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Keyword: phoenicia

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    11/25/2003 8:54:56 AM PST · by Hermann the Cherusker · 11 replies · 398+ views
    Web ^ | Unknown | Unknown
    ANCIENT PHONICIAN-HEBREW VOWELSThe following ancient witnesses show that the Jewish writing didn't used the actual system of points for indicating the vowels, but specific characters: the character sounded as ah, the character sounded as eh, the letter had two sounds Y/J and ee, as in yearly/January; the character sounded as oh, the character sound as Uh and as V THE (click to enlarge image) STELE OF KILAMUTHE SILOE INSCRIPTIONCertainly, the use of points in the Stele of Kilamu and in the Siloe inscription is to separate the words. The Vowels were there all the time In all these writings, from...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • Easy as Alep, Bet, Gimel? Cambridge research explores social context of ancient writing

    04/08/2016 1:50:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 5, 2016 | University of Cambridge
    The project, called Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS)... is led by Dr Philippa Steele of the University's Faculty of Classics... For instance, today the notion of "alphabetical order" is used to arrange everything from dictionaries to telephone books, but why is the alphabet organised the way it is? Alphabetical order as we would recognise it first appeared over three thousand years ago in Ugaritic, written in a cuneiform script made of wedge-shaped signs impressed on clay tablets. The Ugaritic alphabet was in use in the ancient city of Ugarit, uncovered at Ras Shamra in modern Syria....
  • Research On Ancient Writing Linked With Modern Mideast Conflict

    11/14/2005 1:25:30 PM PST · by blam · 31 replies · 1,424+ views
    The State ^ | 11-14-2005 | Ron Grossman
    Posted on Sun, Nov. 13, 2005 Research on ancient writing linked with modern Mideast conflict BY RON GROSSMAN CHICAGO - Professorial colleagues think Ron Tappy has made a landmark breakthrough in our understanding of the world of the Bible. He himself is waiting for the other shoe to drop. This week, Tappy will formally unveil his discovery at the meetings of the American Schools of Oriental Research. Normally a presentation titled "The 2005 Excavation Season at Tel Zayit, with Special Attention to the Tenth Century BCE" would hardly be noticed beyond the scholars who will gather at the Hyatt Penn's...
  • Phoenicians Left Deep Genetic Mark, Study Shows

    11/03/2008 5:16:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 480+ views
    New Jack City Times ^ | Thursday, October 30, 2008 | John Noble Wilford
    The Phoenicians, enigmatic people from the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, stamped their mark on maritime history, and now research has revealed that they also left a lasting genetic imprint. Scientists reported Thursday that as many as 1 in 17 men living today on the coasts of North Africa and southern Europe may have a Phoenician direct male-line ancestor. These men were found to retain identifiable genetic signatures from the nearly 1,000 years the Phoenicians were a dominant seafaring commercial power in the Mediterranean basin, until their conquest by Rome in the 2nd century B.C... The scientists who conducted the...
  • Lebanese are Phoenicians After All; And so Are Many of the Rest of US

    12/27/2008 6:02:57 AM PST · by decimon · 21 replies · 705+ views
    Informed Comment ^ | Dec. 23, 2008 | Juan Cole
    A team of biologists at Lebanese American University estimates that 1 in 17 persons around the Mediterranean carries genetic markers distinctive to the ancient Phoenician people who resided in what is now Lebanon. The Phoenicians spread out in a trade diaspora two millennia ago, establishing colonies from Spain to Cyprus. The team also found that one third of Lebanese have the markers for Phoenician descent, and that these are spread evenly through the population, among both Christians and Muslims. In fact, all Lebanese have broadly similar sets of genetic markers. The lead researcher commented, "Whether you take a Christian village...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Maltas Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • Phoenician City Not Destroyed

    03/15/2006 11:40:56 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 600+ views
    Ansa ^ | 3-15-2006
    Phoenician city not destroyedLife after supposed death for Motya near Trapani (ANSA) - Palermo, March 14 - An ancient Phoenician city unearthed in Sicily was inhabited after its supposed destruction, the head of an Italian dig team claims . "Our finds, including cooking pans, Phoenecian-style vases, small altars and pieces of looms, show Motya had a thriving population long after it is commonly believed to have been destroyed by the Ancient Greeks," said Maria Pamela Toti . The continued life of Motya had been put forward by various archaeologists over the years but until now no proof had been found...
  • Phoenician Tombs Found In Sicily

