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Keyword: siberia

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  • World's largest sawdust dump is on fire 'and will burn for years'

    07/26/2016 8:01:34 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 61 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | July 25, 2016
    World's largest sawdust dump is on fire 'and will burn for years' By The Siberian Times reporter 25 July 2016 Greenpeace concern as firefighters say they cannot extinguish 3 year blaze with smoke visible from space. The mountain of sawdust is the size of more than 800 Olympic swimming pools at a site in the Ust-Kutsky district of Irkutsk region. A council spokesman said: 'It is now impossible to extinguish dump with such an amount of sawdust. 'Obviously, it will keep burning for a few more years.' It has remained aflame winter and summer for around three years - and...
  • Russia Looks to Populate Its Far East. Wimps Need Not Apply

    07/14/2016 12:42:46 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 49 replies
    nytimes.com ^ | JULY 14, 2016 Continue reading the main storyShare This Page Share Tweet Email More | ANDREW HIGGINS
    KAMEN-RYBOLOV, Russia — Standing ankle deep in mud in a swampy grassland more than 4,000 miles from his home, Yuri A. Bugaev surveyed a mosquito-infested wasteland that the Russian government is offering to would-be pioneers under its own modern-day version of the 1862 Homestead Act in the United States. “This is not really what I had in mind,” said Mr. Bugaev, who had traveled across seven time zones from St. Petersburg, Russia, to scout the possibilities for settlers in the country’s sparsely populated Far East, a territory roughly two-thirds the size of the United States. The nine Far Eastern regions...
  • 24,000-Year-Old Body Is Kin to Both Europeans and American Indians

    11/20/2013 2:33:43 PM PST · by mandaladon · 51 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 20 Nov 2013 | NICHOLAS WADE
    The genome of a young boy buried at Mal’ta near Lake Baikal in eastern Siberia some 24,000 years ago has turned out to hold two surprises for anthropologists. The first is that the boy’s DNA matches that of Western Europeans, showing that during the last Ice Age people from Europe had reached farther east across Eurasia than previously supposed. Though none of the Mal’ta boy’s skin or hair survive, his genes suggest he would have had brown hair, brown eyes and freckled skin. The second surprise is that his DNA also matches a large proportion — some 25 percent —...
  • Meet Lyuba

    06/27/2016 6:27:06 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 06/27/16 | Dr. Klaus Kaiser
    Just hope that the current interglacial period will last for a few more decades to come. Anything else would spell disaster for much of mankind! Lyuba, of course, is the name bestowed upon the baby mammoth that was found a few years ago in the western Siberian tundra. The baby woolly mammoth is thought to be around 40,000 years old (by now) and is thought to have died by drowning at the age of two months. What’s so remarkable is Lyuba’s state of preservation, almost life-like, with skin and (sparse) hair fully intact. That kind of find is most uncommon.
  • Putin: Free land in Russia’s far east

    05/05/2016 8:05:47 AM PDT · by Eleutheria5 · 38 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 5/5/16 | Shoshana Miskin
    Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday signed a law offering a hectare (2.5 acres) of land for free in Russia's Far East. The move, which is open to all Russian citizens, aims to boost the population and the economy in the vast remote region. Estimates by Russia's Minister for the Development of the Far East, Aleksandr Galushka, predicts that the project could increase the region's population to 36 million people, from the current 6.4 million. According to the bill, the land will be free of payment or tax for five years and may be used for any lawful purpose. However,...
  • Russia offers free land to all citizens willing to move to the Far East

    05/04/2016 10:22:49 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 100 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | Ishaan Tharoor | May 4 at 4:00 AM
    Call it the Muscovite version of "manifest destiny." On Monday, President Vladimir Putin signed into law a bill that offers every Russian citizen a tract of land in their country's remote Far East. "All citizens will be entitled to apply for up to hectare of land in the Kamchatka, Primorye, Khabarovsk, Amur, Magadan and Sakhalin regions, the republic of Sakha, or the Jewish and Chukotka autonomous districts," the Moscow Times reports. This is a vast stretch of territory spanning the upper Arctic reaches near Alaska, down to islands off the coast of Japan and deep into the Siberian hinterland. Those...
  • Unicorn Found in Siberia! Will Flying Pigs Be Next?

