helpings of vegetables. Using the oldest published samples of human fecal matter, archaeologists have found the first direct evidence that Neandertals in Europe cooked and ate plants about 50,000 years ago... ...the team was able to detect the chemical byproducts created by bacteria in the gut in the digestion of cholesterol from meat, as well as sterols and stanols, which are lipids in plants that are similar to cholesterol. The tests revealed that...
  • Omnivore Ancestors? Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat & vegetables

    06/27/2014 2:46:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Scientist ^ | June 26, 2014 | Jyoti Madhusoodanan
    Fossilized feces offer new evidence that Neanderthals ate both meat and plants. Chemical analysis confirmed the oldest-known ancient human fecal matter, according to a study published yesterday (June 25) in PLOS ONE. Previous isotope studies of bones suggested Neanderthals were primarily meat-eaters. Analyses of tartar from their teeth have indicated they may have also eaten plants, although some researchers noted that these plant remains could be traces from the stomach contents of herbivore prey. Stool, however, is "the perfect evidence because you’re sure it was consumed," study author Ainara Sistiaga from the University of La Laguna in Spain told BBC...
  • Fossilized Human Poop Reveals The Real Paleo Diet (Neanderthals)

    06/26/2014 7:54:45 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 6-26-2014 | Will Dunham
    Will Dunham, Reuters Jun. 26, 2014 Don't laugh, but the discovery of the oldest known human poop is offering valuable scientific insight into the life of Neanderthals who lived in Spain some 50,000 years ago. Scientists said on Wednesday they found five samples of human fecal matter at an archeological site called El Salt, in the floor of a rock shelter where Neanderthals once lived. Analysis of the samples provided a new understanding of the diet of this extinct human species, offering the first evidence that Neanderthals were omnivores who also ate vegetables as part of their meat-heavy diet, they...
  • Cavemen among us: Some humans are 4 percent Neanderthal

    05/25/2014 2:05:03 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 79 replies
    csmon ^ | May 6, 2010 | Pete Spotts
    A new study concludes that humans mated with Neanderthals 50,000 to 80,000 years ago, leaving traces of the Neanderthal genome in some modern humans. This picture shows the reconstruction of a Neanderthal woman at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany, on March 20, 2009. A new study is offering insights into how early humans and Neanderthals were similar and different.
  • Trove of skulls...missing link in human evolution: early Neanderthals used teeth as 'third hand'

    06/19/2014 7:50:23 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 19 June 2014 | ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD
    Full headline: Treasure trove of skulls reveal missing link in human evolution: Facial bones suggest early Neanderthals used their teeth as a 'third hand' The 17 skulls belong to a single population of a fossil hominin species This is the biggest collection of human fossils ever found on one site They shed light on pre-human evolution from around 400,000 years ago Skulls showed Neanderthal features in face and teeth but not elsewhere These features evolved due to eating and perhaps for use as a 'third hand' Study adds to theories that the Neanderthals developed their characteristic looks slowly, and intermittently,...
  • Neanderthals may have been ‘as intelligent’ as humans, scientists say

    05/02/2014 2:05:26 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 39 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8:17PM BST 01 May 2014 | Neil Murphy
    New research has undermined the popular belief that Neanderthals were less intelligent than Homo sapiens, and challenges the widely-held view they were forced into extinction by modern humans. Many experts have suggested humans’ advanced culture and hunting ability caused Neanderthals to disappear from Europe over 30,000 years ago. …