Keyword: phoenicians

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Canadian scientists using ancient coins to map trading routes

    12/09/2010 4:14:21 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Montreal Gazette ^ | December 7, 2010 | Randy Boswell
    Canadian scientists probing the metal content of coins exchanged thousands of years ago in Mediterranean Europe have discovered a new way to map ancient trade patterns, to retrace economic ups and downs at the dawn of Western Civilization and even to shed new light on the collapse of the Roman Empire. Researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton have launched a research project in which nuclear radiation is used to identify changes in metal content among ancient Greek and Roman coins held in a world-class collection amassed at the university since the 1940s... A joint project between the university's classics department...
  • Shipwreck off Malta yields 700 B.C. cargo; some of oldest finds of Phoenician times ever

    08/30/2014 6:12:37 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    FOX News ^ | August 25, 2014 | ·Associated Press
    VALLETTA, Malta – Divers near a Maltese island have found an ancient ship's cargo that experts say is yielding what could be some of the oldest Phoenician artifacts.
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Malta’s Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Punic Vessels in Balearic Islands

    05/05/2014 2:03:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, May 01, 2014 | unattributed
    The discovery was first made by students in 2013 while investigating underwater shipwreck remains near the ancient port of Sanitja on the island of Menorca... ancient Punic amphorae, more than 150 of them, lying in situ, still at rest where a seagoing vessel identified with the site known as the Binisafuller wreck gave up its cargo... Archaeologists date the amphorae to between 325-275 BC. It makes the shipwreck the oldest documented one in Menorca. It is a significant discovery because the remains of the port of Sanitja have been most often associated with the adjacent Roman period city of Sanisera....
  • Old Egypt investigator identifies to mysterious Hyksos kings [sic]

    03/28/2006 10:58:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 705+ views
    Rowley Regis Online ^ | Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:47 pm | mariafvp
    Georgeos Diaz-Montexano, scriptologist and Egyptologist amateur, has been able to identify the names of the Hyksos kings like pertaining to the group of languages and proto-Greek or Mycenaean's dialects. The true ethnic origin of the mysterious Hyksos that were able to take control of the power of a considerable part of Old Egypt, during centuries XVII to the XVI before Christ, has been always a true challenge for the Egyptologists. However, the generalized opinion more for a long time has been that the Hyksos would be Semitic towns, fundamentally coastal inhabitants of the strip Syrian-Palestine, that is, Canaanites or proto-Phoenicians....
  • Ancient Volcano, Seeds And Treerings, Suggest Rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean History (More)

    04/29/2006 12:24:20 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 723+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 4-28-2006 | Alex Kwan
    April 28, 2006Cornell study of ancient volcano, seeds and tree rings, suggests rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean history By Alex Kwan Separated in history by 100 years, the seafaring Minoans of Crete and the mercantile Canaanites of northern Egypt and the Levant (a large area of the Middle East) at the eastern end of the Mediterranean were never considered trading partners at the start of the Late Bronze Age. Until now. Trenchmaster Vronwy Hankey and foreman Antonis Zidianakis excavate storage jars from the Minoan settlement Myrtos-Pyrgos. The jars were analyzed in the Cornell study using radiocarbon analyses. Cultural links between...
  • Phoenician colony in southeast Spain re-examined

    04/01/2014 1:54:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 30, 2014 | University of Alicante
    ...This wall, built between 900 and 850BCE contains eastern Mediterranean compartmented rooms within the main excavated structure, following a typical Phoenician pattern of internal architecture. The organisation and the size of the colony itself is one that is replicated in other such pioneer settlements, and the type of defence found here has close parallels in the Near East with sites such as Hazor or Qeiyafa in Israel, as can be clearly seen in the aerial images... The peaceful abandonment of the settlement occurred around 700 BCE and, pending further research, may be due partially to the gradual silting up of...
  • A new day surfaces for deep sea archaeology

    06/28/2002 5:31:01 PM PDT · by vannrox · 7 replies · 810+ views
    USA Today ^ | 06/26/2002 - Updated 10:04 PM ET | By Dan Vergano
    <p>The desert winds swept over the sands and out to the sea. Waters churned and the ships, loaded with wine from the ancient city of Tyre, tumbled in the storm.</p> <p>Swamped, the Tanit and Elissa foundered around 800 B.C., coming to rest upright some 1,300 feet under the Mediterranean, too deep for recovery.</p>
  • Supermarket molluscs reveal Roman secret