    03/29/2016 1:16:51 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 28 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | March 29, 2016 | Michael Walsh
    Okay, you can stop making all those unicorn jokes now: Dreams do come true – sort of. According to a study published in the American Journal of Applied Sciences, the Siberian unicorn – Elasmotherium sibiricum – last walked the Earth about 29,000 years ago. Scientists previously thought the creature with the partially mythical name died out about 350,000 years ago, but a newly discovered fossilized skull reveals it lived here much more recently.The skull was found in the Pavlodar region of Kazakhstan, and scientists hope it will help shed light on how some members of the species apparently were able...
  • A fossilised skull has revealed when the last 'Siberian unicorn' lived on Earth

    03/28/2016 1:54:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 27 MAR 2016 | JOSH HRALA
    For decades, scientists have estimated that the Siberian unicorn - a long-extinct species of mammal that looked more like a rhino than a horse - died out some 350,000 years ago, but a beautifully preserved skull found in Kazakhstan has completely overturned that assumption. Turns out, these incredible creatures were still around as recently as 29,000 years ago. Before we talk about the latest discovery, yes, there was a very real 'unicorn' that roamed Earth tens of thousands of years ago, but it was nothing like the one found in your favourite children’s book. (Sorry - it’s a bummer for...
  • Reading An Ancient Bond In The Look Of Puppy Love

    03/06/2016 5:39:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    University of Alberta ^ | March 1, 2016 | Geoff McMaster
    The irresistible gaze of "puppy-dog eyes" has roots in thousands of years of human evolution alongside domesticated dogs, says anthropologist Robert Losey. Anyone who owns a dog is familiar with the "gaze" -- that hypnotic, imploring stare that demands reciprocation. It can seem to hold a world of mystery and longing, or just pure bafflement at what makes humans tick. It turns out that the look of mutual recognition between human and dog reflects thousands of years of evolution, a bond programmed into our very body chemistry. Last spring a research team in Japan discovered that both species release a...
  • [Earthquake] M7.2 - 91km N of Yelizovo, Russia

    01/30/2016 9:18:08 AM PST · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    USGS ^ | 1/30/2016 | USGS
    The January 30, 2016 M 7.2 earthquake beneath the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia occurred as the result of oblique-normal faulting at a depth of 180 km. At the location of this earthquake, the Pacific plate is moving towards the west-northwest with respect to the North America and Eurasia plates at a rate of approximately 77 mm/yr. Note that some authors divide this region into several microplates that together define the relative motions between the larger Pacific, North America and Eurasia plates; these include the Okhotsk and Amur microplates that are respectively part of North America and Eurasia. The depth and...
  • Hermit Meets 21st Century After Being Flown To Siberian Hospital

    01/18/2016 11:46:38 AM PST · by Decombobulator · 31 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | 01/17/2016
    A 70-year-old hermit who has spent her entire life in the Siberian wilderness has been introduced to the 21st century after being airlifted to a hospital for leg pain. Agafya Lykova was born in the wilderness after her family fled civilization in 1936, The Guardian reported. On Wednesday she called for help using an emergency satellite phone and said she had pain in her leg, according to a release from the Kemerovo regional government. Lykova's remarkable story first surfaced in the late 1970s after geologists flying overhead discovered her remote family, the Siberian Times reported. When contacted, her family reportedly...
  • A Mysterious Mammoth Carcass Could Change Human History

    01/14/2016 8:42:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 108 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 01/14/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The carcass was remarkably well preserved, but something was clearly wrong. A rounded hole through the interior jugal. Deep incisions along the ribs. Dents in the left scapula. A broken mandible. This 45,000 year-old mammoth's life ended violently at the hands of hunters. That wouldn't be surprising-it's well known that Pleistocene humans were expert mammoth killers=but for the location. It was excavated from a permafrost embankment at Yenisei bay, a remote spot in central Siberia where a massive river empties into the Arctic Ocean. That makes this brutalized mammoth the oldest evidence for human expansion into the high Arctic by...
  • Merry (Western) Christmas from Siberia (where Santa is not always red!)

