Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $69,645
81%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $15.5k to go!! We can do this. Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: thegeneral

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Women at war: The 'lady' and George Washington's secret six (the Culper Ring)

    11/08/2014 9:32:44 PM PST · by RoosterRedux · 22 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | Brian Kilmeade
    Let the politicians debate equal pay and pursue the folly of a war on women in America. Personally, I would like to take a moment to salute woman at war—one woman and one war in particular: Agent 355, the female covert operative of the Revolutionary War’s Culper Spy Ring. When my book "George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spy Ring that Saved the American Revolution" ,written with co-author Don Yaeger, was first released in November 2013, over half-a-million people scrambled to buy it and one of the elements that struck a chord most strongly with readers was the enigmatic figure of...
  • The 1814 burning of Washington, D.C.

    08/31/2014 12:25:10 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 46 replies
    CBS News ^ | 8-31-14
    Moving from the Capitol, British Navy Rear Admiral George Cockburn, Army Major General Robert Ross, and 150 redcoats marched to the White House. Rocca asked Allman what the Britons' impression of the White House would have been as they walked in the door: "I think that it was a pretty good-sized house, but not a palatial one. No Buckingham Palace. No Versailles. That it was, you know, reasonably well decorated." The biggest surprise? A dinner set for 40. So the British feasted in the White House dining room before burning the mansion down. Here, too, the walls survived. But little...
  • College Board Erases the Founding Fathers

    08/16/2014 10:13:32 AM PDT · by Steelfish · 80 replies
    American Thinker ^ | August16, 2014 | Patrick Jakeway
    August 16, 2014 College Board Erases the Founding Fathers. By Patrick Jakeway The classic novel Brave New World describes a future in which people have lost all of their liberty and in which they have become drugged robots obedient to a central authority. It also details how this control was first established. First, the rulers had to erase all history and all the people’s memory of a time before their bondage. Today, the history of George Washington's leadership has been erased in the new Advanced Placement (AP) U.S. History test/curriculum, taking effect in the fall of 2014. The College Board,...
  • Was the American Revolution sinful?

    08/05/2014 7:14:54 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 64 replies
    World Magazine ^ | 8/2/14 | Rod D Martin
    A father explains to his son why the Founding Fathers were justified in overthrowing the rule of King George... There is a recurring—albeit ill-informed—question in Christian circles regarding Romans 13 (which counsels dutiful subordination to legally established authorities) and the American Revolution: Were the Founding Fathers in sin when they rebelled against King George? Most recently, my son (a Harvard- and Yale-educated Mayo Clinic doctor who performs heart and lung transplants daily but does not have a lot of time for historiography) asked me for some references he could read to help answer this question, which was raised by some...
  • The surprising ages of the Founding Fathers on July 4, 1776

    07/06/2014 8:35:05 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 76 replies
    kottke.org ^ | August 13, 2013
    For the Journal of the American Revolution, Todd Andrlik compiled a list of the ages of the key participants in the Revolutionary War as of July 4, 1776. Many of them were surprisingly young: Marquis de Lafayette, 18 James Monroe, 18 Gilbert Stuart, 20 Aaron Burr, 20 Alexander Hamilton, 21 Betsy Ross, 24 James Madison, 25 This is kind of blowing my mind...because of the compression of history, I'd always assumed all these people were around the same age. But in thinking about it, all startups need young people...Hamilton, Lafayette, and Burr were perhaps the Gates, Jobs, and Zuckerberg of...
  • New England man had oldest birth date ever to be photographed

    05/30/2014 4:00:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 105 replies
    New Market Press VT ^ | Thursday, July 25, 2013 | News & Staff Reports
    Conrad Heyer crossed the Delaware with Washington... was born in 1749 and was 103 when he was photographed, He was the earliest born man in history to have been photographed. Heyer crossed the Delaware River with George Washington in 1776. Conrad Heyer was born in 1749 and was 103 when he was photographed, He was the earliest born man in history to have been photographed. Heyer crossed the Delaware River with George Washington in 1776. New Englander Conrad Heyer was born in 1749 and was 103 when he was photographed. According to the Maine Historical Society, Heyer may be the...
  • Historic stone house being restored to former stature [Battle of King's Mountain]

