Keyword: sanliurfa

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  • Humans have been drinking beer for 11,500 years

    01/01/2013 10:38:04 AM PST · by Renfield · 45 replies
    Antiquity ^ | Dietrich, Oliver, et al
    (Abstract of article only): The role of cult and feasting in the emergence of Neolithic communities. New evidence from Göbekli Tepe, south-eastern Turkey 1Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Orient-Abteilung, Podbielskiallee 69–71, D-14195 Berlin, Germany (Email: odi@orient.dainst.de; jn@orient.dainst.de; kls@orient.dainst.de), 2Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Aas, Norway (Email: manfred.heun@umb.no), and 3Technische Universität München, Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan, Weihenstephaner Steig 20, D-85354 Freising, Germany (Email: Martin.Zarnkow@wzw.tum.de)*Author for correspondence Göbekli Tepe is one of the most important archaeological discoveries of modern times, pushing back the origins of monumentality beyond the emergence of agriculture. We are pleased to present a summary of work in progress...
  • World's oldest temple built to worship the dog star

    08/17/2013 4:28:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Friday, August 16, 2013 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    Magli simulated what the sky would have looked like from Turkey when Gbekli Tepe was built. Over millennia, the positions of the stars change due to Earth wobbling as it spins on its axis. Stars that are near the horizon will rise and set at different points, and they can even disappear completely, only to reappear thousands of years later. Today, Sirius can be seen almost worldwide as the brightest star in the sky -- excluding the sun -- and the fourth brightest night-sky object after the moon, Venus and Jupiter. Sirius is so noticeable that its rising and setting...
  • Gobekli Tepe Constellations

    08/04/2013 6:12:23 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    The first interesting form is the scorpion, which might first be thought to represent is known as Scorpius, but this does not appear to be the case.  This is due to the presence of the three birds to the middle right (A, B, C), these three most clearly correspond to the “Summer Triangle” stars, the three birds, one represented by each star: Cygnus, Aquila (aka Vultur volans), and Vultur cadens (Lyra).  The shape of the Aquila constellations holds the same general appearance as bird A, the angle of the Cygnus stars matches the shape of the body of bird B,...
  • Archaeologists discover 'finest ever' piece of Neolithic art...3,500BC (Scotland)

    08/04/2013 8:36:09 AM PDT · by Renfield · 36 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 8-1-2013 | Mark Duell
    Archaeologists have found an astonishing piece of Neolithic artwork that was buried for 4,500 years. The stone creation - which is decorated on both sides and has been described as one of the finest ever to be found in Britain - was uncovered last night on the Ness of Brodgar in Orkney, Scotland. It was found at the base of the south-west internal corner of the Neolithic cathedral at the site, which covers 2.5 hectares and is believed to have been occupied from as early as 3,500BC....
  • Gbekli Tepe, Turkey: a new wonder of the ancient world (9,000 B.C. Neolithic site)

    04/23/2013 10:17:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 53 replies
    The London Telegraph ^ | April 23, 2013 | Jeremy Seal
    "Wow," exclaims the visitor from New Zealand, a place, after all, with a human history shorter than most. For from a wooden walkway were gazing down at an archaeological site of giddying age. Built about 9000 BC, its more than twice as old as Stonehenge or the Pyramids, predating the discovery of metals, pottery or even the wheel. This is Gbekli Tepe in south-eastern Turkey, generally reckoned the most exciting and historically significant archaeological dig currently under way anywhere in the world, and there are neither queues nor tickets to get in. Wow for a number of reasons, then, though...
  • 'World's Oldest Temple' May Have Been Cosmopolitan Center

    03/17/2012 10:44:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, March 15, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    Gobekli Tepe is located in southern Turkey near the modern-day city of Urfa. It contains at least 20 stone rings (circles within a circle) that date back more than 11,000 years. T-shaped limestone blocks line the circles and reliefs are carved on them. Long ago, people would fill in the outer circle with debris before building a new circle within... Ancient blades made of volcanic rock that were discovered at what may be the world's oldest temple suggest that the site in Turkey was the hub of a pilgrimage that attracted a cosmopolitan group of people some 11,000 years ago....
  • Archaeologist argues world's oldest temples were not temples at all

