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Keyword: phoenicians

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  • Origin of Mysterious 2,700-Year-Old Gold Treasure Revealed

    05/15/2018 12:11:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | April 10, 2018 | unattributed
    ...a magnificent hoard of ancient gold objects discovered by Spanish construction workers near Seville in 1958... 2,700-year-old treasure... sparked speculation and debate about Tartessos, a civilization that thrived in southern Spain between the ninth and sixth centuries B.C... That wealth, and the fact that the Tartessians seemingly 'disappear' from history about 2,500 years ago... Another side of the debate held that the jewelry came with the Phoenicians – a Semitic, seafaring culture from the Near East which first arrived in the western Mediterranean in the eighth century B.C. and established a trading port at what is now modern-day Cadiz... The...
  • Herodotus' History

    09/09/2004 10:31:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 704+ views
    The History: Thalia, the Internet Classics Archive ^ | 440 B.C. | Herodotus, tr by George Rawlinson
    There is a great river in Arabia, called the Corys, which empties itself into the Erythraean sea. The Arabian king, they say, made a pipe of the skins of oxen and other beasts, reaching from this river all the way to the desert, and so brought the water to certain cisterns which he had dug in the desert to receive it. It is a twelve days' journey from the river to this desert tract. And the water, they say, was brought through three different pipes to three separate places.
  • THE HISTORY OF HERODOTUS

    09/22/2003 12:29:49 PM PDT · by restornu · 10 replies · 195+ views
    Ancient History Page ^ | 440 BC | by Herodotus trans. by George Rawlinson
    The First Book, Entitled CLIO THESE are the researches of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, which he publishes, in the hope of thereby preserving from decay the remembrance of what men have done, and of preventing the great and wonderful actions of the Greeks and the Barbarians from losing their due meed of glory; and withal to put on record what were their grounds of feuds. According to the Persians best informed in history, the Phoenicians began to quarrel. This people, who had formerly dwelt on the shores of the Erythraean Sea, having migrated to the Mediterranean and settled in the parts...
  • Who Invented the Alphabet: The Semites or the Greeks?

    01/17/2011 6:27:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Archaeolgy Odyssey ^ | Winter 1998 | Barry B. Powell
    I would make the startling suggestion that the alphabet was invented by a single human being, who created this remarkable technology to record the Greek hexameters of the poet we call Homer. Certainly everyone agrees that the invention of the alphabet made possible the development of philosophy, science and democracy, some of the finest achievements in the history of human culture. But who invented the alphabet? Was it really the Semitic-speaking Phoenicians, as many of us learned in grammar school? Or was it actually the Greeks, to whom the Phoenicians supposedly passed it? I don't believe the Phoenicians actually had...
  • Ancient Phoenician DNA from Sardinia, Lebanon reflects settlement, integration, mobility

    01/18/2018 5:56:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 10, 2018 | from PLOS
    E. Matisoo-Smith from the University of Otago, New Zealand and Pierre Zalloua from the Lebanese American University, Beirut, and colleagues... looked at mitochondrial genomes... to investigate how Phoenicians integrated with the Sardinian communities they settled. The researchers found 14 new ancient mitogenome sequences from pre-Phoenician (~1800 BCE) and Phoenician (~700-400 BCE) samples from Lebanon and Sardinia and then compared these with 87 new complete mitogenomes from modern Lebanese and 21 recently published pre-Phoenician ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia. The researchers found evidence of continuity of some lineages of indigenous Sardinians after Phoenician settlement, which suggests that there was integration between Sardinians...
  • 'Indiana Joan', 95, is accused of looting $1MILLION in ancient artefacts from Egypt and the ME

    11/25/2017 6:10:05 AM PST · by mairdie · 48 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 25 November 2017 | Brooke Rolfe
    ...Ms Howard, otherwise known as 'Indiana Joan', volunteered on archeological digs for around 11 years with British and American archaeologists in Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel from around 1967... Her collection includes neolithic axe heads more than 40,000 years old, pottery and weapons from the Phoenicians and the Romans, coins and seals and jewellery from the time of the pharaohs, and a precious funerary mask from Egypt. She said a favourite was a Roman dagger she found buried with the skeletal remains of its owner. Another was the wrappings of a mummy's remains and a cat claw wound...
  • ANCIENT PHONICIAN-HEBREW VOWELS

