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Keyword: pompeii

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  • Buried city of Pompeii unveils three new houses [well, not new...]

    04/20/2014 6:28:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    ANSA/UPI ^ | April 17, 2014 | Ed Adamczyk
    There is new real state to be seen in the Pompeii, Italy, archaeological site, with three restored houses open to the public. In time for Easter tourists, three additional houses in the ancient city of Pompeii, Italy, buried in a volcano eruption in 79 A.D., were opened Thursday. Italian Culture Minister Dario Franceschini inaugurated the three restored houses, or domus, in a ceremony at the celebrated archeological site. The houses were formerly occupied by the families of Marcus Lucretius Fronto, Romulus and Remus and Trittolemo, the office of Pompeii’s archeological superintendent said. Superintendent Massimo Osanna described them as “aristocratic houses.”...
  • Ancient Romans Preferred Fast Food

    06/19/2007 4:25:23 PM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 1,814+ views
    Discovery ^ | 6-18-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Ancient Romans Preferred Fast Food Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News June 18, 2007 — Just as a U.S. Presidential state dinner does not reflect how most Americans eat and socialize, researchers think the formal, decadent image of wining and dining in ancient Rome mostly just applied to the elite. According to archaeologist Penelope Allison of the University of Leicester, the majority of the population consumed food "on the run." Allison excavated an entire neighborhood block in Pompeii, a city frozen in time after the eruption of volcano Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Historians often extend findings from Pompeii to other parts...
  • In pictures: Ancient Roman paintings

    12/21/2007 11:46:49 AM PST · by WesternCulture · 49 replies · 3,845+ views
    news.bbc.co.uk ^ | 12/21/2007 | news.bbc.co.uk
    A unique exhibition of 2,000-year-old paintings called Pompeian Red has opened at the National Museum of Rome.
  • Thieves pry off ancient fresco from Pompeii walls

    03/19/2014 9:14:15 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    <p>ROME (AP) — Thieves have pried off a chunk of an ancient fresco of the Greek goddess Artemis from the walls of Pompeii.</p> <p>Pompeii's archaeological authorities said Tuesday the theft occurred on March 12 in the "Home of Neptune," in an area of Pompeii's sprawling excavation site not currently open to the public.</p>
  • Pompeii-like volcanic ash kept dinosaur remains fresh

    02/04/2014 7:44:58 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 02/04/2014 | Jeff Hecht
    It's hot storage. Millions of years before volcanic ash entombed the Roman town of Pompeii, a group of dinosaurs succumbed to a similar fate. China's famous feathered dinosaur fossils owe their exquisite preservation to volcanic eruptions between about 130 and 120 million years ago. The Jehol fossils have transformed our understanding of dinosaurs by showing that the relatives of Velociraptor and T. rex had a feather-like body covering, like birds. The Jehol deposits also preserved soft tissue from early mammals and flowering plants. Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University, China, and his colleagues think they know why the remains are so...
  • Herculaneum Panoramas

    05/10/2013 6:20:20 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 16 replies
    Herculaneum Panoramas ^ | 2001 - 2012 | Herculaneum Conservation Project
    Virtual tour of Herculaneum, documenting the site, and the work of the Herculaneum Conservation Project. Click on the node-markers to view an interactive 360-degree panorama (in a new window). The plan above shows the locations of panoramas made mainly in 2001 (a few are from 1999), where the aim was to provide an overview of the site (as it was then), along with tours of a few selected houses. The menu of houses and other areas at left accesses additional, more recent coverage (including revisits to some houses and other structures) made from 2003 onward.
  • Diets of the middle and lower class in Pompeii revealed

    01/05/2014 7:13:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 1-2-2014 | Dawn Fuller
    University of Cincinnati archaeologists are turning up discoveries in the famed Roman city of Pompeii that are wiping out the historic perceptions of how the Romans dined, with the rich enjoying delicacies such as flamingos and the poor scrounging for soup or gruel. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, will present these discoveries on Jan. 4, at the joint annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and American Philological Association (APA) in Chicago. UC teams of archaeologists have spent more than a decade at two city blocks within a non-elite district in the Roman...
  • Italian mafia boss ‘fed alive to pigs’--- Police believe Francesco Raccosta was kidnapped......

