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Keyword: oenology

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  • World's oldest brewery discovered, was making beer 13,000 years ago

    09/16/2018 7:17:51 AM PDT · by ETL · 45 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Sept 14, 2018 | James Rogers
    Researchers from the U.S. and Israel have found evidence of the world’s oldest beer-making in an Israeli cave. Scientists studied three 13,000-year-old stone mortars uncovered in the Raqefet Cave near what is now the Israeli city of Haifa. Residues confirmed that the mortars were used for brewing of wheat and barley, as well as for food storage. Experts from Stanford University and the University of Haifa participated in the research. “This accounts for the oldest record of man-made alcohol in the world,” said Li Liu, a professor of Chinese archaeology at Stanford, in a statement. The cave formed part of...
  • ARCHAEOLOGISTS UNCOVER 13,000-YEAR-OLD BREWERY IN THE CARMEL

    09/14/2018 6:08:43 AM PDT · by ASA Vet · 30 replies
    The Jerusalem Post ^ | September 13, 2018 | TAMARA ZIEVE
    Study found the earliest evidence of alcohol production in a cave in northern Israel.Researchers have discovered the earliest evidence of alcohol production, from 13,000 years ago, in the Rakefet Cave in the Carmel, Haifa University announced Thursday. The discovery was made in a joint archaeological collaboration project by Haifa University and Stanford University researchers.Archaeologists analyzed three stone mortars from the 13,000-year-old Natufian burial cave site in Israel, concluding that these mortars were used for brewing wheat/barley, as well as for food storage. The researchers explained that the earliest archaeological evidence for cereal-based brewing, even before the advent of agriculture, comes...
  • The Speyer Wine Bottle: the oldest unopened bottle of wine in the world

    09/06/2018 10:56:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 86 replies
    The Vintage News ^ | November 23, 2016 | Brad Smithfield
    The age of the Speyer wine bottle is epic, estimated at around 1,650 years. Its makers did well by sealing it with hot wax and splashing it with olive oil, which is how the bottle, containing a presumably once drinkable white wine, has maintained the liquid inside it... Microbiologists have recommended not opening the wine and the same opinion was shared by the museum's wine department curator, Ludger Tekampe, who in the past stated that if the bottle were to be opened, "We are not sure whether or not it could stand the shock of the air." ..finding the Speyer...
  • This Beer Is from 500 BC, and Now Scientists Are Trying to Brew It

    08/15/2018 11:32:34 AM PDT · by C19fan · 89 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | August 15, 2018 | Sarah Rense
    Archaeologists have found traces of beer in Iraq that are super old, dating back 2,500 years to ancient Mesopotamia and the Babylonian Empire. While texts from those forgotten days speak of fermented drinks, this is the "oldest direct evidence" of beer discovered, Smithsonian reports. And now the archaeologists who discovered the traces are trying to replicate the recipe for us to enjoy in the modern era. Eons pass and civilizations fall, but beer is always good. Elsa Perruchini, the lead author on the study announcing the discovery, used a process called gas chromatography, which has never before been used to...
  • Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirms

    06/25/2018 6:15:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, June 20, 2018 | Lund University news release
    Archaeologists at Lund University in Sweden have found carbonized germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the [European] Iron Age in the Nordic region... in southern Sweden indicate[s] a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade... beer was produced in Mesopotamia as early as 4000 BCE. However, as written sources in the Nordic region are absent prior to the Middle Ages (before ca 1200 CE), knowledge of earlier beer production in this region is dependent on botanical evidence... Beer is made in two stages. The first is the malting process, followed by...
  • Ancient Beverage Brewed In Milwaukee

    10/28/2016 9:51:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 27 replies
    Archaeology ^ | 10-25-16 | NPR
    ANCIENT BEVERAGE BREWED IN MILWAUKEE MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — NPR reports that archaeologist Bettina Arnold of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her research team worked with Lakefront Brewery to try to re-create an alcoholic beverage that had been placed in a bronze cauldron and buried in a grave sometime between 400 and 450 B.C. in what is now Germany. The recipe was based upon the research of paleobotanist Manfred Rösch, who analyzed the residues in the Iron Age cauldron. He found evidence of honey, meadowsweet, barley, and mint—ingredients in a type of beverage known as a braggot.
  • George Washington's beer recipe

    05/06/2011 7:55:23 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 51 replies
    London Telegraph ^ | 05 May 2011 | Jon Swaine
    Before devoting his time to defeating the British in the Revolutionary War and being the first president of the United States, George Washington enjoyed brewing his own beer. A handwritten recipe for "small beer" created by Washington in 1757, while serving in the Virginia militia, has been published by the New York Public Library. The recipe, which was found in Washington's "Notebook as a Virginia Colonel", lists the ingredients as bran hops, yeast and molasses –... "Take a large Sifter full of Bran Hops to your Taste," Washington instructed. "Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall into a...
  • Prehistoric wine discovered in inaccessible caves forces a rethink of ancient Sicilian culture