    10/07/2011 2:07:06 PM PDT · by decimon · 26 replies
    University of Chicago Press Journals ^ | October 6, 2011 | Unknown
    Ancient structures uncovered in Turkey and thought to be the world's oldest temples may not have been strictly religious buildings after all, according to an article in the October issue of Current Anthropology. Archaeologist Ted Banning of the University of Toronto argues that the buildings found at Göbekli Tepe may have been houses for people, not...gods. The buildings at Göbekli, a hilltop just outside of the Turkish city of Urfa, were found in 1995 by Klaus Schmidt of the German Archaeological Institute and colleagues from the Şanlıurfa Museum in Turkey. The oldest of the structures at the site are immense...
  • Gbekli Tepe - The Birth of Religion

    05/23/2011 8:23:10 AM PDT · by No One Special · 27 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | June 2011 | Charles C. Mann
    We used to think agriculture gave rise to cities and later to writing, art, and religion. Now the world’s oldest temple suggests the urge to worship sparked civilization. Every now and then the dawn of civilization is reenacted on a remote hilltop in southern Turkey. The reenactors are busloads of tourists—usually Turkish, sometimes European. The buses (white, air-conditioned, equipped with televisions) blunder over the winding, indifferently paved road to the ridge and dock like dreadnoughts before a stone portal. Visitors flood out, fumbling with water bottles and MP3 players. Guides call out instructions and explanations. Paying no attention, the visitors...
  • 12,000 Years Old Unexplained Structure [Gobekli Tepe]

    04/18/2011 4:25:18 PM PDT · by stockpirate · 107 replies
    via UTUBE ^ | 2/10/2011 | HISTORY CHANNEL
    This site is 12,000 years old, the most advanced strutures ever found. Several video's on the link
  • History in the Remaking

    02/23/2010 8:21:35 AM PST · by Palter · 30 replies · 885+ views
    Newsweek ^ | 19 Feb 2010` | Patrick Symmes
    A temple complex in Turkey that predates even the pyramids is rewriting the story of human evolution. They call it potbelly hill, after the soft, round contour of this final lookout in southeastern Turkey. To the north are forested mountains. East of the hill lies the biblical plain of Harran, and to the south is the Syrian border, visible 20 miles away, pointing toward the ancient lands of Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent, the region that gave rise to human civilization. And under our feet, according to archeologist Klaus Schmidt, are the stones that mark the spotthe exact spotwhere humans...
  • Do These Mysterious Stones Mark The Site Of The Garden Of Eden?

    02/27/2009 9:47:03 PM PST · by Steelfish · 122 replies · 4,668+ views
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | February 27, 2009
    Do these mysterious stones mark the site of the Garden of Eden? By TOM COX For the old Kurdish shepherd, it was just another burning hot day in the rolling plains of eastern Turkey. Following his flock over the arid hillsides, he passed the single mulberry tree, which the locals regarded as 'sacred'. The bells on his sheep tinkled in the stillness. Then he spotted something. Crouching down, he brushed away the dust, and exposed a strange, large, oblong stone. The man looked left and right: there were similar stone rectangles, peeping from the sands. Calling his dog to heel,...
  • Stone Age Temple May Be Birthplace of Civilization

    11/14/2008 7:46:29 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 41 replies · 1,333+ views
    foxnews.com ^ | November 14, 2008
    It's more than twice as old as the Pyramids, or even the written word. When it was built, saber-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths still roamed, and the Ice Age had just ended. The elaborate temple at Gobelki Tepe in southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border, is staggeringly ancient: 11,500 years old, from a time just before humans learned to farm grains and domesticate animals. According to the German archaeologist in charge of excavations at the site, it might be the birthplace of agriculture, of organized religion of civilization itself.
  • Gobekli Tepe: The Worlds First Temple? ( massive carved stones about 11,000 years old )

