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Keyword: primatology

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Fossils point to ancient ape-monkey split

    05/18/2013 3:37:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Science News ^ | May 15, 2013 | Bruce Bower
    The oldest known fossils of an ape and a monkey have been uncovered, providing an intriguing glimpse of a crucial time in primate evolution. The discoveries suggest that by 25 million years ago, two major groups of primates were distinct: one that today includes apes and humans and another that encompasses Old World monkeys such as baboons and macaques. Previous studies using living primates’ DNA suggested that ancient apes and Old World monkeys parted from a common ancestor between 25 million and 30 million years ago. The new ape and monkey fossils, from Tanzania’s Rukwa Rift Basin, suggest that the...
  • Ancient Anthropoid Origins Discovered In Africa

    10/14/2005 3:27:55 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 127 replies · 2,184+ views
    Duke University ^ | 13 October 2005 | News office staff
    New species firmly establish African roots for anthropoid line.The fossil teeth and jawbones of two new species of tiny monkey-like creatures that lived 37 million years ago have been sifted from ancient sediments in the Egyptian desert, researchers have reported. Related They said their findings firmly establish that the common ancestor of living anthropoids -- including monkeys, apes and humans -- arose in Africa and that the group had already begun branching into many species by that time. Also, they said, one of the creatures appears to have been nocturnal, the first example of a nocturnal early anthropoid. The researchers...
  • Oldest hominid discovered is 7 million years old: study

    02/28/2008 4:21:27 AM PST · by Renfield · 33 replies · 737+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 2-27-08
    CHICAGO (AFP) - French fossil hunters have pinned down the age of Toumai, which they contend is the remains of the earliest human ever found, at between 6.8 and 7.2 million years old. The fossil was discovered in the Chadian desert in 2001 and an intense debate ensued over whether the nearly complete cranium, pieces of jawbone and teeth belonged to one of our earliest ancestors. Critics said that Toumai's cranium was too squashed to be that of a hominid -- it did not have the brain capacity that gives humans primacy -- and its small size indicated a creature...
  • Little teeth suggest big jump in primate timeline

    08/07/2008 10:27:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 168+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | Monday, August 4, 2008 | Duke University
    Just 9-thousandths of a square inch in size, the teeth are about 54.5 million years old and suggest these early primates were no larger than modern dwarf lemurs weighing about 2 to 3 ounces... Previous fossil evidence shows primates were living in North America, Europe and Asia at least 55 million years ago. But, until now, the fossil record of anthropoid primates has extended back only 45 million years... In addition to stretching the primate timeline, the specimens represent a new genus as well as a new species of anthropoid, which the researchers have named Anthrasimias gujaratensis by drawing from...
  • New fossil reveals primates lingered in Texas

    11/06/2008 4:10:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 756+ views
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 13, 2008 | Chris Kirk, University of Texas at Austin
    More than 40 million years ago, primates preferred Texas to northern climates that were significantly cooling, according to new fossil evidence discovered by Chris Kirk, physical anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin. Kirk and Blythe Williams from Duke University have discovered Diablomomys dalquesti, a new genus and species of primate that dates to 44-43 million years ago when tropical forests and active volcanoes covered west Texas. The researchers have published their discovery in the Journal of Human Evolution article, "New Uintan Primates from Texas and their Implications for North American Patterns of Species Richness during the Eocene." During...
  • The Chinese evolved from Indians: Study(along with the Japanese,Koreans and all other east Asians)

    12/11/2009 4:39:58 PM PST · by cold start · 42 replies · 1,887+ views
    DNA ^ | 11th December 2009
    New Delhi: A genetic study has found that Indians are the ancestors of the Chinese and other East Asian populations. The study, a joint project of 10 Asian countries, found that India received a wave of migration from Africa 60,000-70,000 years ago and these early humans subsequently moved to East and Southeast Asia. The earlier belief was that humans from Africa reached India and East and Southeast Asia separately. The study has important implications, especially in the understanding of human migratory patterns and in the investigation of genetics and disease. The findings of the five-year study -- conducted by a...
  • First Molars Provide Insight Into Evolution of Great Apes, Humans

