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Keyword: oenology

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  • Liquor: the Poetic Truth (What's Behind the the Sacred) [a translation from an Arabic article]

    01/21/2016 10:03:17 AM PST · by Ulmius · 10 replies
    Raseef22 ^ | December 24, 2015 | Omar al-Ma'moun
    Liquor is abundant in Arabic culture, its role a liquid of material and spiritual pleasure; considering that the Arab heritage is poetic as well as literary, liquor and other spirits abound in these works, their presence being felt in many types of poetic works. This makes liquor an element in reading material, a depiction meant to show splendor and fame, or a catchall term for drinks similar to it. So that one may attempt to approach the poetic truth, characteristics are attributed to liquor, like being a drink with the ability to transcend that which is sensual or habitual (any...
  • 3,400-year-old Canaanite Fort to Be Incorporated Into High-rise

    01/08/2016 3:20:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | January 6, 2016 | Ruth Schuster
    A 3,400-year-old Canaanite fort discovered in the heart of the modern Israeli city of Nahariya will be incorporated into a residential high-rise to be built at the spot. The Bronze Age citadel apparently served as an administrative center serving Mediterranean mariners... It had been destroyed at least four times by fire and was rebuilt each time... Among the artifacts discovered in the ruined citadel's rooms are ceramic figurines with human and animal forms, bronze weapons, and pottery vessels that hadn't been made locally -- they had been imported. That is further testimony to the extensive trading relations among the peoples...
  • Waiter, There's a Fish in My Wine!

    01/31/2005 1:44:55 PM PST · by Junior · 46 replies · 923+ views
    Oddly Enough, Reuters ^ | Mon Jan 31,10:36 AM ET
    BEIJING (Reuters) - The French used grapes, Russians fermented potatoes, Koreans put ginseng in their drink and Mexicans distilled cactus plants to make fiery tequila. Now China is introducing fish wine. Sun Keman, an entrepreneur in the northeastern port city of Dalian, has formed the Dalian Fisherman's Song Maritime Biological Brewery, with a plan to use his background in the fishing industry to make fish into wine. "Different from China's thousands of years of brewing, the brewery will clean, boil, and ferment fish for making wine," the official Xinhua news agency reported. The company already had orders from Japan, Russia...
  • The first inter-cultural ‘party’ in Europe?

    12/07/2015 10:44:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 6, 2015 | Francesco Iacono
    The sharing of food and alcoholic beverages is extremely important today as in the past because provides a wealth of information on societies where this occurred. So far however, most of these practices known through archaeology have been primarily those undertaken by people from the same individual community or regional district. The Bronze Age site of Roca (2) in Southern Italy, has produced clear evidence for the existence at this place of one of the earliest inter-cultural feasting 'party' in Mediterranean Europe, dating to c.a. 1200 BC. This small (about 3 hectares nowadays, although it was larger in the past)...
  • Tequila Regulates Insulin-Like Signaling and Extends Life Span in Drosophila melanogaster

    12/06/2015 5:55:11 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 46 replies
    Oxford Journals ^ | 8/11/15 | Cheng-Wen Huang et al
    Abstract The aging process is a universal phenomenon shared by all living organisms. The identification of longevity genes is important in that the study of these genes is likely to yield significant insights into human senescence. In this study, we have identified Tequila as a novel candidate gene involved in the regulation of longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that a hypomorphic mutation of Tequila (Teq f01792), as well as cell-specific downregulation of Tequila in insulin-producing neurons of the fly, significantly extends life span. Tequila deficiency–induced life-span extension is likely to be associated with reduced insulin-like signaling, because Tequila...
  • Israel Aims to Recreate Wine That Jesus and King David Drank

    11/30/2015 6:28:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 41 replies
    NY Times ^ | NOV. 29, 2015 | JODI RUDOREN
    HEFER VALLEY, Israel — The new crisp, acidic and mineral white from a high-end Israeli winery was aged for eight months — or, depending on how you look at it, at least 1,800 years. The wine, called marawi and released last month by Recanati Winery, is the first commercially produced by Israel’s growing modern industry from indigenous grapes. It grew out of a groundbreaking project at Ariel University in the occupied West Bank that aims to use DNA testing to identify — and recreate — ancient wines drunk by the likes of King David and Jesus Christ. Eliyashiv Drori, the...
  • How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky (Shackleton's Antartica Scotch)