    01/01/2016 7:03:55 AM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 7 replies
    The Siberian Times ^ | 24 December 2015
    Merry (Western) Christmas from Siberia (where Santa is not always red!) By The Siberian Times reporter 24 December 2015 Seasonal greetings from the east of Russia where there are no less than seven different Father Christmas figures to bring joy to children in winter.  Best known across Russia is Grandfather Frost - or Ded Moroz - often carries a magical staff. Picture: Anna Permyakova All of them look old, with flowing white beards, and mostly have long histories, possibly reaching back to pagan times, but each is distinct, covering their own territory. Intriguingly, most are accompanied by glamorous snow maidens. Quite...
  • Dead man talking: conscript comes back to life after 10 years (Russia/Kamchatka)

    12/21/2015 6:52:22 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 8 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | December 16, 2015
    Dead man talking: conscript comes back to life after 10 years By The Siberian Times reporter 16 December 2015 Leonid Durkin, 30, shows how easy it is to vanish while living near to people. 'What does a person needs to be happy? To have own home and family, nothing else.' Picture: NTV This is the first picture of the army deserter who disappeared for more than a decade, and was declared dead by his own family. His death certificate was issued in 2005 after his father mistakenly identified a corpse as being him. All the time, he was living incognito in woodland...
  • Pearl Harbor 2.0

    12/07/2012 6:18:42 PM PST · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Time ^ | 07 Dec 2012 | John Koster
    The “infamy” of December 7, 1941, is deeper than most Americans have ever imagined. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was almost certainly the result of a Soviet plot—“Operation Snow”—carried out by Harry Dexter White, a figure of enormous influence in the Roosevelt administration and a known Soviet spy. Americans remember Pearl Harbor as the work of a Japanese military machine hell-bent on a war of conquest. The truth is more complicated. The imperial regime had faced severe political shocks throughout the 1930s. Two attempts on the life of Emperor Hirohito—one by a Japanese communist whose father was a member...
  • 'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold

    11/29/2015 7:27:04 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 48 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | November 28, 2015
    'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold By The Siberian Times reporter 28 November 2015 Fast track evolution as great Siberian symbol is surprisingly unmasked as an immigrant breed. Researchers say these horses, which seem so well attuned to the harsh cold with thick, dense winter coats, their armour against temperatures of minus 70C (minus 94F), are incomers that only arrived in these parts within the last 800 years. Picture: Maria Vasilyeva The resilient Yakutian horses are one of the great native sights of the Sakha Republic - or Yakutia. In their way as much a part of...
  • Arctic Dig Unearths Prehistoric Settlement

    01/02/2004 4:16:23 AM PST · by johnny7 · 17 replies · 196+ views
    The Baltimore Sun ^ | January 2, 2004 | Dennis O'Brien
    Russian archaeologists have discovered the remains of the world's oldest known Arctic settlement - a Siberian riverfront site that they say could help determine when humans first arrived in the Americas. The 30,000-year-old site - twice as old as any previous Arctic dig - includes a rhinoceros bone shaped into a spear that shows a "striking resemblance" to spear points found by archaeologists in Clovis, N.M.
  • Does Celtic art have links with Asia?

    10/15/2015 11:26:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | October 15, 2015 | editors
    An Oxford University-led... research team... will be looking at a group of artefacts in excavations and museum collections that are traditionally described as ‘Celtic’ because of their use of spirals, circles, interlaced designs, or swirling representations of plants or animals. One main line of enquiry is the relationship between the central European Celts and their nomadic Eurasian neighbours (often referred to as Scythians or Sarmatians), who inhabited the European end of a grassland (steppe) corridor that stretched east towards Central Asia and China... Iron Age tombs frozen in the mountains of Siberia, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan have yielded Roman glass, Chinese...
  • Is the Mysterious Siberian “X-Woman” a New Hominid Species?