    09/12/2003 9:17:38 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 47 replies · 791+ views
    BBC News ^ | Friday, 12 September, 2003 | Kristine Krug
    The secret of imperial purple has been rediscovered. A British amateur chemist has worked out how the ancient Romans dyed the togas of emperors this deep colour thanks to a bacterium found in cockles from the supermarket Tesco. The hue had special significance as the colour of imperial power. Cleopatra also had the sails on her ship dyed the same colour. The recipe for the dye had been kept a craft secret, even in ancient Egypt and Rome. There are few references to the dying process in the historical literature. Green to purple Modern chemistry can make every shade of...
  • French wine 'has Italian origins' [Etruscans]

    06/08/2013 7:40:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    BBC News ^ | Monday, June 3, 2013 | Jason Palmer
    The earliest known examples of wine-making as we know it are in the regions of modern-day Iran, Georgia, and Armenia -- and researchers believe that modern winemaking slowly spread westward from there to Europe... The Etruscans, a pre-Roman civilisation in Italy, are thought to have gained wine culture from the Phoenicians -- who spread throughout the Mediterranean from the early Iron Age onward -- because they used similarly shaped amphoras... Dr McGovern's team focused on the coastal site of Lattara, near the town of Lattes south of Montpellier, where the importation of amphoras continued up until the period 525-475 BC....
  • Ancient Ivory: Metal traces on Phoenician artifacts show long-gone paint and gold

    05/21/2013 7:20:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Chemical & Engineering News, v91, i20, p8 ^ | May 17, 2013 | Sarah Everts
    Ancient ivory carvings made by Phoenician artists some 3,000 years ago have long hidden a secret, even while being openly displayed in museums around the world: The sculptures were originally painted with colorful pigments, and some were decorated with gold... These metals are found in pigments commonly used in antiquity, such as the copper-based pigment Egyptian blue or the iron-based pigment hematite. The metals are not normally in ivory nor in the soil where the artifacts were long buried, explains Ina Reiche, a chemist at the Laboratory of Molecular & Structural Archaeology, in Paris. Reiche led the research, which was...
  • Carthage: Ancient Phoenician City-State

    10/29/2012 6:15:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 24 October 2012 | Owen Jarus
    The Phoenicians were originally based in a series of city-states that extended from southeast Turkey to modern-day Israel. They were great seafarers with a taste for exploration. Accounts survive of its navigators reaching places as far afield as Northern Europe and West Africa. They founded settlements throughout the Mediterranean during the first millennium B.C. Carthage, whose Phoenician name was Qart Hadasht (new city), was one of those new settlements. It sat astride trade routes going east to west, across the Mediterranean, and north to south, between Europe and Africa. The people spoke Punic, a form of the Phoenician language... The...
  • The Children of Hannibal (MICHAEL J. TOTTEN)

    12/17/2012 11:22:08 PM PST · by neverdem · 5 replies
    City Journal ^ | Autumn 2012 | MICHAEL J. TOTTEN
    The rich heritage of Tunisia, maybe the only place where the Arab Spring stands a chance Modern-day Tunisians, more Westernized than most Arabs, see themselves as descendants of the great Carthaginian general who invaded Italy. The Arab Spring began in Sidi Bouzid, a small Tunisian town, at the end of 2010. In a desperate protest against the corrupt and oppressive government that had made it impossible for him to earn a living, food-cart vendor Mohamed Bouazizi stood before City Hall, doused himself with gasoline, and lit a match. His suicide seeded a revolutionary storm that swept the countryside and eventually...
  • Archaeological report: Razed ruins not Phoenician port