    12/29/2005 3:44:44 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 35 replies · 2,059+ views
    Kingsport Times-News ^ | December 29, 2005 | JAMES BROOKS
    The old Klepper house, also known as the old stone house, was built in 1792 for Col. George Gillispie, who with his son Capt. Thomas Gillispie were members of the Overmountain Men that turned the tide of the American Revolution at King's Mountain, S.C., in 1780. Tony Duncan photo.LIMESTONE - They called it the old Klepper house in Limestone. As memories of the family faded and the house began to be obscured by brush and trees growing up around it, it was known as the old stone house. It is one of three stone houses built in Washington County...
  • April 30th, The Lost Holiday

    04/27/2014 8:17:33 AM PDT · by No One Special · 33 replies
    The American Thinker ^ | April 27, 2014 | Craig Seibert
    A little-remembered anniversary occurs this April 30 -- the 225th Anniversary of the U.S. Constitution being put into operation. Many might remember that April 30, 1789 was the day that George Washington took the oath of office and gave his inaugural address. But lest we forget, this very act also marked the launching of the American Constitutional System. Those living at the time knew what a landmark day it was and the details surrounding the events of the day show this depth of understanding. Through the process of time, neglect and the active rewriting of American history, these details have...
  • Chronicling the Course of Human Events

    07/05/2012 6:57:12 AM PDT · by jfd1776 · 7 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | July 5, 2012 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    In June, 1776, with Richard Henry Lee’s proposal for independence from Great Britain awaiting a vote in the Continental Congress, a committee of five – Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston, Roger Sherman, and Thomas Jefferson – selected one from among their number to be the key author of a formal Declaration of Independence. While the entire Continental Congress contributed to it, through their helpful editing, the principal author has long been known to be Thomas Jefferson, and he was rightly so proud of it that he wanted his authorship of this document to be on his tombstone rather...
  • If the Times Covered the American Revolution (Must Read)

    07/06/2006 10:55:34 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies · 797+ views
    The American Prowler ^ | 7/7/2006 | Andrew Cline
    If the Times Covered the American Revolution (We'd still be paying exorbitant taxes on breakfast tea.)If the New York Times had been around to report on the American Revolution, its coverage might have looked something like this... * Dec. 16, 1773: Sons of Liberty to raid East India Company ships BOSTON -- Members of the undergound organization called the Sons of Liberty are plotting to raid three East India Company ships tonight and dump the cargo -- thousands of pounds worth of Darjeeling tea -- into Boston Harbor, the Times has learned. Contacted at his headquarters, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson said,...
  • The FReeper Foxhole Enjoys a Lazy Sunday - January 30th, 2005

    01/29/2005 9:46:14 PM PST · by snippy_about_it · 82 replies · 1,299+ views
    Lord, Keep our Troops forever in Your care Give them victory over the enemy... Grant them a safe and swift return... Bless those who mourn the lost. . FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer for all those serving their country at this time. ...................................................................................... ........................................... U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues Where Duty, Honor and Countryare acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated. Our Mission: The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans. In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should feel...
  • Mount Vernon, Alarmed by Fading Knowledge, Seeks to Pep Up Washington's Image

    07/29/2002 5:19:55 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 46 replies · 2,396+ views
    NY Times ^ | 7-29-02 | STEPHEN KINZER
    Gen. Washington courageously attempting to rallyfleeing militia at Kip's Bay, Manhattan MOUNT VERNON, Va. — Say goodbye to the stern and remote George Washington, the boring one who wore a powdered wig, had wooden teeth and always told the truth. Embrace instead the action hero of the 18th century, a swashbuckling warrior who survived wild adventures, led brilliant military campaigns, directed spy rings and fell in love with his best friend's wife. That is the new message from the people who run Mount Vernon, the estate where Washington spent much of his life and where more than one million people...
  • Experts say: George Washington's honesty a sign of stupidity