    03/25/2010 9:09:33 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies · 932+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | March 25, 2010 | Smriti Rao
    In 2008, archeologists working at the Denisova Cave in Siberia’s Altai Mountains discovered a tiny piece of a finger bone, believed to be a pinky, buried with ornaments in the cave. Scientists extracted the mitochondrial DNA (genetic material from the mother’s side) from the ancient bone and checked to see if its genetic code matched with the other two known forms of early hominids–Neanderthals and the ancestors of modern humans. What they found was a real surprise. The team, led by geneticist Svaante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute, discovered that the mtDNA from the finger bone matched neither–suggesting there...
  • Woolly mammoth extinction 'not linked to humans'

    08/18/2010 11:32:29 AM PDT · by decimon · 61 replies
    BBC ^ | August 17, 2010 | Pallab Ghosh
    Woolly mammoths died out because of dwindling grasslands - rather than being hunted to extinction by humans, according to a Durham University study.After the coldest phase of the last ice age 21,000 years ago, the research revealed, there was a dramatic decline in pasture on which the mammoths fed. The woolly mammoth was once commonplace across many parts of Europe. It retreated to northern Siberia about 14,000 years ago, where it finally died out approximately 4,000 years ago.
  • The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

    12/19/2013 12:22:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 56 replies
    The Scientist ^ | December 18, 2013 | Ruth Williams
    A high-quality genome sequence obtained from a female Neanderthal toe bone reveals that the individual’s parents were close relatives and that such inbreeding was prevalent among her recent ancestors, according to a paper published today (December 18) in Nature. But the sequence also reveals that interbreeding occurred between Neanderthals and other hominin groups, including early modern humans. “Did humans evolve like a constantly branching tree? A lot of people think so,” said Milford Wolpoff, a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, who was not involved in the study. “But there’s also been this thread of thought, by some...
  • Builders in Omsk stumble across Bronze Age burial site

    09/30/2015 12:27:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 29 September 2015 | reporter
    Two graves dating back 2,700 years believed to be from ancient necropolis under city centre. Workmen called in police and archeologists after discovery of the remains of the ancient people. One was buried with a knife and buckle. Archeologists are still inspecting the find but they grave is believed to be from the Irmen culture and dates to approximately 700 BC to 800 BC. The experts believe the graves are in the same Bronze Age necropolis as was disturbed 103 years ago when the site was previously excavated during construction of a building that is now being renovated. At this...
  • OPEC’s Family Feud

    09/28/2015 5:47:49 AM PDT · by thackney · 17 replies
    Hellenic Shipping News ^ | 9/28/2015 | Hellenic Shipping News
    When Venezuelan Oil Minister Juan Pablo Pérez Alfonso resigned in 1963, he blasted the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, at the time torn by internal rivalries, for failing to produce any benefits for his country. Half a century later, OPEC is still split and Venezuela is again unhappy, this time at the unwillingness of the organization’s top producer, Saudi Arabia, to rescue oil prices from a six-year low that’s dragging the battered Venezuelan economy into an even deeper crisis. On Sept. 10, Venezuela’s oil minister, Eulogio del Pino, tweeted appeals for OPEC and non-OPEC countries “to have a discussion on...
  • Frankenvirus emerges from Siberia's frozen wasteland

    09/12/2015 10:42:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | September 8, 2015 | STAFF
    Imaging of Mollivirus particles. (A) Scanning electron microscopy of two isolated particles showing the apex structure. (B) Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of an ultrathin section of an open particle after fusion of its internal lipid membrane with that of a phagosome. (C) Enlarged view of the viral tegument of a Mollivirus particle highlighting the layer made of a mesh of fibrils (black arrow), resembling Pandoraviruses’ intermediate layer, and the underneath internal membrane (white arrow). Three ∼25-nm interspaced rings are visible around the mature particle. (D) Light microscopy (Nomarski optics 63×) imaging of a lawn of Mollivirus particles, some of...
  • Massive Wildfire Turns Russia's Lake Baikal Into Hellish Landscape

