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Keyword: pompeii

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  • Three D animated reconstruction of Pompei

    10/11/2016 9:26:14 AM PDT · by wildbill · 40 replies
    Ancient Origens ^ | 10/11/2016 | Natalia Klimczak
    Pompeii was an ancient Roman city near modern-day Naples in Italy, which was wiped out and buried under 6 meters of ash and pumice following the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. It is an eerie feeling to walk the empty streets of Pompeii and to view shops and homes left virtually untouched for nearly two millennia. One home still contains a complete loaf of bread sitting in the oven, perfectly preserved by a coating of ash. Now everyone has the opportunity to walk the streets and peer inside homes thanks to a detailed 3D digital reconstruction of an...
  • A 2,000-year-old ancient Roman laundromat open to public for first time

    01/05/2016 1:47:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | December 24, 2015 | Alice Philipson
    An ancient dry cleaner's where ancient Romans brought their tunics to be dyed and washed is among six newly restored buildings in Pompeii to be opened to the public... The opening of the buildings comes after years of mismanagement and bureaucratic squabbling at the historic site Spectacular brightly coloured frescoes and intricate mosaics were revealed across the walls and floors of almost all of the buildings, some of which were severely damaged by bombing during the Second World War. But the laundry, painted in a deep red and decorated with frescoes of birds and ornamental vases, was the most highly...
  • Skeletons and Gold Coins Found in Pompeii Shop

    06/24/2016 10:31:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists excavating a shop on the outskirts of Pompeii have found four skeletons, several gold coins, and a necklace pendant, according to an Associated Press report. The skeletons belonged to young people who died in the back of the shop when nearby Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. There was an oven in the shop that the archaeologists believe may have been used to make bronze objects. There is evidence that the shop was targeted by looters seeking treasure after the eruption, but they apparently missed the gold coins and the gold-leaf-foil, flower-shaped pendant. Archaeologists have been excavating a second...
  • Oldest noodles unearthed in China

    10/12/2005 1:36:46 PM PDT · by bigmac0707 · 78 replies · 1,386+ views
    BBC News ^ | 9/12/05 | BBC News
    Oldest noodles unearthed in China Late Neolithic noodles: They may settle the origin debate The 50cm-long, yellow strands were found in a pot that had probably been buried during a catastrophic flood. Radiocarbon dating of the material taken from the Lajia archaeological site on the Yellow River indicates the food was about 4,000 years old. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the noodles were made using grains from millet grass - unlike modern noodles, which are made with wheat flour. The discovery goes a long way to settling the old argument over who first created the string-like food. Professor Houyuan...
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • How Ancient Rome's 1% Hijacked the Beach

    04/08/2016 2:06:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Hakai Magazine ^ | April 5, 2016 | Heather Pringle
    About 400 years ago, a throng of dusty workmen laid down their shovels and huddled around an ancient painted wall -- a fresco, technically -- unearthed in a tunnel near Italy's Bay of Naples. The men were at work on a massive construction project, burrowing through a hill to build a canal for a local armament factory and mill. No one expected to find fine art. But as the workmen dug deeper into the hill, they encountered wonder upon wonder -- house walls painted blood red and sunflower yellow, fragments of carved inscriptions, pieces of Roman statues. The architect supervising...
  • Excavations at Idalion, Cyprus: Crossing Cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean [April 6, 2016]

    04/01/2016 12:03:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    via Biblical Archaeology ^ | April 2016 | JCCGW
    Excavations at Idalion, Cyprus: Crossing Cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean 8 p.m. JCCGW Theatre 6125 Montrose Road Rockville, MD Ann-Marie Knoblauch | Virginia Tech University Co-Sponsored by the Hellenic Society Prometheas Cyprus was an important trade center and cultural ‘crossroad’ in antiquity, controlled and influenced in different periods by the Mycenaean civilization, the sea-faring Phoenicians and Philistines of the Bible, Archaic Greece, the Persians in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Roman Empire, and even Christian Byzantium. The ancient site of Idalion is fortuitously situated near the copper-rich mountains of Cyprus and the harbors of the coast.  This prime location led to the...
  • How Pompeii brought ancient Roman wine back to life

