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Keyword: thevikings

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  • Viking longship to sail across North Sea - The Sea Stallion of Glendalough

    05/27/2007 7:36:50 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 29 replies · 3,185+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 5/27/07 | Jan M. Olson - ap
    ROSKILDE, Denmark - On the skipper's command, deckhands haul in tarred ropes to lower the flax sail. Oars splash into the water. The crew, grimacing with strain, pull with steady strokes sending the sleek Viking longship gliding through the fjord. A thousand years ago, the curved-prow warship might have spewed out hordes of bloodthirsty Norsemen ready to pillage and burn. This time, the spoils are adventure rather than plunder. The Sea Stallion of Glendalough is billed as the world's biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction, modeled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord after being buried...
  • [Viking ship replica] Sea Stallion arrives in Inverie, Scotland

    07/31/2007 11:54:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 478+ views
    Sail World ^ | Saturday, July 28, 2007 | Tinna Damgard-Sorensen
    The Sea Stallion right before arrival to the Orkney Islands Pastime and cosy atmosphere. Sea Stallion taken from the support vessel 'Cable One' by the Viking ship And the further on, 4 hours of rowing in between the Orkney - Sea Stallion.
  • Irish River Find May Be First Discovery Of Viking Ship

    01/29/2007 9:25:44 AM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,151+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 1-26-2007 | Andrew Bushe
    Irish river find may be first discovery of Viking ship by Andrew Bushe Fri Jan 26, 5:29 PM ETAFP/Scanpix/File Photo: A replica of a Viking ship sails off Oslo in 2006. An ancient boat discovered... " DUBLIN (AFP) - An ancient boat discovered in a riverbed north of Dublin may be the first Viking longship found in the country, Environment and Heritage Minister Dick Roche said. The wreck in the River Boyne, close to the northeastern port of Drogheda, was described by Roche as potentially an "enormously exciting discovery". The vessel, nine metres (30 feet) wide by 16 metres long,...
  • Replica Viking longship sets sail - Sea Stallion of Glendalough

    07/01/2007 12:16:55 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 1,153+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 7/1/07 | Jan M. Olson - ap
    ROSKILDE, Denmark - A 100-foot-long replica of a Viking longship glided out of a Danish fjord Sunday with 65 crew members determined to sail across the North Sea to Ireland. Roughly 4,000 people watched the Sea Stallion of Glendalough begin the attempt to relive the perilous journey its Viking forebear made some 1,000 years ago. The ship is billed as the world's biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction. It was modeled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord after being buried in the seabed for nearly 950 years. "The Vikings are coming back. Be prepared," skipper...
  • Sea Stallion Steps Back In History

    05/27/2008 3:06:51 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 794+ views
    Irish Examiner ^ | 5-25-2008 | Richard Collins
    Sea Stallion steps back in historyRichard Collins on a remarkable Danish replica ship. AT three o’clock next Thursday afternoon Dubliners will be treated to an extraordinary spectacle. The Viking ship Sea Stallion, which has been on display at the National Museum in Collins Barracks, will be lifted 50 metres into the air by a giant crane. Then the huge vessel will be swung out over the three-storey museum building and deposited in the nearby Croppy’s Acre. In the middle of the night it will be moved to the River Liffey, prior to its long sea journey back to Denmark. The...
  • Viking voyage: The crew's diary

    07/13/2007 7:40:37 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 49 replies · 986+ views ^ | 07/12/2007 | Hans Jacob Andersen
    A replica Viking ship has set sail for Dublin from the Danish port of Roskilde. It is currently crossing the North Sea, in an attempt to recreate the voyages undertaken by early Norsemen. The volunteer crew on the 30m-long (100ft) Sea Stallion from Glendalough are recording their experiences on the journey. Bad weather is already proving a major challenge. Like the vikings the crew have no shelter from the weather, no cleaning facilities and no lavatories.
  • Real Viking Ship Completes North Atlantic Crossing