    01/03/2010 10:10:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 111 replies · 1,559+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Tuesday, December 29, 2009 | Arizona State University, via EurekAlert
    The timing of molar emergence and its relation to growth and reproduction in apes is being reported by two scientists at Arizona State University's Institute of Human Origins in the Dec. 28 online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). From the smallest South American monkeys to the largest African apes, the timing of molar development and eruption is closely attuned to many fundamental aspects of a primate's biology, according to Gary Schwartz, a researcher at the Institute of Human Origins and an associate professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change in...
  • Finding Bigfoot Live Thread

    02/19/2012 7:10:59 PM PST · by matt04 · 74 replies · 2+ views
    Feb 19, 10:00 pm The team travels to Kentucky to investigate a piece of footage that seems to show the glowing eyes of a bigfoot. With locals reporting activity in Daniel Boone National Forest, the team tries a new search technique to see there really are bigfoots in KY.
  • Libyan find suggests earlier ancestors came from Asia

    10/27/2010 1:15:20 PM PDT · by decimon · 38 replies
    AFP ^ | October 27, 2010 | Unknown
    PARIS (AFP) – Ancient fossilized teeth of small anthropoid monkeys discovered in Libya suggest our earliest ancestors may have migrated from Asia to Africa, research published Wednesday showed. The origin of anthropoids -- primates including monkeys, apes and humans -- has long been a source of hot debate among palaeontologists. Experts have long argued anthropoids first appeared in Africa -- but recent studies suggest an earlier Asian origin, dating 55 million years ago. Now new fossils, dating 38 to 39 million years ago and discovered in Dur At-Talah in central Libya, further complicate the debate. They reveal the existence of...
  • Brooklyn College Anthropologist Identifies New Prehistoric Monkey

    03/30/2006 8:53:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 805+ views
    Brooklyn College Associate Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology Alfred L. Rosenberger is part of a team of Argentinean and United States scholars who have identified a new species of monkey that once roamed the forests of South America. The discovery of the monkey species, Killikaike blakei, is the result of painstaking analysis of a small, perfectly preserved monkey skull that was found embedded in volcanic rock by members of an Argentinean ranching family. The results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. This fossil, which is dated to 16.4 million years ago, is a spectacular addition...
  • Why don't we just kiss and make up?

    05/05/2005 3:31:35 PM PDT · by missyme · 18 replies · 699+ views
    New Scientist ^ | May 5th, 2005
    LOOK at the world's worst trouble spots and you can't fail to notice they have one thing in common: tit-for-tat attacks between warring parties. Escalation of violence is incredibly destructive, yet we humans find it very difficult to break the vicious cycle. It seems we are not good at conflict resolution. Perhaps we could learn a lesson or two from the spotted hyena. Spotted hyenas are highly sociable. Like other animals that live in close-knit groups, they don't always get along. But spotted hyenas don't hold a grudge. Within about 5 minutes of a fight, the erstwhile combatants can often...
  • Early volcano victims discovered

    09/03/2004 10:59:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 807+ views
    BBC ^ | Monday, May 3, 1999 | editors
    Whole communities of ape-like creatures may have been killed in volcanic disasters that struck East Africa 18 million years ago... It follows a study of rock deposits close to the once active volcano Kisingiri. These contained fossils of what is believed to be a forerunner of humans called Proconsul... research suggests they may have been caught by a pyroclastic flow. These are clouds of hot gas, dust and rubble which travel at huge speeds from erupting volcanoes. Scientists, who report their findings in the Journal of the Geological Society, believe the abundance of the hominoid fossils may represent "death...
  • Monkey began recently walking exclusively on her hind legs (photo)

    07/21/2004 1:21:33 PM PDT · by dennisw · 108 replies · 3,464+ views
    yahoo ^ | July 20, 2004
    Wed Jul 21, 3:47 PM ET Natasha, a 5-year-old black macaque walks at the Safari Park near Tel Aviv Tuesday July 20, 2004. The young monkey began recently walking exclusively on her hind legs after a stomach ailment nearly killed her, zookeepers said.(AP Photo/Eli Dasa)