Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $27,840
Woo hoo!! And the first 31% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: oenology

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Did the Ancient Israelites Drink Beer?

    09/02/2010 6:53:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    BAR 36:05 ^ | Sep/Oct 2010 | Michael M. Homan
    Ancient Israelites, with the possible exception of a few teetotaling Nazirites and their moms, proudly drank beer -- and lots of it. Men, women and even children of all social classes drank it. Its consumption in ancient Israel was encouraged, sanctioned and intimately linked with their religion. Even Yahweh, according to the Hebrew Bible, consumed at least half a hin of beer (approximately 2 liters, or a six-pack) per day through the cultic ritual of libation, and he drank even more on the Sabbath (Numbers 28:7-10). People who were sad were advised to drink beer to temporarily erase their troubles...
  • Now that really would be vintage vodka!Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouch

    06/30/2016 10:27:15 AM PDT · by dware · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 30 June 2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouched for 300 years (tr)

    06/30/2016 10:31:55 AM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 06.30.2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • The world’s oldest paycheck was cashed in beer

    06/29/2016 7:23:28 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 30 replies
    On one tablet excavated from the area we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning “ration”, and a conical vessel, meaning “beer”. Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker. It’s the world’s oldest known payslip.
  • Wine Used In Ritual Ceremonies 5000 Years Ago In Georgia, The Cradle Of Viticulture

    06/19/2016 5:23:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Ca' Foscari University of Venice
    Georgian-Italian archaeological expedition of Ca' Foscari University of Venice in collaboration with the Georgian Museum of Tbilisi has discovered vine pollen in a zoomorphic vessel used in ritual ceremonies by the Kura-Araxes population. In the archeological site of Aradetis Orgora, 100 kilometers to the west of the Georgian capital Tbilisi, Ca' Foscari's expedition led by Elena Rova (Ca' Foscari University of Venice) and Iulon Gagoshidze (Georgian National Museum Tbilisi) has discovered traces of wine inside an animal-shaped ceramic vessel (circa 3,000 BC), probably used for cultic activities. The vessel has an animal-shaped body with three small feet and a pouring...
  • 5,000-Year-Old Beer Recipe Had Secret Ingredient

    05/24/2016 7:14:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies ^ | May 24, 2016 09:42 AM ET | Tom Metcalfe, Live Science
    Scientists conducted tests on ancient pottery jars and funnels found at the Mijiaya archaeological site in China’s Shaanxi province. The analyses revealed traces of oxalate — a beer-making byproduct that forms a scale called “beerstone” in brewing equipment — as well as residues from a variety of ancient grains and plants. These grains included broomcorn millets, an Asian wild grain known as “Job’s tears,” tubers from plant roots, and barley. Barley is used to make beer because it has high levels of amylase enzymes that promote the conversion of starches into sugars during the fermenting process. It was first cultivated...
  • Winston Churchill's Doctor's Note Allowing Him to Drink "Unlimited" Alcohol in Prohibition America

    05/18/2016 4:54:22 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 24 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 05/17/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    Winston Churchill arrived in the United States for a long (40 stop) lecture tour in December of 1931, and shortly after his arrival was struck by a car while crossing the street. A cab carried him off to Lenox Hill Hospital where he was treated for a deep gash to the head, a fractured nose, fractured ribs, and severe shock. He spent two weeks in the hospital, where he also developed pleurisy. Six weeks after the accident, he resumed an reduced 14-stop version of the tour, despite his fears that he would prove unfit. Dr. Otto Pickhardt, Lenox Hill’s admitting...
  • Is wine good for you or is it not?