    12/29/2013 6:21:23 AM PST · by dennisw · 47 replies
    nydailynews ^ | Nov. 28, 2013 | By Lee Moran
    Police believe Francesco Raccosta - who disappeared from his home in Calabria back in 2012 - was kidnapped by rival mobsters and fed alive to a herd of pigs. Francesco Raccosta, who vanished without a trace from his home in Calabria in March 2012, is now believed to have been kidnapped by opposition mobsters. They then severely beat him before throwing him into a herd of pigs - who swiftly ate his body as he screamed and begged for mercy. Cops say they found out about his fate earlier this month while investigating the southern 'Ndrangheta mafia organization. Officers claim...
  • Unlocking the scrolls of Herculaneum

    12/21/2013 2:02:18 AM PST · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News Magazine ^ | 21st December 2013 | Robin Banerji
    'The British Museum's 2013 show of artefacts from the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried in ash during an explosive eruption of Mount Vesuvius, was a sell-out. But could even greater treasures - including lost works of classical literature - still lie underground?.'
  • Unlocking the scrolls of Herculaneum

    12/20/2013 9:11:01 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12-19-2013 | Robin Banerji
    For centuries scholars have been hunting for the lost works of ancient Greek and Latin literature. In the Renaissance, books were found in monastic libraries. In the late 19th Century papyrus scrolls were found in the sands of Egypt. But only in Herculaneum in southern Italy has an entire library from the ancient Mediterranean been discovered in situ. On the eve of the catastrophe in 79 AD, Herculaneum was a chic resort town on the Bay of Naples, where many of Rome's top families went to rest and recuperate during the hot Italian summers. It was also a place where...
  • Getty Villa Examines Life and Legacy of Roman Emperor Tiberius

    10/19/2013 4:42:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, Octoer 10, 2013 | Press Release of the J. Paul Getty Museum
    Buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, an over-life-size bronze portrait of Tiberius (ruled A.D. 14–37) was discovered in 1741, during the first years of excavation at Herculaneum. On loan from the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples, this statue is the subject of the exhibitionTiberius: Portrait of an Emperor, on view at the Getty Villa October 16, 2013 through March 3, 2014. Brought to the Getty Villa for conservation and analysis last October, the sculpture provides an opportunity to re-examine the career and character of Rome’s second emperor. The exhibition has been co-organized by the J. Paul Getty...
  • Roman Statues Found in Blue Grotto Cave

    09/28/2009 3:45:34 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 23 replies · 1,574+ views
    Discovery.com ^ | 9/28/09 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sept. 28, 2009 -- A number of ancient Roman statues might lie beneath the turquoise waters of the Blue Grotto on the island of Capri in southern Italy, according to an underwater survey of the sea cave. Dating to the 1st century A.D., the cave was used as a swimming pool by the Emperor Tiberius (42 B.C. - 37 A.D.), and the statues are probably depictions of sea gods. "A preliminary underwater investigation has revealed several statue bases which might possibly hint to sculptures lying nearby," Rosalba Giugni, president of the environmentalist association, Marevivo, told Discovery News. Carried out in...
  • Construction Magnate Donates Millions To Restore Pompeii As UNESCO Criticises Italian Government

    07/12/2013 10:00:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Italy magazine ^ | Tuesday, July 2, 2013 | Carol King
    Italian construction magnate Pietro Salini wants to donate €20 million ... to restore the archaeological site that has been damaged by weather, and has suffered from corrupt management and mafia interference. Salini aims to attract other international donors to restore the Ancient Roman city, telling a press conference: "It would be a crime to let Pompeii crumble." Salini's announcement comes at a time when the head of the UNESCO National Commission in Italy, Giovanni Puglisi, warned the Italian government that it needs to accelerate ongoing restoration work at the archaeological site, saying the government "has until 31 December to adopt...
  • The Unsolved Mystery of the Tunnels at Baiae