    05/27/2010 9:45:22 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 42 replies · 1,241+ views
    American Thinker ^ | 05/27/2010 | Peter Wilson
    It is no secret that many of us who reject Obama's neo-communist agenda have turned to the Founding Fathers for guidance; when you think your country's founding principles are under attack, it's natural to re-acquaint yourself with the writings of the extraordinary group of men who wrote our founding documents.   When we examine this genius cluster, George Washington is perhaps the best loved.  Last week Glenn Beck recommended the four-year old, 1208-page tome, George Washington's Sacred Fire, which discusses pop culture fave topics like the religious beliefs of our first President.  The book shot to number one on Amazon's bestseller...
  • How George Washington Celebrated Christmas

    12/25/2013 10:57:57 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    U.S. News ^ | 12-25-13 | John Avlon
    The father of our nation knew how to throw a Christmas party. I’m talking thousands of pounds of bacon, gallons of homemade rye whiskey, a massive “great cake” and what he called an “attack of Christmas pies.” Everyone got four days off to celebrate at his Mount Vernon plantation and while there was no regular scheduled appearance by Santa, there was at least one recorded visit by a camel. But the abundant Christmas feasts of Washington’s later years were preceded by some years that were lean on Christmas cheer. When young George was 8 years old in 1740, his home...
  • The American Flag Daily: George Washington's Death & Alabama Statehood

    12/14/2013 5:47:03 AM PST · by Master Zinja · 3 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | December 14, 2013 | FlagBearer
    Today, in 1799, George Washington died at his Mount Vernon home. He was remembered by Congressman Henry Lee with these famous words: "First in war—first in peace—and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in the humble and enduring scenes of private life; pious, just, humane, temperate, and sincere; uniform, dignified, and commanding, his example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of that example lasting...." Today also marks the statehood of Alabama, the 23rd state to join the Union.
  • New AMC show: Turn (about America's first spy ring in the Revolutionary War)

    04/03/2014 11:52:22 AM PDT · by FrdmLvr · 20 replies
    I thought this sounded good. It starts this Sunday on AMC. Has anyone heard anything about it yet?
  • ‘Turn,’ AMC’s New Series About America’s First Spy Ring, Is A Visually Arresting Historical Epic

    04/06/2014 9:42:14 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 79 replies
    The new AMC series Turn, which premieres April 6, is bewildering at first. We’re dropped smack in the middle of British-occupied New York. The year is 1776, and Abraham Woodhull (Jamie Bell) is scraping by as a cabbage farmer and sometime innkeeper in Setauket, Long Island. He’s husband to Mary (Meegan Warner), and father to a young child. His father, Richard (Kevin McNally), is a local magistrate loyal to George III. Then the scene shifts. We’re now in New Jersey. A stunning overhead shot reveals a sprawling field of bluecoat rebel bodies lying next to a pool dyed red with...
  • New RevWar TV series on AMC: "Turn," about Gen. Washington's Long Island spy network.

    03/23/2014 2:43:39 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 43 replies
    AMC ^ | March 23, 2014 | Anon
    It looks really, really good from the previews/website. I don't want to go beyond crazy here, but it seems to have a slant that Freepers would like. We can only hope...From their website:"Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN centers on Abe Woodhull (Jamie Bell), a farmer living in British-occupied Long Island who bands together with his childhood friends to form the Culper Ring -- an unlikely team of secret agents who not only went on to help George Washington...
  • Book(s) about George Washington

    03/08/2014 8:51:35 AM PST · by roofgoat · 29 replies
    Looking to buy a book or books that accurately and honestly cover the life of George Washington. Something I can find on Amazon. Any comments why you liked the book would be appreciated. Thanks
  • Why is George Washington the Greatest President?