    08/23/2006 6:12:18 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 827+ views
    ANSA ^ | 8-23-2006
    Phoenician tombs found in Sicily 40 sarcophagi unearthed at necropolis near ancient colony (ANSA) - Marsala (Trapani), August 23 - Archaeologists have unearthed 40 sarcophagi in what was once the sacred Phoenician burial grounds of Birgi, near the ancient colony of Motya . The tombs were discovered by chance by a group of construction workers excavating the foundations of a house close to the westernmost tip of Sicily near Marsala, culture officials said . Archaeologists said the sarcophagi were made of simple stone slabs and resembled those found on display outside the museum on the neighbouring island of Motya (present-day...
  • Phoenician Temple Found In Sicily

    02/28/2006 11:37:16 AM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 1,191+ views
    ANSA ^ | 2-28-2006
    Phoenician temple found in SicilySite believed to be 'unique', archaeologists say (ANSA) - Palermo, February 28 - An ancient Phoenician temple unearthed in Sicily is "unique" in the West, the head of the Italian dig team claims. "You have to go all the way to Amrit in Syria to find a similar one," said Lorenzo Nigro of the Rome University team. The temple came to light last year after a portion of a lagoon surrounding the Phoenician city of Motya (present-day Mozia) was drained. The pool began to fill up again and a fresh-water spring was found - a fact...
  • Phoenicians: Ancient Mariners

    10/12/2004 10:45:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 446+ views
    National Geographic ^ | October 2004 | Rick Gore
    Although they're mentioned frequently in ancient texts as vigorous traders and sailors, we know relatively little about these puzzling people. Historians refer to them as Canaanites when talking about the culture before 1200 B.C.The Greeks called them the phoinikes, which means the "red people"a name that became Phoeniciansafter their word for a prized reddish purple cloth the Phoenicians exported. But they would never have called themselves Phoenicians. Rather, they were citizens of the ports from which they set sail, walled cities such as Byblos, Sidon, and Tyre.
  • Carthaginian temples found -- Azores

    07/10/2011 6:57:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Portuguese American Journal ^ | Saturday, July 9, 2011 |
    Archaeologists from the Portuguese Association of Archeological Research (APIA) believe to have found in the Azores a significant number of Carthaginian temples, from the fourth century BC, dedicated to the goddess Tanit. The new archaeological sites were found in Monte Brasil, Angra Heroismo, Terceira island. According to APIA archaeologists Nuno Ribeiro and Anabela Joaquinito, "More than five hypogea type monuments (tombs excavated in rocks) and at least three 'sanctuaries' proto-historic, carved into the rock, were found." A monument located at "Monte do Facho" shows inbuilt sink shaped carvings linked to water conduits for libations. "There are 'chairs' carved into the...
  • Phoenician colony in southeast Spain re-examined

    04/01/2014 1:54:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 30, 2014 | University of Alicante
    ...This wall, built between 900 and 850BCE contains eastern Mediterranean compartmented rooms within the main excavated structure, following a typical Phoenician pattern of internal architecture. The organisation and the size of the colony itself is one that is replicated in other such pioneer settlements, and the type of defence found here has close parallels in the Near East with sites such as Hazor or Qeiyafa in Israel, as can be clearly seen in the aerial images... The peaceful abandonment of the settlement occurred around 700 BCE and, pending further research, may be due partially to the gradual silting up of...
  • Two-and-a-Half Millennia Dont Change Much

    01/29/2010 7:25:04 AM PST · by mattstat · 10 replies · 365+ views
    Herodotus begins his history by telling us that some Phoenician traders came to Argos, Greece and, on a whim, abducted the kings daughter Io and took her to Egypt. Later, to show that two could play at that game, the Greeks slid over to Phoenicia and stole their kings daughter, Europa. (Bad pun: and how these ladies ended up with Jupiter, nobody knows.) So far, Herodotus, checking his sums, said, the scores were even. But then the Greeks, into the game, decided to do a one-up. The went back to another Phoenician stronghold and kidnapped that kings daughter, Medea. The...
  • The Earliest Known Abecedary

    10/24/2015 5:58:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    A flake of limestone (ostracon) inscribed with an ancient Egyptian word list of the fifteenth century BC turns out to be the world's oldest known abecedary. The words have been arranged according to their initial sounds, and the order followed here is one that is still known today. This discovery by Ben Haring (Leiden University) with funding from Free Competition Humanities has been published in the October issue of the 'Journal of Near Eastern Studies'. The order is not the ABC of modern western alphabets, but Halaham (HLHM), the order known from the Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Arabian and Classical Ethiopian...
  • Abandoned Anchors From Punic Wars Found Near Sicily