    06/30/2016 11:32:36 AM PDT · by Ketill Frostbeard · 44 replies ^ | June 30, 2016 | GCaptain Staff
    The world’s largest viking ship has arrived in North America after crossing the North Atlantic Ocean on a journey from its homeport in Haugesund, Norway. The Viking ship, named Draken Harald Hårfagre, set sail from Norway with its approximately 32 crew members in late April and made stops in Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland, Canada, before making its way through the Saint Lawrence Seaway to Toronto for the Tall Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2016 festival this weekend. Future stops for the Viking ship include Chicago, Green Bay and Duluth, before heading to U.S. east coast with stops in New York City...
  • Body In Well Confirms Viking Saga

    06/12/2016 6:41:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | June 10, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists working in Trondheim in Norway are amazed by the discovery of a human skeleton in the bottom of an abandoned castle well. The skeleton provides evidence that confirms dramatic historical events mentioned in the Sagas. The location and contents of the well are mentioned in Sverre's Saga, a chronicle of one of the kings of Norway, and one of very few historical manuscripts describing events in the Norwegian Viking age and medieval period. Scholars have questioned the chronicle's trustworthiness as a historical document. But now, at least one part of the saga seems to hold truth -- down to...
  • Amateur archaeologist finds Denmark’s oldest crucifix

    05/17/2016 8:42:20 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 14 replies ^ | 5-17-16 | Christian W
    When amateur archaeologist Dennis Fabricius Holm got off work early last Friday and decided to spend a couple of hours searching a little field in Funen with his metal detector, little did he know he was about to make history. Holm stumbled across one of the most extraordinary finds in recent times near the little town of Aunslev when he discovered a crucifix that dates back about 1,100 years – Denmark’s oldest crucifix ever found. It could rewrite Danish history. “It’s a completely sensational find that dates back to the first half of the 900s,” Malene Refshauge Beck, a curator...
  • First Discovery Of A Pre-Columbian Port On The Gulf Coast

    04/20/2013 8:33:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, April 16, 2013 | INAH
    A retaining pier wall, four shrines and an unusual circular structure dating to over 1000 years old, have recently been found by archaeologists of the National Institute of anthropology and history (INAH) in the pre-Hispanic site of Tabuco in Veracruz... Tabuco is located on the southern bank of the Tuxpan River 5 km from the sea, on a narrow strip of land between the river and to the south are the mangroves of Tumilco. This Huastec site was explored in the 1940s by Gordon Ekholm, who carried out some initial investigations and determined the dates for occupation at between the...
  • View From Space Hints at a New Viking Site in North America

    04/01/2016 9:28:40 AM PDT · by zeestephen · 43 replies ^ | 31 March 2016 | Ralph Blumenthal
    A thousand years after the Vikings braved the icy seas from Greenland to the New World in search of timber and plunder, satellite technology has found intriguing evidence of a long-elusive prize in archaeology — a second Norse settlement in North America, further south than ever known.
  • 1,100 year-old Denmark crucifix ‘may change history’

    03/17/2016 12:25:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 71 replies ^ | 03-17-2016 | Staff
    A cross discovered by an amateur Danish archaeologist may "change history" according to an expert, who believes the cross may date from before Christianity is thought to have reached Denmark. An amateur archaeologist on the island of Funen made a startling discovery last week – a necklace resembling Jesus on the cross. But after posting a picture of the discovery on Facebook, Dennis Fabricius Holm quickly found that the item may have a lot more significance than he had initially thought. “I finished work early last Friday, so I decided to spend a couple of hours searching with my metal...
  • Was Viking ruler Rollo Danish or Norwegian?

    03/03/2016 8:11:39 AM PST · by Eurotwit · 73 replies
    The Local ^ | Published: 02 Mar 2016 11:49 GMT+01:00 | The Local
    Norwegian researches opened a tomb containing the remains of descendants of Viking leader Rollo in Normandy, France on Monday with the aim of putting an end to a centuries-long debate: was Rollo Danish or Norwegian? Norwegian researchers opened a tomb containing the remains of descendants of Viking leader Rollo in Normandy, France on Monday with the aim of putting an end to a centuries-long debate: was Rollo Danish or Norwegian? “We have worked on investigating this for about seven years, so to finally obtain material that we can test for DNA is huge,” historian Sturla Ellingvåg told NTB. Rollo was...
  • Evidence for unknown Viking king Airdeconut found in Lancashire

