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Keyword: neanderthals

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  • SCIENTIST CLAIMS HE CAN BRING BACK NEANDERTHALS

    07/26/2016 8:25:00 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 82 replies
    DAILY MAIL UK via Barbwire ^ | DAILY MAIL UK 20 January 2013/UPDATED DAILY MAIL UK 1 February 2016 via Barbwire 22 July 2016 | BY ALLAN HALL FOR MAILONLINE AND FIONA MACRAE FOR THE DAILY MAIL via Barbwire LEE DUIGON
    All he needs is “an adventurous female” to be a surrogate mother, says a scientist at Harvard Medical School, and he’s off to the races on a plan to resurrect the extinct Neanderthals. He thinks he has enough Neanderthal DNA that he can “reconstruct” the whole DNA strand. Would that mean filling the little gaps with, say, frog DNA? It worked in Jurassic Park. Professor George Church of Harvard Medical School believes he can reconstruct Neanderthal DNA and resurrect the species which became extinct 33,000 years ago. His scheme is reminiscent of Jurassic Park but, while in the film dinosaurs...
  • A Good Neanderthal Was Hard to Find

    02/26/2006 3:25:01 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 251 replies · 4,010+ views
    NY Times:Week in Review ^ | February 26, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Maybe they just didn't have time to get to know each other. The question of what Neanderthals and Homo sapiens might have done on cold nights in their caves, if they happened to get together and the fire burned down to embers, has intrigued scientists since the 19th century, when the existence of Neanderthals was discovered. A correction in the way prehistoric time is measured using radiocarbon dating, described last week in the journal Nature, doesn't answer the enduring question, but it might at least help explain why no DNA evidence of interbreeding has been found: the two species spent...
  • Neanderthal bones show signs of cannibalism

    07/07/2016 1:18:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    The remains that were found were radiocarbon-dated to be about 40,500 to 45,500 years old, and it was determined that Neanderthals butchered and used the bones of their peers as tools, according to a press release from the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. The findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports. The team identified 99 "uncertain" bone fragments as belonging to Neanderthals, which would make this the greatest trove of Neanderthal remains ever found north of the Alps. The findings also shed light on the genetics of this lost human species, adding to previously collected data on Neanderthal genes....
  • Could the first Maltese have been Neanderthals?

    06/19/2016 7:15:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 34 replies
    The Times of Malta ^ | June 19, 2016 | Ivan Martin
    Maltese prehistory may have just been extended by 30,000 years. The verdict of experts from the London Natural History Museum has revived the theory that a tooth discovered in Għar Dalam in 1917 may prove Neanderthals once roamed the island. The claim is not new. It was made in the 1920s by two British anthropologists, but four decades later the theory no longer had credence. “Anyone who wrote a history book from 1964 till today will say there were never any Neanderthals on Malta. According to them, the first people to come here were Sicilian farmers around 7,000 years ago,”...
  • Neanderthals built mysterious cave structures 175,000 years ago

    06/13/2016 1:51:05 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 27 replies
    The Guardian. ^ | 5/25/2016 | Ian Sample
    Mysterious structures found deep inside a French cave are the work of Neanderthal builders who lived in the region more than 100,000 years before modern humans set foot in Europe. The extraordinary constructions are made from nearly 400 stalagmites that have been yanked from the ground and stacked on top of one another to produce rudimentary walls on the damp cave floor. The most prominent formations are two ringed walls, built four layers deep in places, which appear to have been propped up with stalagmites wedged in place as vertical stays. The largest of the walls is nearly seven metres...
  • The work of Neanderthals: Ancient ring-like structures from 176,000 years ago

    05/25/2016 7:10:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    l a times ^ | 05/25/2016 | Deborah Netburn
    Deep in a dark cave in southwestern France lie half a dozen mysterious structures that scientists believe were built by Neanderthals 176,000 years ago -- about 140,000 years before the first modern humans arrived in Europe. The structures, described Wednesday in the journal Nature, are located in what is known as the Bruniquel Cave. They are made of roughly 400 pieces of stalagmites, all roughly, almost eerily, the same size. Archaeologists say these mineral formations were probably broken off the cave floor by ancient hands and then deliberately arranged into two large rings and a series of four round piles...
  • Prehistoric Hand Stencils In Spanish Caves Not Randomly Placed, Say Researchers