    10/04/2012 5:34:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Past Imperfect 'blog ^ | October 1, 2012 | Mike Dash
    According to legend, the sibyl traveled to Tarquin's palace bearing nine books of prophecy that set out the whole of the future of Rome. She offered the set to the king for a price so enormous that he summarily declined -- at which the prophetess went away, burned the first three of the books, and returned, offering the remaining six to Tarquin at the same price. Once again, the king refused, though less arrogantly this time, and the sibyl burned three more of the precious volumes. The third time she approached the king, he thought it wise to accede to...
  • Pompei Discovery For Swedish Archaeologists

    04/17/2005 1:36:52 PM PDT · by blam · 49 replies · 1,380+ views
    The Local ^ | 4-17-2005
    Published: 17th April 2005 11:48 BST+1 Pompei discovery for Swedish archeologists (AFP) Swedish archeologists have discovered a Stone Age settlement covered in ash under the ruins of the ancient city of Pompei, indicating that the volcano Vesuvius engulfed the area in lava more than 3,500 years before the famous 79 AD eruption. The archeologists recently found burnt wood and grains of corn in the earth under Pompei, Anne-Marie Leander Touati, a professor of archeology at Stockholm University who led the team, told AFP. "Carbon dating shows that the finds are from prehistoric times, that is, from 3,500 years BC," Leander...
  • Italian 'Super Volcano' May Threaten Millions: Scientists plan to drill deep below Romans'...

    08/06/2012 7:54:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Newser ^ | Monday, August 06, 2012 | Rob Quinn
    A hidden "super volcano" near Pompeii threatens an eruption that could make Vesuvius look like a picnic, scientists warn. The Phlegraean Fields zone of intense seismic activity -- which the ancient Romans believed was the gateway to hell -- could doom millions of people in the Naples area if it erupts, Reuters reports. Scientists plan to drill more than two miles below its surface to monitor any signs of a pending eruption in the huge chamber of molten rock, but some experts fear that the drilling itself could trigger an earthquake or eruption. Areas like the Phlegraean fields "can give...
  • "Come Back To Sorrento"

    06/12/2012 1:19:06 PM PDT · by sussex · 3 replies
    Look at the sea of Surriento, what a treasure it is! Even who has travelled all over the world, he has never seen a sea like this one.
  • Pillar at Pompei villa collapses

    12/24/2011 9:22:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Monsters and Critics ^ | Thursday, December 22, 2011 | Deutsche Presse-Agentur
    A pillar has collapsed at one of Pompeii's most well-preserved buildings, officials in Italy said Thursday, the latest in a series of accidents to befall the treasured archaeological site. The collapse took place on an external area of the House of Loreius Tiburtinus - also known as the House of Octavius Quartio - the office of Archaeological Heritage of Naples and Pompeii, said in a statement. Officials were in the process of inspecting the causes and extent of the damage, the statement added. The House of Loreius Tiburtinus is renowned for its artwork and large gardens. In October a portion...
  • Mount Vesuvius [ erupted and buried Pompeii et al, August 24-25, A.D. 79 ]

    08/27/2011 7:54:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Wheeling Jesuit University ^ | January 18, 2011 | ETE Team
    Pliny the Elder's ship approached the shore near Pompeii. Ashes were already falling, hotter and thicker as the ships drew near, followed by bits of pumice and blackened stones, charred and cracked by the flames . . . Meanwhile on Mount Vesuvius broad sheets of fire and leaping flames blazed at several points, their bright glare emphasized by the darkness of night. (pp. 429, 431) But they could not land because the shore was blocked by volcanic debris, so they sailed south and landed at Stabiae. Hoping to quiet the frightened people, the uncle asked to be carried to the...
  • Pompeii ruin collapses amid claims site mismanaged (House of the Gladiators)