    01/22/2012 4:18:28 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 52 replies
    PopSci ^ | 01.04.2012 | Paul Adams
    How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky Preserved in Antarctica since 1907, the Scotch that Ernest Shackleton drank is now available in stores In 1907, Ernest Shackleton and crew set out on the ship Nimrod to visit Antarctica and, they hoped, the South Pole. The good news was, the entire party survived the trip, thanks in part to the Rare Old Highland Whisky they brought to the frozen continent. But the expedition was forced to evacuate in 1909, some 100 miles short of the Pole they sought. And, as winter ice encroached and the men hurried home, they left behind...
  • Explorer's rare Scotch returned to Antarctic stash

    01/19/2013 12:25:10 PM PST · by Kaslin · 69 replies
    Yahoo!News ^ | January 19, 2013 | ROD McGUIRK
    SCOTTBASE, Antarctica (AP) Talk about whisky on ice: Three bottles of rare, 19th century Scotch found beneath the floor boards of Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackelton's abandoned expedition base were returned to the polar continent Saturday after a distiller flew them to Scotland to recreate the long-lost recipe. But not even New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, who personally returned the stash, got a taste of the contents of the bottles of Mackinlay's whisky, which were rediscovered 102 years after the explorer was forced to leave them behind. "I think we're all tempted to crack it open and have a...
  • New Zealand museum thaws 100-year-old whisky

    07/24/2010 5:20:35 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 71 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 7/22/2010
    A crate of Scotch whisky that has been frozen in Antarctic ice for more than a century is being slowly thawed by New Zealand museum officials. The crate of whisky was recovered earlier this year - along with four other crates containing whisky and brandy - beneath the floor of a hut built by British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton during his 1908 Antarctic expedition. Four of the crates were left in the ice, but one labelled Mackinlay's whisky was brought to the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand's South Island, where officials said it was being thawed in a...
  • World's oldest malt whisky ($15,000 a bottle) goes on sale

    03/12/2010 7:10:30 AM PST · by envisio · 74 replies · 1,308+ views
    DAILYMAIL ^ | 12th March 2010 | By Daily Mail Reporter
    The world's oldest malt whisky - costing up to 10,000 a bottle - went on sale today. The Mortlach 70-year-old Speyside was sampled by a select group of tasters at a ceremony in Edinburgh Castle. Bottles of the rare piece of Scotland's 'liquid history' have now hit the market. Only 54 full-size bottles, costing 10,000 each, and 162 smaller bottles at 2,500 have been made available. The whisky has been released under Gordon and MacPhail's Generations brand. It was filled into its cask on October 15 1938 on the order of John Urquhart, the grandfather of the firm's joint managing...
  • Scotch Whisky Meant To Warm Antarctic Explorers Retrieved After Century Locked In Ice

    02/06/2010 9:26:13 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 30 replies · 1,108+ views
    StarTribune.com ^ | February 5, 2010 | AP
    Scotch whisky meant to warm Antarctic explorers retrieved after century locked in ice Associated Press WELLINGTON, New Zealand - This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved." New Zealand Antarctic...
  • Shackleton's whisky recovered

    02/05/2010 7:52:41 PM PST · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies · 815+ views
    Guardian.co.uk ^ | February 2010 12.20 GMT | Rick Peters
    That's the spirit! Cases of Mackinlay's 'Rare Old' scotch whisky have been recovered from the ice outside Shackleton's Antarctic hut. What will it taste like? After some hype and anticipation news has emerged that the crates of whisky long suspected to have been entombed by ice outside Sir Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic hut have finally been recovered. A team from the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust have managed to extract five cases, three of Chas Mackinlay & Co's whisky and two containing brandy made by the Hunter Valley Distillery Limited, Allandale (Australia), which were abandoned by the expedition in 1909 as...
  • Explorers' century-old whisky found in Antarctic

    02/05/2010 5:57:24 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 32 replies · 994+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Fri Feb 5, 4:49 am ET | unknown
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved."
  • Team drills for century-old Scotch whiskey in Antarctica

    11/16/2009 8:36:45 AM PST · by buccaneer81 · 22 replies · 1,703+ views
    The Columbus Dispatch ^ | November 16, 2009 | NA
    <p>WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- A beverage company has asked a team to drill through Antarctica's ice for a lost cache of some vintage Scotch whiskey that has been on the rocks since a century ago.</p> <p>The drillers will be trying to reach two crates of McKinlay and Co. whiskey that were shipped to the Antarctic by British polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton as part of his abandoned 1909 expedition.</p>
  • Preserved in ice for 100 years, the whisky Shackleton used to keep out the cold.