    04/09/2016 7:53:28 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 34 replies
    The Economist ^ | 8 Apr, 2016
    FEW things arouse such warm adulation and sharp denunciation as alcohol. It is beloved by some and despised by others, and its consumption is governed by legal and religious rules. Wine is central to Christian rites but is widely considered by Muslims to be forbidden by the Quran. It is also the subject of debate within the scientific community: some researchers contend that alcohol, particularly wine, has health benefits, but others disagree. Pro-oenological forces point to a large body of evidence demonstrating wine’s positive effect on both the cardiovascular system and longevity. This viewpoint was given additional support this week...
  • Archaeobeer (Brewers and Vintner's thread)

    04/08/2016 2:04:46 PM PDT · by taxcontrol · 20 replies
    Brew your own ^ | September 2007 | Dan Mouer
    Back in the day - we're talking WAY back in the day - beer was brewed with malt, and bread, and honey and wine . . . and just about anything that could be fermented. How the ancients brewed - and how you can too! Archaeology and beer seem to go together, and it’s not just because a cold brew helps wash the dust from your teeth after a long day on the digs. I’m an archaeologist by profession and a homebrewer by avocation. Lots of archaeologists brew their own, and those who don’t often have a passion for more...
  • When vineyards bloomed in Sudan...

    03/29/2016 12:25:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | March 25, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebłowski
    In the mid-seventh century, Egypt was conquered by Muslim armies. The pressure of the invading army, advancing south along the Nile Valley, stopped the Christian kingdom of Makuria. The relics of this civilization have been discovered by Poznań archaeologists in the area of the Letti Basin, about 350 km north of Khartoum. Makuria was a powerful kingdom, which existed from the sixth to the fourteenth century between II and V cataracts of the Nile. For several centuries its power reached even farther north almost to the modern Aswan... Now archaeologists confirmed the presence of previously known sites, but also discovered...
  • How lager conquered the world: Food historian argues it globally dominated because it’s ‘clean’

    03/12/2016 6:05:35 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 39 replies
    National Post ^ | March 11, 2016 | Joseph Brean
    Like a Big Mac or a Coke, a Budweiser is one of the global economy’s more reliable pleasures, cheaply available almost everywhere. Historically, like the double-pattie burger and the iconic cola, the global dominance of light, fizzy, relatively bland, central European-style lager — from Budweiser to Molson and Corona — relied as much on cleanliness and consistency as it did on taste, as anyone who has tasted a Bud can tell you. In a talk to a gastronomy conference at the University of Toronto Mississauga this weekend, food historian Jeffrey Pilcher will argue that lager conquered the world, after first...
  • How Pompeii brought ancient Roman wine back to life

    02/27/2016 12:39:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | February 25, 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Made from ancient grape varieties grown in Pompeii, 'Villa dei Misteri' has to be one of the world's most exclusive wines. The grapes are planted in exactly the same position, grown using identical techniques and grow from the same soil the city's wine-makers exploited until Vesuvius buried the city and its inhabitants in AD 79. In the late 1800s, archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli first excavated some of the city's vineyards from beneath three metres of solid ash. The digs turned up an almost perfect snapshot of ancient wine-growing - and thirteen petrified corpses, huddled against a wall. Casts were made of...
  • Mead, drink of vikings, comes out of the Dark Ages

    12/29/2010 10:09:41 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 67 replies · 3+ views
    hosted ^ | Dec 29 | ALLEN G. BREED
    PITTSBORO, N.C. (AP) -- Mead, that drink of viking saga and medieval verse, is making a comeback. But this ain't your ancestors' honey wine. "It's not just for the Renaissance fair anymore," says Becky Starr, co-owner of Starrlight Mead, which recently opened in an old woven label mill in this little North Carolina town. In fact, this most ancient of alcoholic libations hasn't been this hot since Beowulf slew Grendel's dam and Geoffrey Chaucer fell in with the Canterbury pilgrims at the Tabard.
  • Eggnog: A Colonial Christmas Tradition (Gen. Washington's Recipe)