    11/11/2010 10:43:45 AM PST · by NYer · 9 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | November 7, 2010 | Nick Pisa
    The stone house, known as Schola Armaturarum Juventus Pompeiani, crumbled into a pile of rubble and dust in the early hours of Saturday morning before visitors were allowed in. Although the house is closed to the public, it was a popular site in the city – buried by an eruption from nearby Mt Vesuvius in AD79 – because of its beautiful gladiator frescoes painted on the outside walls. Pompeii, south of Naples is a unique historical site and is on the UNESCO World Heritage list but for decades it has been allowed to fall into ruin and disrepair. Today more...
  • Pompeii's House of Gladiators collapses

    11/07/2010 4:00:26 PM PST · by Islander7 · 24 replies
    BBC ^ | Nov 7, 2010 | BBC
    A house in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii has collapsed, raising concerns about Italy's state support for its archaeological heritage. --------------------- Video at the link
  • Pompeii's Mystery Horse Is a Donkey

    11/03/2010 8:28:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 1+ views
    Softpedia ^ | Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 | Smaranda Biliuti
    Back in 2004, when academics unearthed skeletons found at a house in the ancient Roman town that was covered in ashes in 79 AD, they thought it belonged to an extinct breed of horse... What happened really was that there seems to have been a mix-up in the lab, which led to horse DNA being combined with donkey DNA, creating an artificial hybrid that actually never existed. Six years ago, the skeletons of equids having belonged to a rich Roman household in Pompeii were analyzed. There were found in the stables of a probably wealthy politician, and all five of...
  • Archaeologists find 'mini-Pompeii' [ Norway, 3500 BC ]

    10/04/2010 5:14:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Views and News from Norway ^ | October 1, 2010 | Sven Goll
    The discovery of a "sealed" Stone Age house site from 3500 BC has stirred great excitement among archaeologists from Norway's Museum of Cultural History at the University in Oslo. The settlement site at Hamresanden, close to Kristiansand's airport at Kjevik in Southern Norway, looks like it was covered by a sandstorm, possibly in the course of a few hours. The catastrophe for the Stone Age occupants has given archaeologists an untouched "mini-Pompeii," containing both whole and reparable pots... the team working on the site at Hamresanden has discovered so many large shards of pottery that they think they can put...
  • Walk the Streets of Roman Pompeii On Google Maps/Earth

    08/25/2010 6:01:09 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 11 replies
    Google Maps ^ | 8/25/2010 | Google
  • In search of Western civilisation's lost classics

    08/11/2008 1:45:29 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 31 replies · 148+ views
    The Australian ^ | 8/6/08 | Luke Slattery
    The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius's eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secretsSTORED in a sky-lit reading room on the top floor of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Naples are the charred remains of the only library to survive from classical antiquity. The ancient world's other great book collections -- at Athens, Alexandria and Rome -- all perished in the chaos of the centuries. But the library of the Villa of the Papyri was conserved, paradoxically, by an act of destruction. Lying to the northwest of ancient Herculaneum, this...
  • "Korean Pompeii" Discovered on Jeju Island

    02/04/2007 4:37:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 648+ views
    Chosun Ilbo ^ | Updated Feb.5,2007 08:51 KST | unattributed
    An archaeological site on Jeju Island is being called Korea's version of Pompeii after the ancient Roman city which was preserved by volcanic debris. Discovered in 2006, a human settlement at the Hamori 105 formation in Daejung-eup, Seogwipo-city was confirmed to have been smothered by a volcanic eruption more than 5,000 years ago. The Jeju Culture & Art Foundation collected volcanic materials that covered Hamori and sent it to an American research institute. The Foundation said Sunday that the U.S. researchers determined the debris to have come from an eruption at nearby Songak Mountain over 5,200 years ago. Local scientists...
  • The Destruction of Pompeii—God’s Revenge?