    11/04/2009 6:03:37 PM PST · by GSP.FAN · 41 replies · 1,672+ views
    MailOnline ^ | 03 March 2007 | Peter Gillman
    They say whisky matures with age...but leaving it embedded in the Antarctic ice for almost 100 years may be going a bit far.
  • Whisky on (Antarctic) ice: Ernest Shackleton...left a stash at the bottom of the world.

    10/26/2009 6:07:49 PM PDT · by xzins · 45 replies · 3,035+ views
    Global Post ^ | October 26, 2009 | Emily Stone
    CAPE ROYDS, Antarctica This spit of black volcanic rock that juts out along the coast of Antarctica is an inhospitable place. Temperatures drop below 50 Fahrenheit and high winds cause blinding snowstorms... But if you happen upon the small wooden hut that sits at Cape Royds and wriggled yourself underneath, you'd find a surprise stashed in the foot and a half of space beneath the floorboards. Tucked in the shadows and frozen to the ground are two cases of Scotch whisky left behind 100 years ago by Sir Ernest Shackleton after a failed attempt at the South Pole. Conservators...
  • Now That’s What I Call On The Rocks! 107-Y/O Crates Of Whisky Found Frozen In Antarctica

    11/27/2015 3:31:17 PM PST · by NYer · 32 replies
    Dusty Old Things ^ | November 26, 2015
    In 2010, researchers and conservators from the Antarctic Heritage Trust of New Zealand made quite the interesting discovery. Hidden beneath the hut legendary explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton used during his 1908 Antarctica expedition (known as the Nimrod) were five crates covered in ice: three containing whisky and two containing scotch! This wasn’t the only discovery made by the Trust either; they also found a notebook and photos from similar expeditions on the continent.From: Youtube / Shackleton Whisky After the whisky was discovered, one crate was sent to New Zealand where it was thawed and displayed for the public at Canterbury Museum. Three of the bottles...
  • Buzzkill: Obamacare Regulation May Put Craft Breweries Out of Business

    11/23/2015 4:57:09 PM PST · by Kaslin · 48 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | November 23, 2015 | Leah Barkoukis
    Obamacare's menu labeling regulationpromises to be a disaster for the food and restaurant industries, as its implementation is both costly and extremely onerous. While its deleterious effects on thepizza, restaurant, and grocery industries have been most well known, it also has the potential to shutter an industry near and dear to Americans' hearts: craft beer. Since beer has a few too many calories for bureaucrats, the health law dictates that all brewers include a detailed calorie count on every type of beer produced. Failure to do so, according to Americans for Tax Reform, "means craft brewers will not be able...
  • Ancient winery discovered in central Israel region during storm

    10/27/2015 1:29:46 PM PDT · by Lera · 14 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 10/26/2015 | DANIEL K. EISENBUD
    Large 1,500-year-old winepress unearthed in area once known for wine production. A large, well-preserved 1,500-year-old winery has been exposed during a violent storm in the Sharon Plain region, located between the Mediterranean Sea and Samarian Hills, the Antiquities Authority announced Monday. According to IAA archeologist Alla Nagorski, the discovery was made off the Eyal Interchange several weeks ago when flooding and hail disrupted an excavation at the site, where natural gas lines are scheduled to be embedded. The northern part of the Sharon Plain is considered the most historical wine region in Israel, and is where the first roots of...
  • Boozy comet leaves '500 bottles of wine per second' trail in its wake

