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Keyword: thevikings

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  • DNA study shows that Celts are not a unique genetic group

    03/19/2015 8:39:02 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 53 replies
    BBC ^ | 3/18/15 | Pallab Ghosh
    A DNA study of Britons has shown that genetically there is not a unique Celtic group of people in the UK. According to the data, those of Celtic ancestry in Scotland and Cornwall are more similar to the English than they are to other Celtic groups. The study also describes distinct genetic differences across the UK, which reflect regional identities. And it shows that the invading Anglo Saxons did not wipe out the Britons of 1,500 years ago, but mixed with them. Published in the Journal Nature, the findings emerge from a detailed DNA analysis of 2,000 mostly middle-aged Caucasian...
  • Britons still live in Anglo-Saxon tribal kingdoms, Oxford University finds

    03/19/2015 8:46:13 AM PDT · by I still care · 41 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 18 Mar 2015 | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    A new genetic map of Britain shows that there has been little movement between areas of Britain which were former tribal kingdoms in Anglo-Saxon England. Britons are still living in the same 'tribes' that they did in the 7th Century, Oxford University has found after an astonishing study into our genetic make-up. Archaeologists and geneticists were amazed to find that genetically similar individuals inhabit the same areas they did following the Anglo-Saxon invasion, following the fall of the Roman Empire. In fact, a map showing tribes of Britain in 600AD is almost identical to a new chart showing genetic variability...
  • Genetic study reveals 30% of white British DNA has German ancestry

    03/19/2015 8:18:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 54 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 18, 2015 | Hannah Devlin
    The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has revealed. The analysis shows that the Anglo-Saxons were the only conquering force, around 400-500 AD, to substantially alter the country’s genetic makeup, with most white British people now owing almost 30% of their DNA to the ancestors of modern-day Germans.
  • Found Islamic Coins Hidden Inside Viking Age Shield Boss

    02/28/2015 1:53:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    ThorNews ^ | Valentine's Day, February 14, 2015 | unattributed
    In August 2014 a hobby archaeologist found a Viking Age sword with metal detector in a field in Skaun, just south of Trondheim in Central Norway. Now, archaeologists have examined the finding and have some exciting news about the owner. Having examined the grave, archaeologists at the NTNU Museum of Natural History and Archaeology in Trondheim tell NRK that it is dated to about the year 950. In addition to the sword, researchers found the remains of a shield. 'We have not managed to find out who owned the sword, but we know that he was a well traveled man",...
  • The Diffusionists Have Landed

    02/22/2015 4:49:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | January 1st, 2000 | Marc K. Stengel
    The Norwegian archaeologists Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad's famous identification, in 1961, of a Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, from just after A.D. 1000 is, of course, a notable exception, no longer in dispute. But that discovery has so far gone nowhere. The Norse settlers, who may have numbered as many as 160 and stayed for three years or longer, seem to have made no lasting impression on the aboriginal skraellings that, according to Norse sagas, they encountered, and to have avoided being influenced in turn. The traditions of the Micmac people, modern-day inhabitants of the area, have...
  • New Iron Age Sites Discovered in Finland [Roman era]

    01/11/2014 9:30:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, January 10, 2014 | unattributed
    Artifacts included a battle axe, a knife, and a bronze buckle, all associated with burned human bones, initially thought to be dated to around 1000 - 1200 CE before analysis. Similar objects have been discovered in the Baltic Sea area and in Ladoga Karelia. Identical cape buckles have also been found in Gotland. But based on the University of Helsinki analysis, the cremation grave finds date to a time that is significantly earlier -- during the Viking Age between 775-980 CE, based on their application of AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) techniques... ...in the area between the towns of Loviisa and...
  • Two Iron Age Sites Discovered in Finland

    09/03/2012 6:21:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, September 6, 2012 | unattributed
    In the autumn of 2010, local amateur archaeologists discovered a large harbor, dating from around 1000-1200 AD, in Ahvenkoski village, at the mouth of western branch of the Kymijoki River in Finland. The findings included a smithy, a iron smelting furnace, forceps, as well as hundreds of iron objects such as boat rivets, similar to those found at Viking settlements in different parts of the Baltic, Scandinavia, Scotland and Iceland. More recently, in August of 2012 and in the same area, a 2 x 3 meter wide late Viking Age or Crusade period cremation grave was uncovered. Artifacts included a...
  • Did the Scandinavians beat Columbus to America twice?