    02/27/2016 12:39:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | February 25, 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Made from ancient grape varieties grown in Pompeii, 'Villa dei Misteri' has to be one of the world's most exclusive wines. The grapes are planted in exactly the same position, grown using identical techniques and grow from the same soil the city's wine-makers exploited until Vesuvius buried the city and its inhabitants in AD 79. In the late 1800s, archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli first excavated some of the city's vineyards from beneath three metres of solid ash. The digs turned up an almost perfect snapshot of ancient wine-growing - and thirteen petrified corpses, huddled against a wall. Casts were made of...
  • Watch the Destruction of Pompeii by Mount Vesuvius, Re-Created with Computer Animation (79 AD)

    02/03/2016 7:01:52 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 33 replies
    Open Culture dot com ^ | 2/2/16 | staff
    Video at link and also at Youtube: A good disaster story never fails to fascinate and, given that it actually happened, the story of Pompeii especially so. Buried and thus frozen in time by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, the ancient Roman town of 11,000 has provided an object of great historical interest ever since its rediscovery in 1599. Baths, houses, tools and other possessions (including plenty of wine bottles), frescoes, graffiti, an ampitheater, an aqueduct, the "Villa of the Mysteries": Pompeii has it all, as far as the stuff of first-century Roman life goes.The ash-preserved...
  • 'A bronze age Pompeii': archaeologists hail discovery of Peterborough site

    01/13/2016 8:02:10 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Manchester Guardian ^ | January 12, 2016 | Maev Kennedy
    Silty fen preserved burning houses and domestic objects inside them to reveal unprecedented view of life 3,000 years ago. Almost 3,000 years after being destroyed by fire, the astonishingly well preserved remains of two Bronze Age houses and their contents have been discovered at a quarry site in Peterborough. The artefacts include a collection of everyday domestic objects unprecedented from any site in Britain, including jewellery, spears, daggers, giant food storage jars and delicate drinking cups, glass beads, textiles and a copper spindle with thread still wound around it. The remains of the large wooden houses, built on stilts in...
  • Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese

    10/10/2002 11:02:29 AM PDT · by chance33_98 · 49 replies · 681+ views
    Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese Oct. 9 — By E. J. Mundell NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A tiny piece of cheese, carbonized in the volcanic eruption that killed the citizens of Pompeii, is yielding up secrets as to how ancient Romans ate, lived and died. Using an electron microscope, anthropological researcher Dr. Luigi Capasso of the State University G. d'Annunzio in Chieti, Italy, has been able to pinpoint goats' milk cheese as a prime source of brucellosis--a debilitating joint disease that ravaged the ancient world. "Roman cheese was an important and continuous source of possible infectious...
  • Scans show Pompeii victims 'in good health' [other than being dead]

    09/30/2015 12:36:18 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    The Local ^ | September 29, 2015 | Patrick Browne
    A recently launched project that is performing CAT scans on the remains of Pompeii victims contained within plaster casts has revealed that good health was widespread among people of the ancient city. “For sure, they ate better than we did,” orthodontist Elisa Vanacore said during a press conference in Pompeii on Tuesday, after analyzing some of the initial results. “They have really good teeth – they ate a diet that contained few sugars, and was high in fruit and vegetables,” she added, perhaps busting the image of Romans as decadent banquet-loving individuals who loved nothing more than a good binge...
  • Archaeologists discover a Pre-Roman era tomb in perfect condition at Pompeii