    12/17/2005 8:35:25 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 62 replies · 1,292+ views ^ | December, 2005 | Jeff Westover
    The General's Eggnog One quart of cream One quart of milk A dozen eggs One pint of brandy A half pint of rye A quarter pint of rum A quarter pint of sherry Christmas of 1826 was snowy, cold and lonely for the cadets of West Point. Though called "men" they were really teenage boys -- some as young as 17 -- and they wanted to celebrate Christmas. Young Jefferson Davis, future president of the Confederate States of America, was amongst them. But West Point then, as it is now, was a house of order and discipline. The military...
  • It’s Beer Thirty FReepers! Time For The Homebrewing/Wine Making Thread #7 Sept 7, 2012

    09/07/2012 4:35:46 PM PDT · by Red_Devil 232 · 70 replies
    Free Republic | 9-7-2012 | Red_Devil 232
    Good afternoon/evening FReepers. Yep, it is Beer Thirty Time Once Again!Happiness is a bubbling airlock! And a Cold Home Brew  BEER Good evening/afternoon brewers and winemakers. My wife and I are heading back to Mississippi from our new digs in Texas mid week next week to check on the house and property we own there. There will not be a beer/wine thread next week and possibly the next week. I do have another Honey Ale kit to brew up when I get back to Texas. I have decided not to brew it yet because I want to be here to...
  • It’s Beer Thirty FReepers! Time For The Homebrewing/Wine Making Thread #8 July 20, 2012

    07/20/2012 5:15:28 PM PDT · by Red_Devil 232 · 52 replies
    Free Republic | 7-20-2012 | Red_Devil 232
    Good afternoon/evening FReepers. Yep, it is Beer Thirty Time Once Again!Happiness is a bubbling airlock!  BEER Good evening/afternoon brewers and winemakers. Nothing brewed at the Red Devil Brew house this week. Just enjoying a few home brews.Tip: If you have ever been disappointed with your homebrews not developing a nice long lasting head or they seem to be over carbonated and really heady when you pour a glass of your homebrew you might want to try cleaning your glass or mug. Use a mixture of equal parts of Baking Soda and salt then add a little water to make a...
  • Liquor: the Poetic Truth (What's Behind the the Sacred) [a translation from an Arabic article]

    01/21/2016 10:03:17 AM PST · by Ulmius · 10 replies
    Raseef22 ^ | December 24, 2015 | Omar al-Ma'moun
    Liquor is abundant in Arabic culture, its role a liquid of material and spiritual pleasure; considering that the Arab heritage is poetic as well as literary, liquor and other spirits abound in these works, their presence being felt in many types of poetic works. This makes liquor an element in reading material, a depiction meant to show splendor and fame, or a catchall term for drinks similar to it. So that one may attempt to approach the poetic truth, characteristics are attributed to liquor, like being a drink with the ability to transcend that which is sensual or habitual (any...
  • 3,400-year-old Canaanite Fort to Be Incorporated Into High-rise

    01/08/2016 3:20:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | January 6, 2016 | Ruth Schuster
    A 3,400-year-old Canaanite fort discovered in the heart of the modern Israeli city of Nahariya will be incorporated into a residential high-rise to be built at the spot. The Bronze Age citadel apparently served as an administrative center serving Mediterranean mariners... It had been destroyed at least four times by fire and was rebuilt each time... Among the artifacts discovered in the ruined citadel's rooms are ceramic figurines with human and animal forms, bronze weapons, and pottery vessels that hadn't been made locally -- they had been imported. That is further testimony to the extensive trading relations among the peoples...
  • Waiter, There's a Fish in My Wine!

    01/31/2005 1:44:55 PM PST · by Junior · 46 replies · 923+ views
    Oddly Enough, Reuters ^ | Mon Jan 31,10:36 AM ET
    BEIJING (Reuters) - The French used grapes, Russians fermented potatoes, Koreans put ginseng in their drink and Mexicans distilled cactus plants to make fiery tequila. Now China is introducing fish wine. Sun Keman, an entrepreneur in the northeastern port city of Dalian, has formed the Dalian Fisherman's Song Maritime Biological Brewery, with a plan to use his background in the fishing industry to make fish into wine. "Different from China's thousands of years of brewing, the brewery will clean, boil, and ferment fish for making wine," the official Xinhua news agency reported. The company already had orders from Japan, Russia...
  • The first inter-cultural ‘party’ in Europe?