    08/27/2015 1:00:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    weather.com ^ | Aug 25 2015 04:08 PM EDT | Sean Breslin
    In the northwestern United States, wildfire smoke has invaded major cities as millions of acres of land burn. On the other side of the world, infernos that have been burning for weeks – in a part of Siberia, no less – have turned the landscape into what resembles Hell on Earth. Near Lake Baikal, the biggest and deepest freshwater lake in the world, large wildfires are sending huge amounts of smoke into the air, shrouding the popular vacation area in the middle of summer, Mashable said. The wildfires have been a combination of natural and man-made, the report added, and...
  • 'Mummy of a child warrior from 'lost medieval civilisation'

    08/12/2015 4:01:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | August 4, 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    Five mummies were found to be shrouded in copper, while also elaborately covered in reindeer, beaver, wolverine or bear fur. Nearby were found three copper masked infant mummies - all males. They were bound in four or five copper hoops, several centimetres wide. Similarly, a red-haired man was found, protected from chest to foot by copper plating. In his resting place, was an iron hatchet, furs, and a head buckle made of bronze depicting a bear. The feet of the deceased are all pointing towards the Gorny Poluy River, a fact which is seen as having religious significance. The burial...
  • Ancient humans, dubbed 'Denisovans', interbred with us

    12/22/2010 6:26:50 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 56 replies · 6+ views
    BBC ^ | 12/22/10 | Pallab Ghosh
    Scientists say an entirely separate type of human identified from bones in Siberia co-existed and interbred with our own species.The ancient humans have been dubbed "Denisovans" after the caves in Siberia where their remains were found. There is also evidence that this population was widespread in Eurasia. A study in Nature journal shows that Denisovans co-existed with Neanderthals and interbred with our species - perhaps around 50,000 years ago. An international group of researchers sequenced a complete genome from one of the ancient hominins (human-like creatures), based on nuclear DNA extracted from a finger bone.
  • Xinjiang discovery provides intriguing DNA link

    05/01/2010 4:55:38 AM PDT · by Palter · 11 replies · 539+ views
    English.news.cn ^ | 28 April 2010 | Mu Xuequan
    The DNA of some 4,000 year-old bodies unearthed five years ago in Xinjiang, in northwest China, provides scientific evidence of early intermingling between people of European and Asian origin. Zhou Hui, a professor of life science and her team discovered that some of the earliest inhabitants of the Tarim Basin in the Taklamakan Desert were of European and Siberian descent. The basin, where hundreds of well-preserved mummies have been found since the 1980s, has attracted great attention from scientists worldwide. Professor Victor Mair of Pennsylvania University claimed in 2006, "From around 1800 B.C. the earliest mummies in the Tarim Basin...
  • Frozen Siberian Mummies Reveal A Lost Civilization

    06/25/2008 5:16:28 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,787+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 6-25-2008 | Andrew Curry
    Frozen Siberian Mummies Reveal a Lost CivilizationGlobal warming may finally do in the bodies of the ancient Scythians. by Andrew Curry That the warrior survived the arrow’s strike for even a short time was remarkable. The triple-barbed arrowhead, probably launched by an opponent on horseback, shattered bone below his right eye and lodged firmly in his flesh. The injury wasn’t the man’s first brush with death. In his youth he had survived a glancing sword blow that fractured the back of his skull. This injury was different. The man was probably begging for death, says Michael Schultz, a paleopathologist at...
  • America first populated in 'a single wave of migration from Siberia' no more than 23,000 years ago

    07/22/2015 4:55:24 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    The Siberian Times ^ | 22 July 2015
    Analysis of DNA of present day indigineous people throws new light on how our ancestors crossed the Bering land and ice bridge which then connected modern-day Chukotka and Alaska. A study led by the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, asserts that there was one one initial migration from Siberia to America. Around 10,000 years later there was a split in these human ancestors into two groups, which anthropologists call Amerindians (American Indians) and Athabascans (a native Alaskan people). Previous research had suggested that Amerindian and Athabascan ancestors had crossed the strait independently. 'Our study presents the most...
  • Scientists Trace an Ancient Connection Between Amazonians and Australasians