    10/26/2015 7:26:54 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 40 replies
    ninemsn ^ | 27/10/2015 | N/A
    A comet with the nickname Happy Hour leaves a boozy trail equivalent to "500 bottles of wine per second" in its wake as it shoots through space. Scientists studying the comet, known as Lovejoy, have found its glowing trail is made up of alcohol and sugar. A study published by a group of scientists from NASA and European agencies observed the unusual comet as it rocketed alongside the sun on January 30, NASA reports. "You have alcohol and sugar, so that can lead to a 'happy hour' name, but I would not recommend anyone drink this water," team researcher Darek...
  • New diversity for lager beers

    09/25/2015 1:49:00 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    phys.org ^ | September 25, 2015 | Provided by: American Society for Microbiology
    Unlike ales, lager beers differ little in flavor. But now, by creating new crosses among the relevant yeasts, Kevin Verstrepen, PhD, Stijn Mertens, and their collaborators have opened up new horizons of taste. The research is published in the September 25 Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The relative uniformity of flavor among lagers turned out to result in significant part from a lack of genetic diversity among the yeasts. Genetic studies showed that lager yeasts had resulted from just two crosses between the parent yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and S. eubayanus. The problem was...
  • Beer Church; The Largest Unorganized Religion in the World!

    07/25/2003 11:00:02 AM PDT · by mhking · 139 replies · 2,112+ views
    Making the world a better place, one beer at a time. For each and every one of you, your own appreciation of beer is something deeply personal. The appreciation of Beer is also something that is universal. Beer Church is about the relationship of the two; your personal affection for beer, and humanity's overwhelming love of Beer. Beer Church is a celebration of Beer (with a capital "B"). Beer Church represents the "something larger than yourself" to which you belong by virtue of your very personal love for beer. Beer Church is about the one thing that we all have...
  • Firenado! 800,000 gallons of Jim Beam

    09/04/2015 12:29:03 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 64 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 9/4/15 | Darren Boyle
    A Jim Beam warehouse in Kentucky was struck by lightning releasing 800,000 gallons of bourbon into a nearby lake. Then, the lake was hit by a 'firenado' setting the inflammable liquid alight. The firenado was caused when a bolt of lighting hit the ground setting a fire which was in the path of a tornado, which sucked up the flames, creating a terrifying spiraling inferno.
  • Booze Sent to Space to Explore 'Mellow' Mechanism

    08/22/2015 12:05:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 31 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | Elizabeth Howell
    Tokyo-based Suntory Global Innovation Center, which has a division called Suntory Whiskey, launched a set of alcoholic beverages toward the International Space Station on Wednesday (Aug. 19) aboard Japan's fifth H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-5). The booze includes five different types of distilled spirits, Suntory representatives said. The robotic HTV-5 is scheduled to reach the orbiting lab on Monday (Aug. 24). But astronauts will not crack open a bottle to celebrate the freighter's arrival; the liquor is flying for purely scientific purposes. Suntory plans to conduct future experiments to see how the "mellowness" of sprits is affected by microgravity and a...
  • Cork Makes Comeback at Bay Area Wineries

    06/01/2015 7:29:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Jun 1, 2015 | Tamara Palmer
    Cork is on the comeback trail in Wine Country. After using synthetic bottle closures for decades, Bay Area winemakers are returning to natural cork, the San Francisco Business Times reports. The possibility of tainted cork has led many producers to use synthetic caps over the years, but the technology for growing and testing cork has improved enough to mitigate the threat and draw companies back, St. Francis Winery & Vineyards CEO Christopher Silva told the publication. If the industry tide shifts back to a natural product, a cheers and a toast to sustainability might just be merited.
  • 250 Year-Old Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum

    05/18/2015 6:26:51 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 49 replies
    The Spirits Business ^ | 18th May, 2015 | Annie Hayes
    Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum Sunken British warship the Lord Clive could hold treasure worth millions, including vast stocks of 250-year-old rum which will be recovered later this year. The wreck, which sunk off the coast of Uruguay, was discovered in 2004, but the Uruguyan government has only given permission for its recovery this year. Salvage of the ship, which was sunk by Spanish cannons in 1763, will require cranes, excavators and around 80 workers and is expected to begin within two months. The ship, which was constructed in Hull for the Royal Navy and was...
  • 170-year-old champagne recovered from shipwreck still delicious, tasters say