    10/22/2003 6:39:07 AM PDT · by mhking · 58 replies · 366+ views
    STOCKHOLM (AFP) - Archeologists have already established that Viking explorers beat Christopher Columbus to America by about 500 years, but experts in Sweden now hope to determine whether another group of Scandinavians landed in the New World in 1362, 130 years before Columbus. A 90-kilo (200-pound) rune stone, a block of stone featuring symbolic engravings common during the Viking era, has been sent from the United States to Sweden's Museum of National Antiquities to establish whether it really dates from 1362, as its markings claim, or is just a hoax. If confirmed as an authentic relic, the so-called Kensington stone...
  • Polish family treasure an archaeological sensation in Sweden

    12/19/2014 11:36:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | May 12, 2014 | Daniel Zysk
    A small gold plate belonging to Polish family Sielscy from the Swedish Malmoe turned out to be an archaeological sensation. According to the researchers, it is probably a souvenir from the funeral of the Danish King Harald Bluetooth on the island of Wolin, dated to c. 986 AD. The discovery was made by 11 years old Maja Sielska, who diligently did her school homework about the Middle Ages. While looking through pictures of coins from this period in the textbook and on the Internet, the girl saw a plate with mysterious inscriptions similar to the one she had received from...
  • Viking 'ring fortress' discovered in Denmark

    09/08/2014 11:44:18 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:22PM BST 06 Sep 2014 | Andrew Marszal
    The fortress found on the Danish island of Zealand, around 30 miles south of Copenhagen, is the fifth circular fortress to be unearthed, and the first in over 60 years. “This is great news,” said Lasse Sonne, a Viking historian from the Saxo Institute at the University of Copenhagen. “Although there were Vikings in other countries, these circular fortresses are unique to Denmark. Many have given up hope that there were many of them left.” Like previously discovered ring fortresses, the Vallø Borgring is thought to date back to the late tenth century and the reign of Harald Bluetooth, the...
  • Archaeologists uncover Harald Bluetooth's royal palace

    06/24/2010 6:04:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Copenhagen Post ^ | Thursday, June 24, 2010 | unattributed
    In what they describe as a 'sensational' discovery, archaeologists from Århus find the remains of 10th century king's royal residence. After speculating for centuries about its location, the royal residence of Harald Bluetooth has finally been discovered close to the ancient Jellinge complex with its famous runic stones in southern Jutland. The remains of the ancient wooden buildings were uncovered in the north-eastern corner of the Jellinge complex which consists of royal burial mounds, standing stones in the form of a ship and runic stones. Harald ruled Denmark between 940 and 985 AD and is reputed to have conquered Norway...
  • Possible Third Jellinge Stone Found (Viking Era)

    11/06/2006 10:35:51 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 916+ views
    Possible third Jellinge stone found By The Copenhagen Post Archaeologists believe they have found a new Viking-era stone engraved with ancient Danish Rune writing Archaeologists from Vejle Museum think they may have found a third 'Jellinge stone' - a large rock with carved runes and considered the first examples of written language in Denmark. The researchers have found seven stones in all, which they believe date from the 10th century. Jellinge stones tell of the founding of Denmark and of Christianity's arrival in the country. Even if the stones do not yield a true Jellinge stone, the find is still...
  • Ireland's Viking Fortress

    02/03/2011 7:02:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 1+ views
    Archaeology, V 64 N 1 ^ | January/February 2011 | Erin Mullally
    Linn Duachaill was founded in A.D. 841, the same year as Viking Dublin. The fortress was used as a center by the Vikings to trade goods, organize attacks against inland Irish monasteries, and send captured Irish slaves abroad. For more than 70 years, Linn Duachaill rivaled Dublin as the preeminent Viking holding on the east coast of Ireland before it was eventually abandoned. The discovery of Linn Duachaill will finally allow archeologists to compare the actual site with medieval documents. The names of leaders of the garrison are recorded, along with extensive accounts of attacks they carried out. The site...
  • Vikings Invade Spanish Village in 'Bloody' Festival

