Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $22,958
27%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 27% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: pediatrics

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Debate simmers over doctors asking about guns

    02/09/2013 7:12:07 PM PST · by Tailgunner Joe · 92 replies
    hamptonroads.com ^ | February 9, 2013 | Amy Jeter
    Do you have a gun in your home? For some, that's a loaded question - particularly when asked by a doctor. A debate is simmering over when and whether physicians should be allowed to talk to their patients about firearms. Doctor groups say physicians are obligated to warn their patients about guns along with other health risks, such as riding in a car without wearing a seat belt. However, gun rights advocates balk at what they see as a needless invasion of privacy and blatant attempt at gun control advocacy. State and federal lawmakers are weighing in. President Barack Obama's...
  • FReeper advice needed: newborn with middle ear infection.

    12/26/2010 9:52:43 AM PST · by DCBryan1 · 99 replies · 2+ views
    26 DEC 10 | dcbryan1
    Need some advice for peace of mind of the wife and I. We have a beautiful baby boy, almost 4 mos. old (next week) that had a high fever last weekend before Christmas. Monday we took him in and Dr. said that his cold/upper respiratory infection has given him a secondary inner ear infection ( acute otitis media (AOM). The good Dr. gave us Cifdinir (Omnicef) 3/4 TSP for 10 days and thankfully his fever has gone. However, this Christmas has been a nightmare for Mom and I due to his frequent waking and screaming. His schedule over Christmas was...
  • Can Catching A Cold Make You Fat?

    09/21/2010 4:27:39 AM PDT · by mattstat · 5 replies
    Jeff Schwimmer and his University of California-San Diego colleagues seem to think so. In a press-release that is being cut-and-pasted across across the internet, Schwimmer tells of a study he conducted which appeared to show that kids who caught a cold from the adenovirus 36 (AD36) were fatter than kids who avoided that virus. To understand this study, you must become savvy to the lingo pediatricians use. Foremost is their use of the word children. Say that word to most civilians and they conjure up images of pre-teens; but to a pediatrician it implies anybody under 19, and sometimes even...
  • Early Female Puberty Linked To Absent Biological Father

    09/19/2010 5:32:22 AM PDT · by Racehorse · 56 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | 19 September 2010 | Christian Nordqvist
    A girl whose biological father does not live in her household has a higher chance of entering puberty earlier than her peers, say researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, in an article published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The investigators report that the absence of a biological father in the household predicted earlier pubic hair and breast development - the association was only detected in higher income families. Even after such factors as the girl's bodyweight were considered, the findings still held, the authors wrote. Julianna Deardorff, UC Berkeley assistant professor of maternal and child health, and lead...
  • New research: Children's vegetable intake linked to Popeye cartoons

    08/06/2010 10:03:56 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies
    Wiley-Blackwell ^ | August 6, 2010 | Unknown
    Popeye cartoons, tasting parties and junior cooking classes can help increase vegetable intake in kindergarten children, according to new research published in the journal Nutrition & Dietetics. Researchers at Mahidol University in Bangkok found the type and amount of vegetables children ate improved after they took part in a program using multimedia and role models to promote healthy food. Twenty six kindergarten children aged four to five participated in the eight week study. The researchers recorded the kinds and amounts of fruit and vegetables eaten by the children before and after the program. Lead researcher Professor Chutima Sirikulchayanonta said: "We...
  • Second Dose Of Gene Therapy For Inherited Blindness Proves Safe In Animal Study

    03/06/2010 10:41:26 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies · 271+ views
    Gene therapy for a severe inherited blindness, which produced dramatic improvements last year in 12 children and young adults who received the treatment in a clinical trial, has cleared another hurdle. The same research team that conducted the human trial now reports that a study in animals has shown that a second injection of genes into the opposite, previously untreated eye is safe and effective, with no signs of interference from unwanted immune reactions following the earlier injection. These new findings suggest that patients who benefit from gene therapy in one eye may experience similar benefits from treatment in the...
  • Somebody must stand up for hotdogs

    02/27/2010 4:45:56 AM PST · by Clive · 35 replies · 738+ views
    Calgary Sun ^ | 2010-02-27 | Stephen Lautens
    You may have seen a warning this week from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hotdogs need to be “redesigned” by manufacturers because their current shape is a potentially lethal choking hazard for children. It is, according to Dr. Gary Smith, the lead author of the report, “the perfect plug for a child’s airway.” As a result, U.S. pediatricians are calling on hotdog manufacturers to put a warning label on hotdogs to explain the choking risk, or better yet recall them as the highest risk food until they can be redesigned to reduce the choking hazard. I suppose the American...
  • Religious Kids Are Healthier, Says Study