    07/03/2012 6:26:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    The Daily Star ^ | June 29, 2012 | Justin Salhani
    Beirut's Minet al-Hosn construction site does not contain the remains of a Phoenician port as maintained by the Directorate General of Antiquities and the former Culture Minister, according to an archaeological report obtained by The Daily Star. The Archaeological Assessment Report on the Venus Towers Site states: "While the site ... is intriguing, it does not fit the known parameters for a port, shipyard, or shipshed facility." The report, written by Dr. Ralph Pederson of Marburg University following an extensive investigation, maintains that there is nothing to connect the site to ships or shipbuilding. "The trenches could not have functioned...
  • Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Phoenician Port City [ Tel Achziv ]

    04/21/2012 8:10:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Gwyn Davies et al
    The ruins of the site rest atop a sandstone hill, hugging the far northern coast of the current State of Israel near the border with Lebanon. One can see later-period standing structures that provide the backdrop for what is now a national park and beach resort. But below the surface, and beneath the ocean waves, lie the remains of an ancient harbor town that reach back in history to as long ago as Chalcolithic times (4500 -3200 BC)... Known today as Tel Achziv, its remnants have been explored and excavated before, by Moshe Prausnitz from 1963 through 1964 and, in...
  • There They Go Again, Those Arab Racists

    11/17/2006 5:18:23 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 19 replies · 644+ views
    Arutz Sheva website ^ | Jul 15, '04 / 26 Tammuz 5764 | by Ariel Natan Pasko
    There they go again. The story is so old already. Arab militia or Arab army or Arab terrorist attacks non-Arab. Or was that Muslim fanatic attacks non-Muslim? This time, it's happening in Sudan. While we're sitting and talking, probably a few hundred more black Africans in Sudan have starved to death, or been brutally killed, raped, enslaved, or simply pushed off their land by 7th century Arab imperialist invaders, or more rightly "Arab settlers". Oh yes, that's right. "Arab settlers". Like the ones Saddam Hussein brought into Kurdistan - i.e., the Kurdish areas of northern Iraq - in the 1970s...
  • Rare Cuneiform Script Found on Island of Malta

    12/24/2011 9:27:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, December 22, 2011 | Vol. 5 December 2011
    A small-sized find in an ancient megalithic temple stirs the imagination. Excavations among what many scholars consider to be the world's oldest monumental buildings on the island of Malta continue to unveil surprises and raise new questions about the significance of these megalithic structures and the people who built them. Not least is the latest find -- a small but rare, crescent-moon shaped agate stone featuring a 13th-century B.C.E. cuneiform inscription, the likes of which would normally be found much farther west in Mesopotamia. Led by palaeontology professor Alberto Cazzella of the University of Rome "La Sapienza", the archaeological team...
  • Bulgarian Archaeology Finds Said to Rewrite History of Black Sea Sailing

    09/14/2011 2:56:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Novinite ^ | Monday, September 12, 2011 | Sofia News Agency
    Massive ancient stone anchors were found by divers participating in an archaeological expedition near the southern Bulgarian Black Sea town of Sozopol. The expedition, led by deputy director of Bulgaria's National Historical Museum Dr Ivan Hristov, found the precious artifacts west of the Sts. Cyricus and Julitta island. The 200-kg beautifully ornamented anchors have two holes in them -- one for the anchor rope and another one for a wooden stick. They were used for 150-200-ton ships that transported mainly wheat, but also dried and salted fish, skins, timber and metals from what now is Bulgaria's coast. The anchors' shape...
  • Sunken Treasure Found in the Seas Of Sicily

    08/14/2011 1:45:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Friday, August 12, 2011 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Italian archaeologists have retrieved a sunken treasure of 3,422 ancient bronze coins in the small Sicilian island of Pantelleria, they announced today. Discovered by chance during a survey to create an underwater archaeological itinerary,the coins have been dated between 264 and 241 BC. At that time, Pantelleria, which lies about 70 miles southwest of Sicily, in the middle of the Sicily Strait, became a bone of contention between the Romans and Carthaginians. Rome captured the small Mediterranean island in the First Punic War in 255 BC, but lost it a year later. In 217 BC, in the Second Punic War,...
  • Carthaginian temples found -- Azores

    07/10/2011 6:57:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    Portuguese American Journal ^ | Saturday, July 9, 2011 | paj.cm
    Archaeologists from the Portuguese Association of Archeological Research (APIA) believe to have found in the Azores a significant number of Carthaginian temples, from the fourth century BC, dedicated to the goddess Tanit. The new archaeological sites were found in Monte Brasil, Angra Heroismo, Terceira island. According to APIA archaeologists Nuno Ribeiro and Anabela Joaquinito, "More than five hypogea type monuments (tombs excavated in rocks) and at least three 'sanctuaries' proto-historic, carved into the rock, were found." A monument located at "Monte do Facho" shows inbuilt sink shaped carvings linked to water conduits for libations. "There are 'chairs' carved into the...
  • Team hopes to unlock mysteries of Cameroon’s granite strongholds!