    04/23/2016 11:54:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, April 17, 2016 | editors
    Prehistoric cave occupants paid attention to cave wall morphology and touch when creating hand stencils. Human occupants of two caves in Northern Spain put some thought into where they placed their hand stencils on cave walls as much as 37,000 years ago, during Palaeolithic times. The topography and physical characteristics of the walls in the low light conditions of the caves seem to have mattered to them, suggest a team of researchers... What they found was a pattern that indicated selection or attention to certain types of natural cave wall features for placement of the stencils. "In total 80% of...
  • Modern humans, Neanderthals shared earth for 1,000 years

    09/02/2005 2:31:25 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 85 replies · 2,234+ views
    ABC NEWSonline ^ | Thursday, September 1, 2005. 3:29pm (AEST)
    Last Update: Thursday, September 1, 2005. 3:29pm (AEST) A reconstruction of the face of a young female Neanderthal who lived about 35,000 years ago in France. (AFP) Modern humans, Neanderthals shared earth for 1,000 years New evidence has emerged that Neanderthals co-existed with anatomically modern humans for at least 1,000 years in central France.The finding suggests Neanderthals came to a tragic and lingering end.Few chapters in the rise of Homo sapiens, as modern mankind is known, have triggered as much debate as the fate of the Neanderthals.Smaller and squatter than Homo sapiens but with larger brains, Neanderthals lived in Europe,...
  • Modern humans 'blitzed Europe'(Radiocarbon Dating Development)

    02/23/2006 10:22:51 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies · 998+ views
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 23/02/2006 | Roger Highfield
    Our ancestors colonised Europe and wiped out their Neanderthal cousins even faster than we thought, says a study published today. Argument has raged for years about whether our ancestors from Africa outsurvived, killed or bred with the Neanderthals, who were stronger, bulkier and shorter but had equally large brains. Now developments in radiocarbon dating suggest that many of the dates published over the past 40 years are likely to underestimate the true ages of the samples. Prof Paul Mellars, of the University of Cambridge, describes today in the journal Nature how better calibration of radiocarbon ages have led to revisions...
  • Humans vs. Neanderthals: Game Over Earlier

    02/22/2006 10:25:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 734+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 22 February 2006 | Associated Press
    Humans and Neanderthals, thought to have coexisted for 10,000 years across the whole of Europe, are more likely to have lived at the same time for only 6,000 years, the new study suggests. Scientists believe the two species could have lived side by side at specific sites for periods of only about 2,000 years, but Mellars claims they would have lived in competition at each site for only 1,000 years... Two new studies of stratified radiocarbon in the Cariaco Basin, near Venezuela, and of radiocarbon on fossilized coral formations in the tropical Atlantic and Pacific have given scientists a better...
  • OU anthropologists reconstruct mitogenomes from prehistoric dental calculus

    04/17/2016 2:17:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | March 28, 2016 | U of Oklahoma
    ...In recent years, dental calculus has emerged as an unexpected, but valuable, long-term reservoir of ancient DNA from dietary and microbial sources... Very little dental calculus was required for analysis--fewer than 25 milligrams per individual. This makes it possible to obtain high quality genetic ancestry information from very little starting material, an important consideration for archaeological remains... Although dental calculus preserves alongside skeletal remains, it is not actually a human tissue. Dental calculus, also known as tartar, is a calcified form of dental plaque that acquires human DNA and proteins passively, primarily through the saliva and other host secretions. Once...
  • Neanderthal Bone Fragment Identified in Denisova Cave