    11/25/2003 8:54:56 AM PST · by Hermann the Cherusker · 11 replies · 398+ views
    Web ^ | Unknown | Unknown
    ANCIENT PHONICIAN-HEBREW VOWELSThe following ancient witnesses show that the Jewish writing didn't used the actual system of points for indicating the vowels, but specific characters: the character sounded as ah, the character sounded as eh, the letter had two sounds Y/J and ee, as in yearly/January; the character sounded as oh, the character sound as Uh and as V   THE (click to enlarge image) STELE OF KILAMU THE SILOE INSCRIPTION Certainly, the use of points in the Stele of Kilamu and in the Siloe inscription is to separate the words. The Vowels were there all the time In all these writings, from...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • Easy as Alep, Bet, Gimel? Cambridge research explores social context of ancient writing

    04/08/2016 1:50:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 5, 2016 | University of Cambridge
    The project, called Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS)... is led by Dr Philippa Steele of the University's Faculty of Classics... For instance, today the notion of "alphabetical order" is used to arrange everything from dictionaries to telephone books, but why is the alphabet organised the way it is? Alphabetical order as we would recognise it first appeared over three thousand years ago in Ugaritic, written in a cuneiform script made of wedge-shaped signs impressed on clay tablets. The Ugaritic alphabet was in use in the ancient city of Ugarit, uncovered at Ras Shamra in modern Syria....
  • Excavations at Idalion, Cyprus: Crossing Cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean [April 6, 2016]

    04/01/2016 12:03:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    via Biblical Archaeology ^ | April 2016 | JCCGW
    Excavations at Idalion, Cyprus: Crossing Cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean 8 p.m. JCCGW Theatre 6125 Montrose Road Rockville, MD Ann-Marie Knoblauch | Virginia Tech University Co-Sponsored by the Hellenic Society Prometheas Cyprus was an important trade center and cultural ‘crossroad’ in antiquity, controlled and influenced in different periods by the Mycenaean civilization, the sea-faring Phoenicians and Philistines of the Bible, Archaic Greece, the Persians in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Roman Empire, and even Christian Byzantium. The ancient site of Idalion is fortuitously situated near the copper-rich mountains of Cyprus and the harbors of the coast.  This prime location led to the...
  • Research On Ancient Writing Linked With Modern Mideast Conflict

    11/14/2005 1:25:30 PM PST · by blam · 31 replies · 1,424+ views
    The State ^ | 11-14-2005 | Ron Grossman
    Posted on Sun, Nov. 13, 2005 Research on ancient writing linked with modern Mideast conflict BY RON GROSSMAN CHICAGO - Professorial colleagues think Ron Tappy has made a landmark breakthrough in our understanding of the world of the Bible. He himself is waiting for the other shoe to drop. This week, Tappy will formally unveil his discovery at the meetings of the American Schools of Oriental Research. Normally a presentation titled "The 2005 Excavation Season at Tel Zayit, with Special Attention to the Tenth Century BCE" would hardly be noticed beyond the scholars who will gather at the Hyatt Penn's...
  • Lebanese are Phoenicians After All; And so Are Many of the Rest of US

    12/27/2008 6:02:57 AM PST · by decimon · 21 replies · 705+ views
    Informed Comment ^ | Dec. 23, 2008 | Juan Cole
    A team of biologists at Lebanese American University estimates that 1 in 17 persons around the Mediterranean carries genetic markers distinctive to the ancient Phoenician people who resided in what is now Lebanon. The Phoenicians spread out in a trade diaspora two millennia ago, establishing colonies from Spain to Cyprus. The team also found that one third of Lebanese have the markers for Phoenician descent, and that these are spread evenly through the population, among both Christians and Muslims. In fact, all Lebanese have broadly similar sets of genetic markers. The lead researcher commented, "Whether you take a Christian village...
  • Phoenician City Not Destroyed