    08/17/2002 9:23:34 AM PDT · by vannrox · 20 replies · 478+ views
    University of Calgary ^ | August 15, 2002 | Greg Harris, Media Relations
    UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS |PH: (403) 220-3500 | FAX: (403) 282-8413 Greg Harris, Media Relations (403) 220-3506 (403) 540-7306 (cell)August 15, 2002Centuries-old African structures have never been excavated U of C-led team hopes to unlock mysteries of Cameroon’s granite strongholdsA University of Calgary archaeologist is leading the first expedition to excavate the so-called Strongholds of Cameroon, which are some of the most remarkable stone-built structures anywhere in Africa.Located in the Mandara Mountains of northern Cameroon, the strongholds range in size from small standalone structures, to complex, castle-sized fortresses with  platforms, terraces and covered passageways. The curving walls on some of the...
  • Ancient tombs discovered on school construction site

    11/02/2010 8:07:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 1+ views
    Times of Malta ^ | Saturday, October 30, 2010 | Kurt Sansone
    A group of ancient tombs dating back to the Punic period were discovered during excavation works for the construction of a new primary school at the Archbishop's Seminary in Tal-Virtù... According to Nathaniel Cutajar from the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage, the discovery is of "great scientific interest" and "confirms the archaeological importance" of the Tal-Virtù area in Rabat. The superintendence is responsible for all scientific investigation of cultural assets, including archaeological excavations. An investigation of the discovery is under way by its team of archaeologists. The Archbishop's Seminary has a planning permit to build a primary school extension to its...
  • Rare Lead Bars Discovered Off The Coast Of Ibiza May Be Carthaginian Munitions

    12/17/2008 7:39:02 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 663+ views
    Science News ^ | Tuesday, December 16, 2008 | source: University of Cologne
    One of the bars has Iberian characters on it. According to the German Mining Museum in Bochum, the lead originates from the mines of Sierra Morena in southern Spain... A fourth specimen had already been found on an earlier occasion. The characters on the upper surfaces of two of the four known bars are syllabary symbols from the script of Northeastern Iberian... The meaning of the characters has not yet been determined, however, the dating of the objects to the third century B.C., i.e. the period of the Second Punic War, raises further questions. The reason for this is that...
  • Ancient Harbors Rise Again

    01/12/2006 4:56:19 AM PST · by flevit · 11 replies · 544+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 9 January 2006 | By Michael Balter
    From about 3000 B.C.E., boats anchored in natural coves and bays. At Sidon, for example, the team found crustaceans typical of brackish lagoons in the cores, indicating that the bays were fairly sheltered. By about 1200 B.C.E., the Phoenicians began building artificial harbors, a period which corresponds to other archaeological evidence that ship traffic was increasing at that time. After the invention of concrete by the Romans around 300 B.C.E., sophisticated harbor engineering became possible, and the ports were at their height during the subsequent Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods, from 332 B.C.E. to about 1000 C.E. After that time, Tyre...
  • Long-lost Phoenician ports found: Old Mediterranean harbours discovered buried under modern cities

    01/07/2006 4:28:42 PM PST · by wagglebee · 8 replies · 750+ views
    Nature.com ^ | 1/6/06 | Philip Ball
    Thanks to political tensions easing in Lebanon, archaeologists have finally managed to locate the sites of ancient Phoenician harbours in the seaports that dominated Mediterranean trade thousands of years ago. By drilling out cores of sediment from the modern urban centres of these cities, geologists have mapped out the former coastlines that the sediments have long since buried. From this they have pinpointed the likely sites of the old harbours, and have marked out locations that, they say, are in dire need of exploration and conservation. The modern cities of Tyre and Sidon on the Lebanese coast were once the...
  • Geoscience Rediscovers Phoenicia's Buried Harbors

