Keyword: oldearthspeculation

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  • Will 'Obamacare' health care reform become law in the US by June 30th 2010? (Intrade)

    03/19/2010 2:45:56 PM PDT · by truthandlife · 5 replies · 852+ views
    Intrade ^ | 3/19/10
    ll 'Obamacare' health care reform become law in the United States? 'Obamacare' health care reform (see contract rules) to become law before midnight ET 30 Jun 2010
  • World's oldest map: Spanish cave has landscape from 14,000 years ago

    08/06/2009 5:51:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 51 replies · 1,265+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Aug. 6, 2009 | Fiona Govan
    Archaeologists have discovered what they believe is man's earliest map, dating from almost 14,000 years ago Photo: EPA A stone tablet found in a cave in Abauntz in the Navarra region of northern Spain is believed to contain the earliest known representation of a landscape. Engravings on the stone, which measures less than seven inches by five inches, and is less than an inch thick, appear to depict mountains, meandering rivers and areas of good foraging and hunting.
  • Pot-Bellied Dinosaur Skeleton Found in Utah

    07/14/2009 9:19:30 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 9 replies · 617+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 7/14/09 | Jeanna Bryner
    The most complete skeleton of a type of pot-bellied dinosaur, a therizinosaur, has been discovered in southern Utah. Such remains shed light on the evolution of leafy and meaty diets back in paleo times, suggesting that iconic predators like Velociraptor may have evolved from less fearsome plant-eating ancestors. The newly discovered dinosaur, dubbed Nothronychus graffami, lived some 93 million years ago. When alive, the animal would have stood at 13 feet (4 meters) and sported a beaked mouth and forelimbs tipped with 9 inch- (22 cm)-long sickle claws. Its stumpy legs, large gut and other features suggest the lumbering giant...
  • 400 Million-Year-Old Male Sex Member ID'd

    07/14/2009 6:45:45 PM PDT · by llevrok · 27 replies · 893+ views
    Discovery.Com ^ | 7/14/09 | Nicky Phillips
    -- Scientists have confirmed the oldest penis-like structure in an ancient fish specimen. The discovery of the 400 million-year-old reproductive organ is one of the earliest examples of internal fertilization in vertebrate animals. Understanding the anatomy of these ancient fish could reveal further details in the evolution of vertebrates -- including humans. The research is published in today's advanced online ahead of print edition of Nature. Earlier this year the team, led by Australian palaeontologist Dr John Long, predicted some ancient fish from the Devonian era, had an attachment to their pelvic bone, which were used by males to fertilize...
  • Longest insect migration revealed

    07/14/2009 8:49:34 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 24 replies · 833+ views
    bbc ^ | 14 July 2009 | Matt Walker
    Every year, millions of dragonflies fly thousands of kilometres across the sea from southern India to Africa. So says a biologist in the Maldives, who claims to have discovered the longest migration of any insect. If confirmed, the mass exodus would be the first known insect migration across open ocean water. It would also dwarf the famous trip taken each year by Monarch butterflies, which fly just half the distance across the Americas.
  • Ice Sheets Can Retreat 'In A Geologic Instant,' Study Of Prehistoric Glacier Shows

    07/10/2009 2:41:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies · 1,545+ views
    Science News ^ | June 22, 2009 | University at Buffalo
    Modern glaciers, such as those making up the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, are capable of undergoing periods of rapid shrinkage or retreat, according to new findings by paleoclimatologists at the University at Buffalo... The proof of such rapid retreat of ice sheets provides one of the few explicit confirmations that this phenomenon occurs. Should the same conditions recur today, which the UB scientists say is very possible, they would result in sharply rising global sea levels, which would threaten coastal populations...The researchers used a special dating tool at UB to study rock samples they extracted from a large fjord...
  • Breaking the Cease-Fire Between Science and Religion

    07/09/2009 6:45:37 AM PDT · by Zionist Conspirator · 50 replies · 1,448+ views
    The Jewish Daily Forward ^ | 7/8/'09 | David Klinghoffer
    What is portrayed as the debate between religion and science feels increasingly like watching the very bitter dissolution of a doomed marriage. The relationship started out all roses and kisses, proceeded to doubts and regrets, then fights and silences, a mutually agreed separation, and finally to curses and maledictions: “I wish you were dead!” In a recent Wall Street Journal opinion article, cosmologist Lawrence Krauss declared “the inconsistency of belief in an activist god with modern science.” Krauss’s essay was the latest eruption of a vituperative argument going on in the scientific community over “accommodationism.” Accommodationists hold that even atheists...
  • Amazon River Up To 11 Million Years Old, Says Study