    06/24/2010 9:58:14 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 44 replies
    Biblical Archeological Review ^ | Jul/Aug 2010 | Hershel Shanks
    Nine years, almost to the day, after Roman legionaries destroyed God’s house in Jerusalem, God destroyed the luxurious watering holes of the Roman elite. Was this God’s revenge? That’s not exactly the question I want to raise, however. Rather, did anyone at the time see it that way? Did anyone connect the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. with the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70? First the dates: The Romans destroyed the Second Temple (Herod’s Temple) on the same date that the Babylonians had destroyed the First Temple (Solomon’s Temple) in 586 B.C.E. But the exact date of...
  • Reading the Writing on Pompeii’s Walls

    08/01/2010 12:30:43 PM PDT · by markomalley · 43 replies · 3+ views
    Smithstonian ^ | 7/27/2010 | Kristin Ohlson
    Rebecca Benefiel stepped into the tiny dark room on the first floor of the House of Maius Castricius. Mosquitoes whined. Huge moths flapped around her head. And – much higher on the ick meter—her flashlight revealed a desiccated corpse that looked as if it was struggling to rise from the floor. Nonetheless, she moved closer to the walls and searched for aberrations in the stucco. She soon found what she was looking for: a string of names and a cluster of numbers, part of the vibrant graffiti chitchat carried on by the citizens of Pompeii before Mount Vesuvius erupted in...
  • Lethal Thermal Impact at Periphery of Pyroclastic Surges: Evidences at Pompeii

    06/18/2010 5:51:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 367+ views
    Public Library of Science ^ | June 2010 | Giuseppe Mastrolorenzo, Pierpaolo Petrone, Lucia Pappalardo, Fabio M. Guarino
    The evaluation of mortality of pyroclastic surges and flows (PDCs) produced by explosive eruptions is a major goal in risk assessment and mitigation, particularly in distal reaches of flows that are often heavily urbanized. Pompeii and the nearby archaeological sites preserve the most complete set of evidence of the 79 AD catastrophic eruption recording its effects on structures and people. Here we investigate the causes of mortality in PDCs at Pompeii and surroundings on the bases of a multidisciplinary volcanological and bio-anthropological study. Field and laboratory study of the eruption products and victims merged with numerical simulations and experiments indicate...
  • Ancient city of Pompeii added to Google Street View

    12/04/2009 6:52:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 925+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, December 4, 2009 | unattributed
    Google has added Pompeii to its Street View application, allowing internet users to take a 360-degree virtual tour of the ancient Roman city. Italy's culture ministry says it hopes the move will boost tourism to the site, state news agency Ansa reports. Among the ruins visible on the search engine's free mapping service are the town's statues, temples and theatres. The city was buried in ash after Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79 and was not discovered until the 18th Century. The volcanic debris preserved many of the city's buildings, frescos, silverware, mosaics and other artefacts. "Giving people a chance to...
  • UQ archaeology digs into the life behind Pompeii [latrines]

    11/25/2009 9:56:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 622+ views
    University of Queensland ^ | November 25, 2009 | Dr Andy Fairbairn or Andrew Dunne
    Brisbane may be 2000 years and half-a-world away from Pompeii, but it hasn't stopped a UQ archaeologist from digging up some hidden treasures. Dr Andy Fairbairn, a senior lecturer in archaeology with UQ's School of Social Science, is working on a project looking at the life inside one of the world's most famous dig sites... He does this by collecting samples from what would have been the toilets of the day to see the types of food were eaten... He said his team of volunteer archaeology students patiently go through hundreds of bags of samples collected in Pompeii, looking for...
  • Digging deeper: Archaeologists race to show Pompeii daily life

    07/16/2009 8:39:10 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies · 427+ views
    Digging deeper: Archaeologists race to show Pompeii daily life
  • UK to 'unroll' papyrus scrolls buried by Vesuvius [Kentucky prof has non-invasive scanning technique

    05/24/2009 5:28:13 AM PDT · by Mike Fieschko · 28 replies · 1,248+ views
    Lexington Herald-Leader ^ | Tuesday, May. 19, 2009 | Jim Warren
    On Aug. 24, 79 A.D., Italy's Mount Vesuvius exploded, burying the Roman towns of Herculaneum and Pompeii under tons of super-heated ash, rock and debris in one of the most famous volcanic eruptions in history. Thousands died. But somehow, hundreds of papyrus scrolls survived -- sort of -- in a villa at Herculaneum thought to have been owned at one time by Julius Caesar's father-in-law. The scrolls contained ancient philosophical and learned writings. But they were so badly damaged -- literally turned to carbon by the volcanic heat -- that they crumbled when scholars first tried to open them centuries...
  • Digital images reveal the secrets of Roman painting