    12/14/2011 10:05:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, December 14 , 2011 | Maev Kennedy
    Evidence of a previously unknown Viking king has been discovered in a hoard of silver found by a metal detectorist, stashed in a lead box in a field in Lancashire. The 201 pieces of silver including beautiful arm rings, worn by Viking warriors, were found on the outskirts of Silverdale, a village near the coast in north Lancashire, by Darren Webster, using the metal detector his wife gave him as a Christmas present. It adds up to more than 1kg of silver, probably stashed for safe keeping around AD900 at a time of wars and power struggles among the Vikings...
  • Mead, drink of vikings, comes out of the Dark Ages

    12/29/2010 10:09:41 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 67 replies · 3+ views
    hosted ^ | Dec 29 | ALLEN G. BREED
    PITTSBORO, N.C. (AP) -- Mead, that drink of viking saga and medieval verse, is making a comeback. But this ain't your ancestors' honey wine. "It's not just for the Renaissance fair anymore," says Becky Starr, co-owner of Starrlight Mead, which recently opened in an old woven label mill in this little North Carolina town. In fact, this most ancient of alcoholic libations hasn't been this hot since Beowulf slew Grendel's dam and Geoffrey Chaucer fell in with the Canterbury pilgrims at the Tabard.
  • Why was a 9th century Viking woman buried with a ring that says ‘for Allah’ on it?

    02/05/2016 12:57:25 PM PST · by beaversmom · 90 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 18, 2015 | Adam Taylor
    By Adam Taylor March 18, 2015 Follow @mradamtaylor (Statens historiska museum / Christer Ahlin) In the modern-era, Scandinavian countries have become known for their sometimes awkward embrace of migrants from the Arab and Muslim world. But the history behind that relationship goes back far further than you might expect.Consider the case of a ring discovered in a Viking grave in Birka, a historic trading center in what is now Sweden. The woman in the grave died in the 9th century and was discovered around a thousand years later by the famous Swedish archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe, who spent years excavating...
  • Swedish woman finds 2,000-year-old gold ring

    11/23/2013 4:58:59 AM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 40 replies
    The Local (Sweden) ^ | 22 Nov 2013 16:23 GMT+01:00
    A woman was left gobsmacked when she learned the gold ring she stumbled across in a field was 2,000 years old. "I walk through that field several times a week. At first I thought it was one of the little rings we put around the chickens’ feet," Camilla Lundin, 51, told The Local. "I thought it was strange that it was so far away from home." Lundin took the ring home and showed her husband, who also didn't believe it was anything special. But Lundin took a picture which she sent to her brother, who immediately told her it was...
  • Gold coin may be key to solve Sweden's 'Pompeii'

    07/02/2015 9:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The Local ^ | August 18, 2014 | Solveig Rundquist/Oliver Gee
    A small team of archaeologists at Kalmar County museum, in collaboration with Lund University, has been digging at the site for the past three years. The team is studying the Migration Period in Scandinavian history, from about 400 to 550 AD... While the team has found several hundred of the coin already, Monday's discovery was a big one, said archaeologist and project manager Helena Victor. "This is the first one found in an archaeological context," she told The Local. "Normally we find them while we're plowing the field. But we found this one inside a house where we found people...
  • A Medieval Coin in New England Soil

    09/12/2010 3:35:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Beachcombing 'blog ^ | September 11, 2010 | eponymous blogger
    It was only when the coin was later identified as Viking that the game heated up. By then poor Mellegren -- who, Beachcombing must say was someone with a reputation for integrity -- had passed away. Beachcombing has no illusions about much of the nonsense written about pre-Columbian visits to North America. But in this case he would give a thumb and a half followed by two cheers and three quarters. There is a good chance that this really is what it seems: A European coin that found its way to North America in the twelfth century. Minted in Norway,...
  • Report: Ancient Roman graveyard found in suburban Copenhagen

    10/11/2007 11:55:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 309+ views
    IHT ^ | October 10, 2007 | Associated Press / Roskilde Dagblad
    Archaeologists have discovered a Roman cemetery from about 300 A.D. in suburban Copenhagen with about 30 graves, a newspaper reported Wednesday. "It is something special and rare in Denmark to have so many (ancient Roman) graves in one place," archaeologist Rune Iversen was quoted as saying by the Roskilde Dagblad newspaper. The graveyard's exact location in Ishoej, southwest of downtown Copenhagen, was being kept secret until the archaeologists from the nearby Kroppedal Museum have completed their work, the newspaper wrote... Archaeologists found necklaces and other personal belongings, as well as ceramics for containing food. "It shows that we're dealing with...
  • Kinder, Gentler Vikings? Not According to Their Slaves