    09/22/2015 2:01:38 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies ^ | September 22, 2015 3:28pm | AFP
    The tomb, unearthed by a team from the French Jean Berard Centre in Naples in southern Italy, dates back to the Samnite era, and is located at the Herculaneaum Gate at Pompeii. The Samnites were a group of tribes involved in fierce battles with the Romans in the fourth century BC. The tomb contained a number of vases and amphoras in perfect condition which give a rare insight into the funerary practices of that era in Pompeii. This discovery allows us “to carry out research on a historical period which has been relatively unexplored until now at Pompeii” said Osanna,...
  • [from January 3, 2014] Giraffe Was on Menu in Pompeii Restaurants

    07/02/2015 8:13:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Discovery News ^ | January 3, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Giraffe was on the menu in Pompeii's standard restaurants, says a new research into a non-elite section of the ancient Roman city buried by Mount Vesuvius' eruption in 79 A.D. The study, which will be presented on Jan. 4 at the Archaeological Institute of America and American Philological Association Joint Annual Meeting in Chicago, draws on a multi-year excavation in a forgotten area inside one of the busiest gates of Pompeii, the Porta Stabia. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, said his team has spent more than a decade researching the life of the middle and...
  • 'Bronze Age Pompeii' Found In Italy

    12/06/2001 6:52:22 AM PST · by blam · 18 replies · 2+ views
    Discovery ^ | 12-03-2001
    'Bronze Age Pompeii' Found in Italy Dec. 3 — Italian archaeologists have discovered one of the world's best-preserved prehistoric villages, a "Bronze Age Pompeii" that was buried in volcanic ash near the world-famous Roman city almost 4,000 years ago. The ancient settlement was overwhelmed by volcanic flow when Mount Vesuvius erupted around 1800 B.C., smothering the village near present-day Nola in southern Italy many centuries before Pompeii suffered the same fate. "This is by far the best-preserved prehistoric village in Italy and one of the best in the world. Everyday life in the ancient Bronze Age is preserved there," Giuseppe ...
  • [Note: This thread is from November 14, 2001]Ancient unisex bathhouse dressing room, decorated with

    11/16/2001 1:10:13 PM PST · by chemicalman · 35 replies · 867+ views
    Associated Press ^ | 11/14/01 4:13 PM | The Associated Press
    <p>ROME (AP) -- Archaeologists have unveiled another steamy corner of ancient Pompeii, and this time it is an eyeful: a bathhouse with a unisex dressing room whose lockers sport erotic sex scenes.</p> <p>Italian officials inaugurated the new addition to the sprawling ancient city on Wednesday. Pompeii was buried by ash when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79, and the archaeological site near Naples is one of Italy's biggest tourist attractions.</p>
  • The Fall and Rise and Fall of Pompeii

    07/01/2015 5:37:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | July 2015 | Joshua Hammer
    ...The two towns remained largely undisturbed, lost to history, through the rise of Byzantium, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In 1738, Maria Amalia Christine, a nobleman's daughter from Saxony, wed Charles of Bourbon, the King of Naples, and became entranced by classical sculptures displayed in the garden of the royal palace in Naples. A French prince digging in the vicinity of his villa on Mount Vesuvius had discovered the antiquities nearly 30 years earlier, but had never conducted a systematic excavation. So Charles dispatched teams of laborers and engineers equipped with tools and blasting powder to the site of...
  • ...Bizarre new pyramid ... opens in Pompeii to house volcano exhibition

    05/26/2015 7:03:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies ^ | By Jack Crone
    The 12-metre high pyramid allows visitors to walk along a track before entering it. It is built almost entirely out of wood with an inner dome made of fiberboard Inside, they will be find the casts of Roman citizens killed more than 1,900 years ago in 79AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted with devastating force destroying the Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The plaster casts are placed in the centre, while the exhibition also features archival photographs documenting the work in the excavations in the 19th and 20th centuries. The photos are partly broken down into fragments and then reassembled...
  • Pictured: The 2,000-year-old gladiator's helmet discovered in Pompeii's ruins