    12/07/2015 10:44:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 6, 2015 | Francesco Iacono
    The sharing of food and alcoholic beverages is extremely important today as in the past because provides a wealth of information on societies where this occurred. So far however, most of these practices known through archaeology have been primarily those undertaken by people from the same individual community or regional district. The Bronze Age site of Roca (2) in Southern Italy, has produced clear evidence for the existence at this place of one of the earliest inter-cultural feasting 'party' in Mediterranean Europe, dating to c.a. 1200 BC. This small (about 3 hectares nowadays, although it was larger in the past)...
  • Tequila Regulates Insulin-Like Signaling and Extends Life Span in Drosophila melanogaster

    12/06/2015 5:55:11 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 46 replies
    Oxford Journals ^ | 8/11/15 | Cheng-Wen Huang et al
    Abstract The aging process is a universal phenomenon shared by all living organisms. The identification of longevity genes is important in that the study of these genes is likely to yield significant insights into human senescence. In this study, we have identified Tequila as a novel candidate gene involved in the regulation of longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that a hypomorphic mutation of Tequila (Teq f01792), as well as cell-specific downregulation of Tequila in insulin-producing neurons of the fly, significantly extends life span. Tequila deficiency–induced life-span extension is likely to be associated with reduced insulin-like signaling, because Tequila...
  • Israel Aims to Recreate Wine That Jesus and King David Drank

    11/30/2015 6:28:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 41 replies
    NY Times ^ | NOV. 29, 2015 | JODI RUDOREN
    HEFER VALLEY, Israel — The new crisp, acidic and mineral white from a high-end Israeli winery was aged for eight months — or, depending on how you look at it, at least 1,800 years. The wine, called marawi and released last month by Recanati Winery, is the first commercially produced by Israel’s growing modern industry from indigenous grapes. It grew out of a groundbreaking project at Ariel University in the occupied West Bank that aims to use DNA testing to identify — and recreate — ancient wines drunk by the likes of King David and Jesus Christ. Eliyashiv Drori, the...
  • How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky (Shackleton's Antartica Scotch)

    01/22/2012 4:18:28 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 52 replies
    PopSci ^ | 01.04.2012 | Paul Adams
    How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky Preserved in Antarctica since 1907, the Scotch that Ernest Shackleton drank is now available in stores In 1907, Ernest Shackleton and crew set out on the ship Nimrod to visit Antarctica and, they hoped, the South Pole. The good news was, the entire party survived the trip, thanks in part to the Rare Old Highland Whisky they brought to the frozen continent. But the expedition was forced to evacuate in 1909, some 100 miles short of the Pole they sought. And, as winter ice encroached and the men hurried home, they left behind...
  • Explorer's rare Scotch returned to Antarctic stash

    01/19/2013 12:25:10 PM PST · by Kaslin · 69 replies
    Yahoo!News ^ | January 19, 2013 | ROD McGUIRK
    SCOTTBASE, Antarctica (AP) — Talk about whisky on ice: Three bottles of rare, 19th century Scotch found beneath the floor boards of Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackelton's abandoned expedition base were returned to the polar continent Saturday after a distiller flew them to Scotland to recreate the long-lost recipe. But not even New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, who personally returned the stash, got a taste of the contents of the bottles of Mackinlay's whisky, which were rediscovered 102 years after the explorer was forced to leave them behind. "I think we're all tempted to crack it open and have a...
  • New Zealand museum thaws 100-year-old whisky