    12/28/2015 10:24:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Monday, December 28, 2015 | Andrew Lawler
    New clues suggest slaves were vital to the Viking way of life -- and argue against attempts to soften the raiders' brutish reputation... Archaeologists are using recent finds and analyses of previous discoveries -- from iron collars in Ireland to possible plantation houses in Sweden -- to illuminate the role of slavery in creating and maintaining the Viking way of life. "This was a slave economy," said Neil Price, an archaeologist at Sweden's Uppsala University who spoke at a recent meeting that brought together archaeologists who study slavery and colonization. "Slavery has received hardly any attention in the past 30...
  • Clues to ancient invasion in DNA [ Scotland, Ireland, Picts, Vikings ]

    04/06/2009 10:00:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 1,344+ views
    BBC ^ | Thursday, April 2, 2009 | unattributed
    Scientific evidence of an ancient invasion of Scotland from Ireland may have been uncovered by DNA techniques. Researchers from Edinburgh University said studies of Scots living on Islay, Lewis, Harris and Skye found strong links with Irish people. Early historical sources recount how the Gaels came from Ireland about 500 AD and conquered the Picts in Argyll. Scientists said the study was the first demonstration of a significant Irish genetics component in Scots' ancestry. The research, which features work by geneticist Dr Jim Wilson, a specialist in population genetics, is being featured in programmes on Gaelic television channel BBC Alba....
  • Viking hoard discovery reveals little-known king 'airbrushed from history'

    12/12/2015 5:43:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    A hoard of Viking coins could change our understanding of English history, after showing how Alfred the Great 'airbrushed' out a rival king A Viking hoard discovered by an amateur metal detectorist could prompt the re-writing of English history, after experts claimed it shows how Alfred the Great "airbrushed" a rival king from history. Ceolwulf II of Mercia is barely mentioned in contemporary records and largely forgotten by history, only briefly described in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as an "unwise King's thane". But as of today, his reputation might be rescued after a haul of coins dug up after more than...
  • Vikings' mysterious abandonment of Greenland was not due to climate change, study suggests

    12/07/2015 6:24:36 PM PST · by skeptoid · 47 replies
    The Washington Post via Alaska Dispatch News ^ | December 7, 2015 | Chris Mooney
    It has often been cited as one of the classic examples of how changes in climate have shaped human history. Circa the year 985, Erik the Red led 25 ships from Iceland to Greenland, launching a Norse settlement there and giving the vast ice continent the name "Greenland." Within just a few decades, the Norse -- sometimes also dubbed Vikings -- would make it to Newfoundland as well. They maintained settlements of up to a few thousand people in southwest Greenland for several centuries, keeping livestock and hunting seals, building churches whose ruins still stand today, and sending back valuable...
  • Traces of Vikings found at Bathonea archaeological excavation in Istanbul

    12/08/2015 2:32:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Today's Zaman ^ | Monday, December 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have found the figure of a goddess that dates back to the early Hittite period as well as a Viking amber necklace during an ongoing excavation in the ancient city of Bathonea by Lake Kucukcekmece in Istanbul. An archaeological excavation was launched in 2009 near Lake Kucukcekmece in the Avcilar district of Istanbul to uncover the ancient city of Bathonea, which is estimated to be 1,600 years old. The excavation is being conducted under the supervision of Associate Professor Fengul Aydingun from Kocaeli University. in an earlier interview with the press, she had said the first two years of...
  • How Vikings May Have Navigated On Cloudy Days (More)

    03/02/2007 10:47:04 AM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 1,092+ views
    Live Science ^ | 3-2-2007 | Corey Binns
    How Vikings Might Have Navigated on Cloudy Days By Corey Binns Special to LiveScience posted: 02 March 2007 08:33 am ET Vikings navigated the oceans with sundials aboard their Norse ships. But on an overcast day, sundials would have been useless. Many researchers have suggested that the on foggy days, Vikings looked toward the sky through rock crystals called sunstones to give them direction. No one had tested the theory until recently. A team sailed the Arctic Ocean aboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden and found that sunstones could indeed light the way in foggy and cloudy conditions. Would have...
  • Crystals 'helped Viking sailors' (For Viking fans....and others, of course).

