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Keyword: newfoundland

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  • Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland?

    07/28/2019 1:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 15, 2019 | Owen Jarus
    Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L'Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period... In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of "ecofacts" -- environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans -- that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland -- Simplocaria metallica,...
  • Federal government takes “preliminary step” to evaluate Strait of Belle Isle subsea tunnel (Canada)

    07/08/2019 12:45:29 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    The Packet ^ | June 25, 2019 | Stephen Roberts
    A subsea tunnel across the Strait of Belle Isle is back in conversation once again after a report was tabled this month in Ottawa. The federal government’s standing committee on transport, infrastructure, and communities is now calling on the federal government to work with the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec, as well, as the private sector, to build a fixed link across the Strait of Belle Isle and complete Route 138 along the Quebec Lower North Shore. The tunnel would link Point Amour in Labrador to Yankee Point on the Great Northern Peninsula in Newfoundland. The project would...
  • Discovery of Viking site in Canada could rewrite history

    04/23/2019 8:02:03 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 82 replies
    Archaeology World ^ | April 19, 2019
    An iron working hearthstone was discovered on Newfoundland, hundreds of miles from the only noted Viking location to date. Another thousand-year-old Viking colony might have been found on the island of Newfoundland, Canada. The finding of the old Viking location on the Canadian coast could drastically change the story of the exploration of North America by the Europeans prior to Christopher Columbus.
  • 5 really cool things about Saint-Pierre and Miquelon [last remaining fragment of New France]

    04/18/2019 11:07:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Just off the coast of Newfoundland is a collection of islands that are not part of the province. Indeed, they are not even Canada! Saint-Pierre and Miquelon are the last piece of French territory in North America. They are quite distinct from Newfoundland and Labrador, making them a must visit. Indeed, the tourism industry of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon and the Burin Peninsula, in Eastern Newfoundland, are closely entwined. You’ll discover a whole new world when you take the ferry from the town of Fortune. Here’s some of the coolest facts about Newfoundland and Labrador’s closest foreign country. It was French,...
  • Skipper found guilty of trying to throw wife overboard but she told judge the story was made up

    01/11/2019 9:19:23 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 22 replies
    National Post ^ | Jan. 10, 2019 | Joseph Brean
    When a Newfoundland judge was about to sentence the skipper of a fishing boat for trying to throw his wife overboard, he suddenly found himself in a tricky legal position. The skipper’s wife — the victim of the crime that had just been proved beyond a reasonable doubt — came forward to say it never happened, that she made it all up because she was angry. This was a problem, raising fears of a miscarriage of justice, and the judge’s ultimate solution is a rare illustration of the law on victims who recant criminal accusations. When he briefly re-opened the...
  • Arctic people were spinning yarn before the Vikings arrived

    08/01/2018 5:46:48 PM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 34 replies
    Digital Journal ^ | 7-24-18 | Karen Graham
    New research and technologies may end up changing the way we think about early Arctic history, upending the assumption that the ancient ancestors of today's Inuit people learned how to spin yarn from Viking settlers. It has long been assumed that the ancient Dorset and Thule people learned how to spin yarn from Norse settlers who arrived in Newfoundland some 1,000 years ago, according to the Canadian press. “There’s a lot we don’t know,” said Michele Hayeur Smith of Brown University in Rhode Island and lead author of a recent paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Hayeur Smith and...
  • It's Almost July and Snow Is Falling in Newfoundland, Canada

    06/28/2018 7:08:36 AM PDT · by george76 · 44 replies
    The Weather Company ^ | June 26, 2018 | Chris Dolce
    Residents of Newfoundland, Canada, were greeted with snow and biting cold winds Tuesday morning despite the fact that July begins in just a few days. Gander, Newfoundland, reported light snow and a wind chill of 20 degrees Fahrenheit in the hours after sunrise Tuesday. The average high temperature in this city of nearly 12,000 people is in the 60s during June and near 70 degrees in July. Photos and videos from Gander and other parts of Newfoundland showed the snow accumulating not only on grassy areas but also on roads. For geographic reference, Newfoundland is a part of Canada's easternmost...
  • Ballast: Creating Cultural Connections Across Time and Space