    02/17/2014 10:51:10 AM PST · by Reagan79 · 62 replies
    Acton PowerBlog ^ | February 17 | Ray Nothstine
    Sometimes I recoil a little when somebody declares that there can be an American president greater than George Washington. Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee declared Washington, “First in the hearts of his countrymen.” Washington is great for many things, but perhaps he is greatest for the manner in which he surrendered power not once but twice. One of the best recent commentaries written on Washington is David Boaz’s, “The Man Who Would Not Be King.” In the piece from 2006, Boaz wonderfully sums up the depth of Washington’s immense character and what that means for liberty and America. The entire commentary...
  • Washington's Farewell Address 1796

    01/21/2014 8:18:49 AM PST · by Renfield · 8 replies
    Avalon Project ^ | 1796 | George Washington
    Friends and Citizens: The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the executive government of the United States being not far distant, and the time actually arrived when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those out of whom a choice is to be made. I beg...
  • America Does Not “Need a King”, America Needs a President

    01/13/2014 5:18:25 AM PST · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | January 13, 2014 | Rebecca Furdec
    Consider George Washington. Led the Continental Army. Presided over the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Elected unanimously to serve as the first President of the United States. Elected unanimously to serve a second term. Endearingly titled “father of his country” even during his own lifetime. Like many leaders, George Washington was a powerful man. A great man. A popular man. Ultimately, though, he knew how to do something that so many revolutionary leaders do not. He knew how to relinquish power. He did so twice, both after his leadership of the Continental Army and after his second presidential term, the latter...
  • Video doc link: Washington's 12/26/76 attack on Hessian camp: Trenton/Delaware Crossing

    12/23/2013 6:08:10 PM PST · by ETL · 12 replies
    This is part three of a 6-part 1997 PBS documentary on the Revolutionary War. The episode is titled "The Times That Try Men's Souls" (1776-1777). In addition to the Delaware River crossing and Hessian camp attack it also covers the British invasion of New York and subsequent Battle of Brooklyn, aka, The Battle of Long Island. "Days after the Declaration of Independence is signed, a British force arrives in New York harbor. Washington and his troops are driven to New Jersey. With only a few days of enlistment left for many of his volunteers, a desperate Washington leads his army...
  • George Washington’s Return from Service to Mount Vernon, Christmas Eve, 1783

    12/23/2013 1:48:31 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 58 replies
    Pharmboy | 12/23/13 | Pharmboy
    As many of you know, there was an hiatus between Cornwallis’ surrender at Yorktown (October 19, 1781) and the Treaty of Paris (September 3, 1783). Washington stayed with his army and did not return to his beloved Mount Vernon until word of the treaty’s signing reached him, and he would see the British Army and Navy depart NYC on Evacuation Day, November 25, 1783. New Yorkers had made up a rhyme, “From Kip’s Bay to Evacuation Day” that had much meaning to them since Kip’s Bay (near present day First Avenue and 30th St. on the East River) was the...
  • George Washington Finally Gets His Presidential Library

    09/27/2013 8:55:36 AM PDT · by re_tail20 · 32 replies
    Newsmax ^ | September 27, 2013 | David A. Patten
    Since Franklin Roosevelt, every modern U.S. president has opened his own presidential library. On Friday, President George Washington, the nation’s first, finally will get his turn, as a state-of-the-art presidential library is christened in his honor. Washington’s beloved Mount Vernon steps into a bold new era with the formal opening of The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington. Some 800 dignitaries, officials, and VIPs will be on hand to witness the unveiling of a library purpose-built to preserve the original books and papers from Gen. Washington’s personal collection. Noted historian and best-selling author David McCullough...
  • The surprising ages of the Founding Fathers on July 4, 1776