    07/03/2013 9:18:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, July 03, 2013 | from Discovery News
    More than 30 ancient anchors have been discovered near the small Sicilian island of Pantelleria. Leonardo Abelli of the University of Sassari says that the anchors were abandoned by the Carthaginians during the First Punic War more than 2,000 years ago. The Romans had captured the strategically located island with a fleet of more than 300 ships. The Carthaginian ships that were stationing near Patelleria had no other choice than hiding near the northern coast and trying to escape. To do so, they cut the anchors free and left them in the sea. They also abandoned part of their cargo...
  • Replica Phoenician ship ends round-Africa journey (Video)

    10/24/2010 2:39:43 PM PDT · by decimon · 23 replies
    BBC ^ | October 24, 2010 | Lina Sinjab
    The replica of a Phoenician ship from 600BC has arrived home in western Syria after a two-year voyage circumnavigating the coast of Africa.
  • 4,000-year-old Canaanite warrior found in Sidon dig[Lebanon]

    08/07/2008 9:48:09 AM PDT · by BGHater · 14 replies · 342+ views
    The Daily Star ^ | 05 Aug 2008 | Mohammed Zaatari
    SIDON: The British Museum's excavation team in Sidon have recently unearthed a new grave containing human skeletal remains belonging to a Canaanite warrior, archeology expert and field supervisor Claude Doumet Serhal told The Daily Star on Monday. According to Serhal, the delegation made the discovery at the "Freres" excavation site near Sidon's crusader castle. "This is the 77th grave that we have discovered at this site since our digging activities has started ten years ago with Lebanese-British financing," she said. According to Serhal, the remains go back to 2000 B.C., with a British archeologist saying the warrior had been buried...
  • No making cents of a coinfusion ('Mahogany Ship' coin not Phoenician?)

    09/28/2005 10:35:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 780+ views
    Warrnambool Standard ^ | September 27, 2005 | Matt Neal
    Mahogany Ship searcher Mark Rawson and his team confidently asserted Ms Crowe's coin was Phoenician but Ms Murphy said she doubted it, although she was unsure of the coin's exact origins... "I believe it came from Holland maybe. It was with a lot of Dutch coins I have." ...Ms Murphy said she was under the impression it was some kind of token perhaps from the First or Second World War.
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • Archaeologists discover secret room in ancient Sidon temple [Phoenicians]

    02/28/2015 12:44:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    The Daily Star ^ | February 24, 2015 | Mohammed Zaatari
    ...The newly discovered monumental room is believed to be an extension of the underground Temple of Sidon, which dates back to the Bronze Age. This finding comes as workers prepare the foundations of a new national museum, which will be established beside the archaeological site. Construction of the museum led to urgent excavations at the site last month. Ten years ago, the delegation discovered an underground "holy of holies" room, dating back to 1300 B.C., where ancient residents are believed to have worshipped their gods. The newly discovered room was found adjacent to it, and is thought to be an...
  • The Voyage of Hanno [The Periplus of Hanno]

    02/15/2015 10:41:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Metrum ^ | circa 1979 | Livio Catullo Stecchini
    In describing a volcanic eruption from a high mountain towering over the sea Hanno mentions such details as sulphuric fumes and streams of lava. The only volcanic area in West Africa is represented by Mount Cameroon, which is still active today. It is located at the deepest point of the Gulf of Guinea, where it rises suddenly from the seashore, reaching a height of over 4000 meters... Those who have seen it from the sea consider it one of the most impressive sights in the world. The natives call it Mongana-Loba, "Mountain of the Gods," which well agrees with the...
  • Ancient Inscribed Slab Brought To Light (Another Rosetta Stone - Three Languages)

    04/20/2004 12:18:46 PM PDT · by blam · 49 replies · 961+ views
    IOL ^ | 4-19-2004
    Ancient inscribed slab brought to light April 19 2004 at 03:15PM Potsdam - A team of German and Egyptian archaeologists working in the Nile Delta has unearthed "quite a remarkable" stele dating back 2 200 years to Ptolemaic Egypt which bears an identical inscription in three written languages - like the famed Rosetta Stone. Announcing the find on Monday, University of Potsdam chief Egyptologist Christian Tietze said the stone fragment was "quite remarkable and the most significant of its kind to be found in Egypt in 120 years". The grey granite stone, 99cm high and 84cm wide, was found "purely...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastin Celestino and Carolina Lpez-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • Ancient Volcano, Seeds And Treerings, Suggest Rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean History (More)