    04/10/2009 7:16:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 515+ views
    University of Southampton ^ | April 3, 2009 | Joyce Lewis
    The delicately painted statue, which was discovered in the ancient ruins of Herculaneum in 2006 and believed to depict an Amazon Warrior, is now the subject of a joint restoration project by the University of Southampton, the University of Warwick, and the Herculaneum Conservation Project. Highly sophisticated digital imaging is vital for the recording, subsequent analysis and restoration of cultural heritage material... A specially-designed rig, camera structure, and associated custom software was developed in the School of Electronics and Computer Science by Dr Kirk Martinez and the team in the Mechanical Workshop to enable very fast acquisition of PTM data,...
  • ISIS Examines Origins Of Pompeii-Style Artifacts

    02/25/2009 6:22:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 307+ views
    RedOrbit ^ | Wednesday, February 25, 2009 | unattributed
    Researchers hope to learn more about our heritage by discovering whether the items were imported from southern Italy, or manufactured using similar techniques in Britain. The bronze artifacts, which include a wine-mixing vessel, jugs and ceremonial pan-shaped objects, were discovered in Kent in two high status Roman pit-burials that are among the best examples ever seen in Britain... Archaeological scientists will compare the 1st Century AD artifacts from Kent with those from Pompeii in Italy. The neutron beams at the world-leading ISIS facility allow for detailed crystal structure analysis of intact delicate objects without cutting out a sample of the...
  • Pompeii Family's Final Hours Reconstructed

    12/15/2008 7:31:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 1,546+ views
    Discovery News ^ | December 11, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    At around 1:00 p.m. on Aug. 24, 79 A.D., Pompeii residents saw a pine tree-shaped column of smoke bursting from Vesuvius. Reaching nine miles into the sky, the column began spewing a thick pumice rain. Many residents rushed in the streets, trying to leave the city. "At that moment, Polybius' house was inhabited by 12 people, including a young woman in advanced pregnancy. They decided to remain in the house, most likely because it was safer for the pregnant woman. Given the circumstances, it was the right strategy," Scarpati said... At around 7:00 p.m., by which time the front part...
  • Pontiff Puts World in Mary's Hands [Catholic Caucus]

    10/20/2008 4:23:55 PM PDT · by NYer · 10 replies · 365+ views
    ZNA ^ | October 19, 2008
    POMPEII, Italy, OCT. 19, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI placed the world in Mary's hands during his one-day visit to the shrine of Our Lady of the Rosary in Pompeii, near Naples. The Pope's leading of the Supplication of the Blessed Virgin of the Rosary, a prayer written by Blessed Bartolo Longo (1841-1926) was one of the high points of this 12th pastoral trip in Italy. "We implore you to have pity today on the nations that have gone astray, on all Europe, on the whole world, that they might repent and return to your heart," the text of the prayer...
  • Pope: in Pompeii to entrust the synod and missionaries to the Virgin Mary [Catholic]

    10/19/2008 2:52:41 PM PDT · by NYer · 2 replies · 202+ views
    ANS ^ | October 19, 2008
    Pompeii (AsiaNews) - Entrusting the synod on the Word of God to Mary, "in whose womb to Word was made flesh," "that it may bring the fruit of authentic renewal to every Christian community," and urging prayers for those who "exert their energies in service of the proclamation of the Gospel to all nations." These are the reasons for the pilgrimage that Benedict XVI made today to Pompeii, the town near Naples reborn last century around the shrine conceived by Blessed Bartolo Longo and dedicated in a special way to the Rosary, which the pope described today as "a...
  • In search of Western civilisation's lost classics (Herculaneum)