    07/24/2010 5:20:35 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 71 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 7/22/2010
    A crate of Scotch whisky that has been frozen in Antarctic ice for more than a century is being slowly thawed by New Zealand museum officials. The crate of whisky was recovered earlier this year - along with four other crates containing whisky and brandy - beneath the floor of a hut built by British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton during his 1908 Antarctic expedition. Four of the crates were left in the ice, but one labelled Mackinlay's whisky was brought to the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand's South Island, where officials said it was being thawed in a...
  • World's oldest malt whisky ($15,000 a bottle) goes on sale

    03/12/2010 7:10:30 AM PST · by envisio · 74 replies · 1,308+ views
    DAILYMAIL ^ | 12th March 2010 | By Daily Mail Reporter
    The world's oldest malt whisky - costing up to £10,000 a bottle - went on sale today. The Mortlach 70-year-old Speyside was sampled by a select group of tasters at a ceremony in Edinburgh Castle. Bottles of the rare piece of Scotland's 'liquid history' have now hit the market. Only 54 full-size bottles, costing £10,000 each, and 162 smaller bottles at £2,500 have been made available. The whisky has been released under Gordon and MacPhail's Generations brand. It was filled into its cask on October 15 1938 on the order of John Urquhart, the grandfather of the firm's joint managing...
  • Scotch Whisky Meant To Warm Antarctic Explorers Retrieved After Century Locked In Ice

    02/06/2010 9:26:13 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 30 replies · 1,108+ views ^ | February 5, 2010 | AP
    Scotch whisky meant to warm Antarctic explorers retrieved after century locked in ice Associated Press WELLINGTON, New Zealand - This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved." New Zealand Antarctic...
  • Shackleton's whisky recovered

    02/05/2010 7:52:41 PM PST · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies · 815+ views ^ | February 2010 12.20 GMT | Rick Peters
    That's the spirit! Cases of Mackinlay's 'Rare Old' scotch whisky have been recovered from the ice outside Shackleton's Antarctic hut. What will it taste like? After some hype and anticipation news has emerged that the crates of whisky long suspected to have been entombed by ice outside Sir Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic hut have finally been recovered. A team from the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust have managed to extract five cases, three of Chas Mackinlay & Co's whisky and two containing brandy made by the Hunter Valley Distillery Limited, Allandale (Australia), which were abandoned by the expedition in 1909 as...
  • Explorers' century-old whisky found in Antarctic

    02/05/2010 5:57:24 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 32 replies · 994+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Fri Feb 5, 4:49 am ET | unknown
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand – This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved."
  • Team drills for century-old Scotch whiskey in Antarctica

    11/16/2009 8:36:45 AM PST · by buccaneer81 · 22 replies · 1,703+ views
    The Columbus Dispatch ^ | November 16, 2009 | NA
    <p>WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- A beverage company has asked a team to drill through Antarctica's ice for a lost cache of some vintage Scotch whiskey that has been on the rocks since a century ago.</p> <p>The drillers will be trying to reach two crates of McKinlay and Co. whiskey that were shipped to the Antarctic by British polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton as part of his abandoned 1909 expedition.</p>
  • Preserved in ice for 100 years, the whisky Shackleton used to keep out the cold.

    11/04/2009 6:03:37 PM PST · by GSP.FAN · 41 replies · 1,672+ views
    MailOnline ^ | 03 March 2007 | Peter Gillman
    They say whisky matures with age...but leaving it embedded in the Antarctic ice for almost 100 years may be going a bit far.
  • Whisky on (Antarctic) ice: Ernest Shackleton...left a stash at the bottom of the world.