    08/13/2013 3:43:07 PM PDT · by NYer · 99 replies
    kottke.org ^ | August 13, 2013 | Todd Andrlik
    For the Journal of the American Revolution, Todd Andrlik compiled a list of the ages of the key participants in the Revolutionary War as of July 4, 1776. Many of them were surprisingly young: Marquis de Lafayette, 18 James Monroe, 18 Gilbert Stuart, 20 Aaron Burr, 20 Alexander Hamilton, 21 Betsy Ross, 24 James Madison, 25 This is kind of blowing my mind...because of the compression of history, I'd always assumed all these people were around the same age. But in thinking about it, all startups need young people...Hamilton, Lafayette, and Burr were perhaps the Gates, Jobs, and Zuckerberg of...
  • George W’s Spooks: Inside the Culper Ring. [NR Interview]

    08/10/2013 10:45:23 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 13 replies
    National Review ^ | June 19, 2013 | Alexander Rose
    ALEXANDER ROSE: Thankfully, this isn’t a chicken-and-egg question, so the answer is a simple one: Washington’s spies, otherwise known as the Culper Ring. There were five primary members. First in seniority was Benjamin Tallmadge, a dragoons officer who acted as the Ring’s manager in American-held Connecticut and made sure their intelligence was passed on to Washington back at headquarters. The agent who sailed back and forth across Long Island Sound (I prefer the more colorful contemporary description of it, “the Devil’s Belt”), tussling with freebooters and dodging patrol-boats, was Caleb Brewster, a former whaleboatman who really, really liked fighting. Brewster’s...
  • 12 Little-Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence (Part 1)

    06/25/2013 3:50:40 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 16 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | June 25, 2013 | Chuck Norris
    Being about a week away from Independence Day, I was doing a little reflecting upon the history surrounding the Declaration of Independence. And I thought it would be of equal interest to many of my readers to look at some often-overlooked aspects of the declaration's production and legacy. Several historical websites hold some fascinating facts about this national treasure -- including the National Archives and Records Administration's site, at http://www.archives.gov. In addition, on History's website, the article "9 Things You May Not Know About the Declaration of Independence," by Elizabeth Harrison, has some intriguing notes. Let me elaborate on some...
  • 12 Little-Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence (Part 2)

    07/02/2013 3:58:07 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 15 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 2, 2013 | Chuck Norris
    Last week, I highlighted four little-known facts about the Declaration of Independence. Here are a few more facts to add to those oddities: There are at least 26 surviving paper copies of the Declaration of Independence of the hundreds made in July 1776 for circulation among the Colonies. After Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, the Committee of Five, which was appointed to write it, was also responsible with overseeing its reproduction for proclamation to those living in the Colonies. The reproduction was done at the shop of Philadelphia printer John Dunlap. "On July 5, Dunlap's copies were dispatched across...
  • 12 Little-Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence (Part 3)

    07/09/2013 3:32:00 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 7 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 9, 2013 | Chuck Norris
    Over the past two weeks, I've highlighted eight little-known facts about the Declaration of Independence. (If you missed the first two parts of this series, you can find them at http://www.creators.com/opinion/chuck-norris.html.) Here are the last four facts in my series: 9) One of the 26 known July 1776 copies of the Declaration of Independence was found behind an old painting purchased at a flea market for $4. In 1991, one of 24 known copies at the time of the declaration -- and one of only three known to be privately owned -- was auctioned for $2.42 million. What's even more...
  • Who coined the name: 'United States of America'? Mystery might have intriguing answer.

    07/05/2013 8:48:20 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 07/05/2013 | By Byron DeLear
    Historians have long tried to pinpoint exactly when the name 'United States of America' was first used and by whom. A new find suggests the man might have been George Washington himself. As if George Washington hasn’t been credited enough with laying the foundation stones of the American republic, a new discovery might put one more feather in his cap. Our leading Founding Father could have been author of the country's name. The identity of who coined the name “United States of America” has eluded historians for years. Online sources vary greatly, erroneously crediting Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton,...
  • George Washington: The Crossing