    08/19/2008 4:35:32 PM PDT · by decimon · 9 replies · 160+ views
    The Australian ^ | August 06, 2008 | Luke Slattery
    The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius's eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secretsSTORED in a sky-lit reading room on the top floor of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Naples are the charred remains of the only library to survive from classical antiquity. The ancient world's other great book collections -- at Athens, Alexandria and Rome -- all perished in the chaos of the centuries. But the library of the Villa of the Papyri was conserved, paradoxically, by an act of destruction. Lying to the northwest of ancient Herculaneum, this...
  • Italians Dig Deep to Reveal Forgotten Roman City

    04/22/2006 8:04:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 504+ views
    Ancient Worlds (Reuters, Yahoo) ^ | Sun Aug 17, 2003 | Estelle Shirbon
    for 10 years, an Italian team has been beavering away underground to reveal the wonders of Pozzuoli, once the port of ancient Rome, which is buried under a 16th century city. Excavators at Pompeii, entombed in ash and toxic debris by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, were able to remove the volcanic material and expose the city to the open air. But in Pozzuoli, whose beauty was such that the great Roman orator Cicero called it "little Rome," the ancient streets were encased in the foundations of a new city built by the Spanish in the 1500s,...
  • Prehistoric Disaster: An Alpine Pompeii from the Stone Age

    10/11/2008 1:51:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1,363+ views
    Der Spiegel ^ | Friday, October 10, 2008 | Matthias Schulz
    The people of the Mondsee Lake settlement were apparently relatively advanced within this cultural group. They had metallurgical skills, which were rare in Europe. They cleverly searched the mountains for copper deposits, melted the crude ore in clay ovens and made refined, shimmering red weapons out of the metal. In dugout canoes... they paddled along the region's river networks and sold their goods in areas of present-day Switzerland and to their relatives on Lake Constance. Even Otzi the Iceman had an axe, made of so-called Mondsee copper. At approximately 3200 B.C., says Binsteiner, the master blacksmiths were struck by a...
  • Fish Sauce Used to Date Pompeii Eruption [ garum / liquamen]

    09/30/2008 4:30:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 6,769+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Monday, September 29, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Remains of rotten fish entrails have helped establish the precise dating of Pompeii's destruction, according to Italian researchers who have analyzed the town's last batch of garum, a pungent, fish-based seasoning. Frozen in time by the catastrophic eruption that covered Pompeii and nearby towns nearly 2,000 years ago with nine to 20 feet of hot ash and pumice, the desiccated remains were found at the bottom of seven jars. The find revealed that the last Pompeian garum was made entirely with bogues (known as boops boops), a Mediterranean fish species that abounded in the area in the summer months of...
  • Beyond Pompeii: Places swallowed by Vesuvius

    09/02/2008 9:49:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 178+ views
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | Sunday, August 31, 2008 | Edward Sozanski
    Over several centuries, millions of tourists have visited Pompeii to acquaint themselves with the cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius that began on Aug. 24, 79 A.D. But while it's the most famous eruption site, the ancient Roman city 15 miles south of Naples isn't the best place to gauge the volcano's awesome destructive power. For that, one should visit lesser-known Herculaneum, which is closer to Vesuvius, or Oplontis and Stabiae, two sites more recently uncovered and still relatively unknown to tourists. In these places, several of which are still being excavated, the eruption's consequences are more visible.
  • Ancient tannery in Pompeii to undergo restoration this year

    01/22/2008 8:51:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 147+ views
    SignOn SanDiego ^ | Monday, January 21, 2008 | Associated Press
    An ancient tannery in the archaeological complex of Pompeii, a city destroyed by a volcanic eruption in the first century, will be restored, officials said Monday. The tannery -- discovered in the 19th century and excavated in the 1950s -- includes water pipes, 15 round tubs and the tannery manager's house, archaeological officials said. A drying area is also believed to have been part of the complex. Restoration of the tannery, which is believed to be among the world's most ancient, is expected to start this year, the statement said. No other information was immediately available. Pompeii was destroyed in...
  • Ground Rises Near Ancient Italian Volcano