    01/06/2006 2:55:18 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 618+ views
    Physorg ^ | 1-6-2006
    Geoscience rediscovers Phoenicia's buried harbors Space and Earth science : January 05, 2006 The exact locations of Tyre and Sidon's ancient harbors, Phoenicia's two most important city-states, have attracted scholarly interest and debate for many centuries. New research reveals that the ancient basins lie buried beneath the medieval and modern city centers. A network of sediment cores have been sunk into the cities' coastal deposits and studied using high-resolution geoscience techniques to elucidate how, where, and when Tyre and Sidon's harbors evolved since their Bronze Age foundations. In effect, ancient port basins are rich geological archives replete with information on...
  • Ancient Shipwreck Points to Site of Major Roman Battle

    10/19/2010 8:17:39 AM PDT · by decimon · 13 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 18, 2010 | Clara Moskowitz
    The remains of a sunken warship recently found in the Mediterranean Sea may confirm the site of a major ancient battle in which Rome trounced Carthage. The year was 241 B.C. and the players were the ascending Roman republic and the declining Carthaginian Empire, which was centered on the northernmost tip of Africa. The two powers were fighting for dominance in the Mediterranean in a series of conflicts called the Punic Wars. Archaeologists think the newly discovered remnants of the warship date from the final battle of the first Punic War, which allowed Rome to expand farther into the Western...
  • Syrian Archaeologists: Discovery of Cemetery Building Casts Light on Phoenician Religious Traditions

    08/10/2010 8:21:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Global Arab Network ^ | Sunday, August 8, 2010 | Haifa Fadi
    A religious cemetery building with carvings dating back to the 6th and 5th centuries BC was unearthed in the Phoenician city of Amrit in Tartous, say Syrian Archaeologists. Director of Archaeological Excavations and Studies Michel Maqdisi said the building consists of a facade that has two entrances engraved on a 2 meter high huge stone surface. The facade to the eastern side is skillfully carved with symbolic decorations similar to what we find on the Phoenician tombstones or those dated to 1000 BC, he added. "The symbolically carved decorations and the nature of architectural formation of the building, as well...
  • Diggers discover Phoenician army complex in Cyprus [ Trojan War connection ]

    06/18/2010 6:00:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 331+ views
    Reuters Life! via Yahoo! ^ | Friday, June 18, 2010 | Michele Kambas, ed Paul Casciato
    Archaeologists in Cyprus have discovered what could be the remains of a garrison used by Phoenician soldiers in an ancient city founded by a hero of the Trojan war. Buildings overlooking a previously discovered Phoenician complex more than 2,000 years old were found at the ancient city of Idalion, the island's Antiquities department said on Friday. The complex, linked by a tower, were found to discover metal weapons, inscriptions and pieces of a bronze shield. "The complex may have been used by the soldiers who guarded the tower," the department said in a news release. Idalion was founded by Chalcanor,...
  • Hannibal's real Alpine trunk road to Rome is revealed

    04/14/2010 8:06:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 604+ views
    The Times ^ | February 17, 2010 | Norman Hammond
    From the Col du Mont Cenis in the north to the Col Agnel 35 miles (60km) almost due south of it three approach routes have been argued for. In the most recent study, Dr William Mahaney, a geomorphologist, and his colleagues have looked at the evidence from Classical sources. "As documented by Polybius and Livy in the ancient literature, Hannibal's army was blocked by a two-tier rockfall on the lee side of the Alps, a rubble sheet of considerable volume," they note in the journal Archaeometry. "The only such two-tier landform lies below the Col de la Traversette, 2,600...
  • Treasure Found Off La Manga [ Phoenician treasure ship ]

    01/18/2010 11:59:53 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 787+ views
    The Leader ^ | Friday, January 15, 2010 | Sally Bengtsson
    Buried beneath shells, rocks and sand, for 2,600 years, ...a treasure of incalculable value has lain just off La Manga...The find appears to be the cargo of a commercial ship carrying ivory from African elephants, amber and lots of ceramic objects. The find has been kept secret for the past three years by the team of divers led by the Spaniard Juan Pinedo Reyes and the American Mark Edward Polzer. The recovery project is being financed by National Geographic, who have reached an agreement with the Spanish Minister of Culture, the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and the University A&M of...
  • Phoenician remains found at Málaga airport

