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  • This Day In History: George Washington’s final farewell to his army

    12/03/2017 7:51:04 AM PST · by iowamark · 12 replies
    TaraRoss.com ^ | December 4, 2016 | Tara Ross
    On this day in 1783, George Washington says his final goodbye to a group of officers at Fraunces Tavern in New York. washingtons-farewell-to-his-officersNew York had served as the British headquarters throughout the long years of the war. It was the last city to be evacuated when the war was over! On November 25, however, the British finally left, and George Washington entered the city. (See November 25 history post.) Despite the celebrations and elaborate dinners that ensued over the course of the next week, the British hadn’t entirely left the area. Some lingered on boats nearby. Others were still on...
  • Did George Washington have Commandos?

    11/13/2017 6:23:27 AM PST · by w1n1 · 31 replies
    During the American Revolution George Washington didn’t have any Tier-1 Spec Ops, but he made the most of what he had.When we think of modern day Special Forces, we think of Seal Team 6, Delta Force and the Green Berets. Back in the day of the American Revolution era, what did George Washington have? In a time where warfare was all about marching to fife and drum then lined up in rows to blast away with muskets at fifty paces. What did they know about unconventional warfare? According to retired U.S. Army colonel Robert Tonsetic explains that unconventional warfare was...
  • A Tale of Two Georges

    07/04/2016 1:33:57 PM PDT · by NYer · 10 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | July 4, 2016 | Fr. George Rutler
    In Philadelphia, in what now is called Independence Hall, is preserved a Chippendale style chair crafted in 1779 by the cabinetmaker John Folwell, with a sun on the horizon carved at the top. For nearly three months in 1787, George Washington used this chair during the sessions of the Federal Convention. According to James Madison, whose feet would have dangled from it since, at 5’4” he was ten inches shorter than Washington, Benjamin Franklin mused: “I have often in the course of the session looked at that sun behind the President without being able to tell whether it was...
  • How a Jewish Patriot Saved the American Revolution

    06/12/2016 8:51:25 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 21 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 6/12/16 | Susan Frickey
    During the Revolutionary War, our new nation faced a financial crisis. The colonies had no money to pay for the war and the prospects of raising funds were dismal, at best. Colonial troops had not been paid the money due them, so protests ensued. Some officers even surrounded the Continental Congress and held it for ransom, trying to get what was promised the troops for years of hardship, struggle and deprivation. Our young country was very near imploding after all the years of bloodshed, sacrifice and valiant commitment to the dream of liberty. Enter Robert Morris: the richest man in...
  • The Revolutionary War was tough and brutal

    07/08/2007 7:39:21 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 64 replies · 1,239+ views
    Creators.com ^ | July 4, 2007 | Froma Harrop
    In the popular mind, the American Revolution was mostly about liberty and the pursuit of happiness -- and the war that followed the Declaration of Independence wasn't much of a war. We imagine toy soldiers in red coats chasing picturesque rebels. Actually, the War of Independence was horrific, according to John Ferling, a leading historian of early America. It was a grinding conflict that rivaled, and in some ways exceeded, the Civil War in its toll on American fighters when looked at on a per-capita basis. Ferling chronicles the suffering in his new book, "Almost a Miracle: The American Victory...
  • Six American Independence War Maps Up For Auction

    05/20/2016 3:02:24 PM PDT · by Ray76 · 19 replies
    Breitbart ^ | May 20, 2016
    Six maps from the American War of Independence, which helped convince George Washington to make a crucial change in strategy, go up for auction in a French chateau next month.
  • "A nation without public virtue...betrayed by their own representatives...