    04/02/2016 2:37:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | editors
    Scientists from the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester have used a new technique, "Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry," or ZooMS, to identify more than 2,000 bone fragments recovered from Russia's Denisova Cave. ZooMS analyzes the collagen peptide sequences in bone, which can then be used to identify its species. Among the remains of mammoths, woolly rhino, wolf, and reindeer, the researchers found one Neanderthal bone. "When the ZooMS results showed that there was a human fingerprint among the bones I was extremely excited. ...The bone itself is not exceptional in any way and would otherwise be missed by...
  • Site in Germany yields human presence over 1 million years ago

    03/25/2016 5:53:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Spring 2016 Issue | Journal of Human Evolution
    The late Early Pleistocene site near Untermassfeld, in Germany, is now well known for a rich array of fauna dating back to about 1.07 million years ago, including simple 'Mode 1' (or Oldowan-type) stone tools evidencing early human occupation. Now researchers Günter Landeck and Joan Garcia Garriga report, for the first time, evidence of early human butchery in the form of cut marks on animal bones and intentional hammerstone-related bone breakage. These human-modified bones were recovered in a small faunal subsample excavated from levels with simple 'Mode 1' stone tools. The butchered assemblage was found during fieldwork and surveying of...
  • A golden age of ancient DNA science begins

    03/25/2016 5:05:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | March 22, 2016 | Darren Curnoe, UNSW Australia
    ...following some remarkable technical developments in that time, including next generation sequencing, ancient DNA research is beginning to come of age... Here are three big issues which I think geneticists are making headway on, following decades of stalled progress by fossil specialists. 1. There's been a shift from merely documenting the occurrence of interbreeding between modern humans and archaic groups, like the Neanderthals and Denisovans, to a focus on the circumstances surrounding it and its consequences for living people... Around 2 per cent of the genome of non-African people was inherited from Neanderthals, with slightly more DNA in Indigenous Oceanic...
  • The man who died half a million years ago

    10/05/2007 4:25:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 52 replies · 618+ views
    Boxgrove The man who died half a million years ago In a gravel pit at Boxgrove, just outside Chichester, the remains of a man have been discovered, half a million years old. Only a shin bone and two teeth were discovered, but his position, under thick layers of gravel show that he is the oldest 'man' so far discovered in Britain. The Boxgrove quarry The discovery was made in a gravel quarry. The gravel was laid down in a later Ice Age on top of a chalk bed, which is visible in the upper squares. Originally a stream flowed from...
  • Brits Got Early Start

    01/04/2006 1:51:36 AM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies · 548+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 15 December 2005 | Ann Gibbons
    A set of 32 flint tools uncovered on the east coast of the United Kingdom indicates that humans inhabited northern Europe almost 700,000 years ago--200,000 years earlier than previously thought. The discovery suggests these early people had the social or technological ability to adapt to varied terrain and, perhaps, climates. Although human ancestors ventured out of their African homeland at least 1.8 million years ago, their bones and tools did not show up in northern Europe until half a million years ago. The earliest evidence of human occupation came from Boxgrove, England, where researchers found a 500,000-year-old shinbone and teeth...
  • The Mysterious End Of Essex Man (UK)

    01/23/2005 3:16:48 PM PST · by blam · 44 replies · 1,105+ views
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 1-23-2005 | Robin McKie
    The mysterious end of Essex man Archaeologists now believe two groups of early humans fought for dominance in ancient Britain - and the axe-wielders won Robin McKie, science editor Sunday January 23, 2005 The Observer Divisions in British culture may be deeper than we thought. Scientists have discovered startling evidence that suggests different species of early humans may have fought to settle within our shores almost half a million years ago. They have found that two different groups - one wielding hand-axes, the other using Stone Age Stanley knives to slash and kill - could have been rivals for control...
  • Stone Age Elephant Remains Found (England, Slain By Humans)

    06/21/2004 5:37:15 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 808+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-21-2004
    Stone Age elephant remains foundThe skeleton was found at the site of a new station Construction work on the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL) in Kent has unearthed the 400,000-year-old remains of an elephant. The skeleton was found on the site of the new Ebbsfleet station, an area thought to be an early Stone Age site. Bones from other large animals, including rhinoceros, buffalo and wild horses, have also been found nearby. The remains were preserved in muddy sediment near what was once the edge of a small lake, a spokesman said. The elephant, which has been identified as a...
  • Prehistoric Knives Suggest Humans Competed