    10/26/2009 6:07:49 PM PDT · by xzins · 45 replies · 3,035+ views
    Global Post ^ | October 26, 2009 | Emily Stone
    CAPE ROYDS, Antarctica — This spit of black volcanic rock that juts out along the coast of Antarctica is an inhospitable place. Temperatures drop below –50 Fahrenheit and high winds cause blinding snowstorms... But if you happen upon the small wooden hut that sits at Cape Royds and wriggled yourself underneath, you'd find a surprise stashed in the foot and a half of space beneath the floorboards. Tucked in the shadows and frozen to the ground are two cases of Scotch whisky left behind 100 years ago by Sir Ernest Shackleton after a failed attempt at the South Pole. Conservators...
  • Now That’s What I Call On The Rocks! 107-Y/O Crates Of Whisky Found Frozen In Antarctica

    11/27/2015 3:31:17 PM PST · by NYer · 32 replies
    Dusty Old Things ^ | November 26, 2015
    In 2010, researchers and conservators from the Antarctic Heritage Trust of New Zealand made quite the interesting discovery. Hidden beneath the hut legendary explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton used during his 1908 Antarctica expedition (known as the Nimrod) were five crates covered in ice: three containing whisky and two containing scotch! This wasn’t the only discovery made by the Trust either; they also found a notebook and photos from similar expeditions on the continent.From: Youtube / Shackleton Whisky After the whisky was discovered, one crate was sent to New Zealand where it was thawed and displayed for the public at Canterbury Museum. Three of the bottles...
  • Buzzkill: Obamacare Regulation May Put Craft Breweries Out of Business

    11/23/2015 4:57:09 PM PST · by Kaslin · 48 replies ^ | November 23, 2015 | Leah Barkoukis
    Obamacare's menu labeling regulation promises to be a disaster for the food and restaurant industries, as its implementation is both costly and extremely onerous. While its deleterious effects on the pizza, restaurant, and grocery industries have been most well known, it also has the potential to shutter an industry near and dear to Americans' hearts: craft beer. Since beer has a few too many calories for bureaucrats, the health law dictates that all brewers include a detailed calorie count on every type of beer produced. Failure to do so, according to Americans for Tax Reform, "means craft brewers will not be able...
  • Ancient winery discovered in central Israel region during storm

    10/27/2015 1:29:46 PM PDT · by Lera · 14 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 10/26/2015 | DANIEL K. EISENBUD
    Large 1,500-year-old winepress unearthed in area once known for wine production. A large, well-preserved 1,500-year-old winery has been exposed during a violent storm in the Sharon Plain region, located between the Mediterranean Sea and Samarian Hills, the Antiquities Authority announced Monday. According to IAA archeologist Alla Nagorski, the discovery was made off the Eyal Interchange several weeks ago when flooding and hail disrupted an excavation at the site, where natural gas lines are scheduled to be embedded. The northern part of the Sharon Plain is considered the most historical wine region in Israel, and is where the first roots of...
  • Boozy comet leaves '500 bottles of wine per second' trail in its wake

    10/26/2015 7:26:54 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 40 replies
    ninemsn ^ | 27/10/2015 | N/A
    A comet with the nickname Happy Hour leaves a boozy trail equivalent to "500 bottles of wine per second" in its wake as it shoots through space. Scientists studying the comet, known as Lovejoy, have found its glowing trail is made up of alcohol and sugar. A study published by a group of scientists from NASA and European agencies observed the unusual comet as it rocketed alongside the sun on January 30, NASA reports. "You have alcohol and sugar, so that can lead to a 'happy hour' name, but I would not recommend anyone drink this water," team researcher Darek...
  • New diversity for lager beers

    09/25/2015 1:49:00 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies ^ | September 25, 2015 | Provided by: American Society for Microbiology
    Unlike ales, lager beers differ little in flavor. But now, by creating new crosses among the relevant yeasts, Kevin Verstrepen, PhD, Stijn Mertens, and their collaborators have opened up new horizons of taste. The research is published in the September 25 Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The relative uniformity of flavor among lagers turned out to result in significant part from a lack of genetic diversity among the yeasts. Genetic studies showed that lager yeasts had resulted from just two crosses between the parent yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and S. eubayanus. The problem was...
  • Beer Church; The Largest Unorganized Religion in the World!