    03/15/2015 1:25:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 4 June 2009 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A gladiator's helmet left behind in the ruins of Pompeii is the centrepiece of an exhibition to be unveiled in Melbourne today. The 2,000-year-old bronze helmet is one of 250 items brought together at the Melbourne Museum to illustrate life in the ancient city. Museum manager Brett Dunlop says the helmet survived the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and was recovered 200 years ago. 'A large number of gladiators' helmets and shin guards and shoulder guards were found in what was most likely a storeroom in the gymnasium area,' he said. 'Most definitely the gladiators who were able to would have...
  • X-ray technique 'reads' burnt Vesuvius scroll

    01/20/2015 12:10:59 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 39 replies
    BBC ^ | 20 January 2015 | Jonathan Webb
    For the first time, words have been read from a burnt, rolled-up scroll buried by Mount Vesuvius in AD79. The scrolls of Herculaneum, the only classical library still in existence, were blasted by volcanic gas hotter than 300C and are desperately fragile. Deep inside one scroll, physicists distinguished the ink from the paper using a 3D X-ray imaging technique sometimes used in breast scans. They believe that other scrolls could also be deciphered without unrolling.
  • Buried city of Pompeii unveils three new houses [well, not new...]

    04/20/2014 6:28:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    ANSA/UPI ^ | April 17, 2014 | Ed Adamczyk
    There is new real state to be seen in the Pompeii, Italy, archaeological site, with three restored houses open to the public. In time for Easter tourists, three additional houses in the ancient city of Pompeii, Italy, buried in a volcano eruption in 79 A.D., were opened Thursday. Italian Culture Minister Dario Franceschini inaugurated the three restored houses, or domus, in a ceremony at the celebrated archeological site. The houses were formerly occupied by the families of Marcus Lucretius Fronto, Romulus and Remus and Trittolemo, the office of Pompeii’s archeological superintendent said. Superintendent Massimo Osanna described them as “aristocratic houses.”...
  • Ancient Romans Preferred Fast Food

    06/19/2007 4:25:23 PM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 1,814+ views
    Discovery ^ | 6-18-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Ancient Romans Preferred Fast Food Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News June 18, 2007 — Just as a U.S. Presidential state dinner does not reflect how most Americans eat and socialize, researchers think the formal, decadent image of wining and dining in ancient Rome mostly just applied to the elite. According to archaeologist Penelope Allison of the University of Leicester, the majority of the population consumed food "on the run." Allison excavated an entire neighborhood block in Pompeii, a city frozen in time after the eruption of volcano Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Historians often extend findings from Pompeii to other parts...
  • In pictures: Ancient Roman paintings

    12/21/2007 11:46:49 AM PST · by WesternCulture · 49 replies · 3,845+ views ^ | 12/21/2007 |
    A unique exhibition of 2,000-year-old paintings called Pompeian Red has opened at the National Museum of Rome.
  • Thieves pry off ancient fresco from Pompeii walls

    03/19/2014 9:14:15 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    <p>ROME (AP) — Thieves have pried off a chunk of an ancient fresco of the Greek goddess Artemis from the walls of Pompeii.</p> <p>Pompeii's archaeological authorities said Tuesday the theft occurred on March 12 in the "Home of Neptune," in an area of Pompeii's sprawling excavation site not currently open to the public.</p>
  • Pompeii-like volcanic ash kept dinosaur remains fresh

    02/04/2014 7:44:58 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 02/04/2014 | Jeff Hecht
    It's hot storage. Millions of years before volcanic ash entombed the Roman town of Pompeii, a group of dinosaurs succumbed to a similar fate. China's famous feathered dinosaur fossils owe their exquisite preservation to volcanic eruptions between about 130 and 120 million years ago. The Jehol fossils have transformed our understanding of dinosaurs by showing that the relatives of Velociraptor and T. rex had a feather-like body covering, like birds. The Jehol deposits also preserved soft tissue from early mammals and flowering plants. Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University, China, and his colleagues think they know why the remains are so...
  • Herculaneum Panoramas