    07/05/2013 3:32:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    American Spectator ^ | 7.4.13 | Jeffrey Lord
    Jack Levin’s Fourth of July reminder of the courage that created America. It was December, 1776. George Washington’s army, encamped on the banks of the frozen Delaware River, was struggling and near death. As Jack E. Levin recounts in his New York Times bestseller, the famous story of George Washington: The Crossing (with a preface by his son Mark Levin) is riveting. A timely reminder on this Fourth of July 2013 — 237 years later — of the sheer, raw courage it took to bring the United States of America to life as more than the ringing words written on...
  • Faces of the American Revolution [Photos of Soldiers of Amer Revolution]

    07/04/2013 7:14:45 PM PDT · by BunnySlippers · 71 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 07/04/13
    These stunning images are early photographs of some of the men who bravely fought for their country in the Revolutionary War some 237 years ago. Images of Americans who fought in the Revolution are exceptionally rare because few of the Patriots of 1775-1783 lived until the dawn of practical photography in the early 1840s. These early photographs – known as daguerreotypes – are exceptionally rare camera-original, fully-identified photographs of veterans of the War for Independence – the war that established the United States.
  • Who coined 'United States of America'? Mystery might have intriguing answer

    07/04/2013 4:41:48 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 12 replies
    As if George Washington hasn’t been credited enough with laying the foundation stones of the American republic, a new discovery might put one more feather in his cap. Our leading Founding Father could have been author of the country's name. The identity of who coined the name “United States of America” has eluded historians for years. Online sources vary greatly, erroneously crediting Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and others.
  • Guide to American Presidents GEORGE WASHINGTON 1732-99 [GW's English Ancestry]

    06/18/2013 8:25:00 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 20 replies
    Burke's Peerage ^ | Unknown | Anon.
    1st PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1789-97 FAMILY ESSAY "Washington came of very good blood - aw, quite good - I b'lieve." Attributed by his classmates to Amory Blaine in F. Scott Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise. The Washingtons are of unusual antiquity in European terms, let alone American ones. A direct male ancestry has been traced back to William de Wessington or Wessyngton (i.e., Washington, a town in Tyne and Wear, formerly County Durham, in northern England), who was living in the late 12th century. The remoter ancestry is not absolutely certain but a detailed argument has...
  • The Americanness of the American Revolution

    06/17/2013 6:15:52 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 28 replies
    City Journal ^ | Myron Magnet
    Why was the American Revolution, of all great revolutions, the only successful one, resulting in two centuries and more of unexampled freedom and prosperity? The French Revolution, by contrast, illuminated by America’s example and Enlightenment thought, began in blissful optimism but collapsed into a blood-soaked tyranny much worse than the monarchy it deposed. It spawned a military dictatorship that convulsed Europe and roiled half the globe for over a decade with wars of grandiose imperial aggression that slew at least 3 million. And the result of 25 years of turmoil? The Bourbon monarchy, minus the Enlightenment of its earlier incarnation,...
  • INTERNATIONAL TRADE ACROSS THE CENTURIES

    04/07/2013 5:38:47 AM PDT · by jfd1776 · 10 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | April 6, 2013 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    NATIONAL SECURITY ISSUES DON'T END AT THE BORDER For over a decade, the British Crown had been at war with the American colonies. One could argue that April 6, 1776 was the day that the American colonies had finally had it. The sundering of the bonds between two peoples is not something that happens in a day. The relationship between Great Britain and what was to become the United States of America began as a close-knit bond. The link between these frontier territories and their mother country was tight and fond at first; Americans were proud to think of themselves...
  • Pa. field holds secrets of 1780s British POW camp

    04/07/2013 3:38:51 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 20 replies
    AP ^ | 4-6-13 | MARK SCOLFORO
    Associated Press/Mark Scolforo - In this photo made on Tuesday, March 26, 2013, Carol Tanzola, president of Friends of Camp Security, points out the property on a 47-acre parcel, located about four miles east of York, Pa. It includes the spot where a 1979 archaeological study found numerous artifacts that confirmed local lore that the area had once served as Camp Security, a prison for the English, Scottish and Canadian soldiers who were captured after defeats in the battles of Saratoga and Yorktown. (AP Photo/Mark Scolforo) (AP) — The mud of a south-central Pennsylvania cornfield may soon produce answers about...
  • George Washington’s Rye Whiskey Going on Sale (@ Mount Vernon Estate in Virginia)