    08/04/2014 3:49:43 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    The Local ^ | 04 Aug 2014
    Fifty thousand 'Vikings' landed on the shores of a small village in northern Spain on Sunday, as part of an annual festival which commemorates a Scandinavian invasion which took place a thousand years ago. On the first Sunday of August, Catoria is flooded with ‘blood-thirsty’ men and women from all across Europe. Dressed in animal skins and armed with the finest plastic weaponry, they disembark on the rugged Galician coast with the aim of capturing the Towers of the West, just as Norway’s King Olaf did a millennia ago. The ‘blood’ spilt during the simulated battles does taste distinctly like...
  • Viking Gainsborough: Former capital promotes Sweyn Forkbeard links

    12/27/2014 9:35:55 AM PST · by Beowulf9 · 27 replies
    http://www.bbc.com ^ | 25 December 2014 | unknown
    A town that was briefly capital of England is looking to make more of its links with a Viking king who ruled for just 40 days. Sweyn Forkbeard, the nation's shortest reigning monarch, began his rule on Christmas Day, 1001 years ago in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. Officials want to twin the town with Sweyn's birthplace of Roskilde, Denmark and stage a festival. They also hope to mark his death with a re-enactment of a Viking burial.
  • Digging up the 'Spanish Vikings'

    12/22/2014 4:27:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    University of Aberdeen News ^ | 18 December 2014 | Euan Wemyss
    Dr Garcia Losquino, who is from the region, was compelled to visit Galicia in Northern Spain unexpectedly when a number of Viking anchors were washed ashore in a storm in March 2014... "On the beach where the anchors were found there was a big mound which locals thought might have been a motte-and-bailey construction, which was used by the later Vikings in France. But with the help of a geographer using tomography we now think this was a longphort -- a Viking construction only found in Ireland during the early Viking age, and very similar to English Viking camps, where...
  • Ancient DNA Sheds New Light on Arctic's Earliest People

    08/28/2014 4:40:35 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 23 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8-28-14 | Heather Pringle
    The earliest people in the North American Arctic remained isolated from others in the region for millennia before vanishing around 700 years ago, a new genetic analysis shows. The study, published online Thursday, also reveals that today's Inuit and Native Americans of the Arctic are genetically distinct from the region's first settlers. Inuit hunters in the Canadian Arctic have long told stories about a mysterious ancient people known as the Tunit, who once inhabited the far north. Tunit men, they recalled, possessed powerful magic and were strong enough to crush the neck of a walrus and singlehandedly haul the massive...
  • First American in Europe 'was native woman kidnapped by Vikings and hauled back to Iceland...'

    11/17/2010 8:33:00 AM PST · by Albion Wilde · 87 replies · 2+ views
    Daily Mail Online (UK) ^ | November 17, 2010 | NIALL FIRTH
    A native woman kidnapped by the Vikings may have been the first American to arrive in Europe around 1,000 years ago, according to a startling new study. The discovery of a gene found in just 80 Icelanders links them with early Americans who may have been brought back to Iceland by Viking raiders. The discovery means that the female slave was in Europe five centuries before Christopher Columbus first paraded American Indians through the streets in Spain after his epic voyage of discovery in 1492...
  • Inuit and viking contact in ancient times

    03/02/2009 3:04:03 PM PST · by BGHater · 4 replies · 906+ views
    The Arctic Sounder ^ | 26 Feb 2009 | RONALD BROWER
    Editor’s note: This is the second of two parts. There are many stories of “Qalunaat,” white-skinned strangers who were encountered in Inuit occupied lands in times of old. Much of the traditional life had changed by the 1840s when Hinrich Johannes Rink went to Greenland to study geology and later became the governor of Greenland. Johannes was soon drawn to a new interest in the Inuit language and folklore, which he viewed as national treasures. He published old stories collected in 1866 “Tales and Traditions of the Eskimo” in which he included some early contact stories with the Qalunaat. In...
  • DNA Tests Debunk Blond Inuit Legend

    10/31/2003 8:11:18 AM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 404+ views
    CBC News ^ | 10-28-2003 | CBC News staff
    DNA tests debunk blond Inuit legend Last Updated Tue, 28 Oct 2003 11:36:10 CAMBRIDGE BAY, NUNAVUT - Two Icelandic scientists have shot holes in the theory of the missing Norse tribes of the Arctic. Agnar Helgason and Gisli Palsson say their DNA tests have failed to find any evidence that Europeans mingled genetically with Inuit half a millennium ago. Agnar Helgason The scientists made the statement after a visit to Cambridge Bay last week. Rumours of blue-eyed, blond-haired Inuit have circulated through the Arctic since the turn of the century. They were thought to possibly descend from a group of...
  • Ancient walrus bone discovered in south Iceland