    10/26/2009 7:34:38 PM PDT · by decimon · 11 replies · 563+ views
    Typically Spanish ^ | Oct 24, 2009 | h.b.
    Drainage work in the construction of the second runway has been moved as a resultThe oldest Phoenician remains yet to be found in Málaga have been unearthed at the airport as land was moved as part of the construction of the second runway.
  • Berlusconi escort tape may spark antiquities probe [ Phoenician tombs? ]

    07/28/2009 1:51:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 779+ views
    Myanmar Star ^ | Friday July 24, 2009 | Philip Pullella
    Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's private conversations with an escort, which have riveted Italians all week, may wind up getting him into trouble with Italy's archaeological authorities... In one of the transcripts of his purported conversations with Patrizia D'Addario posted on an Italian website, Berlusconi boasts to her about his sprawling villa in Sardinia -- complete with an ice cream parlour and artificial lakes. "Here we found 30 Phoenician tombs from (around) 300 BC," the voice is heard to say.
  • Business Models in Antiquity

    07/27/2009 9:47:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 445+ views
    The Globalist ^ | Tuesday, July 21, 2009 | Karl Moore and David C. Lewis
    The Phoenicians were not the first ancient people to sponsor long-distance seaborne trade, but they and their Carthaginian children were the first to perfect it. They are the real pioneers of what we will call maritime capitalism. How did they do it? By taking advantage of a unique window of opportunity. During the Middle Bronze Age (traditionally dated to the first half of the second millennium BCE), first Babylon and then Egypt dominated the Middle East. As their power faded, no single power dominated. In this climate of peace and stability, trade took the place of war. Babylonia tried to...
  • Ancient Mass Graves of Soldiers, Babies Found in Italy [ Himera battled Carthage ]

    12/21/2008 3:20:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,593+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Wednesday, December 17, 2008 | Maria Cristina Valsecchi
    More than 10,000 graves containing ancient amphorae, "baby bottles," and the bodies of soldiers who fought the Carthaginians were found near the ancient Greek colony of Himera, in Italy, archaeologists announced recently... "Each [mass grave] contains from 15 to 25 skeletons. They were all young healthy men and they all died a violent death. Some of the skeletons have broken skulls and in some cases we found the tips of the arrows that killed them," Vassallo said. He thinks the human remains are from soldiers who died fighting the Carthaginians in a famous 480 B.C. battle described by Greek historian...
  • Lebanon finds 2,900 year old Phoenician remains

    11/12/2008 8:35:33 AM PST · by BGHater · 8 replies · 637+ views
    Reuters ^ | 12 Nov 2008 | Yara Bayoumy
    Lebanese and Spanish archaeologists have discovered 2,900-year-old earthenware pottery that ancient Phoenicians used to store the bones of their dead after burning the corpses. They said more than 100 jars were discovered at a Phoenician site in the southern coastal city of Tire. Phoenicians are known to have thrived from 1500 B.C. to 300 B.C and they were also headquartered in the coastal area of present-day Syria. "The big jars are like individual tombs. The smaller jars are left empty, but symbolically represent that a soul is stored in them," Ali Badawi, the archaeologist in charge in Tire, told Reuters...
  • French dig exposes underside of Tyre

    11/03/2008 5:44:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 319+ views
    Daily Star ^ | Saturday, November 1, 2008 | Mohammed Zaatari
    A French excavations team from the Universite de Lyon has wrapped up phase I of works in the southern port city of Tyre, the head of the Directorate General of Antiquities (DGA) in the South told The Daily Star on Friday. "Excavations are centered in two main sites inside Tyre's Al-Mina ancient ruins area," Ali Badawi said. He added that archaeologists were working on uncovering the tomb of Frederic Archbishop of Tyre, which is said to be buried under an ancient cathedral dating back to the times of the Crusaders in the coastal city. "A German excavating team came to...
  • Phoenicians Left Deep Genetic Mark, Study Shows