    02/07/2007 2:04:03 PM PST · by Jedi Master Pikachu · 45 replies · 1,042+ views
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, February 7, 2007
    The sun was not necessary for Vikings to navigate, say researchers Vikings may have used a special crystal called a sunstone to help navigate the seas even when the sun was obscured by fog or cloud, a study has suggested. Researchers from Hungary ran a test with sunstones in the Arctic ocean, and found that the crystals can reveal the sun's position even in bad weather. This would have allowed the Vikings to navigate successfully, they say. The sunstone theory has been around for 40 years, but some academics have treated it with extreme scepticism. Researcher Gabor Horvath from...
  • Hiker taking a rest finds a 1,200-year-old Viking sword in great condition

    10/24/2015 5:33:35 PM PDT · by ETL · 31 replies
    FoxNews.Com ^ | October 23, 2015 | Jenn Gidman
    Goran Olsen was enjoying a leisurely hike recently in Norway when he stopped near the fishing village of Haukeli, about 150 miles west of Oslo. Under some rocks along a well-traversed path, he made a discovery that's now the envy of every detectorist in Scandinavia: a 30-inch wrought-iron Viking sword, estimated to be about 1,200 years old, CNN reports. One would think a sword that old would be so decrepit it could never be wielded again, but a Hordaland County archaeologist says it just needs a little polish and a new grip to be good to go. "The sword was...
  • Hiker finds 1,200-yr-old Viking sword

    10/21/2015 2:09:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | unattributed
    A hiker travelling the ancient route between western and eastern Norway found a 1,200-year-old Viking sword after sitting down to rest after a short fishing trip. The sword, found at Haukeli in central southern Norway will be sent for conservation at the The University Museum of Bergen. Jostein Aksdal, an archeologist with Hordaland County said that the sword was in such good condition that if it was given a new grip and a polish, it could be used today. "The sword was found in very good condition. It is very special to get into a sword that is merely lacking...
  • Archaeologists to uncover secrets of Viking fortress

    10/09/2015 1:49:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Copenhagen Post ^ | October 9th, 2015 | Christian W
    When archaeologists found the first Viking Age fortress in Denmark for 60 years last September, it was hailed as a fantastic archaeological discovery... "With the grant, the Danish Castle Centre -- a division of Museum Southeast Denmark and Aarhus University -- has worked out a unique research project seeking to explore the secrets Borgring is hiding beneath Danish soil," the Danish Castle Centre said. "With the use of modern archaeological methods the scientists and archaeologists will investigate how the fortresses were used, how they were organised, how quickly they were built, their age and what environment, landscape and geography they...
  • Incised stone sun discs found during Danish island excavations

    08/15/2015 6:50:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | August 13, 2015 | PAP – Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Evidence of the beliefs and rituals of the inhabitants of the Danish island of Bornholm (Baltic Sea) over 5,500 years ago, have been discovered by Warsaw University archaeologists during excavations in Vasagard. The research project is the result of several years of collaboration between the Institute of Archaeology of the University of Warsaw and Bornholms Museum. This year also included students from the University of Copenhagen. Sun worship The study site -- Vasagard, is a puzzling one, but is thought to be a temple for Sun worship. During this season of excavations, archaeologists have discovered several ditches, in which, in...
  • A Minnesota Mystery: The Kensington Runestone

    08/25/2007 12:21:22 PM PDT · by BGHater · 77 replies · 2,308+ views ^ | 18 Aug 2007 | Ben Tracy
    It's one of Minnesota's greatest mysteries. It's something that puts settlers in America well before Columbus. A Minnesota geologist thinks the controversial Kensington Runestone is the real thing and there is evidence that he says backs up the theory. The Kensington Runestone is a rock found near Alexandria a century ago. It's inscription speaking of Norwegians here in 1362. It begs the question. Were Vikings exploring our land more than 100 years before Columbus? Or is it just an elaborate hoax? New research shows that the stone is genuine and there's hidden code that may prove it. It contains carved...
  • Letter From Newfoundland: Homing In On The Red Paint People