    03/13/2009 6:09:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies · 454+ views
    Scientific Blogging ^ | March 11, 2009 | Staff
    Like adults, kids who are more spiritual or religious tend to be healthier. Thats the conclusion of Dr. Barry Nierenberg, Ph.D., ABPP, associate professor of psychology at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, who has been studying the relationship between faith and health. He presented on the topic at the American Psychological Associations Division of Rehabilitation Psychology national conference on February 27, in Jackson, Fla. A number of studies have shown a positive relationship between participatory prayer and lower rates of heart disease, cirrhosis, emphysema and stroke in adults, he says. Prayer has been shown to correlate to lower...
  • Cholesterol Screening Is Urged for Young

    07/06/2008 11:32:04 PM PDT · by neverdem · 67 replies · 1,286+ views
    NY Times ^ | July 7, 2008 | TARA PARKER-POPE
    The nations pediatricians are recommending wider cholesterol screening for children and more aggressive use of cholesterol-lowering drugs starting as early as the age of 8 in hopes of preventing adult heart problems. The new guidelines were to be issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics on Monday. The push to aggressively screen and medicate for high cholesterol in children is certain to create controversy amid a continuing debate about the use of prescription drugs in children as well as the best approaches to ward off heart disease in adults. But proponents say there is growing evidence that the first signs...
  • One in four child deaths is 'avoidable' says report exposing wrong diagnoses and treatments (UK)

    06/29/2008 6:29:39 AM PDT · by Stoat · 5 replies · 164+ views
    One in four child deaths is 'avoidable' says report exposing wrong diagnoses and treatments Last updated at 23:29pm on 28.06.08 Failures in care by medical professionals, social workers and parents are responsible for one in four child deaths, according to a Government-backed report.A panel of experts reviewed 126 deaths in one year and found 'avoidable factors', such as doctors misdiagnosing a serious illness or giving the wrong treatment, in 26 per cent of cases.A further 43 per cent were due to 'potentially avoidable factors' including missing important immunisations or delays in treatment. Tragedy: Nine-month-old Liam Eaves died...
  • Obesity Threatens a Generation - 'Catastrophe' of Shorter Spans, Higher Health Costs

    05/18/2008 1:13:55 PM PDT · by neverdem · 54 replies · 337+ views
    Washington Post ^ | May 17, 2008 | Susan Levine and Rob Stein
    An epidemic of obesity is compromising the lives of millions of American children, with burgeoning problems that reveal how much more vulnerable young bodies are to the toxic effects of fat. In ways only beginning to be understood, being overweight at a young age appears to be far more destructive to well-being than adding excess pounds later in life. Virtually every major organ is at risk. The greater damage is probably irreversible. Doctors are seeing confirmation of this daily: boys and girls in elementary school suffering from high blood pressure, high cholesterol and painful joint conditions; a soaring incidence of...
  • Hospitals admit white kids with lesser emergencies

    06/04/2007 3:14:27 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 49 replies · 1,393+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | June 4, 2007 | SENA DESAI GOPAL
    Studies have shown that white children are hospitalized more often for medical emergencies than Hispanic or black children. Researchers from George Washington University School of Medicine assumed that the disparity was because the children of color were receiving less aggressive care. But in a new study, researchers found instead that all children were admitted equally when they had true emergencies, and the white children were over-admitted for conditions that could be readily treated at home. Using data available on 8,952 children at 13 pediatric emergency rooms across the country researchers compared observed and expected admission rates for different levels of...
  • Seeking straight A's, parents push for pills

    09/08/2006 8:13:36 AM PDT · by fgoodwin · 18 replies · 520+ views
    MSNBC ^ | 10:16 a.m. CT Sept 7, 2006 | Victoria Clayton
    A 15-year-old girl and her parents recently came in for a chat with Dr. James Perrin, a Boston pediatrician, because they were concerned about the girl's grades. Previously an A student, she was slipping to B's, and the family was convinced attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was at fault and that a prescription for Ritalin would boost her brainpower. After examining the girl, Perrin determined she didn't have ADHD. The parents, who had come in demanding a prescription, left empty-handed. Perrin, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics, and other physicians...
  • A lack of balance on issue of guns