    11/03/2008 5:16:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 480+ views
    New Jack City Times ^ | Thursday, October 30, 2008 | John Noble Wilford
    The Phoenicians, enigmatic people from the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, stamped their mark on maritime history, and now research has revealed that they also left a lasting genetic imprint. Scientists reported Thursday that as many as 1 in 17 men living today on the coasts of North Africa and southern Europe may have a Phoenician direct male-line ancestor. These men were found to retain identifiable genetic signatures from the nearly 1,000 years the Phoenicians were a dominant seafaring commercial power in the Mediterranean basin, until their conquest by Rome in the 2nd century B.C... The scientists who conducted the...
  • Port of 'second Carthage' found [ Tharros / Sardinia ]

    10/01/2008 3:29:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 502+ views
    ANSA.it ^ | September 25, 2008 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Sardinia said Thursday they have found the port of the Phoenician city of Tharros, held by some to be the ancient people's most important colony in the Mediterranean after Carthage. Researchers from the University of Cagliari and Sassari found the submerged port in the Mistras Lagoon, several kilometres from the city ruins. Excavations have long been going on at the site of the city itself, on a peninsula overlooking the Bay of Oristano in western Sardinia, but this is the first time its waterfront has been located despite almost two centuries of hunting. As well as an impressive...
  • Rubbish Threatens Tuvixeduu Necropolis (Ancient Ruins - Sardinia)

    05/24/2008 2:32:40 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 171+ views
    Times On Line ^ | 5-24-2008
    Rubbish threatens Tuvixeddu necropolisRichard Owen in RomeMay 24,2008 An ancient Mediterranean necropolis described as one of the world's greatest historical sites is being submerged beneath cement, high rise housing and rubbish dumps, according to Italian conservationists. Tuvixeddu - which means “hills with small cavities” in the Sardinian dialect - contains thousands of Phoenician and Punic burial chambers from the 6th century BC. It has long been robbed of funerary objects but some of its tombs have retained their original paintings, including “Ureo's Tomb”, named after a sacred serpent, and “The Warrior's Tomb”, in which a decoration depicts a warrior throwing...
  • Sailor to recreate Phoenicians' epic African voyage

    03/24/2008 1:41:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 221+ views
    Stone Pages ^ | Sunday, March 23, 2008 | The Independent
    On the ancient Syrian island of Arwad, which was settled by the Phoenicians in about 2000 BCE, men are hard at work hammering wooden pegs into the hull of a ship. But this vessel will not be taking fishermen on their daily trip up and down the coast. It is destined for a greater adventure – one that could solve a mystery which has baffled archaeologists for centuries. The adventure begins not in Arwad but in Dorset, where an Englishman has taken it upon himself to try to prove that the Phoenicians circumnavigated Africa thousands of years before any Europeans...
  • Major Archeological Discovery of Necropolis in Sousse Sheds Light on Punic Life in... 4th century BC

    01/30/2008 10:44:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 149+ views
    Tunisia Online / AllAfrica ^ | Monday, January 28, 2008 | unattributed
    A Punic necropolis dating back to the 4th-5th century BC has been recently discovered at the museum of Sousse during extension and refurbishing works that started last May and are due to be completed by the end of the current year... This discovery comes following last year's discovery of a roman burial vault located near the roman catacombs in the district of Bouhsina in Sousse. The vault which is being restored by the INP, contains 2 tombs with the remains of some 13 members of the same family buried together along with sacred ceramic vessels.
  • In Lebanon, DNA may yet heal rifts

    09/09/2007 8:12:40 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 13 replies · 960+ views
    Reuters via Yahoo ^ | 9-9-07 | Anon
    Lebanese geneticist Pierre Zalloua takes a saliva sample form a Lebanese man to test his DNA in a university laboratory near Byblos ancient city in north Lebanon, in this August 17, 2007 file photo. Zalloua following the genetic footprint of the ancient Phoenicians says he has traced their modern-day descendants, but stumbled into an old controversy about identity in his country. (Jamal Saidi/Files/Reuters) A Lebanese scientist following the genetic footprint of the ancient Phoenicians says he has traced their modern-day descendants, but stumbled into an old controversy about identity in his country. Geneticist Pierre Zalloua has charted the spread...
  • Book lays out how Portuguese found Australia