    05/09/2006 5:10:45 PM PDT · by blam · 57 replies · 4,003+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | 6-2000 | Angela M.H. Schuster
    Letter from Newfoundland: Homing in on the Red Paint People Volume 53 Number 3, May/June 2000 by Angela M.H. Schuster (Lynda D'Amico) Port au Choix, Newfoundland-- More than 5,000 years ago, this barren, sea-lashed coast was home to the Maritime Archaic Indians (MAI), who hunted and fished the coasts of Labrador and Newfoundland for more than 2,000 years. The first evidence of the Maritime Archaic culture was discovered more than 30 years ago when James A. Tuck of Memorial University of Newfoundland excavated 56 elaborate burials exposed during housing construction on a small promontory at Port au Choix, on the...
  • Kensington Rune Stone

    01/09/2002 12:52:12 PM PST · by crystalk · 161 replies · 1,010+ views
    myself | 1-9-02 | myself
    Kensington Rune Stone This subject used to fascinate me when I was 9 or 11. I read everything the late Hjalmar Holand ever wrote. It has fascinated many others, unfortunately mainly “professional Scandinavians” who have made their lives out of their ethnicity, especially as professors of that language or culture. Most have used it only as a way to get a cheap Ph.D. thesis by demolishing it once again, or by using its possible validity to back up some ulterior theory or hobby-horse they may have. Few if any mainstream observers of American antiquities have been willing to touch it. ...
  • Researchers suggest Vikings used crystals with sun compass to steer at night

    03/29/2014 9:14:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | March 26, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers working in Hungary has proposed that a sun compass artifact found in a convent in 1948 might have been used in conjunction with crystals to allow Vikings to guide their boats even at night. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical & Engineering Sciences, the team describes theories they've developed that might explain how Viking sailors were able to so accurately sail to places such as Greenland. Since the discovery of the sun compass fragment, researchers have theorized that Viking sailors used them to plot their course—at least when the...
  • Researchers: We may have found a fabled sunstone (Update)

    03/08/2013 11:05:59 AM PST · by Red Badger · 45 replies ^ | 08 March 2013 | Raphael Satter
    A rough, whitish block recovered from an Elizabethan shipwreck may be a sunstone, the fabled crystal believed by some to have helped Vikings and other medieval seafarers navigate the high seas, researchers say. In a paper published earlier this week, a Franco-British group argued that the Alderney Crystal—a chunk of Icelandic calcite found amid a 16th century wreck at the bottom of the English Channel—worked as a kind of solar compass, allowing sailors to determine the position of the sun even when it was hidden by heavy cloud, masked by fog, or below the horizon. That's because of a property...
  • Did Vikings navigate by polarized light?

    01/31/2011 8:30:21 PM PST · by Palter · 30 replies
    Nature ^ | 31 Jan 2011 | Jo Marchant
    'Sunstone' crystals may have helped seafarers to find the Sun on cloudy days. A Viking legend tells of a glowing 'sunstone' that, when held up to the sky, revealed the position of the Sun even on a cloudy day. It sounds like magic, but scientists measuring the properties of light in the sky say that polarizing crystals — which function in the same way as the mythical sunstone — could have helped ancient sailors to cross the northern Atlantic. A review of their evidence is published today in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B1. The Vikings, seafarers from Scandinavia...
  • How Did Marth's Vineyard Get it's Name?

    08/16/2015 7:24:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Martha's Vineyard Tour Guide ^ | 27 June (2015?) | Jim Rivard
    The most popular and very believable account is that the island was named by the British explorer Bartholomew Gosnold, after his infant daughter -- Martha... He would take short sails to "the big island" (Martha's Vineyard) for the purpose of gathering sassafras root, to be hauled back to England for medicinal use. Gosnold was only on Cuttyhunk about six weeks because of a small skirmish with the Wampanoags... the British wisely withdrew from the Islands before winter. Before leaving, however, it's believed that Gosnold named the big island after his infant daughter, Martha... Another, not as popular version of the...
  • Danish Archaeologists In Search Of Vikings In Iran