    11/11/2008 5:08:14 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 86 replies · 3,696+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | November 2008 | # Andrew Curry # Photographs by Berthold Steinhilber
    Predating Stonehenge by 6,000 years, Turkey's stunning Gobekli Tepe upends the conventional view of the rise of civilization Six miles from Urfa, an ancient city in southeastern Turkey, Klaus Schmidt has made one of the most startling archaeological discoveries of our time: massive carved stones about 11,000 years old, crafted and arranged by prehistoric people who had not yet developed metal tools or even pottery. The megaliths predate Stonehenge by some 6,000 years. The place is called Gobekli Tepe, and Schmidt, a German archaeologist who has been working here more than a decade, is convinced it's the site of the...
  • Mysterious Neolithic People Made Optical Art

    09/25/2008 5:39:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 5,997+ views
    Discovery News ^ | September 22, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Running until the end of October at the Palazzo della Cancelleria in the Vatican, the exhibition, "Cucuteni-Trypillia: A Great Civilization of Old Europe," introduces a mysterious Neolithic people who are now believed to have forged Europe's first civilization... Archaeologists have named them "Cucuteni-Trypillians" after the villages of Cucuteni, near Lasi, Romania and Trypillia, near Kiev, Ukraine, where the first discoveries of this ancient civilization were made more than 100 years ago. The excavated treasures -- fired clay statuettes and op art-like pottery dating from 5000 to 3000 B.C. -- immediately posed a riddle to archaeologists... "Despite recent extensive excavations, no...
  • Turkish Site A Neolithic 'Supernova'

    04/21/2008 3:24:52 PM PDT · by blam · 21 replies · 193+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 4-21-2008 | Nicholas Birch
    Turkish site a Neolithic 'supernova' By Nicholas Birch April 21, 2008 Archaeologist Klaus Schmidt was among the first to realize the significance of the Gobekli Tepe site, which is 7,000 years older than Stonehenge. URFA, Turkey - As a child, Klaus Schmidt used to grub around in caves in his native Germany in the hope of finding prehistoric paintings. Thirty years later, as a member of the German Archaeological Institute, he found something infinitely more important: a temple complex almost twice as old as anything comparable. "This place is a supernova," said Mr. Schmidt, standing under a lone tree on...
  • A Journey To 9,000 Years Ago (atalhyk)

    01/17/2008 4:06:53 PM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 114+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | 1-17-2008 | VERCİHAN ZİFLİOĞLU
    A journey to 9,000 years ago Thursday, January 17, 2008VERCİHAN ZİFLİOĞLU ISTANBUL - Turkish Daily News Çatalhöyük Research Project Director Ian Hodder says goddess icons do not, contrary to assumptions, point to a matriarchal society in Çatalhöyük. Findings in Çatalhöyük show that men and women had equal social status. According to Hodder, who also has been following the Göbeklitepe excavations in Şanlıurfa, meticulous archaeological excavation in southeastern Anatolia can change all scientific archaeological assumptions Clues as to when mankind really began living in urban patterns lie in the Neolithic layers of Çatalhöyük. Çatalhöyük is within the borders of Cumra district...
  • Is this the world's oldest statue? [Anatolia, Gobekli Tepe]

    11/26/2007 9:01:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 2,067+ views
    The First Post ^ | November 24, 2006 | Sean Thomas
    The statue turned out to be part of a larger discovery: of a Neolithic temple. This and the statue have now been dated to 10,000BC, making the 'Snowman' possibly the oldest statue in the world. The veracity of this claim depends on semantics. What is a 'statue'? The Venus of Willendorf dates back to 20,000BC. But the Venus is just 11cm long: surely not a statue. So the Balikli Gol Snowman is the first sizeable sculpture of a man. Arguably, it is the oldest sculptural representation of humanity, the oldest self-portrait in stone. In the accepted sense of the word,...
  • Did we plough up the Garden of Eden?