    09/16/2005 1:40:12 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies · 653+ views
    THE DAILY NEWS (NC) ^ | September 16,2005 | BY STAFF REPORTS
    One of the perennial issues facing Americans, especially lawmakers, is gun control. Those of us who defend private ownership of firearms are continually battling those who wish to restrict guns in private hands. Opponents of gun ownership approach their goal from many directions. Some of their proposals seem at first to be common-sense measures whose aim is to protect us from ourselves. One of the most recent of these measures making the rounds in state legislatures is something called "safe storage" of firearms. These laws require gun owners to keep firearms locked in some way so curious children cannot get...
  • Bush daughter is said to volunteer in S. Africa

    07/06/2005 7:43:30 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 43 replies · 1,513+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | July 6, 2005 | John Donnelly
    CAPE TOWN -- At the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, children sit on their mothers' laps in waiting rooms, waddle down hallways, and wail inside the burn unit, where nurses carefully wrap gauze around their arms, legs, and heads. It is here, say some doctors and nurses, that Barbara Bush, one of President Bush's twin daughters, has been working in near anonymity as a volunteer. .....A White House official, Peter Watkins, confirmed yesterday that her mother, Laura Bush, will visit Barbara in South Africa later this week, ... The official said Laura Bush and her other daughter, Jenna, will...
  • WARNING: Whooping Cough Outbreak

    06/09/2005 12:26:04 AM PDT · by ppaul · 211 replies · 11,722+ views
    Whooping Cough Outbreak Communities throughout the U.S. are experiencing whooping cough (pertussis) outbreaks - the worst in 40 years. If the school nurse or the health department informs you that there is a pertussis outbreak in your school or community, you may need to call your pediatrician. The school or health department will tell you if your child was directly exposed and requires antibiotics. Health departments across the country are acting quickly to prevent the spread of pertussis, so your cooperation in contacting your pediatrician is crucial. Please follow the instruction of the health department. The care of children in...
  • 'PCRM Week': The Dairy Attack

    04/13/2005 3:35:11 PM PDT · by freepatriot32 · 92 replies · 2,112+ views
    www.consumerfreedom.com ^ | 4 12 05 | www.consumerfreedom.com
    Unless you're among the bean-sprout-sized minority of Americans who describe themselves as "vegans" (vegetarians who also won't touch milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, or even a dollop of honey), you may have been alarmed by the publicity surrounding an article appearing last month in the journal Pediatrics. The anti-milk piece -- written by activists from the PETA-affiliated Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) -- concluded that feeding milk to children is unnecessary, and that there are better ways (kale, tofu, turnip greens, or spinach, for instance) for kids to get the calcium they need. In reaching this result, PCRM relied on...
  • A Crusade Born of a Suffering Infant's Cry (NYT Lionizes Dutch Doctor Who Puts Down Infants)

    03/19/2005 12:17:14 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies · 802+ views
    New York Times ^ | March 19, 2005 | GREGORY CROUCH
    March 19, 2005 THE SATURDAY PROFILE A Crusade Born of a Suffering Infant's Cry BOUNDING down a metal spiral staircase that resembles a sawed-off strand of DNA, Dr. Eduard Verhagen is wrapping up a tour of what is surely the world's most controversial pediatric ward. In the last two years, Dr. Verhagen, the clinical director of pediatrics at the University Medical Center Groningen, has presided over the medically induced deaths of four extraordinarily ill newborns. For his efforts to end what he calls their unbearable and incurable suffering, Dr. Verhagen has been called Dr. Death, a second Hitler and worse...
  • Mercy killing of infants: A doctor explains

    03/18/2005 8:25:23 AM PST · by Crackingham · 33 replies · 1,087+ views
    International Herald Tribune ^ | March 19, 2005 | Gregory Crouch
    Bounding down a spiral staircase that resembles a sawed-off strand of DNA, Dr. Eduard Verhagen is wrapping up a tour of what is surely the world's most controversial pediatric ward. In the past two years, Dr. Verhagen, the clinical director of pediatrics at the University Medical Center, Groningen, has presided over the medically induced deaths of four extraordinarily ill newborns. For his efforts to end what he calls their unbearable and incurable suffering, he has been called "Dr. Death," a second Hitler and worse, mostly by American opponents of euthanasia. snip"My first reaction to most of the criticism is: ridiculous,...
  • Theyre Home Alone