    04/29/2006 12:24:20 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 723+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 4-28-2006 | Alex Kwan
    April 28, 2006Cornell study of ancient volcano, seeds and tree rings, suggests rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean history By Alex Kwan Separated in history by 100 years, the seafaring Minoans of Crete and the mercantile Canaanites of northern Egypt and the Levant (a large area of the Middle East) at the eastern end of the Mediterranean were never considered trading partners at the start of the Late Bronze Age. Until now. Trenchmaster Vronwy Hankey and foreman Antonis Zidianakis excavate storage jars from the Minoan settlement Myrtos-Pyrgos. The jars were analyzed in the Cornell study using radiocarbon analyses. Cultural links between...
  • Major Quake Likely In Middle East, Survey Finds

    07/26/2007 1:42:31 PM PDT · by blam · 44 replies · 1,129+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-26-2007 | Kate Ravilious
    Major Quake Likely in Middle East, Survey Finds Kate Ravilious for National Geographic News July 26, 2007 In A.D. 551, a massive earthquake devastated the coast of Phoenicia, now Lebanon. The disaster is well-documented, but scientists had struggled over the years to locate the earthquake fault. Now a new underwater survey has uncovered the fault and shown that it moves approximately every 1,500 yearswhich means a disaster is due any day now. "It is just a matter of time before a destructive tsunami hits this region again," said Iain Stewart, an earthquake expert at the University of Plymouth in the...
  • Ancient Ivory: Metal traces on Phoenician artifacts show long-gone paint and gold

    05/21/2013 7:20:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Chemical & Engineering News, v91, i20, p8 ^ | May 17, 2013 | Sarah Everts
    Ancient ivory carvings made by Phoenician artists some 3,000 years ago have long hidden a secret, even while being openly displayed in museums around the world: The sculptures were originally painted with colorful pigments, and some were decorated with gold... These metals are found in pigments commonly used in antiquity, such as the copper-based pigment Egyptian blue or the iron-based pigment hematite. The metals are not normally in ivory nor in the soil where the artifacts were long buried, explains Ina Reiche, a chemist at the Laboratory of Molecular & Structural Archaeology, in Paris. Reiche led the research, which was...
  • Carthage: Ancient Phoenician City-State

    10/29/2012 6:15:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 24 October 2012 | Owen Jarus
    The Phoenicians were originally based in a series of city-states that extended from southeast Turkey to modern-day Israel. They were great seafarers with a taste for exploration. Accounts survive of its navigators reaching places as far afield as Northern Europe and West Africa. They founded settlements throughout the Mediterranean during the first millennium B.C. Carthage, whose Phoenician name was Qart Hadasht (new city), was one of those new settlements. It sat astride trade routes going east to west, across the Mediterranean, and north to south, between Europe and Africa. The people spoke Punic, a form of the Phoenician language... The...
  • Rare Lead Bars Discovered Off The Coast Of Ibiza May Be Carthaginian Munitions

    12/17/2008 7:39:02 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 663+ views
    Science News ^ | Tuesday, December 16, 2008 | source: University of Cologne
    One of the bars has Iberian characters on it. According to the German Mining Museum in Bochum, the lead originates from the mines of Sierra Morena in southern Spain... A fourth specimen had already been found on an earlier occasion. The characters on the upper surfaces of two of the four known bars are syllabary symbols from the script of Northeastern Iberian... The meaning of the characters has not yet been determined, however, the dating of the objects to the third century B.C., i.e. the period of the Second Punic War, raises further questions. The reason for this is that...
  • Ancient Mass Graves of Soldiers, Babies Found in Italy [ Himera battled Carthage ]

    12/21/2008 3:20:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,593+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Wednesday, December 17, 2008 | Maria Cristina Valsecchi
    More than 10,000 graves containing ancient amphorae, "baby bottles," and the bodies of soldiers who fought the Carthaginians were found near the ancient Greek colony of Himera, in Italy, archaeologists announced recently... "Each [mass grave] contains from 15 to 25 skeletons. They were all young healthy men and they all died a violent death. Some of the skeletons have broken skulls and in some cases we found the tips of the arrows that killed them," Vassallo said. He thinks the human remains are from soldiers who died fighting the Carthaginians in a famous 480 B.C. battle described by Greek historian...
  • Quest for the Phoenicians (National Geographic special)