    01/23/2005 3:35:39 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,017+ views
    Payvand ^ | 1-20-2005
    1/20/05Danish Archaeologists in Search of Vikings in Iran Tehran, Jan. 20 (Iranian Cultural Heritage News Agency) – Researchers from the Copenhagen Museum in Denmark have traveled to the coasts of the Caspian Sea, northern Iran, in search of clues of relationships between Iranians and Vikings. A few years ago, a researcher from the Copenhagen Museum, Nadia Haupt, discovered more than one thousand coins and relics that did not belong to the Danish or other Scandinavian cultures, and therefore set to find out more about the historical roots of the Danish civilization. The ancient items that took the attention of experts...
  • Viking Burial Site Found in England

    09/07/2004 7:53:26 AM PDT · by 68skylark · 127 replies · 2,470+ views
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS via NY Times ^ | September 7, 2004 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    LONDON (AP) -- Archaeologists in northwestern England have found a burial site of six Viking men and women, complete with swords, spears, jewelry, fire-making materials and riding equipment, officials said Monday. The site, discovered near Cumwhitton, is believed to date to the early 10th century, and archaeologists working there called it the first Viking burial ground found in Britain. The only other known Viking cemetery was found in Ingleby east of Cumwhitton. It was excavated in the 1940s, but the bodies had been cremated and not buried. Local metal specialist Peter Adams made the find at the end of March...
  • Maine Coon Cat (Straight Dope Mailbag)

    08/05/2004 11:19:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 524+ views
    Straight Dope Science Advisory Board ^ | 29-Jun-1999 | SDSTAFF Jill
    One of the oldest breeds of cats in North America is the Maine Coon Cat, and some say 40% of the originals had extra toes. One article said it evolved as a "snowshoe foot" to help these cats walk in the snow. Cute story, but probably [expletive deleted] ...The breed closest to the Maine Coon Cat is the Norwegian Forest Cat which evolved in the same climate and lends credence to one theory that ancestors of the Coon Cat may have even come to the New World onboard Viking ships. I like that theory best.
  • Vikings' Josh Robinson Compares Gay Marriage to Incest and Pedophilia

    06/28/2015 9:54:01 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 66 replies
    Eonline ^ | 06/28/2015 | Brett Malec
    Cue the backlash!Following this morning's history-making Supreme Court Decision on marriage equality, Vikings cornerback Josh Robinson took to Twitter to condemn gay marriage in a series of homophobic tweets. He event compared marriage equality to incest and pedophilia."Love is love? So what will we say when the 30yr old loves YOUR 10 year old. When the dad loves HIS 6 year old? It's different? Yea okay!" the 24-year-old football star wrote Friday. "The day one person makes that stand, some may support, but many will say that's sick! That day I will say ‘hypocrites.'""When did we start defining a word...
  • Viking Farms Tell Cautionary Climate Tale

    06/17/2008 1:43:08 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 985+ views
    NPR ^ | 6-16-2008 | Richard Harris
    Viking Farms Tell Cautionary Climate Tale Boundary walls built by Iceland's Viking farmers run through Unnsteinn Ingason's land. At some point, farmers stopped repairing the walls, and a climate change may help explain why. Ingason's land had been farmed for hundreds of years prior to his family's ownership. Here, ruins of a stone farm house with a turf roof on a hill behind Ingason's home. Archaeologist Adolf Fridriksson stands near the ruins of an early Viking farm. The farm was long ago abandoned, and its soil heavily eroded. Icelandic farmers bring their sheep down from the hills for the winter....
  • Viking ring is "treasure" and will be valued at British Museum[UK]

    08/04/2008 9:54:08 AM PDT · by BGHater · 8 replies · 152+ views
    Bridlington Free Press ^ | 31 July 2008 | Alexa Copeland
    TREASURE dating back to the time of the Vikings has been found in a Bridlington field. The Viking finger ring has a silver content of 98% which, combined with its age, meets the criteria for it to be officially classed as treasure. The ring, found by Paul Rennoldson, has been sent to the British Museum in London where it will be valued. Alan Worth, chairman of the Bridlington Metal Detecting Society, said finding any items dating back to the Viking age was very rare. "The Vikings were around in about 700AD which is an incredibly long time ago," said Mr...
  • The Kensington Runestone; verified as proof of Scandinavians in Minnesota in 1362