    03/26/2013 6:38:50 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 25 replies
    Hot Air ^ | March 26, 2013 | Mary Katharine Ham
    George Washington’s rye whiskey going on sale Rye whiskey using George Washington’s own recipe will soon go on sale at the first president’s Mount Vernon estate in Virginia. The presidential home reconstructed Washington’s distillery and will make more than 1,100 bottles of unaged whiskey available beginning April 4. The bottles sell for $95 each. Mount Vernon says the rye is the most authentic version of Washington’s whiskey available. Washington was a detailed record keeper, and distillers used the same grain recipe and fermentation process as it was done 250 years ago. No word on whether it’ll be available online or...
  • In the Shadow of the Greats: Humility and Arrogance

    03/08/2013 2:59:49 PM PST · by JERussell · 1 replies
    "......Think on this a moment. Washington never assumed. He never assumed that he would be chosen to lead the army (and when he was he turned down their offer of payment for his service), and he never assumed that he would be made the first president of the United States. I thought about this as I was driving home from work the day that I heard this particular lecture. Dr Freeman was spot on. His modest demeanor was exactly what this country needed. It still is......"
  • GEORGE WASHINGTON, KEEPER OF THE PEACE

    02/22/2013 6:46:34 PM PST · by jfd1776 · 11 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | February 22, 2013 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    A year into his second term, President George Washington celebrated his 63rd birthday on February 22, 1794, and received one of the best birthday presents any head of state ever received. The new minister from France, Jean Antoine Joseph Baron Fauchet presented his credentials as the new ambassador from France, replacing the troublesome Edmund-Charles Genet at last. Citizen Genet was many things. A child prodigy, fluent in six languages by age twelve, he was born at Versailles in 1763, the only son of a French civil servant. Genet served as court translator in his youth and was then sent to...
  • George Washington's Bibles Coming to Historic Arkansas Museum

    01/30/2013 5:16:31 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 5 replies
    Arkansas Matters ^ | 1-28-13 | KARK 4 News
    The Historic Arkansas Museum will have two of George Washington's Bibles on display beginning Feb. 8. According to the museum's website, the Bible from the first president's inauguration will be on display for only two days, Feb. 8 from 5:00-8:00 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 9 from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The George Washington Family Bible will also be exhibited, but will be on display for a longer period of time.
  • Christmas at Valley Forge 1777 with George Washington

    12/25/2012 3:15:24 PM PST · by lowbridge · 17 replies
    http://williamdbailey.wordpress.com ^ | december 25, 2012 | ETHELENE DYER JONES
    Many of us have ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War. Whether they were with General Washington at Valley Forge or at Cowpens or King’s Mountain or any of the other notable battlegrounds of our War for Independence, they were there to lay down their very lives as the price for freedom. Let us take a little time to recall Christmas, 1777, during that war… Christmas in wartime is especially difficult, and so it was at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania in 1777. “These are the times that try men’s souls,” wrote Thomas Paine in his well-circulated pamphlet entitled “The American Crisis.”...
  • George Washington's 1776 Christmas Present: Saving the American Revolution

    12/25/2012 8:20:59 AM PST · by Bratch · 9 replies
    Yahoo! Voices ^ | Dec 20, 2006 | Brian Tubbs
    The American Revolution was over. The United States of America was finished. The Continental Army was all but finished in December 1776 as the British and their Hessian (German) mercenary allies settled in for a long winter rest. In those days, it was customary that armies rest and refit in the winter months in preparation for the campaign seasons of spring and summer. And the British were all about custom and tradition. No matter, thought the British. They saw little need to move directly against Washington's army and risk further casualties. The Continental Army was disintegrating. Unpaid, ill-equipped, cold, and...
  • A Revolutionary War General Escapes History’s Margins