    02/02/2005 10:06:38 AM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 863+ views
    Discovery ^ | 2-1-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Prehistoric Knives Suggest Humans Competed By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Feb. 1, 2005 — A recent excavation of 400,000-year-old stone tools in Britain suggests that two groups of early humans could have competed with each other for food and turf. In the past, anthropologists have argued that only one group of ancient humans lived in Britain, and that these hominids created and used both axes and flake knives, which were made by flaking off small particles from a larger rock, or by breaking off a large flake that was then used as the tool. Some form of prehistoric human had...
  • Stones May Hold Key To Why We Are Here

    01/28/2004 8:51:24 AM PST · by blam · 33 replies · 298+ views
    EDP24 ^ | 1-28-2004 | Isabel Cockayne
    Stones may hold key to why we are here ISABEL COCKAYNE January 28, 2004 10:06 They may not look like the greatest talkers, but these stones have a story to tell. Hundreds of thousands of years ago they were washed down to East Anglia with a vast river that cut through the middle of England. But what the experts are puzzling over today is where this river ran its course. If they can plot its course and date it accurately, they could prove there were humans living in Britain 500,000 years ago and fill a gap in our pre-historic knowledge....
  • Neanderthals diet: 80% meat, 20% vegetables

    03/20/2016 5:22:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 14, 2016 | Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum
    Scientists from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (HEP) in Tübingen have studied the Neanderthals' diet. Based on the isotope composition in the collagen from the prehistoric humans' bones, they were able to show that, while the Neanderthals' diet consisted primarily of large plant eaters such at mammoths and rhinoceroses, it also included vegetarian food. The associated studies were recently published in the scientific journals Journal of Human Evolution and Quaternary International. The paleo-diet is one of the new trends among nutrition-conscious people -- but what exactly did the meal plan of our extinct ancestors include? "We have...
  • Ancient Denisovan DNA excavated in modern Pacific Islanders

    03/20/2016 2:51:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 17, 2016 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine
    Many recent studies have tried to understand when and where archaic hominins and our modern ancestors co-existed and interbred. Most of this research has been intent on cataloging Neanderthal gene sequences remaining in the genomes people of European or Asian descent. According to Vernot, "Different populations of people have slightly different levels of Neanderthal ancestry, which likely means that humans repeatedly ran into Neanderthals as they spread across Europe." Where the ancestors of modern humans might have had physical contact with Denisovans is debatable. The best guess, Akey said, is that Denisovans may have had a broad geographic range that...
  • 400,000-year-old fossils from Spain provide earliest genetic evidence of Neandertals

    03/20/2016 2:54:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Max Planck Gesselschaft ^ | March 14, 2016 | SJ, SP, MM/HR
    Previous analyses of the hominins from Sima de los Huesos in 2013 showed that their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA was distantly related to Denisovans, extinct relatives of Neandertals in Asia. This was unexpected since their skeletal remains carry Neandertal-derived features. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have since worked on sequencing nuclear DNA from fossils from the cave, a challenging task as the extremely old DNA is degraded to very short fragments. The results now show that the Sima de los Huesos hominins were indeed early Neandertals. Neandertals may have acquired different mitochondrial genomes...
  • Better Living Through Neanderthal Chemistry

    03/02/2016 3:02:33 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 01, 2016 | editors
    Scientists from Leiden University and Delft University of Technology think that Neanderthals that lived at the site of Pech-de-l'Azé some 50,000 years ago may have used manganese dioxide to help kindle their fires. It had been thought that the blocks of manganese oxides found at Neanderthal sites in France were used for body decoration, but soot from their fires would have been readily available for use as a dark pigment. Why would Neanderthals go to the trouble to collect this mineral? Peter J. Heyes, Konstantinos Anastasakis, Wiebren de Jong, Annelies van Hoesel, Wil Roebroeks, and Marie Soressi found that although...
  • Mysterious Migrations