    07/25/2003 11:00:02 AM PDT · by mhking · 139 replies · 2,112+ views
    Making the world a better place, one beer at a time. For each and every one of you, your own appreciation of beer is something deeply personal. The appreciation of Beer is also something that is universal. Beer Church is about the relationship of the two; your personal affection for beer, and humanity's overwhelming love of Beer. Beer Church is a celebration of Beer (with a capital "B"). Beer Church represents the "something larger than yourself" to which you belong by virtue of your very personal love for beer. Beer Church is about the one thing that we all have...
  • Firenado! 800,000 gallons of Jim Beam

    09/04/2015 12:29:03 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 64 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 9/4/15 | Darren Boyle
    A Jim Beam warehouse in Kentucky was struck by lightning releasing 800,000 gallons of bourbon into a nearby lake. Then, the lake was hit by a 'firenado' setting the inflammable liquid alight. The firenado was caused when a bolt of lighting hit the ground setting a fire which was in the path of a tornado, which sucked up the flames, creating a terrifying spiraling inferno.
  • Booze Sent to Space to Explore 'Mellow' Mechanism

    08/22/2015 12:05:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 31 replies ^ | Elizabeth Howell
    Tokyo-based Suntory Global Innovation Center, which has a division called Suntory Whiskey, launched a set of alcoholic beverages toward the International Space Station on Wednesday (Aug. 19) aboard Japan's fifth H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-5). The booze includes five different types of distilled spirits, Suntory representatives said. The robotic HTV-5 is scheduled to reach the orbiting lab on Monday (Aug. 24). But astronauts will not crack open a bottle to celebrate the freighter's arrival; the liquor is flying for purely scientific purposes. Suntory plans to conduct future experiments to see how the "mellowness" of sprits is affected by microgravity and a...
  • Cork Makes Comeback at Bay Area Wineries

    06/01/2015 7:29:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Jun 1, 2015 | Tamara Palmer
    Cork is on the comeback trail in Wine Country. After using synthetic bottle closures for decades, Bay Area winemakers are returning to natural cork, the San Francisco Business Times reports. The possibility of tainted cork has led many producers to use synthetic caps over the years, but the technology for growing and testing cork has improved enough to mitigate the threat and draw companies back, St. Francis Winery & Vineyards CEO Christopher Silva told the publication. If the industry tide shifts back to a natural product, a cheers and a toast to sustainability might just be merited.
  • 250 Year-Old Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum

    05/18/2015 6:26:51 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 49 replies
    The Spirits Business ^ | 18th May, 2015 | Annie Hayes
    Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum • Sunken British warship the Lord Clive could hold “treasure worth millions”, including “vast stocks” of 250-year-old rum which will be recovered later this year. The wreck, which sunk off the coast of Uruguay, was discovered in 2004, but the Uruguyan government has only given permission for its recovery this year. Salvage of the ship, which was sunk by Spanish cannons in 1763, will require cranes, excavators and around 80 workers and is expected to begin within two months. The ship, which was constructed in Hull for the Royal Navy and was...
  • 170-year-old champagne recovered from shipwreck still delicious, tasters say

    04/20/2015 7:38:06 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 35 replies ^ | Delila James
    Biochemist Phillipe Jeandet.... who has analyzed the early 19-century bubbly, says there were surprising amounts of copper and iron in the wine. The copper most likely came from copper sulfate, which vintners used to kill mildew and fungus on growing grape vines, the report said. The nails used to hold the wooden storage barrels together probably account for the liquid’s high iron content, he said. Even after 170 years lying some 165 feet deep in the ancient sunken cargo vessel, the champagne corks had not deteriorated because, scientists say, there was liquid both inside and out. And, according to Andrew...
  • Ancient Brewery Discovered On Mountain Top In Peru

    07/28/2004 7:51:19 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 543+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 7-27-2004 | Greg Borzo
    Public release date: 27-Jul-2004 Contact: Greg Borzo 312-665-7106 Field Museum Ancient brewery discovered on mountain top in Peru Field Museum online expedition still in progress describes discovery of 'Beer of Kings' Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old brewery from the Wari Empire's occupation of Cerro Baúl, a mountaintop city in the Andes. Remains of the brewery were well preserved because a fire set when the brewery was closed made the walls collapse over the materials. Photo by Patrick Ryan Williams, courtesy of The Field Museum CHICAGO--Archaeologists working in southern Peru found an ancient brewery more than 1,000 years old. Remains of...
  • Did early Southwestern Indians ferment corn and make beer?