    07/08/2009 12:55:12 PM PDT · by decimon · 35 replies · 862+ views
    Scientific Blogging ^ | July 7th 2009 | News Staff
    Sediment column at the mouth of the Amazon River. Credit: NASA The Amazon River has been around for 11 million years ago and in its shape for the last 2.4 million years ago, according to a study on two boreholes drilled in proximity of the mouth of the Amazon River by Petrobras, the national oil company of Brazil. Until recently the Amazon Fan, a sediment column of around 10 kilometres in thickness, proved a hard nut to crack, and scientific drilling expeditions such as Ocean Drilling Program could only reach a fraction of it. Recent exploration efforts by Petrobras lifted...
  • Was Universe 1.0 Destroyed by Dark Matter?

    07/07/2009 1:06:35 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 51 replies · 1,851+ views
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 7/07/09
    Did dark matter destroy the universe? You might be looking around at the way things "exist" and thinking "No", but we're talking about ancient history. Three hundred million years after the start of the universe, things had finally cooled down enough to form hydrogen atoms out of all the protons and electrons that were zipping around - only to have them all ripped up again around the one billion year mark. Why? Most believe that the first quasars, active galaxies whose central black holes are the cosmic-ray equivalent of a firehose, provided the breakup energy, but some Fermilab scientists have...
  • Creationism question 'misleading'

    07/07/2009 8:35:58 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 15 replies · 340+ views
    An exam board has scrapped a GCSE biology question about creationism after admitting it could be misleading. The Assessment and Qualifications Alliance paper asked pupils how the Bible's theory of creation seeks to explain the origins of life. AQA stressed that pupils taking its biology GCSE were not required to study creationism as a scientific theory. But it admitted that describing it as a "theory" could be misleading, and said it would review the wording of papers. The review was prompted by a complaint from teachers and a university lecturer. 'Misleading' In a statement, AQA said: "Merely asking a question...
  • Talking about Geckos

    07/06/2009 8:13:56 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 24 replies · 1,056+ views
    delcotimes ^ | Laura Wiseley,
    Forget that little guy selling insurance. Geckos are a lot more than that. Need proof? Just visit the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia from now through Sept. 7 and check out “Geckos: Tails to Toepads,” an interactive exhibit featuring dozens of the small, agile – and surprisingly noisy – creatures. “Geckos are among the most diverse and interesting of all reptiles,” said Dr. Aaron Bauer, a Villanova University professor and an Academy research associate who is a world expert on geckos. “This exhibit will give people a good look at their unique specializations and an appreciation for why they...
  • Ancient Volcanic Eruptions Caused Global Mass Extinction

    07/01/2009 9:28:15 PM PDT · by george76 · 12 replies · 710+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 30, 2009
    A previously unknown giant volcanic eruption that led to global mass extinction 260 million years ago has been uncovered by scientists at the University of Leeds. The eruption in the Emeishan province of south-west China unleashed around half a million cubic kilometres of lava, covering an area 5 times the size of Wales, and wiping out marine life around the world. Unusually, scientists were able to pinpoint the exact timing of the eruption and directly link it to a mass extinction event in the study published in Science. This is because the eruptions occurred in a shallow sea – meaning...
  • Miniature carnivore dinosaurs roamed North America (the size of a small chicken)

    03/17/2009 2:16:07 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 30 replies · 1,585+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 3/17/09 | Jean-Louis Santini
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – Meat-eating dinosaurs the size of a small chicken roamed areas of North America 75 million years ago, according to research by Canadian paleontologists. The mini-dinosaur, similar in appearance to the Velociraptor, is named Hesperonychus elizabethae and is the smallest carnivorous dinosaur known to have lived in North America. "Hesperonychus is currently the smallest dinosaur known from North America," said University of Calgary paleontologist Nick Longrich. "Its discovery just emphasizes how little we actually know, and it raises the possibility that there are even smaller ones out there." Longrich, together with University of Alberta paleontologist Philip Currie, are...
  • Burmese Fossil Indicates Apes Arose in Asia, Not Africa