    04/20/2015 7:38:06 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    sciencerecorder.com ^ | Delila James
    Biochemist Phillipe Jeandet.... who has analyzed the early 19-century bubbly, says there were surprising amounts of copper and iron in the wine. The copper most likely came from copper sulfate, which vintners used to kill mildew and fungus on growing grape vines, the report said. The nails used to hold the wooden storage barrels together probably account for the liquids high iron content, he said. Even after 170 years lying some 165 feet deep in the ancient sunken cargo vessel, the champagne corks had not deteriorated because, scientists say, there was liquid both inside and out. And, according to Andrew...
  • Ancient Brewery Discovered On Mountain Top In Peru

    07/28/2004 7:51:19 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 543+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 7-27-2004 | Greg Borzo
    Public release date: 27-Jul-2004 Contact: Greg Borzo gborzo@fieldmuseum.org 312-665-7106 Field Museum Ancient brewery discovered on mountain top in Peru Field Museum online expedition still in progress describes discovery of 'Beer of Kings' Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old brewery from the Wari Empire's occupation of Cerro Bal, a mountaintop city in the Andes. Remains of the brewery were well preserved because a fire set when the brewery was closed made the walls collapse over the materials. Photo by Patrick Ryan Williams, courtesy of The Field Museum CHICAGO--Archaeologists working in southern Peru found an ancient brewery more than 1,000 years old. Remains of...
  • Did early Southwestern Indians ferment corn and make beer?

    12/04/2007 12:35:33 PM PST · by Red Badger · 50 replies · 970+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 12/04/07 | Sandia National Laboratory
    Sandia researcher Ted Borek used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to analyze vapors produced by mild heating of pot samples. (Photo by Randy Montoya) The belief among some archeologists that Europeans introduced alcohol to the Indians of the American Southwest may be faulty. Ancient and modern pot sherds collected by New Mexico state archeologist Glenna Dean, in conjunction with analyses by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Ted Borek, open the possibility that food or beverages made from fermenting corn were consumed by native inhabitants centuries before the Spanish arrived. Dean, researching through her small business Archeobotanical Services, says, Theres been...
  • What would Jesus drink? Experts guess what wine was like in ancient times and what modern ones ...

    04/02/2015 2:21:42 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 172 replies
    Orange County Register ^ | April 2, 2015 | Anne Valdespino
    Full title: What would Jesus drink? Experts guess what wine was like in ancient times and what modern ones are similar Christ was a vintner. And if you heed the Scriptures, quite a good one, according to the maitre d' at the wedding in Cana. "... the headwaiter called the bridegroom and said to him, 'Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.'" (John 2:9-10). In ancient times, wine was precious and revered, mentioned more than 140 times in the Bible. As Easter and...
  • Determining recipes for some of the world's oldest preserved beers

    03/04/2015 10:20:58 AM PST · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-04-2015 | Provided by American Chemical Society
    Some breweries have taken to resurrecting the flavors of ages past. Adventurous beer makers are extrapolating recipes from clues that archeologists have uncovered from old and even ancient brews found at historical sites. Now scientists have analyzed some of the oldest preserved beer samples from an 1840s' shipwreck to try to provide insight into how they were made. They report their findings in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Brian Gibson and colleagues explain that in 2010, divers discovered an old schooner at the bottom of the Baltic Sea near Finland. Archeological evidence suggested the ship went down about...
  • Letter from Ireland: Mystery of the Fulacht Fiadh

    02/19/2015 2:24:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2012 | Erin Mullally
    On a typically misty morning in the west of Ireland, just outside the medieval town of Athenry, County Galway, archaeologist Declan Moore... is taking me to visit an unexcavated fulacht fiadh (pronounced FULL-ahk FEE-add), or fulachta fia in plural, the most common type of prehistoric archaeological site in Ireland. Better known as a "burnt mound" in the neighboring United Kingdom, where they are also found, there are nearly 6,000 recorded fulacht fiadh sites dotted around Ireland alone... When we arrive at the site, Moore shows me the basic features of a fulacht fiadh -- a horseshoe-shaped mound of soil and...
  • How Bronze Age man Enjoyed His Pint

    08/12/2007 4:39:08 PM PDT · by blam · 66 replies · 1,688+ views
    BBC ^ | 8-12-2007
    How Bronze Age man enjoyed his pint Declan Moore and Billy Quinn have an ancient beer theory Bronze Age Irishmen were as fond of their beer as their 21st century counterparts, it has been claimed. Two archaeologists have put forward a theory that one of the most common ancient monuments seen around Ireland may have been used for brewing ale. Fulacht fiadh - horseshoe shaped grass covered mounds - are conventionally thought of as ancient cooking spots. But the archaeologists from Galway believe they could have been the country's earliest breweries. To prove their theory that an extensive brewing tradition...
  • ...Why was the wine of the Negev so renowned in the Byzantine Empire...