    07/22/2015 3:07:40 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 21, 2015 | James Gorman
    Some people in the Brazilian Amazon are very distant relations of indigenous Australians, New Guineans and other Australasians, two groups of scientists who conducted detailed genetic analyses reported Tuesday. But the researchers disagree on the source of that ancestry. The connection is ancient, all agree, and attributable to Eurasian migrants to the Americas who had some Australasian ancestry, the scientists said. But one group said the evidence is clear that two different populations came from Siberia to settle the Americas 15,000 or more years ago. The other scientific team says there was only one founding population from which all indigenous...
  • Skull Study Suggests at Least Two Groups Colonized America

    12/15/2005 3:48:14 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 18 replies · 864+ views
    Sci-Tech Today ^ | December 15, 2005
    The 7,500- to 11,000-year-old remains suggest the oldest settlers of the Americas came from different genetic stock than more recent Native Americans. Modern Native Americans share traits with Mongoloid peoples of Mongolia, China, and Siberia, the researchers said. But they found dozens of skulls from Brazil appear much more similar to modern Australians, Melanesians, and Sub-Saharan Africans. A Brazilian study involving a large collection of South American skulls suggests at least two distinct groups of early humans colonized the Americas. Anthropologists Walter Neves and Mark Hubbe of the University of Sao Paulo studied 81 skulls of early humans and found...
  • Autopsy carried out in Far East on world's oldest dog mummified by ice

    06/19/2015 12:01:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | Thursday, June 18 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    Scientists in the Russian Far East have carried out a post-mortem examination of the remains of the only mummified dog ever found in the world. Found sealed inside permafrost during a hunt for traces of woolly mammoths, the perfectly-preserved body is 12,450 years old. The dog, believed to be a three-month-old female, was unearthed in 2011 on the Syallakh River in the Ust-Yana region of Yakutia, also known as the Sakha Republic. Experts spent the past four years analysing the body – which included not just bones but also its heart, lungs and stomach – but only carried out the...
  • Ancient Greece's 'global warming'

    05/08/2009 6:39:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 30 replies · 1,347+ views
    American Thinker ^ | May 08, 2009 | Ben-Peter Terpstra
    In Heaven + Earth (Global Warming: The Missing Science), Ian Plimer, Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide, Australia, asks us to embrace big-picture science views; for to recognize our limits is a sign of maturity. "Climate science lacks scientific discipline," says the pro-amalgamation Professor, and in order to see more clearly we need to adopt an interdisciplinary approach. This requires humbleness. In Chapter 2: History, Plimer travels back in time, thousands of years, in fact, to debunk Gore's catastrophic global warming myths. I particularly like his research on the ancient Greeks. For Plato (427-347 BC) advanced the...
  • Russian rocket pieces may crash on land after launch goes awry

    05/16/2015 1:45:19 PM PDT · by Lurch Addams · 31 replies
    CNN ^ | 5/16/15 | Ben Brumfield and Brian Walker
    A glitch in a Russian space launch may have sent part of a rocket and its payload -- a satellite -- plummeting down onto southeastern Siberia, according to Russian state-run media reports. It is the second space mission failure for the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, in less than a month. And the mishap occurs on the anniversary of a similar loss in 2014.
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 35 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...
  • [From September 11, 2014] Russian Journalist Detained Following 'Federalization' Interview

    02/26/2015 10:44:19 PM PST · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty RFE/RL ^ | September 11, 2014 | RFE/RL's Russian Service
    Russian police have detained journalist Dmitry Shipilov hours after the publication of his interview with an advocate of greater autonomy for Siberian provinces.
  • Siberian woman becomes latest victim of unexplained mass sleep epidemic