    03/20/2018 4:26:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    object matters ^ | probably March 2018 | Mats Burström
    Along the shores in Newfoundland there is an abundance of flint to be found although this material does not occur naturally in the area. The reason for the presence of flint is that it was used as ballast by sailing vessels in the transatlantic migratory fishery that started in the beginning of the sixteenth century and lasted for about four centuries. During this period several millions of tons of material were relocated as ballast from the coasts of England and France to Newfoundland. Among this huge amount of relocated material there are some supposedly Palaeolithic artefacts that have been brought...
  • Global Temperature Trends From 2500 B.C. To 2040 A.D. [Awesome chart]

    03/04/2010 8:58:57 AM PST · by SloopJohnB · 37 replies · 2,501+ views
    Long Range Weather.com ^ | Cliff Harris & Randy Mann
    Until recently, global temperatures were more than a degree Fahrenheit warmer when compared to the overall 20th Century mean. From August of 2007 through February of 2008, the Earth’s mean reading dropped to near the 200-year average temperature of 57 degrees. Since that time, the mean reading has been fluctuating. (See Long-Term Chart Below.)
  • Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

    02/28/2015 2:26:30 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 34 replies
    Montana Public Radio ^ | 2-28-2015 | GREG ALLEN
    In Florida, archaeologists are investigating a site that a century ago sparked a scientific controversy. Today, it's just a strip of land near an airport. But in 1915, it was a spot that became world-famous because of the work of Elias Sellards, Florida's state geologist. Sellards led a scientific excavation of the site, where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized animal bones and then, human remains. Andy Hemmings of Mercyhurst University is the lead archaeologist on a project that has picked up where Sellards left off a century ago. "Quite literally, where we're standing, they found what they, at...
  • Tooth marks link Vikings, Indians

    01/14/2006 8:32:48 PM PST · by Tyche · 18 replies · 719+ views
    CanWest News Service ^ | Jan 13, 2006 | Randy Boswell
    A scientist who found deep grooves chiselled into the teeth of dozens of 1,000-year-old Viking skeletons unearthed in Sweden believes the strange custom might have been learned from aboriginal tribes during ancient Norse voyages to North America -- a finding that would represent an unprecedented case of transatlantic, cross-cultural exchange during the age of Leif Ericsson. The marks are believed to be decorations meant to enhance a man's appearance, or badges of honour for a group of great warriors or successful tradesmen. They are the first historical examples of ceremonial dental modification ever found in Europe, and although similar customs...
  • Native Americans descended from three Asian groups: study

    07/11/2012 11:22:20 AM PDT · by Theoria · 57 replies
    AFP ^ | 11 July 2012 | AFP
    Native Americans spread out today from Canada to the tip of Chile descended not from one but at least three migrant waves from Siberia between 5,000 and 15,000 years ago, a study said Wednesday. The finding is controversial among geneticists, archaeologists and linguists -- many of whom have maintained that a single Asian ancestral group populated the Americas. But the new study, claiming to be the most comprehensive analysis yet of Native American genetics, claims to have found incontrovertible proof that there were three immigration waves -- a theory first put forward in 1986. Most Native Americans, said the study,...
  • Ptolemy's Geography, America and Columbus: Ancient Greeks and why maybe America was discovered

    09/25/2009 12:32:08 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 22 replies · 1,238+ views
    mlahanas.de ^ | Michael Lahanas
    Ptolemy's Geography, America and Columbus: Ancient Greeks and why maybe America was discovered Michael Lahanas Aristotle: “there is a continuity between the parts about the pillars of Hercules and the parts about India, and that in this way the ocean is one.” [As] for the rest of the distance around the inhabited earth which has not been visited by us up to the present time (because of the fact that the navigators who sailed in opposite directions never met), it is not of very great extent, if we reckon from the parallel distances that have been traversed by us... For...
  • The Mystery of Maine’s Viking Penny

    12/27/2017 4:51:40 PM PST · by Eurotwit · 46 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | DECEMBER 21, 2017 | BY SARAH LASKOW
    The coin is the real deal, but how did it get all the way from Norway? ON FEBRUARY 6, 1979, KOLBJØRN Skaare, a Norwegian numismatist with a tall, wide forehead, walked into the Maine State Museum to see the coin. Just a few years earlier, he had published Coins and Coinage in Viking-Age Norway, a doctoral thesis that grew from the decade-plus he had spent as a keeper at the University of Oslo’s Coin Cabinet. The first specialist to examine the coin in person, he had just a day with it before Bruce J. Bourque, the museum’s lead archaeologist, had...
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 55 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • Happy 2013 Leif Erikson Day!