    02/13/2015 12:07:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Israel Antiquities Authority ^ | February 2015 | unattributed
    For the first time, grape seeds from the Byzantine era have been found. These grapes were used to produce "the Wine of the Negev" -- one of the finest and most renowned wines in the whole of the Byzantine Empire. The charred seeds, over 1,500 years-old, were found at the Halutza excavation site in the Negev during a joint dig by the University of Haifa and the Israel Antiquities Authority. "The vines growing in the Negev today are European varieties, whereas the Negev vine was lost to the world. Our next job is to recreate the ancient wine, and perhaps...
  • Will climate change kill off Pinot Noir? Vineyards are ditching grape varieties that can't cope...

    01/03/2015 1:57:57 PM PST · by Libloather · 64 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 1/02/15 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    If global temperatures continue to rise, the taste of your favourite wine could either drastically change, or the drink could be off the menu completely. A wine expert has warned that fine wines in particular, such as Pinot Noir, are having their flavour significantly altered due to climate change. And, as a result, vineyard owners are ditching these grape varieties in favour of those that are better equipped to handle the increases in global temperature.
  • How Archaeologists Recreate Ancient Booze (interview with Patrick McGovern)

    01/03/2015 1:57:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Slate ^ | Saturday, January 3, 2015 | Linda Geddes (in New Scientist)
    Phrygians were brewing with barley before it was cool. Resurrecting ancient beers and wines is a subtle alchemy, but Patrick McGovern knows all the tricks. He directs the Biomolecular Archaeology Project for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Many of his ancient brews are sold by Dogfish Head brewery in Delaware. How did you start making ancient drinks? One of the first we made was the Midas beverage, based on residues in bronze vessels recovered from the Midas tomb in Turkey, which dates from 700 B.C. These pointed to an unusual drink combining wine, barley...
  • Beer Domesticated Man

    12/19/2013 5:54:42 AM PST · by Second Amendment First · 35 replies
    Nautilus ^ | December 19, 2013 | Gloria Dawson
    The domestication of wild grains has played a major role in human evolution, facilitating the transition from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to one based on agriculture. You might think that the grains were used for bread, which today represents a basic staple. But some scientists argue that it wasnt bread that motivated our ancestors to start grain farming. It was beer. Man, they say, chose pints over pastry. Beer has plenty to recommend it over bread. First, and most obviously, it is pleasant to drink. Beer had all the same nutrients as bread, and it had one additional advantage, argues Solomon...
  • Abandoned Anchors From Punic Wars Found Near Sicily

    07/03/2013 9:18:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, July 03, 2013 | from Discovery News
    More than 30 ancient anchors have been discovered near the small Sicilian island of Pantelleria. Leonardo Abelli of the University of Sassari says that the anchors were abandoned by the Carthaginians during the First Punic War more than 2,000 years ago. The Romans had captured the strategically located island with a fleet of more than 300 ships. The Carthaginian ships that were stationing near Patelleria had no other choice than hiding near the northern coast and trying to escape. To do so, they cut the anchors free and left them in the sea. They also abandoned part of their cargo...
  • Lager Beer's Mystery Yeast

    08/22/2011 7:12:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 22 August 2011 | Sara Reardon
    Enlarge Image Bottoms up. Lager, as we know it, is likely a hybrid of S. cerevisiae and a newly discovered yeast from Patagonia. Credit: Stephan Zabel/iStockphoto Lager may have its roots in Bavaria, but a key ingredient arrived from halfway around the world. Scientists have discovered that the yeast used to brew this light-colored beer may hail from Argentina. Apparently, yeast cells growing in Patagonian trees made their way to Europe and into the barrels of brewers. Through the ages, brewers have tried to make their beers better, for instance, by improving on taste or color or making them...
  • Alcohol's Neolithic Origins: Brewing Up a Civilization