    05/10/2013 6:20:20 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 16 replies
    Herculaneum Panoramas ^ | 2001 - 2012 | Herculaneum Conservation Project
    Virtual tour of Herculaneum, documenting the site, and the work of the Herculaneum Conservation Project. Click on the node-markers to view an interactive 360-degree panorama (in a new window). The plan above shows the locations of panoramas made mainly in 2001 (a few are from 1999), where the aim was to provide an overview of the site (as it was then), along with tours of a few selected houses. The menu of houses and other areas at left accesses additional, more recent coverage (including revisits to some houses and other structures) made from 2003 onward.
  • Diets of the middle and lower class in Pompeii revealed

    01/05/2014 7:13:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 1-2-2014 | Dawn Fuller
    University of Cincinnati archaeologists are turning up discoveries in the famed Roman city of Pompeii that are wiping out the historic perceptions of how the Romans dined, with the rich enjoying delicacies such as flamingos and the poor scrounging for soup or gruel. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, will present these discoveries on Jan. 4, at the joint annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and American Philological Association (APA) in Chicago. UC teams of archaeologists have spent more than a decade at two city blocks within a non-elite district in the Roman...
  • Italian mafia boss ‘fed alive to pigs’--- Police believe Francesco Raccosta was kidnapped......

    12/29/2013 6:21:23 AM PST · by dennisw · 47 replies
    nydailynews ^ | Nov. 28, 2013 | By Lee Moran
    Police believe Francesco Raccosta - who disappeared from his home in Calabria back in 2012 - was kidnapped by rival mobsters and fed alive to a herd of pigs. Francesco Raccosta, who vanished without a trace from his home in Calabria in March 2012, is now believed to have been kidnapped by opposition mobsters. They then severely beat him before throwing him into a herd of pigs - who swiftly ate his body as he screamed and begged for mercy. Cops say they found out about his fate earlier this month while investigating the southern 'Ndrangheta mafia organization. Officers claim...
  • Unlocking the scrolls of Herculaneum

    12/21/2013 2:02:18 AM PST · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News Magazine ^ | 21st December 2013 | Robin Banerji
    'The British Museum's 2013 show of artefacts from the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried in ash during an explosive eruption of Mount Vesuvius, was a sell-out. But could even greater treasures - including lost works of classical literature - still lie underground?.'
  • Unlocking the scrolls of Herculaneum

    12/20/2013 9:11:01 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12-19-2013 | Robin Banerji
    For centuries scholars have been hunting for the lost works of ancient Greek and Latin literature. In the Renaissance, books were found in monastic libraries. In the late 19th Century papyrus scrolls were found in the sands of Egypt. But only in Herculaneum in southern Italy has an entire library from the ancient Mediterranean been discovered in situ. On the eve of the catastrophe in 79 AD, Herculaneum was a chic resort town on the Bay of Naples, where many of Rome's top families went to rest and recuperate during the hot Italian summers. It was also a place where...
  • Getty Villa Examines Life and Legacy of Roman Emperor Tiberius

    10/19/2013 4:42:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, Octoer 10, 2013 | Press Release of the J. Paul Getty Museum
    Buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, an over-life-size bronze portrait of Tiberius (ruled A.D. 14–37) was discovered in 1741, during the first years of excavation at Herculaneum. On loan from the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples, this statue is the subject of the exhibitionTiberius: Portrait of an Emperor, on view at the Getty Villa October 16, 2013 through March 3, 2014. Brought to the Getty Villa for conservation and analysis last October, the sculpture provides an opportunity to re-examine the career and character of Rome’s second emperor. The exhibition has been co-organized by the J. Paul Getty...
  • Roman Statues Found in Blue Grotto Cave