    10/17/2006 6:10:35 AM PDT · by NYer · 159 replies · 8,639+ views
    First Post ^ | October 17, 2006
    An archaeological dig may have uncovered ‘Eden’ in Turkey, says sean thomas I am standing above an archaeological dig, on a hillside in southern Turkey. Beneath me, workmen are unearthing a sculpture of some sort of reptile (right). It is delicate and breathtaking. It is also part of the world's oldest temple. If this sounds remarkable, it gets better. The archaeologist in charge of the dig believes that this artwork once stood in Eden. The archaeologist is Klaus Schmidt; the site is called Gobekli Tepe. In academic circles, the astonishing discoveries at Gobekli Tepe have long been a talking...
  • anlurfa To Shed More Light On History Of Civilization

    06/24/2006 3:14:51 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 558+ views
    anlurfa to shed more light on history of civilization Saturday, June 24, 2006 anlurfa to shed more light on history of civilization ANKARA - Turkish Daily News The southeastern Anatolian province of anlurfa, considered to be the cradle of agriculture as well as hosting numerous examples of ancient architecture, promises new discoveries to shed light on the history of human evolution in the region. Harran University Assistant Professor Cihan Krkolu noted that every archaeological excavation to be carried out in anlurfa would provide new information on the history of civilization in the region. Krkolu reminded the Anatolia news agency that...
  • Layers of clustered apartments hide artifacts of ancient urban life

    04/20/2005 9:26:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 752+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Monday, April 18, 2005 | David Perlman
    But because of the spectacular female clay figures that the archaeologists have found in the excavated layers over the years, atalhyk has become a draw for modern believers who hold to the idea that the neolithic people were ruled by a matriarchy whose central figure was a mother goddess... But to Ian Hodder of Stanford and Ruth Tringham of Berkeley, who will lead the expedition's 11th season at atalhyk this summer, the evidence questions the notion of a mother goddess and a matriarchal society... Mellaart's mother goddess was found in a grain bin, and the Hodder team's 3-inch figurine was...
  • Italian Archaeologist: Anatolia - Home To First Civilization On Earth

    06/22/2003 9:14:54 AM PDT · by blam · 58 replies · 5,700+ views
    Beku Today ^ | 6-20-2003
    Italian Archeologist: Anatolia - Home to First Civilization on Earth Prof. Dr. Marcella Frangipane is trying to convince scientists that Anatolia is the source of civilization on earth, and not Mesopotamia, as historians have claimed. 20/06/2003 13:20 After 13 years of work in the Aslantepe Mound Orduzu, Malatya, Frangipane says the archefacts she uncovered prove that the first civilization was established in Anatolia. According to Frangipane, the swords he found in Aslantepe and the palace, are the oldest in the world. These findings contradict everything in history books. Frangipane held a seminar, accompanied by a slide show, entitled 'Anatolia and...
  • Rewriting the dawn of civilization ( Was Gbekli Tepe the cradle of civilization? )

    01/03/2012 10:27:32 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 44 replies · 1+ views
    JoNova ^ | January 2nd, 2012 | Joanne
    If National Geographic had more stories like this one, I’d be inclined to subscribe. This is fascinating stuff.Seven thousand years before Stonehenge was Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, where you’ll find ring upon ring of T-shaped stone towers arranged  in a circle. Around 11,600 B.C. hundreds of people gathered on this mound, year after year, possibly for centuries.There are plenty of mysteries on this hill.  Some of the rocks weigh 16 tons, but archaeologists can find no homes, no hearths, no water source, and no sign of a town or village to support the hundreds of workers who built the rings...
  • German Paper Reports World's Oldest Temple Is In Sanliurfa (Turkey- 10,000BC)

    01/21/2006 10:34:38 AM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 972+ views
    German paper reports worlds oldest temple is in anlurfa Saturday, January 21, 2006 ANKARA - Turkish Daily News One of Germany's leading newspapers, Die Welt, reported this week that the world's oldest temple, dating back around 12,000 years, is located on Gbekli Hill in Turkey's province of anlurfa, said the Anatolia news agency. According to an article titled Holy Hill of the Hunters, the temple was discovered by German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt, standing around 15 meters in height and located on a hill upon which a single tree stands. Defining the area as the cradle of civilization, the paper said...