    12/30/2009 9:14:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 787+ views
    Der Spiegel ^ | Frank Thadeusz
    Did our Neolithic ancestors turn to agriculture so that they could be sure of a tipple? US Archaeologist Patrick McGovern thinks so. The expert on identifying traces of alcohol in prehistoric sites reckons the thirst for a brew was enough of an incentive to start growing crops... Here is how the story likely began -- a prehistoric human picked up some dropped fruit from the ground and popped it unsuspectingly into his or her mouth. The first effect was nothing more than an agreeably bittersweet flavor spreading across the palate. But as alcohol entered the bloodstream, the brain started sending...
  • 9,000-year-old brew hitting the shelves this summer

    06/10/2009 7:53:01 PM PDT · by grey_whiskers · 113 replies · 1,923+ views
    60-Second Science Blog via Scientific American ^ | 60-Second Science Blog | Brendan Borrell
    This summer, how would you like to lean back in your lawn chair and toss back a brew made from what may be the worlds oldest recipe for beer? Called Chateau Jiahu, this blend of rice, honey and fruit was intoxicating Chinese villagers 9,000 years agolong before grape wine had its start in Mesopotamia. University of Pennsylvania molecular archaeologist Patrick McGovern first described the beverage in 2005 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences based on chemical traces from pottery in the Neolithic village of Jiahu in Northern China. Soon after, McGovern called on Sam Calagione at the...
  • California Draft Gore Poised to Put Gore's Name on Ballot

    09/26/2007 6:06:34 PM PDT · by Libloather · 25 replies · 119+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 9/26/07
    California Draft Gore Poised to Put Gore's Name on BallotWed Sep 26, 3:56 PM ET To: POLITICAL EDITORS Contact: Roy Gayhart, +1-858-581-1024, roy@california4gore.org, or Patrick McGovern, +1-812-219-0180, LA@california4gore.org, or Chris Vallone, +1-415-336-0796, all for California Draft Gore SACRAMENTO, Calif., Sept. 26 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Organizers of California Draft Gore, a grassroots campaign to put Al Gore's name on the California presidential primary ballot, announced today that the campaign has volunteers located in or assigned to all of the state's 53 congressional districts. Originally convening on websites like algore.org, meetup.com, savethewhitehouse.com and draftgore.com, California Gore supporters quickly built the infrastructure necessary to...
  • History of Drinking - Uncorking the Past

    01/16/2002 4:39:19 PM PST · by lds23 · 3 replies · 1+ views
    Economist ^ | 12/22/01 | Staff
    The history of drinking Uncorking the past Dec 20th 2001 Recreating old drinks provides an enjoyable form of time-travelling IT MAY be smalleach molecule is less than a billionth of a metre long, and consists of a handful of atoms of carbon, hydrogen and oxygenbut ethyl alcohol makes an excellent time machine. People have enjoyed alcoholic drinks since prehistoric times, making drinking one of the few strands that runs throughout the history of western civilisation. Appreciating the art, music or literature of long-vanished cultures can require years of study; recreating their drinks, and comparing them to what we enjoy today, ...
  • Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits

    09/23/2004 7:24:12 PM PDT · by blam · 41 replies · 1,168+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 9-23-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Sept. 23, 2004 Mummy hair has revealed the first direct evidence of alcohol consumption in ancient populations, according to new forensic research.The study, still in its preliminary stage, examined hair samples from spontaneously mummified remains discovered in one of the most arid regions of the world, the Atacama Desert of northern Chile and southern Peru. The research was presented at the 5th World Congress on Mummy Studies in Turin, Italy, this month. In modern human hair the levels would generally be in the ranges of social drinking, but we...
  • Ancients Rang In New Year With Dance, Beer