    09/28/2009 3:45:34 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 23 replies · 1,574+ views ^ | 9/28/09 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sept. 28, 2009 -- A number of ancient Roman statues might lie beneath the turquoise waters of the Blue Grotto on the island of Capri in southern Italy, according to an underwater survey of the sea cave. Dating to the 1st century A.D., the cave was used as a swimming pool by the Emperor Tiberius (42 B.C. - 37 A.D.), and the statues are probably depictions of sea gods. "A preliminary underwater investigation has revealed several statue bases which might possibly hint to sculptures lying nearby," Rosalba Giugni, president of the environmentalist association, Marevivo, told Discovery News. Carried out in...
  • Construction Magnate Donates Millions To Restore Pompeii As UNESCO Criticises Italian Government

    07/12/2013 10:00:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Italy magazine ^ | Tuesday, July 2, 2013 | Carol King
    Italian construction magnate Pietro Salini wants to donate €20 million ... to restore the archaeological site that has been damaged by weather, and has suffered from corrupt management and mafia interference. Salini aims to attract other international donors to restore the Ancient Roman city, telling a press conference: "It would be a crime to let Pompeii crumble." Salini's announcement comes at a time when the head of the UNESCO National Commission in Italy, Giovanni Puglisi, warned the Italian government that it needs to accelerate ongoing restoration work at the archaeological site, saying the government "has until 31 December to adopt...
  • The Unsolved Mystery of the Tunnels at Baiae

    10/04/2012 5:34:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Past Imperfect 'blog ^ | October 1, 2012 | Mike Dash
    According to legend, the sibyl traveled to Tarquin's palace bearing nine books of prophecy that set out the whole of the future of Rome. She offered the set to the king for a price so enormous that he summarily declined -- at which the prophetess went away, burned the first three of the books, and returned, offering the remaining six to Tarquin at the same price. Once again, the king refused, though less arrogantly this time, and the sibyl burned three more of the precious volumes. The third time she approached the king, he thought it wise to accede to...
  • Pompei Discovery For Swedish Archaeologists

    04/17/2005 1:36:52 PM PDT · by blam · 50 replies · 1,380+ views
    The Local ^ | 4-17-2005
    Published: 17th April 2005 11:48 BST+1 Pompei discovery for Swedish archeologists (AFP) Swedish archeologists have discovered a Stone Age settlement covered in ash under the ruins of the ancient city of Pompei, indicating that the volcano Vesuvius engulfed the area in lava more than 3,500 years before the famous 79 AD eruption. The archeologists recently found burnt wood and grains of corn in the earth under Pompei, Anne-Marie Leander Touati, a professor of archeology at Stockholm University who led the team, told AFP. "Carbon dating shows that the finds are from prehistoric times, that is, from 3,500 years BC," Leander...
  • Italian 'Super Volcano' May Threaten Millions: Scientists plan to drill deep below Romans'...

    08/06/2012 7:54:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Newser ^ | Monday, August 06, 2012 | Rob Quinn
    A hidden "super volcano" near Pompeii threatens an eruption that could make Vesuvius look like a picnic, scientists warn. The Phlegraean Fields zone of intense seismic activity -- which the ancient Romans believed was the gateway to hell -- could doom millions of people in the Naples area if it erupts, Reuters reports. Scientists plan to drill more than two miles below its surface to monitor any signs of a pending eruption in the huge chamber of molten rock, but some experts fear that the drilling itself could trigger an earthquake or eruption. Areas like the Phlegraean fields "can give...
  • "Come Back To Sorrento"

    06/12/2012 1:19:06 PM PDT · by sussex · 3 replies
    Look at the sea of Surriento, what a treasure it is! Even who has travelled all over the world, he has never seen a sea like this one.
  • Pillar at Pompei villa collapses