    01/15/2015 3:06:49 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    Almost all of the victims have fallen asleep suddenly, some literally as they walked, and remembered nothing at the point of awakening. Many of the village’s 582 residents have now suffered the condition several times and have even been unconscious for as long as five days at a time. Doctors have already ruled out viruses and bacterial infections, while scientists have been unable to find any chemicals in the soil or water that might be behind the epidemic. ... The first reports of a problem in the area emerged in early 2010, but the number of incidents has been steadily...
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Mammoth fragments raise cloning hopes

    09/15/2012 11:44:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | Tuesday, September 11, 2012 | AP
    Well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth fragments have been discovered deep in Siberia that may contain living cells, edging a tad closer to the possibility of cloning a prehistoric animal, the mission's organiser has said. Russia's North-Eastern Federal University said an international team of researchers had discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow some 328 feet (100 meters) underground during a summer expedition in the northeastern province of Yakutia. Expedition chief Semyon Grigoryev said Korean scientists with the team had set a goal of finding living cells in the hope of cloning a mammoth. Scientists have previously found bones and fragments...
  • Did the ancient Egyptians know of pygmy mammoths? Well, there is that tomb painting.

    01/20/2011 6:38:56 AM PST · by Palter · 31 replies
    Tetrapod Zoology ^ | 19 Jan 2011 | Darren Naish
    One of the things that came up in the many comments appended to the article on Bob's painting of extinct Maltese animals was the famous Egyptian tomb painting of the 'pygmy mammoth'. You're likely already familiar with this (now well known) case: here's the image, as it appears on the beautifully decorated tomb wall of Rekhmire, 'Governor of the Town' of Thebes, and vizier of Egypt during the reigns of Tuthmose III and Amenhotep II (c. 1479 to 1401 BCE) during the XVIII dynasty... In 1994, Baruch Rosen published a brief article in Nature in which he drew attention to...
  • Scientists Aim to Revive the Woolly Mammoth

    04/18/2005 8:08:56 AM PDT · by Drew68 · 166 replies · 2,919+ views
    live Science ^ | 11 Apr 05 | Bill Christensen
    Scientists Aim to Revive the Woolly Mammoth Scientists with the Mammoth Creation Project hope to find a frozen woolly mammoth specimen with sperm DNA. The sperm DNA would then be injected into a female elephant; by repeating the procedure with offspring, a creature 88 percent mammoth could be produced within fifty years. "This is possible with modern technology we already have," said Akira Iritani, who is chairman of the genetic engineering department at Kinki University in Japan and a member of the Mammoth Creation Project. However, the DNA in mammoth remains found to date has been unusable, damaged by time...
  • Mammoths stranded on Bering Sea island delayed extinction

    06/17/2004 8:07:34 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 27 replies · 457+ views
    University of Alaska Fairbanks ^ | 16-Jun-2004 | Contact: Marie Gilbert
    Public release date: 16-Jun-2004 Contact: Marie Gilbert marie.gilbert@uaf.edu 907-474-7412 University of Alaska Fairbanks Mammoths stranded on Bering Sea island delayed extinction Fossil is first record in the Americas of a mammoth population to have survived the Pleistocene Woolly mammoths stranded on Pribilofs delayed extinction Fossil is first record in the Americas of a mammoth population to have survived the Pleistocene St. Paul, one of the five islands in the Bering Sea Pribilofs, was home to mammoths that survived the extinctions that wiped out mainland and other Bering Sea island mammoth populations. In an article in the June 17, 2004 edition...
  • Flowers regenerated from 30,000-year-old frozen fruits, buried by ancient squirrels

    02/21/2012 12:42:13 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 20 replies
    discovermagazine.com ^ | Feb. 20, 2012 | Ed Yong
    Fruits in my fruit bowl tend to rot into a mulchy mess after a couple of weeks. Fruits that are chilled in permanent Siberian ice fare rather better. After more than 30,000 years, and some care from Russian scientists, some ancient fruits have produced this delicate white flower. These regenerated plants, rising like wintry Phoenixes from the Russian ice, are still viable. They produce their own seeds and, after a 30,000-year hiatus, can continue their family line. The plant owes its miraculous resurrection to a team of scientists led by David Gilichinsky, and an enterprising ground squirrel. Back in the...
  • Russians revive Ice Age flower from frozen burrow