    03/23/2007 3:38:50 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 876+ views
    Science News ^ | 3-23-2007 | Bruce Bower
    Mysterious MigrationsOur prehistoric ancestors journeyed out of Africa on contested roads Bruce Bower It was the most momentous immigration ever, a population realignment that marked a startling departure for our species, Homo sapiens. After emerging in eastern Africa close to 200,000 years ago, anatomically modern people stayed on one continent for roughly 140,000 years before spreading out in force around the world. Then, from 40,000 to 35,000 years ago, our forerunners advanced into areas stretching from what is now France to southeastern Asia and Australia. DIGGING THE PAST. Workers excavate deep into a site near the Russian village of Kostenki,...
  • Neanderthals and modern humans mated 50,000 years earlier than we thought, scientists say.

    02/21/2016 5:06:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 108 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 02/20/2016 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki,
    Ever since geneticists sequenced the first Neanderthal genome in 2010, researchers have been reporting just how related humans are to their ancient, extinct cousins. Since then, there's been more research. And more. And more. As it turns out, non-African modern humans have Neanderthals to thank for 1 to 4 percent of their DNA. The two species were thought to have interbred around 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, based on the Neanderthal DNA found in anatomically modern human specimens and people living today. But scientists had yet to find a signature of such mating interactions in Neanderthal DNA, until now. "Instead...
  • Neanderthal-human trysts may be linked to modern depression, heart disease

    02/12/2016 12:47:35 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 92 replies
    Fox News ^ | 2/12/2016 | Charles Q. Choi
    Ancient trysts between Neanderthals and modern humans may have influenced modern risks for depression, heart attacks, nicotine addiction, obesity and other health problems, researchers said. Some of the scientists' discoveries confirm previous ideas. For example, earlier research suggested that Neanderthal DNA influenced skin cells known as keratinocytes that help protect the skin from environmental damage such as ultraviolet radiation and germs. The new findings suggest that Neanderthal genetic variants increase the risk of developing sun-triggered skin lesions known as keratoses, which are caused by abnormal keratinocytes.
  • Neanderthals boosted our immune system

    01/07/2016 10:51:53 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Max-Planck-Gesellschaft ^ | January 07, 2016 | SJ/HR
    When modern humans met Neanderthals in Europe and the two species began interbreeding many thousands of years ago, the exchange left humans with gene variations that have increased the ability of those who carry them to ward off infection. This inheritance from Neanderthals may have also left some people more prone to allergies. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS in Paris, France, report about the discoveries in two independent studies, adding to evidence for an important role for interspecies relations in human evolution and specifically in the...
  • Archaeologists Return to Neanderthal Cave as ISIS Pushed from Iraq

    01/05/2016 10:53:29 AM PST · by presidio9 · 9 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 04, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    As the terrorist group ISIS is pushed out of northern Iraq, archaeologists are resuming work in the region, making new discoveries and figuring out how to conserve archaeological sites and reclaim looted antiquities. Several discoveries, including new Neanderthal skeletal remains, have been made at Shanidar Cave, a site in Iraqi Kurdistan that was inhabited by Neanderthals more than 40,000 years ago. Additionally, though ISIS did destroy and loot a great number of sites, there are several ways for archaeologists, scientific institutions, governments and law enforcement agencies in North America and Europe to help save the region's heritage, said Dlshad Marf...
  • Archaeologists Return to Neanderthal Cave as ISIS Pushed from Iraq

    01/05/2016 12:30:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Monday, January 04, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    As the terrorist group ISIS is pushed out of northern Iraq, archaeologists are resuming work in the region, making new discoveries and figuring out how to conserve archaeological sites and reclaim looted antiquities. Several discoveries, including new Neanderthal skeletal remains, have been made at Shanidar Cave, a site in Iraqi Kurdistan that was inhabited by Neanderthals more than 40,000 years ago. Additionally, though ISIS did destroy and loot a great number of sites, there are several ways for archaeologists, scientific institutions, governments and law enforcement agencies in North America and Europe to help save the region's heritage, said Dlshad Marf...
  • Latest study suggests early human dispersal into Spain through Strait of Gibraltar

