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Keyword: preclovis

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  • Plant and animal DNA suggests first Americans took the coastal route

    08/15/2016 10:22:44 AM PDT · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Nature ^ | 10 Aug 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Life came to ice-free Canadian corridor too late to sustain migrations of Clovis and pre-Clovis people. Archaeologists need a new theory for the colonization of the Americas. Plant and animal DNA buried under two Canadian lakes squashes the idea that the first Americans travelled through an ice-free corridor that extended from Alaska to Montana.The analysis, published online in Nature on 10 August and led by palaeo­geneticist Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen, suggests that the passageway became habitable 12,600 years ago1. That’s nearly 1,000 years after the formation of the Clovis culture — once thought to be the first Americans — and...
  • Prehistoric Site in Florida Confirms Pre-Clovis Peopling of the Americas

    05/31/2016 4:14:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | May 13, 2016
    Radiocarbon dating of a prehistoric archeological site in Florida suggests that 14,550 years ago, hunter-gatherers, possibly accompanied by dogs, butchered or scavenged a mastodon next to a small pond. The findings, based on a four-year study of the Page-Ladson archaeological site in the Aucilla River, about 45 minutes from Tallahassee, Florida, provide a rare glimpse of the earliest human occupation in the southeastern United States, and offer clues to the timing of the disappearance of large animals like the mastodon and camel that roamed the American Southeast during the Late Pleistocene. Additionally, the artifacts at Page-Ladson highlight that much of...
  • Who Were the First Americans?

    01/13/2002 7:51:38 AM PST · by sarcasm · 10 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | September 2000 | Sasha Nemecek
    Images: Pamela Patrick MAMMOTH HUNTER OR FISH CATCHER? Archaeologists had concluded that the first inhabitants of the New World were fur-clad big-game hunters who swept across the Bering land bridge in pursuit of their prey. But recent evidence suggests that the first settlers may have been just as likely to hunt small game, catch fish or gather plants as they moved through more temperate environments. The leaf-shaped spearpoint I'm holding is surprisingly dainty--for a deadly weapon. I let my mind wander, trying to imagine life some 14,700 years ago in the marshes of southern Chile, where this relic was ...
  • Prehistoric animal remains discovered in U.S.

    08/09/2014 12:18:58 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 12 replies
    abc 25 wpbf ^ | 8-9-2014 | By Jareen Imam
    The cave is cool and damp -- prefect for preserving prehistoric remains, Meachen says. "It's like a refrigerator in there, and probably has been for 20,000 years," she said. "Some of the bones we're finding there have collagen in them. That is where you could get the ancient DNA." The scientists saw bones falling out of a part of the cave, and decided to start digging there. "That was the fossil layer," she said. "There is so much to dig. We have two more years for funding that we can be out there, so we are going to try to...
  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • West US cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    07/27/2014 1:48:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 24, 2014 | unattributed
    For the first time in three decades, paleontologists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: The bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave. Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming is 85 feet (25 meters) deep and almost impossible to see until you're standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals—including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahs—shared the misfortune of not noticing the 15-foot-wide (4 meters) opening until they were plunging to their deaths. Now, the U.S. Bureau...
  • Did Humans Kill Huge Animals in Snowmass 50,000 Years Ago?

    02/19/2016 1:40:44 AM PST · by SteveH · 31 replies
    Aspen Journalism ^ | July 3, 2013 | Allan Best
    Do earthquakes explain all those mastodon bones at Snowmass? Not likely, say scientists, although they haven’t completely shelved the idea. And did humans kill a mammoth 50,000 years ago and then cache the meat for later use? Circumstantial evidence of rocks intermixed with bones suggests that was the case. If so, it would rank as one of the major scientific discoveries of the decade, putting people on the North American continent some 36,000 years earlier than what is now generally agreed upon by archaeologists. That intriguing idea also remains on the shelf, just beyond touch for lack of corroborating evidence.
  • Rediscovering America. (The New World May Be 20,000 Years Older Than Experts Thought)