    11/19/2004 6:38:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies · 824+ views
    NRO ^ | November 19, 2004 | Rich Lowry
    E-mail Author Author Archive Send to a Friend <% printurl = Request.ServerVariables("URL")%> Print Version November 19, 2004, 10:47 a.m. They're Home AloneKids want to know: "Mom, Dad where are you?" Mary Eberstadt has written an unwelcome book. That doesn't make it any less important or less necessary. But many people will want to look the other way. In Home-Alone America, Eberstadt confronts us with the consequences of a revolution in American parenting that has left children increasingly deprived of time or any relationship at all with their mothers and fathers. This revolution has two causes: "The...
  • BLAME CONGRESS (Vaccines For Children++ Program -- 1994 -- drove out manufacturers)

    10/22/2004 11:03:43 AM PDT · by OESY · 12 replies · 809+ views
    New York Post ^ | October 22, 2004 | ROBERT M. GOLDBERG
    America's flu vaccine shortage has become a campaign issue, with Sen, John Kerry blaming President Bush for failing to take steps to assure a reliable supply of shots this year. That's a typical Kerry tactic: Blame the president for a problem he's been trying to solve and which Kerry and other politicians created.... The answer is that Congress decided 10 years ago to have the government buy up most of the vaccines at fixed, below-market prices. The Vaccines for Children Program, established by the Clinton administration and a Democratic Congress in 1994, federalized much of the once-private U.S. market...
  • Professional Pediatrics Group Discourages Gay Parenting

    05/26/2004 2:38:49 PM PDT · by EdReform · 90 replies · 610+ views
    Narth.com ^ | 23 April 2004 | Frank York
    The American College of Pediatricians has recently come out with a paper discouraging the rearing of children in homosexual households. The report, "Homosexual Parenting: Is It Time For Change?" cites studies showing that children who are reared in traditional two-parent homes are "more likely to thrive emotionally, mentally, and physically in a home with two heterosexual parents versus a home with a single parent." The report notes that "...current studies that appear to indicate neutral to favorable results from homosexual parenting have critical flaws such as non-longitudinal design, lack of proper controls, and failure to account for confounding variables."...
  • Pediatrician Warns Parents About Cicadas

    05/14/2004 5:29:34 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 129 replies · 1,304+ views
    Reuters via My Yahoo! ^ | Fri May 14, 2004 | Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - First there was the girl who fell off her bike fleeing a flying cicada. Then a boy trying to swat a cicada out of the air with a baseball bat instead hit his friend in the nose. The final straw came when another child hurt his hand trying to squish a cicada under a car's tires. Dr. Ray Baker of Cincinnati Children's Hospital was convinced -- cicadas can be a safety hazard to children. Starting this week and lasting into June, billions and possibly even trillions of cicadas will emerge across much of the eastern half of...
  • Study Casts Doubt on Theory of Vaccines' Link to Autism

    09/03/2003 8:41:09 PM PDT · by Pan_Yans Wife · 6 replies · 281+ views
    The NY Times ^ | September 4, 2003 | DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
    A new study from Denmark tends to discount widely held fears that a mercury-based preservative formerly used in childhood vaccines may be responsible for the rapid rise in diagnoses of autism. In the study, published this week in the journal Pediatrics, a team of Danish doctors counted all the diagnoses of autism in the country from 1971 to 2000. They found no decrease after 1992, when Denmark became the first country in the world to ban the preservative, thimerosal. Rather, autism diagnoses continued to skyrocket on the same trajectory that began in the late 1980's, rising from less than one...
  • Against all odds

    02/11/2003 4:52:20 AM PST · by miltonim · 1 replies · 418+ views
    Benton Courier ^ | 02/10/2003 | Monica Sattley
    Against all odds (abortion) By Monica Sattley February 10, 2003 Hunter Hill is battling against a premature birth "Welcome to Sonic ... (sniff) ... Can I take your order? (sniffle)." Had the restaurant been walk-in instead of drive-in, a swipe across the eyes of the cashier to remove a tear would have accompanied the sad greeting. It was July 16, 2002, and the Sonic employees at 1703 Military Road had just heard the nerve-racking news that a son had been born to their assistant manager - four months early. At just 1 pound, 4 ounces, Hunter Brant Hill's condition was,...