    01/02/2016 11:49:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Popular Archaeology, Journal of Human Evolution ^ | Saturday, January 2, 2016 | editors
    Most recent dating places one wave of human dispersal out of Africa into southeastern Spain at almost one million years ago. Using state-of-the-art dating methodologies, a team of scientists have obtained or confirmed a date range between .9 and .85 Mya (million years ago) as a time when a species of Old World monkey (Theropithecus) and an early species of human occupied the cave site of Cueva Victoria in southeastern Spain. It is a location not far from where many scientists have hypothesized that humans may have crossed over into Europe from North Africa through the Strait of Gibraltar at...
  • Anthropologist suggests Mediterranean islands inhabited much earlier than thought

    11/16/2012 8:16:41 AM PST · by Renfield · 4 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-16-2012 | Bob Yirka
    Modern science has held that islands such as Cypress and Crete were first inhabited by seafaring humans approximately 9,000 years ago by agriculturists from the late Neolithic period. Simmons writes that research over the past 20 years has cast doubt on that assumption however and suggests that it might be time to rewrite the history books. He cites evidence such as pieces of obsidian found in a cave in mainland Greece that were found to have come from Melos, an island in the Aegean Sea and were dated at 11,000 years ago as well as artifacts from recent digs on...
  • Cretan tools point to 130,000-year-old sea travel

    01/03/2011 1:35:19 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 19 replies
    AP via Google ^ | 3 January 2011
    Archaeologists on the island of Crete have discovered what may be evidence of one of the world's first sea voyages by human ancestors, the Greek Culture Ministry said Monday A ministry statement said experts from Greece and the U.S. have found rough axes and other tools thought to be between 130,000 and 700,000 years old close to shelters on the island's south coast. Crete has been separated from the mainland for about five million years, so whoever made the tools must have traveled there by sea (a distance of at least 40 miles). That would upset the current view that...
  • Ancient hominids may have been seafarers

    01/14/2010 4:18:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 636+ views
    Science News ^ | Friday, January 8th, 2010 | Bruce Bower
    Human ancestors that left Africa hundreds of thousands of years ago to see the rest of the world were no landlubbers. Stone hand axes unearthed on the Mediterranean island of Crete indicate that an ancient Homo species -- perhaps Homo erectus -- had used rafts or other seagoing vessels to cross from northern Africa to Europe via at least some of the larger islands in between, says archaeologist Thomas Strasser of Providence College in Rhode Island. Several hundred double-edged cutting implements discovered at nine sites in southwestern Crete date to at least 130,000 years ago and probably much earlier, Strasser...
  • On Crete, New Evidence of Very Ancient Mariners

    02/17/2010 7:15:26 AM PST · by Palter · 27 replies · 531+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 15 Feb 2010 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    <p>Early humans, possibly even prehuman ancestors, appear to have been going to sea much longer than anyone had ever suspected.</p> <p>That is the startling implication of discoveries made the last two summers on the Greek island of Crete. Stone tools found there, archaeologists say, are at least 130,000 years old, which is considered strong evidence for the earliest known seafaring in the Mediterranean and cause for rethinking the maritime capabilities of prehuman cultures.</p>
  • Ancient human ancestor may have persisted through Ice Age

    12/17/2015 4:04:01 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    After years of studying a mysterious thigh bone from a cave in China, scientists said on Thursday they believe it represents an ancient species of human that persisted much longer than previously thought. The 14,000-year-old bone was uncovered in 1989 in Maludong, known as the Red Deer Cave. The trove of fossils it was initially found with went unstudied until 2012. The partial femur, though relatively young in age, looks like the bones of far older species like Homo habilis and early Homo erectus that lived more than 1.5 million years ago, said the study in PLOS ONE. "Its young...
  • Mysterious 14,000-year-old leg bone may belong to archaic human species