    05/17/2016 7:22:10 AM PDT · by stars & stripes forever · 9 replies
    The First Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, being appointed by George Washington, was also President of the American Bible Society. Who was he? John Jay, who died MAY 17, 1829. As President of the Continental Congress, John Jay approved the "Circular Letter from the Congress of the United States of America to their Constituents," September 13, 1779: "Friends and Fellow Citizens... In governments raised on the generous principles of equal liberty... the rulers of the state are the servants of the people, and not the masters of those from whom they derive authority... ...The ungrateful despotism and inordinate...
  • Washington and Hamilton – The Alliance That Formed America

    05/15/2016 2:47:48 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 28 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 15, 2016 | Christoper N, Malagisi
    In a gripping new look at the important relationship between American founders George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Stephen F. Knott and Tony Williams – authors of the new book Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance That Formed America, tell the story below of the American founding, which would not have been possible without this grand alliance.  While many historians focus on the friendship and alliance of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, Washington and Hamilton reminds us why America would truly not be the prosperous country it is today without this special alliance.Congratulations Stephen & Tony on the paperback release of your new book: Washington and...
  • Researchers Believe Captain Cook’s Famed ‘Endeavour’ Rests at Bottom of Newport Harbor

    05/04/2016 3:22:10 PM PDT · by artichokegrower · 18 replies
    gCaptain ^ | May 4, 2016 | Scott Malone
    The wreckage of the Endeavour, the storied British ship that 18th-century explorer Captain James Cook sailed through the uncharted South Pacific, may lie a few hundred feet off Rhode Island’s coast in Newport Harbor, researchers said Wednesday. The 105-foot (32-meter) long, three-masted bark, later renamed the Lord Sandwich, had been hired out by the British Royal Navy as a troop transport when it was one of 13 ships deliberately sunk by the British in 1778 in an effort to blockade the harbor.
  • The Forgotten Story of the Revolutionary War

    05/04/2016 10:34:59 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 38 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | May 4, 2016 | Kallina Crompton
    On April 8, 2016, military historian and author Patrick K. O’Donnell spoke at the Heritage Foundation to discuss his book “Washington’s Immortals,” a book about the forgotten people and battles in the revolutionary war. The author discusses facts of the war that many schools fail to recognize; these include details of the colonists’ struggles with the loyalists, the soldiers’ shortages of clothing and food, and the sacrifices of many wealthy colonists. The stories in this book of the band of brotherhood and the sacrifices of the colonists are beneficial for students in order for them to fully understand American values....
  • A proofread version of George Washington's Rules of Civility

    02/22/2016 11:16:30 AM PST · by re_tail20 · 50 replies
    1730's | George Washington
    Today is George Washington’s Birthday. I thought I would post a proofread version of his famous Rules of Civility. George Washington was a product of the time in which he lived, as are we. Grammar and Punctuation were much different 270 years ago than they are today. Periods and commas were not used in places where they are used today, and words that are not capitalized now were capitalized then. In some cases, I have substituted words. In some cases, I have left the original words. Some of these translate well to today, and some don't. For example, the rules...
  • George Washington, Legislator

    02/22/2016 11:29:41 AM PST · by jfd1776 · 7 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | February 22, 2016 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    The great George Washington was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia on February 22, 1732, and served about seventeen years as a delegate in the Virginia colony’s House of Burgesses. He is remembered for many other things as well. The Father of his Country was known as a successful merchant, farmer, and horticulturalist, a prominent frontier soldier and wartime commander, and of course, the first President of these United States. But, oddly, his service as a legislator is largely forgotten. These United States have sent 43 men to the office of the Presidency, so far. Some have been governors, others cabinet...
  • New audiobook release: The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution, by William Cooper Nell

    02/20/2016 9:06:48 AM PST · by ProgressingAmerica · 16 replies
    Librivox ^ | February 18th, 2016
    One thing progressives are very, very good at is omitting facts that they find to be too difficult to deal with. So it goes for all of the black heroes who fought alongside our Founding Fathers during the American Revolution. The progressives continual racial narrative is what it is. I first learned of this book through Founders Fridays, because of the work of David Barton. After I read about 5 or 10 pages, I knew it needed to be made into an audiobook so that more people could consume it. Progressives have controlled the universities, have controlled history; for over...
  • Eggnog: A Colonial Christmas Tradition (Gen. Washington's Recipe)