    12/10/2003 1:30:57 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 2,783+ views
    Blue Corn Comics (?) ^ | Charles W, Petit
    Rediscovering AmericaThe New World may be 20,000 years older than experts thought BY CHARLES W. PETIT Late in the afternoon last May 17, a tired archaeological team neared the end of a 14-hour day winching muck to the deck of a Canadian Coast Guard vessel. It was in water 170 feet deep in Juan Perez Sound, half a mile offshore among British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands. For four days, team members had fruitlessly sieved undersea mud and gravel. Then, in the slanting light of sunset, a deckhand drew from the goop a triangular blade of dark basalt. Its sharp edge...
  • Ancestry of polar bears traced to Ireland

    07/07/2011 12:36:25 PM PDT · by decimon · 29 replies
    Penn State ^ | July 7, 2011 | Unknown
    An international team of scientists has discovered that the female ancestor of all living polar bears was a brown bear that lived in the vicinity of present-day Britain and Ireland just prior to the peak of the last ice age -- 20,000 to 50,000 years ago. Beth Shapiro, the Shaffer Associate Professor of Biology at Penn State University and one of the team's leaders, explained that climate changes affecting the North Atlantic ice sheet probably gave rise to periodic overlaps in bear habitats. These overlaps then led to hybridization, or interbreeding -- an event that caused maternal DNA from brown...
  • The First Americans May Have Come By Water

    12/10/2001 7:30:51 PM PST · by blam · 73 replies · 2,654+ views
    The First Americans May Have Come by Water by E. James Dixon If the foragers who created Clovis culture walked into North America, they had to pass through the long-described “ice-free corridor.” But a growing body of evidence indicates that pathway between the great glaciers of the last Ice Age was closed — in fact, the way south may have been blocked until centuries after the dawn of Clovis. If the first Americans could not walk into the New World, how did they get there? Coastal or ocean routes navigated by watercraft are the most likely explanation. No reliably dated ...
  • Does Skull Prove That The First Americans Came From Europe?

    11/24/2007 11:28:47 AM PST · by blam · 90 replies · 930+ views
    UTexas.edu ^ | 12-03-2002 | Steve Conner
    Does skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe? By Steve Connor Science Editor 03 December 2002 Scientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and...
  • Experts doubt Clovis people were first in Americas

    02/23/2007 9:34:17 AM PST · by george76 · 100 replies · 1,975+ views
    yahoo...Reuters ^ | Feb 22 | Will Dunham
    The Clovis people, known for their distinctive spear points, likely were not the first humans in the Americas, according to research placing their presence as more recent than previously believed. Using advanced radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers writing in the journal Science on Thursday said the Clovis people, hunters of large Ice Age animals like mammoths and mastodons, dated from about 13,100 to 12,900 years ago. That would make the Clovis culture, known from artifacts discovered at various sites including the town of Clovis, New Mexico, both younger and shorter-lived than previously thought. Previous estimates had dated the culture to about...
  • Stone Age Columbus

    12/15/2005 7:19:43 AM PST · by ASA Vet · 24 replies · 1,914+ views
    BBC ^ | Dec 15, 2005 | BBC programme summary
    Who were the first people in North America? From where did they come? How did they arrive? The prehistory of the Americas has been widely studied. Over 70 years a consensus became so established that dissenters felt uneasy challenging it. Yet in 2001, genetics, anthropology and a few shards of flint combined to overturn the accepted facts and to push back one of the greatest technological changes that the Americas have ever seen by over five millennia. The accepted version of the first Americans starts with a flint spearhead unearthed at Clovis, New Mexico, in 1933. Dated by the mammoth...
  • America 'discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe'

    02/28/2012 7:44:29 PM PST · by Theoria · 51 replies · 5+ views
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | 28 Feb 2012 | David Keys
    New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World. A remarkable series of several dozen European-style stone tools, dating back between 19,000 and 26,000 years, have been discovered at six locations along the US east coast. Three of the sites are on the Delmarva Peninsular in Maryland, discovered by archaeologist Dr Darrin Lowery of the University of Delaware. One is in Pennsylvania and another in Virginia. A sixth was discovered by scallop-dredging fishermen on the seabed 60...
  • First Americans May Have Been European