    12/20/2015 12:39:43 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 12/20/2015 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki
    A 14,000-year-old thigh bone may upend human history. Unearthed in southwest China, this femur resembles those of an ancient species of humans thought to be long extinct by the Late Pleistocene, scientists say. The scientists compare the leg bone to ancient and modern human femurs in a paper published Thursday in the journal PLOS ONE, arguing that this specimen represents a population of ancient humans that lived surprisingly recently. If they're right, this could dramatically change the way we see human history. Today, our species, Homo sapiens, are the only humans to walk the Earth. But it hasn't always been...
  • Thigh bone points to unexpectedly long survival of ancient human ancestors

    12/17/2015 3:58:49 PM PST · by MinorityRepublican · 4 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Thursday 17 December 2015 | Tim Radford
    A 14,000-year-old fragment of thigh bone found in a cave in China may represent evidence of the unexpected survival of long-vanished human ancestors. If so, then right into and through the ice age, a creature that was either Homo habilis or Homo erectus survived alongside the Neanderthals, the unknown humans who left behind some DNA in a cave in Siberia, the mysterious so-called hobbit of the island of Flores in Indonesia, and modern Homo sapiens. But by the end of this multicultural ice age 10,000 years ago, only one human species survived. The fossil, a partial femur, had survived unstudied...
  • Italy's first Neanderthal dates back 250,000 years

    11/06/2015 4:55:08 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | November 4, 2015 | unattributed
    Neanderthal man arrived on the Italian peninsular some 100,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to a study set to be published this month. The discovery was made after researchers analyzed radioactive deposits that were found in sediments present inside two Neanderthal skulls unearthed in a gravel pit Saccopastore, Lazio, in the 1930s. The site of the dig is now occupied by an eastern section of Rome's ring road. "The results of our studies show that the Saccopastore remains are 100,000 years older than previously thought -- and push back the arrival of Neanderthal man in Italy to 250,000 years...
  • Discovery Of 47 Teeth In Chinese Cave Changes Picture Of Human Migration Out Of Africa

    10/17/2015 9:09:33 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 33 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 15 October 2015 | Amina Khan
    Forty-seven smooth teeth dug out of a cave in southern China reveal that Homo sapiens may have arrived there 80,000 years ago...The findings, published this week in the journal Nature, may compel researchers to reconsider their theories about human migrations out of Africa.
  • Music in Human Evolution

    10/16/2015 2:05:10 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 41 replies
    Melting Asphalt ^ | 10/15/2015 | Kevin Simler
    I just finished the strangest, most disconcerting little book. It's called Why Do People Sing?: Music in Human Evolution by Joseph Jordania. If the title hasn't already piqued your interest, its thesis surely will. The thesis is wild, bold, and original, but makes an eerie amount of sense. If true, it would be a revolution — and I don't use the term lightly — in how we understand the evolution of music, cooperation, warfare, and even religion.
  • Neanderthals are almost TWICE as old as first thought: DNA suggests emerged 700,000 years ago

    09/14/2015 5:01:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 41 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 14, 2015 | Richard Gray
    They are one of our closest human relatives and dominated Europe and much of Asia for hundreds of thousands of years, but Neanderthals may be far older than previously thought. A new study by geneticists has revealed a collection of fossilised bones discovered in a cave in northern Spain belonged to an early member of the Neanderthal family. It is the oldest partial genome from early human fossils ever to be sequenced and pushes back the date for the origins of the Neanderthal branch of our evolutionary tree by up to 300,000 years....
  • The Pain of Being a Redhead

    08/08/2009 9:34:39 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 42 replies · 1,776+ views
    New York Times ^ | August 6, 2009 | TARA PARKER-POPE
    Nobody likes going to the dentist, but redheads may have good reason. A growing body of research shows that people with red hair need larger doses of anesthesia and often are resistant to local pain blockers like Novocaine. As a result, redheads tend to be particularly nervous about dental procedures and are twice as likely to avoid going to the dentist as people with other hair colors, according to new research published in The Journal of the American Dental Association. Researchers believe redheads are more sensitive to pain because of a mutation in a gene that affects hair color. In...
  • The Relationship Between The Basque And Ainu