    10/22/2012 6:14:20 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 26 replies
    NY Times ^ | 10-22-12 | JULIE TURKEWITZ
    Over 150 people gathered Sunday at Trinity Church in Manhattan to honor Gen. Horatio Gates. Mention “the Victor at Saratoga” and people may think that you are talking about a horse. Yet that so-called victor, Gen. Horatio Gates, the commander of the American forces at the Battle of Saratoga, played a crucial role in the triumph there over the British forces of Gen. John Burgoyne in October 1777. Though other figures of the War of Independence are still widely revered and studied, Gates faded from the national memory. He died in New York in 1806 and was buried at Trinity...
  • The Wisdom of Washington

    07/01/2012 7:33:34 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 23 replies
    NY Post ^ | June 30, 2012 | Maureen Callahan
    His annotated Constitution was worth $9.8 million at auction — but was priceless to a nation When George Washington’s personal, annotated copy of the Constitution sold last week for $9.8 million at auction in New York, it didn’t just set a record. It allowed us to see, for the first time, how cautiously our first president assumed the office, his eyes not toward history but the future. “This shows that he let the presidency define him, rather than for him to define the presidency,” says Edward Lengel, military historian and author of two books on Washington. “He was a man...
  • George Washington's U.S. Constitution up for auction [today at New York City's Christie's]

    06/22/2012 6:02:22 AM PDT · by ETL · 38 replies
    Reuters ^ | June 13, 2012 | Chris Michaud
    (Reuters) - A gold-embossed piece of U.S. history will go up for sale this month, when Christie's auctions off George Washington's personal copy of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. The documents, which date to 1789 and are signed and annotated by the first U.S. president, are poised to fetch from $2 million to $3 million when they hit the block on June 22, the auction house said on Wednesday. The bound papers constitute Washington's personal copy of the Acts of Congress. These include the Constitution, whose preamble promises to "secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our...
  • James Madison Letter to General Washington

    06/16/2012 12:52:03 PM PDT · by Jacquerie · 32 replies
    The Constitution Society ^ | April 16th 1787 | James Madison
    Two hundred and twenty five years ago, and one month before the Philadelphia Convention, aka the Constitutional Convention, Congressional delegate James Madison responded to a letter from George Washington. He offered thoughts on his new plan of government, the Virginia Plan. Compared to the Articles of Confederation it was radical, yet it was structurally close enough to the mixed governments of the States to be familiar as well. It would emerge in modified form five months later as The Constitution of the United States of America.To George Washington New York, April 16 1787 Dear Sir, I have been honoured with...
  • BOOK REVIEW: GEORGE WASHINGTON’S MILITARY GENIUS

    06/12/2012 7:10:47 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 48 replies
    Human Events ^ | 6/12/2012 | Jarrett Stepman of review
    George Washington is justifiably called the "Father of America" for his military and civilian leadership during the American Revolution and his two terms as America's first president, however, in the new book, George Washington’s Military Genius, General David Palmer persuasively argues that Washington's strategic military talent was key to his success. Gen. Palmer, who is a former superintendent of West Point, attempts to bust the myths surrounding Washington’s American Revolutionary War experience and to put the accomplishments on the battlefield in perspective. Some historians view Washington as an incompetent bungler who merely got lucky in a few engagements with the...
  • George Washington, Circular Letter to the States

    06/08/2012 2:13:48 PM PDT · by Jacquerie · 18 replies
    The Founders' Constitution ^ | June 8th, 1783 | George Washington
    When word that peace with Great Britain was assured, General Washington issued a blistering condemnation of Congress. In addition to demands for soldier's back pay, he called for reforms to the Articles of Confederation. His admonitions would culminate in 1788 with ratification of the Constitution. George Washington: When we consider the magnitude of the prize we contended for, the doubtful nature of the contest, and the favorable manner in which it has terminated, we shall find the greatest possible reason for gratitude and rejoicing; this is a theme that will afford infinite delight to every benevolent and liberal mind, whether...