    03/21/2007 5:11:29 PM PDT · by xcamel · 22 replies · 1,212+ views
    MSNBC ^ | March 21, 2007 | Michael Perry
    SYDNEY, Australia - A 16th-century maritime map shows that Portuguese adventurers, not the British or the Dutch, were the first Europeans to find Australia, according to a new book that details the story of the secret discovery. The book "Beyond Capricorn" says the map, which accurately marks geographical sites along Australia's east coast in Portuguese, proves that Portuguese seafarer Christopher de Mendonca led a fleet of four ships into Botany Bay in 1522, almost 250 years before Britain's Captain James Cook.
  • Captain Cook Is Scuppered By Book

    03/20/2007 5:28:36 PM PDT · by blam · 52 replies · 1,187+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 3-20-2007 | Nick Squires
    Captain Cook is scuppered by book By Nick Squires in Sydney Last Updated: 9:02am GMT 20/03/2007 The image of Captain Cook stepping onto the shores of Botany Bay has been a staple of British history books for generations but now it seems the explorer may have been beaten to Australia by the Portuguese, who arrived 250 years earlier. A new appraisal of 16th century maps offers evidence that a small Portuguese fleet charted much of Australia's coast as early as 1522. It has long been known that Cook was preceded by Dutch navigators, whose ships were wrecked on the coast...
  • Archaeologists discover remains of Phoenician city

    07/12/2006 10:36:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 202+ views
    Typically Spanish ^ | Wed, 12 Jul 2006, 21:36 | m.p.
    The excavations have uncovered the remains of a block of houses, covering an area of 40 x 12 metres, although the whole city is said to have covered more than six hectares. Kitchen utensils and dishes have also been discovered intact. The site is what remains of the Phoenician city of Las Chorreras, founded in the 8th century BC, and abandoned a hundred years later.
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • The Marsala Punic Warship

    04/13/2006 12:31:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 319+ views
    Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum ^ | circa 1999 | Honor Frost
    Punta Scario is opposite to and only twenty minutes by sail from, the Egadi Islands which gave their name to the Roman naval victory that took place on the morning of March the 10th, 241 BC and ended the First Punic War. The wreck's contents, epigraphy and Carbon 14 determinations are consistent with this period, while circumstantial evidence points to a connection with the Battle itself. The Ship's architecture and contents show that it was not a merchantman, but some kind of hastily built auxiliary warship, possibly a Liburnian. After the Battle the wind had changed direction, so that by...
  • In the Wake of the Phoenicians: DNA study reveals a Phoenician-Maltese link

    08/21/2005 1:38:08 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 35 replies · 1,729+ views
    The National Geographic ^ | October 2004 | Cassandra Franklin-Barbajosa
    In the Wake of the Phoenicians: DNA study reveals a Phoenician-Maltese link The idea is fascinating. Who among us hasn't considered our heritage and wondered if we might be descended from ancient royalty or some prominent historical figure? Led by a long-standing interest in the impact of ancient empires on the modern gene pool, geneticist and National Geographic emerging explorer Spencer Wells, with colleague Pierre Zalloua of the American University of Beirut, expanded on that question two years ago as they embarked on a genetic study of the Phoenicians, a first millennium B.C. sea empire that—over several hundred years—spread across...
  • Quest for the Phoenicians (National Geographic special)

    10/17/2004 7:53:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 2,058+ views
    PBS ^ | Oct 20 2004 | National Geographic
    In "Quest for the Phoenicians," three renowned scientists, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and oceanographer Robert Ballard, geneticist Spencer Wells and archaeologist Paco Giles, search for clues about the Phoenicians in the sea, in the earth and in the blood of their modern-day descendents... Ballard looks at ancient shipwrecks along Skerki Bank off the island of Sicily... Paco Giles excavates a cave at the bottom of the rock of Gibraltar... Spencer Wells collects DNA from a 2,500-year-old Phoenician mummy's tooth, to extract its unique genetic code and compare it with DNA samples collected from men and women from Lebanon to Tunisia.