    03/12/2007 1:05:38 PM PDT · by Kimmers · 65 replies · 1,528+ views
    A bone which came from the penis of a walrus (Os penis) and is believed to be 10,000 to 12,000 years old, was discovered in a gravel mine by Lambafell in Ölfuss in south Iceland a few weeks ago. Sigurdur Sigurdsson, a veterinarian, handed the bone over to the Museum in Thorlákshöfn at a special ceremony last weekend, RÚV reports. The bone was found at an altitude of 285 meters above sea level. Sigurdsson said it is unprecedented that a bone from a sea animal is discovered at such a high altitude. Barbara Gudnadóttir, the cultural representative of Ölfuss, told...
  • The Viking farm under the sand in Greenland

    03/05/2004 4:06:31 PM PST · by Burkeman1 · 58 replies · 1,363+ views
    Express News ^ | 2004 | Teresa Brasen
    The Viking farm under the sand in Greenland By Terese Brasen In 1991, two caribou hunters stumbled over a log on a snowy Greenland riverbank, an unusual event because Greenland is above the tree line. Closer investigation uncovered rock-hard sheep droppings. The hunters had stumbled on a 500-year-old Viking farm that lay hidden beneath the sand, gift-wrapped and preserved by nature for future archaeologists. Gården under Sandet or GUS, Danish for 'the farm under the sand,' would become the first major Viking find in Greenland since the 1920s. "GUS is beautifully preserved because, once it was buried, it was frozen,"...
  • Are the Narragansett and other American Indians the descendants of Viking settlers?

    07/24/2002 6:25:27 PM PDT · by vannrox · 12 replies · 571+ views
    The Vinland Sagas ^ | July, 2000 | Frederick N. Brown
    Plain Talk on the Genetic Issue For some, a world outlook entails a vision of permanence and stability; that like the day, time commenced at some point and will continue to another; that the world is fixed, unchanging, and immutable - all that is necessary for human comfort is written for the ages as preparation for a coming Winter.Others see the universe in constant flux; that when the Lord made time, He made it in plenty - perhaps to see that not everything would happen all at once - that all things ~ all life ~ is in motion; that...
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 54 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • Immigrants From The Other Side (Clovis Is Solutrean?)

    11/02/2003 4:11:21 PM PST · by blam · 55 replies · 16,673+ views
    CSFA ^ | 11-3-2003 | Dennis Sanford
    Immigrants from the Other Side? According to the Clovis-First theory, for decades the gospel preached by authorities on the peopling of the Americas, the first Americans walked across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia about 12,000 years ago, and after finding a corridor through the Cordilleran Ice Sheet--admittedly it wasn't an easy trip and the timing was tricky--descended into temperate North America. We know them by their classic fluted points, unlike any others in the world, they left at campsites on their journey south to populate Central and South America. [~ 45:l ~] There have been variations of the basic...
  • Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada

    12/17/2014 7:39:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Dawn Peters
    A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D. Researchers reporting in the journal Geoarchaeology discovered that the interior of the container, which was found at an archaeological site on southern Baffin Island, contains fragments of bronze as well as small spherules of glass that form when rock is heated to high temperatures. The object is a crucible for melting bronze, likely in order to cast it into small tools or ornaments. Indigenous peoples of northern...
  • 1000-year old Viking treasure hoard found in Scotland

    10/13/2014 12:12:29 PM PDT · by dware · 25 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 10.13.2014 | Reuters via Yahoo!
    LONDON (Reuters) - A hoard of Viking gold and silver artifacts dating back over 1,000 years has been discovered by a treasure hunter with a metal detector in Scotland, in a find hailed by experts as one of the country's most significant.
  • A Viking Burial Described by Arab Writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan

    09/27/2014 2:26:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Thor News ^ | May 12, 2012 | unattributed
    ...A 10th century Arab Muslim writer named Ahmad ibn Fadlan produced a description of a funeral of a Scandinavian, Swedish, chieftain who was on an expedition on the eastern route. The account is a unique source on the ceremonies surrounding the Viking funeral, of a chieftain. The dead chieftain was put in a temporary grave which was covered for ten days until they had sewn new clothes for him. One of his thrall women volunteered to join him in the afterlife and she was guarded day and night, being given a great amount of intoxicating drinks while she sang happily......
  • Who makes up the ranks of Kiev's "elite National Guard" being sent to Odessa and Slavyansk?