    12/04/2007 12:35:33 PM PST · by Red Badger · 50 replies · 970+ views ^ | 12/04/07 | Sandia National Laboratory
    Sandia researcher Ted Borek used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to analyze vapors produced by mild heating of pot samples. (Photo by Randy Montoya) The belief among some archeologists that Europeans introduced alcohol to the Indians of the American Southwest may be faulty. Ancient and modern pot sherds collected by New Mexico state archeologist Glenna Dean, in conjunction with analyses by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Ted Borek, open the possibility that food or beverages made from fermenting corn were consumed by native inhabitants centuries before the Spanish arrived. Dean, researching through her small business Archeobotanical Services, says, “There’s been...
  • What would Jesus drink? Experts guess what wine was like in ancient times and what modern ones ...

    04/02/2015 2:21:42 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 172 replies
    Orange County Register ^ | April 2, 2015 | Anne Valdespino
    Full title: What would Jesus drink? Experts guess what wine was like in ancient times and what modern ones are similar Christ was a vintner. And if you heed the Scriptures, quite a good one, according to the maitre d' at the wedding in Cana. "... the headwaiter called the bridegroom and said to him, 'Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.'" (John 2:9-10). In ancient times, wine was precious and revered, mentioned more than 140 times in the Bible. As Easter and...
  • Determining recipes for some of the world's oldest preserved beers

    03/04/2015 10:20:58 AM PST · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-04-2015 | Provided by American Chemical Society
    Some breweries have taken to resurrecting the flavors of ages past. Adventurous beer makers are extrapolating recipes from clues that archeologists have uncovered from old and even ancient brews found at historical sites. Now scientists have analyzed some of the oldest preserved beer samples from an 1840s' shipwreck to try to provide insight into how they were made. They report their findings in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Brian Gibson and colleagues explain that in 2010, divers discovered an old schooner at the bottom of the Baltic Sea near Finland. Archeological evidence suggested the ship went down about...
  • Letter from Ireland: Mystery of the Fulacht Fiadh

    02/19/2015 2:24:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2012 | Erin Mullally
    On a typically misty morning in the west of Ireland, just outside the medieval town of Athenry, County Galway, archaeologist Declan Moore... is taking me to visit an unexcavated fulacht fiadh (pronounced FULL-ahk FEE-add), or fulachtaí fia in plural, the most common type of prehistoric archaeological site in Ireland. Better known as a "burnt mound" in the neighboring United Kingdom, where they are also found, there are nearly 6,000 recorded fulacht fiadh sites dotted around Ireland alone... When we arrive at the site, Moore shows me the basic features of a fulacht fiadh -- a horseshoe-shaped mound of soil and...
  • How Bronze Age man Enjoyed His Pint

    08/12/2007 4:39:08 PM PDT · by blam · 66 replies · 1,688+ views
    BBC ^ | 8-12-2007
    How Bronze Age man enjoyed his pint Declan Moore and Billy Quinn have an ancient beer theory Bronze Age Irishmen were as fond of their beer as their 21st century counterparts, it has been claimed. Two archaeologists have put forward a theory that one of the most common ancient monuments seen around Ireland may have been used for brewing ale. Fulacht fiadh - horseshoe shaped grass covered mounds - are conventionally thought of as ancient cooking spots. But the archaeologists from Galway believe they could have been the country's earliest breweries. To prove their theory that an extensive brewing tradition...