    10/17/2004 7:53:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 2,058+ views
    PBS ^ | Oct 20 2004 | National Geographic
    In "Quest for the Phoenicians," three renowned scientists, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and oceanographer Robert Ballard, geneticist Spencer Wells and archaeologist Paco Giles, search for clues about the Phoenicians in the sea, in the earth and in the blood of their modern-day descendents... Ballard looks at ancient shipwrecks along Skerki Bank off the island of Sicily... Paco Giles excavates a cave at the bottom of the rock of Gibraltar... Spencer Wells collects DNA from a 2,500-year-old Phoenician mummy's tooth, to extract its unique genetic code and compare it with DNA samples collected from men and women from Lebanon to Tunisia.
  • In Lebanon, DNA may yet heal rifts

    09/09/2007 8:12:40 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 13 replies · 960+ views
    Reuters via Yahoo ^ | 9-9-07 | Anon
    Lebanese geneticist Pierre Zalloua takes a saliva sample form a Lebanese man to test his DNA in a university laboratory near Byblos ancient city in north Lebanon, in this August 17, 2007 file photo. Zalloua following the genetic footprint of the ancient Phoenicians says he has traced their modern-day descendants, but stumbled into an old controversy about identity in his country. (Jamal Saidi/Files/Reuters) A Lebanese scientist following the genetic footprint of the ancient Phoenicians says he has traced their modern-day descendants, but stumbled into an old controversy about identity in his country. Geneticist Pierre Zalloua has charted the spread...
  • In the Wake of the Phoenicians: DNA study reveals a Phoenician-Maltese link

    08/21/2005 1:38:08 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 35 replies · 1,729+ views
    The National Geographic ^ | October 2004 | Cassandra Franklin-Barbajosa
    In the Wake of the Phoenicians: DNA study reveals a Phoenician-Maltese link The idea is fascinating. Who among us hasn't considered our heritage and wondered if we might be descended from ancient royalty or some prominent historical figure? Led by a long-standing interest in the impact of ancient empires on the modern gene pool, geneticist and National Geographic emerging explorer Spencer Wells, with colleague Pierre Zalloua of the American University of Beirut, expanded on that question two years ago as they embarked on a genetic study of the Phoenicians, a first millennium B.C. sea empire thatover several hundred yearsspread across...
  • So How Far Did The Phoenicians Really Go In The Region?

    02/23/2004 8:55:51 AM PST · by blam · 109 replies · 1,380+ views
    Daily Star ^ | 2-23-2004 | Peter Speetjens
    So how far did the Phoenicians really go in the region?In one of the early adventures of Asterix and Obelix, a Phoenician trade ship takes the worlds funniest Celtic warriors from the Gauls last village free from Roman rule to Queen Cleopatra in the land of the Nile. Now, of course this is but an image in a comic book, but still, is it possible that the Phoenicians, generally known as the greatest seafarers of antiquity, actually reached Brittany, or even further? Theres no doubt that Phoenicians were well established all over the Mediterranean. Archeological remains prove they lived in...
  • Im not Arab, Im Phoenician a common phrase, but flawed concept

    02/19/2004 8:44:57 PM PST · by Destro · 27 replies · 5,098+ views ^ | 09/02/04 | Peter Speetjens
    DS 09/02/04 Im not Arab, Im Phoenician a common phrase, but flawed concept It isnt always easy to live in the postmodern era. No absolute truths or morals to hang on to. The world is what you make of it and anything goes seem to be lifes only principles. Consequently, your identity is not something that befalls upon you by birth, but something you are free to choose and construct, which can lead to rather bizarre results. Lets take as an example a young man I know. Born and bred in his beloved London, he has a British passport,...
  • Ancient Harbors Rise Again

    01/12/2006 4:56:19 AM PST · by flevit · 11 replies · 544+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 9 January 2006 | By Michael Balter
    From about 3000 B.C.E., boats anchored in natural coves and bays. At Sidon, for example, the team found crustaceans typical of brackish lagoons in the cores, indicating that the bays were fairly sheltered. By about 1200 B.C.E., the Phoenicians began building artificial harbors, a period which corresponds to other archaeological evidence that ship traffic was increasing at that time. After the invention of concrete by the Romans around 300 B.C.E., sophisticated harbor engineering became possible, and the ports were at their height during the subsequent Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods, from 332 B.C.E. to about 1000 C.E. After that time, Tyre...
  • Long-lost Phoenician ports found: Old Mediterranean harbours discovered buried under modern cities