    02/19/2006 9:08:52 PM PST · by anymouse · 133 replies · 3,061+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 2/19/06 | Bjorn Carey
    ST. LOUIS—The first humans to spread across North America may have been seal hunters from France and Spain. This runs counter to the long-held belief that the first human entry into the Americas was a crossing of a land-ice bridge that spanned the Bering Strait about 13,500 years ago. The new thinking was outlined here Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The tools don’t match Recent studies have suggested that the glaciers that helped form the bridge connecting Siberia and Alaska began receding around 17,000 to 13,000 years ago, leaving very little...
  • Constructing The Solutrean Solution

    08/28/2007 11:34:31 AM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 1,063+ views
    Clovis In The Southeast.Net (Smithsonian) ^ | 8-28-2007 | Dennis Stanford - Bruce Bradley
    Constructing the Solutrean Solution Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley Smithsonian Institution University of Exeter At the 1999 Clovis and Beyond Conference held in Santa Fe, we presented a hypothesis, now known as the "Solutrean Solution", to explain the origin of Clovis technology. The hypothesis is based on the fact that there is little commonality between Clovis and Northeast Asian technologies on the one hand, while on the other, there are many technological traits shared between Clovis and the Solutrean culture of Paleolithic Europe. In the past, scholars have rejected the idea of a historical connection between the two cultures because...
  • Archaeologist says Va. bolsters claim on how people got to America [ Solutrean ]

    05/10/2006 10:09:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 598+ views
    Richmond Times-Dispatch ^ | May 11, 2006 | A.J. Hostetler
    The Smithsonian archaeologist pursuing the contentious claim that ancient Europeans fleeing the Ice Age settled in America says artifacts unearthed in the Chesapeake Bay region support his theory. Smithsonian Institution curator of archaeology Dennis Stanford argues that about 18,000 years ago, Solutrean hunters from the coasts of France, Spain and Portugal followed seals and other marine mammals for their fur, food and fuel across a partially frozen north Atlantic Ocean to the New World... "Pre-Clovis is a fact in North and South America," archaeologist Michael Collins of the University of Texas at Austin said this year at a symposium on...
  • New clues emerge about the earliest known Americans

    11/21/2015 10:27:26 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Vanderbilt U ^ | November 18, 2015 | Liz Entman
    The stone tools discovered by the team were similar to what Dillehay had previously found at Monte Verde. Many were simple unifacial tools -- meaning they were worked on only one side of the stone, to create a sharp edge -- though some of the younger tools and projectile points indicate bifacial technologies... The bones tended to be small fragments, broken and scorched, indicating that the animals had been cooked. They often came from very large animals, like prehistoric llamas or mastodons, as well as smaller creatures like prehistoric deer and horses. The Monte Verde site was unlikely to have...
  • Signs of an earlier American

    09/24/2004 9:18:58 AM PDT · by zide56 · 34 replies · 747+ views
    The Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 23, 2004 | Peter N. Spotts
    South Carolina dig could move habitation date back another 12,000 years.
  • The Iceman Cameth [Solutreans, Pre-Clovis]

    10/02/2015 11:41:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 2, 2015 | Patrick Hahn
    All early American ancestors hailed from East Asia and Siberia? Not so fast, says a prominent scientist... Stanford shows me some other artifacts. In addition to bifacial spear points, there are bone points, spear throwers, bow drills, hammerstones, scrapers, and flat stones that still retain traces of birch sap, which may have been used to apply waterproof seals to their boats. “Everything the Solutreans had, they have here,” Stanford explains. “Of course, that’s just coincidence.” Then he laughs that infectious laugh of his... Stanford opens another drawer and shows some spear points recovered from Tennessee. The points are over 14,000...