    07/01/2009 2:03:25 PM PDT · by james500 · 20 replies · 830+ views
    AP ^ | 7/1/2009
    Fossils recently discovered in Burma could prove that the common ancestors of humans, monkeys and apes evolved from primates in Asia, rather than Africa, researchers contend in a study released Wednesday. ... The pieces of 38 million-year-old jawbones and teeth found near Bagan in central Burma in 2005 show typical characteristics of primates, said Dr. Chris Beard, a paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh and a member of the team that found the fossils. "When we found it, we knew we had a new type of primate and basically what kind of primate it was," Beard...
  • Extinct giant elephant skeleton discovered in Indonesia

    06/25/2009 3:29:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 1,412+ views
    Times Online ^ | Tuesday, June 9, 2009 | Sophie Tedmanson
    The accidental death of an elephant which had become bogged in mud 200,000 years ago led to the perfect preservation of its skeleton -- and a remarkable scientific discovery... the skeleton of the prehistoric ancestor to the modern Asian elephant which was fossilised in an abandoned sand quarry in East Java, Indonesia. The ancient bones were discovered after land collapsed at the sand quarry on the Indonesian island, adjacent to the Solo River, which killed two men in April. Researchers from the University of Wollongong in Australia and the Geological Survey Institute spent four weeks excavating the bones of the...
  • Humans Weren't Always 'So Special,' Expert Says

    06/25/2009 10:48:53 AM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies · 579+ views
    Forbes.com ^ | Jun 25, 2009 | Unknown
    THURSDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- A 54-million-year-old skull has yielded the first detailed images of a primitive primate brain. The 1.5-inch-long skull was from an animal species called Ignacius graybullianus, part of a group of primates known as plesiadapiforms. They evolved in the 10 million years after dinosaurs disappeared from the Earth.
  • Rabbit-Size Elephant Ancestor Found -- Oldest Known

    06/25/2009 10:10:39 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 53 replies · 2,395+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | June 23, 2009 | Mark Anderson
    After the dinosaurs perished, life on Earth didn't take long to bounce back, a new study suggests. A newfound 60-million-year-old creature called Eritherium azzouzorum—the oldest known elephant ancestor—bolsters the case that whole new orders of mammals were already around less than 6 million years after global catastrophe ended the age of reptiles some 65.5 million years ago. Paleontologist Emmanuel Gheerbrant discovered the rabbit-size proto-elephant's skull fragments in a basin 60 miles (100 kilometers) east of Casablanca, Morocco. Elephant ancestors, he said, now join the likes of rodents and early primates as some of the first known mammals to walk the...
  • Woman's Skeleton Found at Bottom of Prehistoric Well

    06/25/2009 7:21:15 AM PDT · by NCDragon · 46 replies · 1,854+ views
    FOXNews.com ^ | Wednesday, June 14, 2009 | AP via FOXNews.com
    NICOSIA, Cyprus — Archeologists have discovered a water well in Cyprus that was built as long as 10,500 years ago, and the skeleton of a young woman at the bottom of it, an official said Wednesday. Pavlos Flourentzos, the nation's top antiquities official, said the 16-foot (5-meter) deep cylindrical shaft was found last month at a construction site in Kissonerga, a village near the Mediterranean island nation's southwestern coast. After the well dried up it apparently was used to dispose trash, and the items found in it included the poorly preserved skeleton of the young woman, animal bone fragments, worked...
  • Dinosaurs May Have Been Smaller Than Previously Thought (Svelteosaurus)

    06/24/2009 4:19:47 AM PDT · by decimon · 32 replies · 1,035+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 22, 2009 | Unknown
    The largest animals ever to have walked the face of the earth may not have been as big as previously thought, reveals a paper published June 21 in the Zoological Society of London’s Journal of Zoology.
  • Ancient flutes more than 35,000 years old - world's oldest instrument

    06/24/2009 5:20:09 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 24 replies · 1,364+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 6/24/2009
    Found in a German cave, suggesting humans were piping tunes from bone and ivory flutes more than 35,000 years ago, new research has shown. Scientists discovered remains of the instruments in a German cave once populated by some of the first modern humans to settle in Europe after leaving Africa. Instrument has five finger holes and two deep V-shaped notches at one end The finds suggest that our oldest ancestors in Europe had a well-established musical tradition. The most significant discovery was a complete flute made from a griffon vulture bone. Measuring 21.8cm, with a diameter of about 8mm, the...