    03/15/2006 11:40:56 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 600+ views
    Ansa ^ | 3-15-2006
    Phoenician city not destroyedLife after supposed death for Motya near Trapani (ANSA) - Palermo, March 14 - An ancient Phoenician city unearthed in Sicily was inhabited after its supposed destruction, the head of an Italian dig team claims . "Our finds, including cooking pans, Phoenecian-style vases, small altars and pieces of looms, show Motya had a thriving population long after it is commonly believed to have been destroyed by the Ancient Greeks," said Maria Pamela Toti . The continued life of Motya had been put forward by various archaeologists over the years but until now no proof had been found...
  • Phoenician Tombs Found In Sicily

    08/23/2006 6:12:18 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 827+ views
    ANSA ^ | 8-23-2006
    Phoenician tombs found in Sicily 40 sarcophagi unearthed at necropolis near ancient colony (ANSA) - Marsala (Trapani), August 23 - Archaeologists have unearthed 40 sarcophagi in what was once the sacred Phoenician burial grounds of Birgi, near the ancient colony of Motya . The tombs were discovered by chance by a group of construction workers excavating the foundations of a house close to the westernmost tip of Sicily near Marsala, culture officials said . Archaeologists said the sarcophagi were made of simple stone slabs and resembled those found on display outside the museum on the neighbouring island of Motya (present-day...
  • Phoenician Temple Found In Sicily

    02/28/2006 11:37:16 AM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 1,191+ views
    ANSA ^ | 2-28-2006
    Phoenician temple found in SicilySite believed to be 'unique', archaeologists say (ANSA) - Palermo, February 28 - An ancient Phoenician temple unearthed in Sicily is "unique" in the West, the head of the Italian dig team claims. "You have to go all the way to Amrit in Syria to find a similar one," said Lorenzo Nigro of the Rome University team. The temple came to light last year after a portion of a lagoon surrounding the Phoenician city of Motya (present-day Mozia) was drained. The pool began to fill up again and a fresh-water spring was found - a fact...
  • Two-and-a-Half Millennia Don’t Change Much

    01/29/2010 7:25:04 AM PST · by mattstat · 10 replies · 365+ views
    Herodotus begins his history by telling us that some Phoenician traders came to Argos, Greece and, on a whim, abducted the king’s daughter Io and took her to Egypt. Later, to show that two could play at that game, the Greeks slid over to Phoenicia and stole their king’s daughter, Europa. (Bad pun: and how these ladies ended up with Jupiter, nobody knows.) “So far,” Herodotus, checking his sums, said, “the scores were even.” But then the Greeks, into the game, decided to do a one-up. The went back to another Phoenician stronghold and kidnapped that king’s daughter, Medea. The...
  • The Earliest Known Abecedary

    10/24/2015 5:58:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    A flake of limestone (ostracon) inscribed with an ancient Egyptian word list of the fifteenth century BC turns out to be the world's oldest known abecedary. The words have been arranged according to their initial sounds, and the order followed here is one that is still known today. This discovery by Ben Haring (Leiden University) with funding from Free Competition Humanities has been published in the October issue of the 'Journal of Near Eastern Studies'. The order is not the ABC of modern western alphabets, but Halaham (HLHM), the order known from the Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Arabian and Classical Ethiopian...
  • Abandoned Anchors From Punic Wars Found Near Sicily

    07/03/2013 9:18:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, July 03, 2013 | from Discovery News
    More than 30 ancient anchors have been discovered near the small Sicilian island of Pantelleria. Leonardo Abelli of the University of Sassari says that the anchors were abandoned by the Carthaginians during the First Punic War more than 2,000 years ago. The Romans had captured the strategically located island with a fleet of more than 300 ships. “The Carthaginian ships that were stationing near Patelleria had no other choice than hiding near the northern coast and trying to escape. To do so, they cut the anchors free and left them in the sea. They also abandoned part of their cargo...
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • Replica Phoenician ship ends round-Africa journey (Video)

    10/24/2010 2:39:43 PM PDT · by decimon · 23 replies
    BBC ^ | October 24, 2010 | Lina Sinjab
    The replica of a Phoenician ship from 600BC has arrived home in western Syria after a two-year voyage circumnavigating the coast of Africa.