    02/25/2007 1:47:41 PM PST · by Strategerist · 30 replies · 1,098+ views
    LiveScience ^ | February 23, 2007 | Andrea Thompson
    The ground on the western edges of Naples, Italy is rising, spurring worries of a possible volcanic eruption, but scientists now think they know exactly what is causing the uplift and may be able to better predict any potential eruption. Using GPS measurements, a group of scientists at the National Institute of Geophysics and Vulcanology in Italy monitored the ground’s motions for several years, and based on the patterns they observed, they believe the uplifting is caused by magma intruding from a shallow chamber. The rising motions of the ground reached a peak rate of about three feet per year...
  • First Pompeii Uncovered (3rd Century BC)

    02/04/2007 2:34:35 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 1,075+ views
    Ansa ^ | 2-1-2007
    First Pompeii uncoveredSamnites founded city in Third Century BC (ANSA) - Rome, February 1 - The origins of the famed buried city of Pompeii have emerged from years of excavations, an international conference in Rome was told Thursday. The first Pompeii was not built by the Romans or even by the Greeks who preceded them, but by an ancient people called the Samnites, Pompeii heritage Superintendent Piero Guzzo told a packed audience of archaeologists and scholars. Wielding photos of inscriptions, votive offerings and even entire buildings, Guzzo said "a new season of studies has begun". "For the first time we...
  • Fossil "Pompeii" of Prehistoric Animals Named U.S. Landmark

    05/16/2006 1:19:43 PM PDT · by texas_mrs · 18 replies · 1,110+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 5/12/2006 | Stefan Lovgren
    The U.S. Department of Interior has designated Nebraska's Ashfall Fossil Beds as a national natural landmark, the first such landmark to be designated in almost two decades. The site, near the town of Neligh (see Nebraska map), is home to hundreds of skeletons of extinct rhinos, camels, three-toed horses, and other vertebrates that were killed and buried by ash from a huge volcanic eruption some 12 million years ago. It is the only place on Earth where large numbers of fossil mammals have been found as whole, three-dimensionally preserved skeletons. "Ashfall has tremendous value for science and education and great...
  • Brooklyn College Anthropologist Identifies New Prehistoric Monkey

    03/30/2006 8:53:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 805+ views
    Brooklyn College Associate Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology Alfred L. Rosenberger is part of a team of Argentinean and United States scholars who have identified a new species of monkey that once roamed the forests of South America. The discovery of the monkey species, Killikaike blakei, is the result of painstaking analysis of a small, perfectly preserved monkey skull that was found embedded in volcanic rock by members of an Argentinean ranching family. The results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. This fossil, which is dated to 16.4 million years ago, is a spectacular addition...
  • Think Pompeii Got Hit Hard? Worse Eruptions Lurk

    03/07/2006 11:10:23 AM PST · by blam · 54 replies · 1,556+ views
    Think Pompeii got hit hard? Worse eruptions lurk By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent Mon Mar 6, 5:03 PM ET WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- The preserved footprints and abandoned homes of villagers who fled a giant eruption of Mount Vesuvius 3,800 years ago show the volcano could destroy modern-day Naples with little warning, Italian and U.S. researchers reported on Monday. The eruption buried entire villages as far as 15 miles (25 kilometres) from the volcano, cooking people as they tried to escape and dumping several feet (metres) of ash and mud. New excavations show far more extensive damage than that...
  • Villa Buried By Pompeii Eruption Is Unearthed

    11/21/2005 6:30:58 PM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 1,427+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 11-22-2005 | Hilary Clarke
    Villa buried by Pompeii eruption is unearthed By Hilary Clarke in Rome (Filed: 22/11/2005) An archaeological dig on the Amalfi coast has revealed the first luxury villa to be built in the idyllic fishing village of Positano, a popular haunt of today's rich and famous. A frescoe on a wall of the villa found in Positano Two storeys of a first century millionaire's abode have been found under a church which was hidden for 2,000 years by the same volcanic eruption that devastated Pompeii in 79AD. During renovation work on the church's crypt last summer, roof beams were found poking...