    12/31/2005 11:28:56 AM PST · by blam · 92 replies · 1,432+ views
    Discovery ^ | 12-30-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Ancients Rang In New Year with Dance, Beer By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Dec. 30, 2005 Many ancient Egyptians marked the first month of the New Year by singing, dancing and drinking red beer until they passed out, according to archaeologists who have unearthed new evidence of a ritual known as the Festival of Drunkenness. During ongoing excavations at a temple precinct in Luxor that is dedicated to the goddess Mut, the archaeologists recently found a sandstone column drum dating to 1470-1460 B.C. with writing that mentions the festival. The discovery suggests how some Egyptians over 3,000 years ago...
  • Human Ancestors Were Consuming Alcohol 10 Million Years Ago

    12/25/2014 4:40:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 83 replies
    Discover 'blogs ^ | December 1, 2014 | Carl Engelking
    Using the tools of paleogenetics, scientists have recently traced the evolutionary history of an enzyme that helps us metabolize ethanol, the principal type of alcohol found in adult beverages. Scientists believe early human ancestors evolved their ethanol-digesting ability about 10 million years ago to fortify their diet as they shifted from a tree-based lifestyle to a more ground-based lifestyle... To help narrow that range, researchers studied the genetic evolution of alcohol-metabolizing enzyme ADH4, which has been present in primates, in one form or another, for at least 70 million years. Using genetic sequences from 28 different mammals, including 17 primates,...
  • 'World's oldest champagne' uncorked

    11/17/2010 6:32:34 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 45 replies · 2+ views
    Windsor Star ^ | 11/17/2010 | Aira-Katariina Vehaskari
    MARIEHAMN - Wine experts Wednesday popped the corks of two bottles of champagne recently salvaged from the bottom of the Baltic Sea, where they had lain in a sunken ship for nearly 200 years. On stage in front of some 100 journalists and wine enthusiasts gathered in the capital of Finland's island province of Aaland, they eased the fragile corks from the dark brown bottles one from the house of Veuve-Clicquot and the other from the now extinct house of Juglar. Swedish and worldwide champagne expert Richard Julin tastes a 200-year-old champagne Read more: http://www.windsorstar.com/life/World+oldest+champagne+uncorked/3841588/story.html#ixzz15b2y19eI As the contents were...
  • Archaeologists Virtually Recreate Ancient Egyptian Brewery

    08/11/2013 10:37:07 AM PDT · by Renfield · 13 replies
    ancient-origins.net ^ | 8-7-2013 | April Holloway
    A Polish archaeologist at the Jagiellonian University Institute of Archaeology has made a 3D reconstruction of a 5,500-year-old brewing installation which was found at Tell el-Farcha, an archaeological site in Egypt dating back to approximately 3700 BC when it functioned as a centre of local Lower Egyptian Culture. The virtual reconstruction has brought to life the ancient scene in which Egyptians practiced a traditional form of beer making. The reconstruction was created based on preserved structures of similar analogous buildings at both Tell el-Farcha and other brewing centres in Upper Egypt. The Tell el-Farcha brewery, the oldest ever brewery found...
  • Nordic Grog Is Latest of Dogfish Head's Ancient Brews

    12/25/2013 2:50:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 23, 2013 | editors
    Residues of pottery sherds from ancient Scandinavian settlements dating as far back as 1200 B.C. are the inspiration for Delaware-based brewey Dogfish Head's latest ancient ale, Kvasir. Patrick McGovern, a bioarchaeolgist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and frequent collaborator with Dogfish Head on these brews calls the drink a Nordic grog. The recipe for Kvasir, which is available in limited quantities now, involves yarrow, lingonberries, cranberries, bog myrtle, and birch syrup. Prior to Kvasir, Dogfish Head brewed Midas Touch, influenced by residues taken from 2,700-year-old pottery found in Turkey, and Chateau Jiahu, an ale that traces its history back...
  • Chemistry Used to Unlock Secrets in Archeological Remains

    04/30/2002 6:10:04 PM PDT · by vannrox · 5 replies · 1,037+ views
    VOA News ^ | 27 Apr 2002 12:35 UTC | Written by Laszlo Dosa , Voiced by Faith Lapidus
    Patrick McGovern "The site is very rich archeologically, has been excavated for the last 50 years by the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It has a large palace area with rooms, some of which are thought to have been kitchens for making the food for the palace, with jars of barley and other goods. Also, it has a whole series of tombs in which the burial was done in a special wooden chamber beneath a very large mound. It's almost as if you cut it yesterday and put the structure together. It is the earliest intact human building made of...