    12/17/2005 8:35:25 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 62 replies · 1,292+ views
    MyMerryChristmas.com ^ | December, 2005 | Jeff Westover
    The General's Eggnog One quart of cream One quart of milk A dozen eggs One pint of brandy A half pint of rye A quarter pint of rum A quarter pint of sherry Christmas of 1826 was snowy, cold and lonely for the cadets of West Point. Though called "men" they were really teenage boys -- some as young as 17 -- and they wanted to celebrate Christmas. Young Jefferson Davis, future president of the Confederate States of America, was amongst them. But West Point then, as it is now, was a house of order and discipline. The military...
  • Lafayette's America

    02/01/2016 10:08:13 AM PST · by NKP_Vet · 15 replies
    http://opportunitylives.com ^ | June 11, 2015 | Ellen Carmichael
    For several weeks, an 18th century replica ship has traveled across the Atlantic Ocean from France to the U.S. L'Hermione is an exact copy of the vessel sailed by the Marquis de Lafayette in 1780 to notify his friend, General George Washington, that the French king had agreed to provide troops and resources to the flailing Continental Army. This week, the boat is docked in the Washington, D.C. area, fittingly near Mount Vernon, and various French and American entities are feting the occasion. They have good reason. America's first and longest ally is France, despite occasional variances in political dispositions....
  • Why Does George Washington Have Two Birthdays?

    02/01/2016 10:37:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    The FindingDulcinea Blog ^ | February 11, 2010 | Denis Cummings
    This Monday is the federal holiday Washington's Birthday, better known as Presidents Day, celebrated on the third Monday of February. If you want to know the actual birth date of George Washington, you will find two dates: Feb. 22, 1732, and Feb. 11, 1731. Both dates are correct. What accounts for the discrepancy? When Washington was born, Britain and its colonies were using the Julian calendar. Developed in first century B.C. under Julius Caesar, it had three too many leap days per 400-year period. The Catholic Church corrected the error in the 16th century by introducing a modified calendar (the...
  • George Washington's Thanksgiving Proclamation

    11/26/2015 5:54:04 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Issued at the request of Congress, Nov. 25 1789. Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the Providence of God...
  • The Founding Fathers - Who is your favourite?

    10/27/2015 1:48:04 PM PDT · by ConfusedSwede · 75 replies
    Archives.gov ^ | Today | ?
    My favorites are Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine.
  • Archaeologists uncover secrets of historic Rev War battle site (Parker's Revenge for Lex)

    10/08/2015 5:57:56 AM PDT · by ETL · 16 replies
    AP, via FoxNews.com ^ | September 30, 2015
    Full title: Archaeologists uncover secrets of historic Revolutionary War battle site BOSTON – Archeologists using 21st-century technology are mapping out the exact spots British soldiers and Colonial militiamen were standing as they fired at each other during a pivotal skirmish on the first day of the American Revolution. Parker's Revenge, as the fight is known, occurred on April 19, 1775, after the battles of Lexington and Concord as the redcoats retreated to Boston. Capt. John Parker, commander of the 77-member Lexington militia, had met the 700-strong British column on the green at 5:30 a.m. Eight of his men were killed...
  • How would George feel about The Donald?

    10/04/2015 5:08:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 46 replies
    The Piqua Daily Call ^ | October 4, 2015 | David Lindeman, former editor, The Troy Daily News
    I would like to have George Washington come back from the dead for one day. I’d stand there and look at George, wearing those tight socks and that funny white wig, and I’d ask him the question: “George, what do you think about Donald Trump?” I’m not sure George would know how to respond. I certainly don’t. The Donald’s phenomenon has been the big political story of the summer, interrupted only for short periods of time when someone else loses some more emails or resigns from Congress or visits from the Vatican. All those other things are interesting, to be...