    02/20/2012 8:05:56 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 49 replies · 3+ views
    AP ^ | 2/20/12 | VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV
    MOSCOW (AP) -- It was an Ice Age squirrel's treasure chamber, a burrow containing fruit and seeds that had been stuck in the Siberian permafrost for over 30,000 years. From the fruit tissues, a team of Russian scientists managed to resurrect an entire plant in a pioneering experiment that paves the way for the revival of other species. The Silene stenophylla is the oldest plant ever to be regenerated, the researchers said, and it is fertile, producing white flowers and viable seeds. The experiment proves that permafrost serves as a natural depository for ancient life forms, said the Russian researchers,...
  • Opec's Wake Up Call

    12/08/2014 7:58:38 AM PST · by thackney · 6 replies
    Energy Intel ^ | December 2014 | Sadad al-Husseini
    The Opec meeting of Nov. 27 brought new strategic thinking to Opec's deliberations and redirected its fixation away from short-term oil pricing toward greater commercial transparency and market-based commodity pricing. This was due in no small measure to Saudi Arabia's determination to eliminate ill-advised oil price manipulations and restore Opec's credibility as the price setting leader of international oil markets. This reality check became inevitable when Opec finally focused on the stark facts of a weak global economy and soft oil demand at a time of abundant oil supplies and inflated prices. The kingdom was forceful in advocating the reality...
  • Passengers had to push Tu-134 (airliner) which froze to a runway (-52 degrees)

    11/26/2014 12:10:30 AM PST · by wetphoenix · 35 replies
    As reported LifeNews a source in the airport of Igarka, state of emergency happened to the liner the day before in the morning. Before take-off stem of thermometer fell to-52 degrees therefore the chassis froze to a surface of an airfield, without allowing the plane to leave on a runway and to make dispersal.
  • Diamonds Beneath the Popigai Crater -- Northern Russia

    11/25/2014 8:36:15 AM PST · by JimSEA · 19 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 11/25/2014 | Hobart King
    About 35 million years ago an asteroid about 5 to 8 kilometers in diameter, travelling at a speed of about 15 to 20 kilometers per second slammed into the area that is now known as the Tamyr Peninsula of northern Siberia, Russia. [1] The energy delivered by this hypervelocity impact was powerful enough to instantly melt thousands of cubic kilometers of rock and blast millions of metric tons of ejecta high into the air. Some of that ejecta landed on other continents. The explosion produced a 100 kilometer-wide impact crater with a rim of deformed rock up to 20 kilometers...
  • Could rare sword have belonged to Ivan the Terrible?

    11/24/2014 3:37:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 21 November 2014 | Anna Liesowska and Derek Lambie
    Intrigue over how German-made 12th century blade, adorned in Sweden, reached Siberia... An exciting new theory has now emerged that it could have belonged to Tsar Ivan the Terrible, and came from the royal armoury as a gift at the time of the conquest of Siberia. The hypothesis, twinning an infamous Russian ruler and a revered battle hero, could turn it into one of the most interesting archaeological finds in Siberian history, though for now much remains uncertain. What Siberian experts are sure about is that the beautifully engraved weapon was originally made in central Europe, and most likely in...
  • Brazil UFO flap: Flying saucer sizzles car DVD player, good photos

    03/14/2009 5:42:14 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 55 replies · 2,344+ views
    allnewsweb ^ | 11-3-2009
    In Brazil an astonishing number of UFO sightings have been reported in the last few weeks. Ufologists are being inundated with emails from confused witnesses searching for answers. One of the most intriguing sightings occurred in the mountains on the outskirts of the city of Urubici in the State of Santa Catarina in the south of Brazil. On February 13 A Mr Genivaldo Rodrigues was standing outside his car taking a break from driving when he allegedly saw a silver disc zooming towards him. He grabbed his camera which he happened to have on him at the time and snapped...