    10/09/2013 5:38:39 PM PDT · by KC_Lion · 45 replies
    EIRÍKS SAGA RAUÐA ^ ^ | Oct 9th, 2013 | Snorri Sturluson
    1. kafli Óleifur hét herkonungur er kallaður var Óleifur hvíti. Hann var son Ingjalds konungs Helgasonar, Ólafssonar, Guðröðarsonar, Hálfdanarsonar hvítbeins Upplendingakonungs.
  • Archaeologists Closer to Finding Lost Viking Settlement

    03/20/2018 1:38:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Live Science ^ | March 6, 2018 | Owen Jarus
    A lost Viking settlement known as "Hóp," which has been mentioned in sagas passed down over hundreds of years, is said to have supported wild grapes, abundant salmon and inhabitants who made canoes out of animal hides. Now, a prominent archaeologist says the settlement likely resides in northeastern New Brunswick. If Hóp is found it would be the second Viking settlement to be discovered in North America. The other is at L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland. ...using the description of the settlement from sagas of Viking voyages, along with archaeological work carried out at L'Anse aux...
  • Viking New England [from 1976, and it's not about the next Super Bowl]

    11/23/2009 8:24:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 812+ views
    New-England Galaxy ^ | Spring 1976, Vol. XVII, No.4 | Nathaniel Nitkin
    ...Maine has a reputation of pulling archaeology out of Sunday supplement romances into science. The University of Maine excavation at Passadumkeag, along with several smaller digs scattered through the state, resulted in a detailed picture of Red Paint Man, inhabiting Maine about 1,000 B.C. His tools, utensils, and other Old Stone Age handicraft along with his usage of red ochre strongly suggest that this proto-Indian still practised Cro-Magnon culture. Another excavation at Pemaquid Point awoke a successful settlement from its long sleep under several feet of soil. Radiocarbon dating set it as early as 1540 A.D., and the colony persisted...
  • Vikings visited Canadian Arctic, research suggests: Artifacts suggest Norse settlement in Nunavut

    09/16/2009 1:02:25 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 23 replies · 900+ views
    canada.com ^ | MAY 27, 2009 | RANDY BOSWELL,
    Vikings visited Canadian Arctic, research suggests Artifacts suggest Norse settlement in Nunavut BY RANDY BOSWELL, CANWEST NEWS SERVICEMAY 27, 2009 This May 26 handout photo shows a Nanook archeological site on Baffin Island. Traces of a stone-and-sod wall found at the site, if confirmed, would represent only the second location in the New World where Norse seafarers -- popularly known as Vikings -- built a dwelling. Photograph by: P. Sutherland, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Canwest News Service One of Canada's top Arctic archeologists says the remnants of a stone-and-sod wall unearthed on southern Baffin Island may be traces of a...
  • 600-Year-Old American Indian Historical Account Has Old Norse Words

    03/06/2011 12:45:36 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 1+ views
    The Guard- blogspot ^ | 3-15-2007 | Larry Stroud
    600-Year-Old American Indian Historical Account Has Old Norse WordsBy Larry Stroud, Guard Associate EditorPublished on Thursday March 15, 2007 Vikings and Algonquins. The first American multi-culturalists? BIG BAY, Mich. — Two experts on ancient America may have solved not only the mysterious disappearance of Norse from the Western Settlement of Greenland in the 1300s, but also are deciphering Delaware (Lenape) Indian history, which they’re finding is written in the Old Norse language. The history tells how some of the Delaware’s ancestors migrated west to America across a frozen sea and intermarried with the Delaware and other Algonquin Indians. Myron Paine,...