    01/07/2006 4:28:42 PM PST · by wagglebee · 8 replies · 750+ views ^ | 1/6/06 | Philip Ball
    Thanks to political tensions easing in Lebanon, archaeologists have finally managed to locate the sites of ancient Phoenician harbours in the seaports that dominated Mediterranean trade thousands of years ago. By drilling out cores of sediment from the modern urban centres of these cities, geologists have mapped out the former coastlines that the sediments have long since buried. From this they have pinpointed the likely sites of the old harbours, and have marked out locations that, they say, are in dire need of exploration and conservation. The modern cities of Tyre and Sidon on the Lebanese coast were once the...
  • Geoscience Rediscovers Phoenicia's Buried Harbors

    01/06/2006 2:55:18 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 618+ views
    Physorg ^ | 1-6-2006
    Geoscience rediscovers Phoenicia's buried harbors Space and Earth science : January 05, 2006 The exact locations of Tyre and Sidon's ancient harbors, Phoenicia's two most important city-states, have attracted scholarly interest and debate for many centuries. New research reveals that the ancient basins lie buried beneath the medieval and modern city centers. A network of sediment cores have been sunk into the cities' coastal deposits and studied using high-resolution geoscience techniques to elucidate how, where, and when Tyre and Sidon's harbors evolved since their Bronze Age foundations. In effect, ancient port basins are rich geological archives replete with information on...
  • Major Archeological Discovery of Necropolis in Sousse Sheds Light on Punic Life in... 4th century BC

    01/30/2008 10:44:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 149+ views
    Tunisia Online / AllAfrica ^ | Monday, January 28, 2008 | unattributed
    A Punic necropolis dating back to the 4th-5th century BC has been recently discovered at the museum of Sousse during extension and refurbishing works that started last May and are due to be completed by the end of the current year... This discovery comes following last year's discovery of a roman burial vault located near the roman catacombs in the district of Bouhsina in Sousse. The vault which is being restored by the INP, contains 2 tombs with the remains of some 13 members of the same family buried together along with sacred ceramic vessels.
  • Charting The Past: Surveys Map Two Lost Harbors Of Phoenicia

    01/31/2006 12:01:24 PM PST · by blam · 6 replies · 420+ views
    Science News Online ^ | 1-28-2006 | Sid Perkins
    Charting the Past: Surveys map two lost harbors of Phoenicia Sid Perkins By analyzing long tubes of sediment drilled from locations in and around the Mediterranean ports of Tyre and Sidon, scientists have discovered the locations of the harbors from which legions of ancient Phoenician mariners set sail. Tyre and Sidon, located in what is now Lebanon, were the two most important city-states of Phoenicia, a trading empire founded more than 3,000 years ago. Although archaeologists knew much about the two cities and Phoenician civilization, they have long debated the sizes and locations of the ancient harbors, says Christophe Morhange,...
  • Ancient Treasure Trove Uncovered

    12/18/2002 9:37:24 AM PST · by blam · 12 replies · 418+ views
    Ananova ^ | 12-18-2002
    Ancient treasure trove uncovered Archaeologists have found a 2,700-year-old temple which contains objects from across the ancient world. Gold and silver figures, jewellery and shells from throughout the Mediterranean were gathered in one place on the small Greek island of Kithnos in the Aegean Sea. The finds suggest the temple was for a female god. Many of the objects were originally from Egypt, Italy and Phoenicia which is now Lebanon and Israel. The ancient city was founded during the 10th century BC and abandoned four centuries later, said Alexander Mazarakis-Ainian, over seeing the dig. He is an associate professor at...
  • Ancient Map Of Africa Poses Questions

    11/12/2002 8:21:38 AM PST · by blam · 49 replies · 2,132+ views
    cooltech.iafrica ^ | 11-12-2002
    Ancient map of Africa poses questions The unveiling in South Africa's parliament on Monday of a replica of an ancient Chinese map of the then known world which includes a recognisable outline of Africa is raising intriguing questions of which foreigners first explored the continent. "The idea is to take us beyond what we have been ... brainwashed into believing" declared Speaker Frene Ginwala at the opening of the exhibition, which includes other maps and rock art. The "Da Ming Hun Yi Tu", the Amalgamated Map of the Great Ming Empire, dates back to 1389, decades before the first European...