    05/06/2014 6:59:44 AM PDT · by Laissez-faire capitalist · 36 replies
    5/6/2014 | Laissez-Faire Capitalist
    Fox News reported yesterday that Kiev is sending an "elite National Guard" to Odessa, and today the International Business Times reported that Kiev is sending an "elite National Guard" to Slavyansk. Who makes up the ranks of this elite National Guard when Vice News reported on March 19, 2014 - in their article "A look Inside Ukraine's Volunteer National Guard" - and in it said then that Ukraine had - by its own admission - only 6,000 combat-ready troops? Looks like Kiev didn't/doesn't have a pot to even... much less an "elite National Guard." BTW, Vice News was the news...
  • 'Vikings' Portrays Crucifixion as Normal Church Punishment for Apostates

    04/04/2014 7:19:32 AM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 37 replies
    NewsBusters ^ | April 4, 2014 | P.J. Gladnick
    Your humble correspondent is a fan of the History Channel show, "Vikings." However, its historical accuracy leaves something to be desired to the extent that a week ago I posted a thread at IMDB, Things I Learned While Watching 'Vikings', which humorously mocked such inaccuracies as well as anachronisms on the show. Along with noticing that Rollo wore L.A. Ink type tattoos, I also took note of a completely unhistorical type of punishment meted out to the apostate monk Athelstan: "The Church punished apostate monks by crucifying them and doing their best to make them appear like Jesus including a...
  • Will NFL's Super Bowl bullying be too much for our lawmakers?

    03/19/2014 7:03:08 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 10 replies
    Pioneer Press ^ | 3-18-14 | Joe Soucheray
    The National Football League sent six of its lieutenants to Minneapolis the other day to advertise what essentially is a take-it-or-leave-it offer. Either you people give us the tax breaks we want so that we might not be fettered by the reasonable expectations of doing business or you don't get a Super Bowl. Capiche? "It's an incredibly competitive environment,'' said Frank Supovitz, NFL senior vice president of events. If Supovitz wasn't wearing a tie, he would have said, "Look, we've got other cities that will do what we want, so you either play by our rules or you can stuff...
  • Cathedral service marks millennium of Brian Boru’s death

    03/08/2014 10:37:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Newsletter UK ^ | March 8, 2014 | unattributed
    The death of Ireland’s High King during the famous bloody battle of Clontarf almost exactly 1,000 years ago will be remembered with a special service in his burial county of Armagh next month. Brian Boru (Bóraime) may have been born in County Clare but, as the well-known theme song ‘The Boys from the County Armagh’ notes, his ashes lie in the city, at the Church of Ireland Cathedral. The legendary leader had requested to be buried in Armagh, possibly due to its religious links to St Patrick, and it is said he was brought to the city by the clergy...
  • The Viking’s Jötunvillur Runic Code is Solved

    02/12/2014 6:45:06 PM PST · by P.O.E. · 48 replies
    On this stick from the 1200s found in Bergen, two men named Sigurd and Lavran have written their names both in code and with regular runes. This helped runologist Jonas Nordby to solve the Jötunvillur code. For the first time, the Jötunvillur runic code is cracked. It can help to solve the mystery of the Vikings’ secret codes. Why did the Vikings use codes when they wrote runes? Was it a secret message or other reasons that they encrypted runic texts? This, we still know little about. But runologist Jonas Nordby think he may be one step closer to the...
  • Sweyn Forkbeard: England's forgotten Viking king

    12/30/2013 6:09:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    BBC News ^ | David McKenna
    On Christmas Day 1013, Danish ruler Sweyn Forkbeard was declared King of all England and the town of Gainsborough its capital. But why is so little known of the man who would be England's shortest-reigning king and the role he played in shaping the early history of the nation? For 20 years, Sweyn, a "murderous character" who deposed his father Harold Bluetooth, waged war on England. And exactly 1,000 years ago, with his son Canute by his side, a large-scale invasion finally proved decisive. It was a brutal time, which saw women burned alive, children impaled on lances and men...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "The Vikings"(1958)