    06/25/2004 3:44:16 PM PDT · by blam · 90 replies · 11,728+ views
    High Speed Plus ^ | 1996 | Edo Nyland
    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BASQUE AND AINU INTRODUCTION The language of the Ainu bear-worshippers of Northern Japan has generally been considered a language-isolate, supposedly being unlike any other language on earth. A few researchers noticed a relationship with languages in south-east Asia, others saw similarity with the Ostiak and Uralic languages of northern Siberia. The Ainu look like Caucasian people, they have white skin, their hair is wavy and thick, their heads are mesocephalic (round) and a few have grey or blue eyes. However, their blood types are more like the Mongolian people, possibly through many millennia of intermixing. The Ainu...
  • DNA from Neandertal relative may shake up human family tree

    09/13/2015 1:17:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 103 replies
    Science Mag ^ | September 11, 2015 | Ann Gibbons
    In a remarkable technical feat, researchers have sequenced DNA from fossils in Spain that are about 300,000 to 400,000 years old and have found an ancestor -- or close relative -- of Neandertals. The nuclear DNA, which is the oldest ever sequenced from a member of the human family, may push back the date for the origins of the distinct ancestors of Neandertals and modern humans, according to a presentation here yesterday at the fifth annual meeting of the European Society for the study of human evolution. Ever since researchers first discovered thousands of bones and teeth from 28 individuals...
  • 400,000-year-old dental tartar provides earliest evidence of manmade pollution

    06/17/2015 10:07:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | June 17, 2015 | Tel Aviv University
    In what Prof. Barkai describes as a "time capsule," the analysed calculus revealed three major findings: charcoal from indoor fires; evidence for the ingestion of essential plant-based dietary components; and fibers that might have been used to clean teeth or were remnants of raw materials. "Prof. Karen Hardy published outstanding research on the dental calculus of Neanderthals from El Sidron cave in Spain, but these dated back just 40,000-50,000 years—we are talking far earlier than this," said Prof. Barkai. "This is the first evidence that the world's first indoor BBQs had health-related consequences," said Prof. Barkai. "The people who lived...
  • Science Journal: Caveman Crooners May Have Aided Early Human Life

    04/01/2006 3:09:41 PM PST · by blam · 25 replies · 681+ views
    Post Gazette ^ | 3-31-2006 | Sharon Begley
    Science Journal: Caveman crooners may have aided early human life Friday, March 31, 2006 By Sharon Begley, The Wall Street Journal In Steven Mithen's imagination, the small band of Neanderthals gathered 50,000 years ago around the caves of Le Moustier, in what is now the Dordogne region of France, were butchering carcasses, scraping skins, shaping ax heads -- and singing. One of the fur-clad men started it, a rhythmic sound with rising and falling pitch, and others picked it up, indicating their willingness to cooperate both in the moment and in the future, when the group would have to hunt...
  • Study reveals human body has gone through four stages of evolution

    09/04/2015 1:49:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Monday, August 31, 2015 | Binghamton University
    Research into 430,000-year-old fossils... A large international research team including Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam studied the body size and shape in the human fossil collection from the site of the Sima de los Huesos in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. Dated to around 430,000 years ago, this site preserves the largest collection of human fossils found to date anywhere in the world. The researchers found that the Atapuerca individuals were relatively tall, with wide, muscular bodies and less brain mass relative to body mass compared to Neanderthals. The Atapuerca humans shared many anatomical features with the later...
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • Jawbone Lifts Lid on Human-Neanderthal Sex

    06/24/2015 6:50:32 AM PDT · by Sopater · 39 replies
    Newser ^ | Jun 23, 2015 9:50 AM CDT | Arden Dier
    (Newser) – A jawbone found in Romania more than a decade ago provides the first genetic evidence that humans and Neanderthals knocked boots in Europe before the latter disappeared between 35,000 and 40,000 years ago. Scientists who came across the bone of one of the earliest modern humans in Europe in a cave known as Pestera cu Oase noticed it had both modern human and Neanderthal traits. Now, a study of the bone's DNA—made possible by recent technological advances—explains why. "The sample is more closely related to Neanderthals than any other modern human we've ever looked at before," Harvard researcher...