    12/24/2011 9:22:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Monsters and Critics ^ | Thursday, December 22, 2011 | Deutsche Presse-Agentur
    A pillar has collapsed at one of Pompeii's most well-preserved buildings, officials in Italy said Thursday, the latest in a series of accidents to befall the treasured archaeological site. The collapse took place on an external area of the House of Loreius Tiburtinus - also known as the House of Octavius Quartio - the office of Archaeological Heritage of Naples and Pompeii, said in a statement. Officials were in the process of inspecting the causes and extent of the damage, the statement added. The House of Loreius Tiburtinus is renowned for its artwork and large gardens. In October a portion...
  • Mount Vesuvius [ erupted and buried Pompeii et al, August 24-25, A.D. 79 ]

    08/27/2011 7:54:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Wheeling Jesuit University ^ | January 18, 2011 | ETE Team
    Pliny the Elder's ship approached the shore near Pompeii. Ashes were already falling, hotter and thicker as the ships drew near, followed by bits of pumice and blackened stones, charred and cracked by the flames . . . Meanwhile on Mount Vesuvius broad sheets of fire and leaping flames blazed at several points, their bright glare emphasized by the darkness of night. (pp. 429, 431) But they could not land because the shore was blocked by volcanic debris, so they sailed south and landed at Stabiae. Hoping to quiet the frightened people, the uncle asked to be carried to the...
  • Pompeii ruin collapses amid claims site mismanaged (House of the Gladiators)

    11/11/2010 10:43:45 AM PST · by NYer · 9 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | November 7, 2010 | Nick Pisa
    The stone house, known as Schola Armaturarum Juventus Pompeiani, crumbled into a pile of rubble and dust in the early hours of Saturday morning before visitors were allowed in. Although the house is closed to the public, it was a popular site in the city – buried by an eruption from nearby Mt Vesuvius in AD79 – because of its beautiful gladiator frescoes painted on the outside walls. Pompeii, south of Naples is a unique historical site and is on the UNESCO World Heritage list but for decades it has been allowed to fall into ruin and disrepair. Today more...
  • Pompeii's House of Gladiators collapses

    11/07/2010 4:00:26 PM PST · by Islander7 · 24 replies
    BBC ^ | Nov 7, 2010 | BBC
    A house in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii has collapsed, raising concerns about Italy's state support for its archaeological heritage. --------------------- Video at the link
  • Pompeii's Mystery Horse Is a Donkey

    11/03/2010 8:28:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 1+ views
    Softpedia ^ | Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 | Smaranda Biliuti
    Back in 2004, when academics unearthed skeletons found at a house in the ancient Roman town that was covered in ashes in 79 AD, they thought it belonged to an extinct breed of horse... What happened really was that there seems to have been a mix-up in the lab, which led to horse DNA being combined with donkey DNA, creating an artificial hybrid that actually never existed. Six years ago, the skeletons of equids having belonged to a rich Roman household in Pompeii were analyzed. There were found in the stables of a probably wealthy politician, and all five of...
  • Archaeologists find 'mini-Pompeii' [ Norway, 3500 BC ]

    10/04/2010 5:14:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Views and News from Norway ^ | October 1, 2010 | Sven Goll
    The discovery of a "sealed" Stone Age house site from 3500 BC has stirred great excitement among archaeologists from Norway's Museum of Cultural History at the University in Oslo. The settlement site at Hamresanden, close to Kristiansand's airport at Kjevik in Southern Norway, looks like it was covered by a sandstorm, possibly in the course of a few hours. The catastrophe for the Stone Age occupants has given archaeologists an untouched "mini-Pompeii," containing both whole and reparable pots... the team working on the site at Hamresanden has discovered so many large shards of pottery that they think they can put...
  • Walk the Streets of Roman Pompeii On Google Maps/Earth

    08/25/2010 6:01:09 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 11 replies
    Google Maps ^ | 8/25/2010 | Google
  • In search of Western civilisation's lost classics

    08/11/2008 1:45:29 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 32 replies · 148+ views
    The Australian ^ | 8/6/08 | Luke Slattery
    The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius's eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secretsSTORED in a sky-lit reading room on the top floor of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Naples are the charred remains of the only library to survive from classical antiquity. The ancient world's other great book collections -- at Athens, Alexandria and Rome -- all perished in the chaos of the centuries. But the library of the Villa of the Papyri was conserved, paradoxically, by an act of destruction. Lying to the northwest of ancient Herculaneum, this...
  • "Korean Pompeii" Discovered on Jeju Island