    06/21/2018 12:08:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    The Conversation US (Creative Commons license) ^ | February 13, 2018 | Davide Tanasi
    Monte Kronio rises 1,300 feet above the geothermally active landscape of southwestern Sicily. Hidden in its bowels is a labyrinthine system of caves, filled with hot sulfuric vapors. At lower levels, these caves average 99 degrees Fahrenheit and 100 percent humidity. Human sweat cannot evaporate and heat stroke can result in less than 20 minutes of exposure to these underground conditions. Nonetheless, people have been visiting the caves of Monte Kronio since as far back as 8,000 years ago. They’ve left behind vessels from the Copper Age (early sixth to early third millennium B.C.) as well as various sizes of...
  • Venezuela’s Empresas Polar May Have to Stop Making Beer Because of Dollar Shortage

    04/22/2016 12:11:44 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 20 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | April 21, 2016 | JUAN FORERO
    Venezuelans grumbling over the scarcity of food and toilet paper may soon face another shortage, beer produced by Empresas Polar SA., the country’s largest private company and biggest beer maker. Polar said on Thursday that it will be forced to stop producing beer next week because it cannot get the U.S. dollars, which are controlled by the government, to import the malted barley needed to brew. Under Venezuela’s stringent currency exchange system, only the government can legally control dollars, which companies need to import raw materials, food, machine parts and other supplies.
  • Venezuela Runs Out of Beer

    05/01/2016 6:12:45 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 50 replies
    Reason ^ | 04/30/2016 | Ed Krayewski|
    Venezuela's largest privately-owned beer company has stopped producing beer after running out of malted barley (or, more specifically, running out of foreign currency with which to buy malted barley). The company, Empresas Polar, stopped production yesterday—it warned last week that it would run out of malted barley by then. Polar is putting "your drunk uncle's favorite political forecast to the test," Francisco Toro of the Caracas Chronicles wrote. "You know the one I'm talking about, right? That one uncle of yours who gets drunk at every family gathering and starts to rant about how the only way we're going to...
  • The 900 Billion dollar fungus

    03/14/2018 7:58:50 PM PDT · by Fungi · 47 replies
    Blog.oup ^ | February, 2018 | Nicholas Money
    I never post, but this is noteworthy. Brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is responsible for five percent of our gross domestic product. From bread to beer and beyond, this fungus has an incredible impact on our lives. Fungi are important!
  • We are evolving an 'ultimate hangover' gene that may stop us from becoming addicted to alcohol

    02/23/2018 5:13:39 AM PST · by C19fan · 17 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 20, 2018 | Cecile Borkhararia
    Humans may be evolving an 'ultimate hangover' gene to protect against alcoholism. That's according to a new study that looked at a variant of a gene that makes booze intolerable to the body. Scientists claim this gene variant is being favoured by evolution - and, in time, could stop us from drinking alcohol in the future.
  • Ben Franklin made up 200 terms for being wasted

    01/16/2018 3:00:35 AM PST · by beaversmom · 17 replies
    The NY Post ^ | December 30, 2017 | Larry Getlen
    Ben Franklin is often quoted as having said, “Beer is proof God loves us and wants us to be happy.” But he was actually talking about wine. In a 1779 letter to French artist Francois Morellet, Franklin began by stating, “In vino veritas . . . Truth is in wine.” He then continued to wax lyrical: “Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards. There it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy.” The new book, “Stirring the Pot with Benjamin Franklin,” by...
  • Massive Scribal Hangovers: One Ninth Century Confession

    12/17/2017 8:40:13 PM PST · by ameribbean expat · 6 replies
    Medieval Irish scribes were habitually recording their emotional and physical state as they labored at the task of copying manuscripts. These scribal glosses range from pious prayers ("God bless my hands today" Laon MS 26, f18v) to curses on pens, parchment, and careless work by fellow scribes. ***** One Irish ninth century copy of a Latin grammar, the Institutiones grammaticae by Priscian (c. 500), contains alongside the usual prayers and complaints a curious marginal gloss in ogham script. Ogham script was used by the Irish possibly as early as the fourth century AD, mainly in grave monuments scattered over Ireland...
  • World’s earliest evidence of wine-making found in Georgia

    11/14/2017 6:38:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | November 14, 2017 | Staff
    he world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday. Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the Zagros Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Did the Ancient Israelites Drink Beer?

    09/02/2010 6:53:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    BAR 36:05 ^ | Sep/Oct 2010 | Michael M. Homan
    Ancient Israelites, with the possible exception of a few teetotaling Nazirites and their moms, proudly drank beer -- and lots of it. Men, women and even children of all social classes drank it. Its consumption in ancient Israel was encouraged, sanctioned and intimately linked with their religion. Even Yahweh, according to the Hebrew Bible, consumed at least half a hin of beer (approximately 2 liters, or a six-pack) per day through the cultic ritual of libation, and he drank even more on the Sabbath (Numbers 28:7-10). People who were sad were advised to drink beer to temporarily erase their troubles...
  • Now that really would be vintage vodka!Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouch

    06/30/2016 10:27:15 AM PDT · by dware · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 30 June 2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouched for 300 years (tr)

    06/30/2016 10:31:55 AM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 06.30.2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • The world’s oldest paycheck was cashed in beer

    06/29/2016 7:23:28 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 30 replies
    On one tablet excavated from the area we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning “ration”, and a conical vessel, meaning “beer”. Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker. It’s the world’s oldest known payslip.