    07/22/2002 2:22:42 PM PDT · by vannrox · 35 replies · 3,045+ views
    Ripsaw News ^ | FR post 07-21-02 | By Jim Richardson and Allen Richardson
    Subject: The Kensington Runestone; verified as proof of Scandinavians inMinnesota in 1362 <> Verified at LastThe Strange and Terrible Storyof the Kensington RunestoneBy Jim Richardson andAllen Richardson The comfortable scientific and scholarly worlds of history, archeology,runology and Scandinavian linguistics have all been rocked by recentdevelopments surrounding a single stone in west centralMinnesota. The Kensington Runestone, thought for over 100 years to be a hoax, nowstands verified as a genuine artifact commemorating the deaths of 10medireview Scandinavians in Minnesota in the year 1362. A recent piece of linguistic scholarship by Dr. Richard Nielsen has hit thescene, which seems to demonstrate conclusively...
  • Builder Found Vikings Washed Up At Pub

    09/09/2007 3:20:35 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,834+ views
    Timesonline ^ | 9-10-2007 | Jack Malvern
    September 10, 2007 Builder found Vikings washed up at pubJack Malvern Archaeologists believe they have found the only intact Viking boat in Britain beneath the patio of a Merseyside pub. The 10th-century vessel was discovered in the 1930s by builders excavating the basement of the Railway Inn on the Wirral peninsula, but they covered it up because they feared an archaeological dig would disrupt their work. The boat would have been forgotten had one of the builders not reported his discovery to his son, who passed the information on to academics at Nottingham University. Stephen Harding, of the university’s archaeology...
  • Irish Viking Trade Centre Unearthed

    05/07/2008 6:48:40 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 168+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-7-2008
    Irish Viking trade centre unearthed Almost 6,000 artefacts and a Viking chieftain's grave have been discovered One of the Vikings' most important trading centres has been discovered in Ireland. The settlement at Woodstown in County Waterford is estimated to be about 1,200 years old. It was discovered during archaeological excavations for a road by-pass for Waterford city, which was founded by the Vikings. The Irish government said the settlement was one of the most important early Viking age trading centres discovered in the country. Its working group, which includes archaeologists from Ireland's museum and monuments service, said it was of...
  • 'Pillaging' Vikings unmasked as eco warriors

    12/03/2009 7:58:22 AM PST · by BGHater · 24 replies · 865+ views
    Yorkshire Post ^ | 02 Dec 2009 | Paul Jeeves
    THEIR reputation for raping and pillaging may not have set them out as the ideal role-models for an environmentally-friendly way of life. But it seems that lessons could perhaps be learnt from the Vikings after the intriguing discovery in Yorkshire of what is believed to be a metal recycling centre dating back to the 11th century. Historians and metal detector enthusiasts have made the find which is being heralded as evidence of how the Norse invaders recycled their fearsome array of weapons. Hundreds of pieces of metal including arrowheads, shards of swords and axe heads have been unearthed as part...
  • Greenland Vikings 'had Celtic blood'

    03/23/2010 8:28:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies · 982+ views ^ | Friday, March 19, 2010 | RC News
    An analysis of DNA from a Viking gravesite near a 1000 year-old church in southern Greenland shows that those buried there had strong Celtic bloodlines... The analysis -- performed by Danish researchers on bones from skeletons found during excavations in south Greenland -- revealed that the settlers' Nordic blood was mixed with Celtic blood, probably originating from the British Isles. Danish archaeologists are currently conducting the first regional study of southern Greenland's original settlers, whose colonies date back to the year 985. The skeletons disinterred outside the old church also date back to just a few years after that period....
  • Climate played big role in Vikings’ disappearance from Greenland

    05/30/2011 1:12:10 PM PDT · by decimon · 55 replies
    Brown University ^ | May 30, 2011 | Varied
    Greenland's early Viking settlers were subjected to rapidly changing climate. Temperatures plunged several degrees in a span of decades, according to research from Brown University. A reconstruction of 5,600 years of climate history from lakes near the Norse settlement in western Greenland also shows how climate affected the Dorset and Saqqaq cultures. Results appear in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — The end of the Norse settlements on Greenland likely will remain shrouded in mystery. While there is scant written evidence of the colony’s demise in the 14th and early 15th centuries, archaeological remains can...