    02/04/2007 4:37:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 648+ views
    Chosun Ilbo ^ | Updated Feb.5,2007 08:51 KST | unattributed
    An archaeological site on Jeju Island is being called Korea's version of Pompeii after the ancient Roman city which was preserved by volcanic debris. Discovered in 2006, a human settlement at the Hamori 105 formation in Daejung-eup, Seogwipo-city was confirmed to have been smothered by a volcanic eruption more than 5,000 years ago. The Jeju Culture & Art Foundation collected volcanic materials that covered Hamori and sent it to an American research institute. The Foundation said Sunday that the U.S. researchers determined the debris to have come from an eruption at nearby Songak Mountain over 5,200 years ago. Local scientists...
  • The Destruction of Pompeii—God’s Revenge?

    06/24/2010 9:58:14 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 47 replies
    Biblical Archeological Review ^ | Jul/Aug 2010 | Hershel Shanks
    Nine years, almost to the day, after Roman legionaries destroyed God’s house in Jerusalem, God destroyed the luxurious watering holes of the Roman elite. Was this God’s revenge? That’s not exactly the question I want to raise, however. Rather, did anyone at the time see it that way? Did anyone connect the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. with the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70? First the dates: The Romans destroyed the Second Temple (Herod’s Temple) on the same date that the Babylonians had destroyed the First Temple (Solomon’s Temple) in 586 B.C.E. But the exact date of...
  • Reading the Writing on Pompeii’s Walls

    08/01/2010 12:30:43 PM PDT · by markomalley · 44 replies · 3+ views
    Smithstonian ^ | 7/27/2010 | Kristin Ohlson
    Rebecca Benefiel stepped into the tiny dark room on the first floor of the House of Maius Castricius. Mosquitoes whined. Huge moths flapped around her head. And – much higher on the ick meter—her flashlight revealed a desiccated corpse that looked as if it was struggling to rise from the floor. Nonetheless, she moved closer to the walls and searched for aberrations in the stucco. She soon found what she was looking for: a string of names and a cluster of numbers, part of the vibrant graffiti chitchat carried on by the citizens of Pompeii before Mount Vesuvius erupted in...
  • Lethal Thermal Impact at Periphery of Pyroclastic Surges: Evidences at Pompeii

    06/18/2010 5:51:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 367+ views
    Public Library of Science ^ | June 2010 | Giuseppe Mastrolorenzo, Pierpaolo Petrone, Lucia Pappalardo, Fabio M. Guarino
    The evaluation of mortality of pyroclastic surges and flows (PDCs) produced by explosive eruptions is a major goal in risk assessment and mitigation, particularly in distal reaches of flows that are often heavily urbanized. Pompeii and the nearby archaeological sites preserve the most complete set of evidence of the 79 AD catastrophic eruption recording its effects on structures and people. Here we investigate the causes of mortality in PDCs at Pompeii and surroundings on the bases of a multidisciplinary volcanological and bio-anthropological study. Field and laboratory study of the eruption products and victims merged with numerical simulations and experiments indicate...
  • Ancient city of Pompeii added to Google Street View

    12/04/2009 6:52:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 925+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, December 4, 2009 | unattributed
    Google has added Pompeii to its Street View application, allowing internet users to take a 360-degree virtual tour of the ancient Roman city. Italy's culture ministry says it hopes the move will boost tourism to the site, state news agency Ansa reports. Among the ruins visible on the search engine's free mapping service are the town's statues, temples and theatres. The city was buried in ash after Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79 and was not discovered until the 18th Century. The volcanic debris preserved many of the city's buildings, frescos, silverware, mosaics and other artefacts. "Giving people a chance to...