    11/10/2013 11:57:21 AM PST · by ReformationFan · 35 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1958 | Richard Fleischer
  • Reconstruction of ancient Slavic boat in Rugen

    10/19/2013 6:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Slavorum ^ | October 17, 2013 | unattributed
    A significant archaeological discovery was made in the village of Ralswiek on the legendary island of Rügen in 1967. During roadworks an excavator dug out several oak planks from the ground. The road workers took their finding to a team of archaeologists working nearby and those soon began archaeological excavations during which four ancient Slavic ships and a trading settlement was uncovered. The settlement was one of the most important ports on the Baltic coast existed the 8th century. It was proposed that Rujani (an early Slavic tribe) harboured their fleet in the place of archealogical discovery because it is...
  • Gun Clause In Minn. Vikings Lease Irks Lawmaker

    10/10/2013 2:30:07 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 16 replies
    WCCO.com ^ | 10/10/13 | AP
    A Minnesota legislator wants a provision stripped from the Vikings new stadium lease that would prevent the building from being used by businesses that sell guns and other weapons. Republican Rep. Pat Garofalo of Farmington said in a letter Thursday that the restriction could discourage hunting and outdoors groups from holding offseason events at the planned $975 million stadium, which is being built with a partial public subsidy. The Associated Press reported on the clause this week that is contained in a 30-year stadium lease.
  • Vikings May Have Been More Social Than Savage

    10/05/2013 9:09:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | October 1, 2013 | Coventry University, via AlphaGalileo
    Academics at Coventry University have uncovered complex social networks within age-old Icelandic sagas, which challenge the stereotypical image of Vikings as unworldly, violent savages. Pádraig Mac Carron and Ralph Kenna from the University's Applied Mathematics Research Centre have carried out a detailed analysis of the relationships described in ancient Icelandic manuscripts to shed new light on Viking society. In a study published in the European Physical Journal, Mac Carron and Kenna have asked whether remnants of reality could lurk within the pages of the documents in which Viking sagas were preserved. They applied methods from statistical physics to social networks...
  • Slaves as burial gifts in Viking Age Norway? Evidence from stable isotope and ancient DNA analyses

    09/28/2013 2:25:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Journal of Archaeological Science via ScienceDirect ^ | September 13, 2013 | Elise Naumanna et al
    Abstract: Ten Viking Age individuals from the northern Norwegian site at Flakstad were analysed for δ13C, δ15N and ancient mitochondrial DNA fragments. The material derives from both single and multiple burials with individuals treated in different ways. The genetic analyses show that the individuals buried together were unlikely to be maternally related, and stable isotope analyses suggest different strata of society. It is, therefore, suggested that slaves may have been offered as grave gifts at Flakstad. A comparison with the remaining population from single graves shows that the presumed slaves had a diet similar to that of the common population,...
  • Archaeological sensation in Oestfold [ Inca remains from 11th c Norway? ]

    06/26/2007 11:34:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies · 1,285+ views
    Norway Post ^ | Tuesday, June 26, 2007 | Rolleiv Solholm (NRK)
    Norwegian arhaeologists are puzzled by a find which indicates an Inca Indian died and was buried in the Oestfold city of Sarpsborg 1000 years ago. The remains of two elderly men and a baby were discovered during work in a garden, and one of the skulls indicates that the man was an Inca Indian. There is a genetic flaw in the neck, which is believed to be limited to the Incas in Peru, says archaeologist Mona Beate Buckholm. The Norway Post suggests that maybe the Vikings travelled even more widely than hitherto believed? Why could not the Viking settlers in...
  • DNA Shows Celtic Hero Somerled's Viking Roots

    04/26/2005 10:52:12 AM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 1,569+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 4-26-2005 | Ian Johnson
    DNA shows Celtic hero Somerled's Viking roots IAN JOHNSTON SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT A HISTORIC Celtic hero credited with driving the Vikings out of western Scotland was actually descended from a Norseman, according to research by a leading DNA expert. According to traditional genealogies, Somerled, who is said to have died in 1164 after ousting the Vikings from Argyll, Kintyre and the Western Isles, was descended from an ancient royal line going back to when the Scots were living in Ireland. But Bryan Sykes, an Oxford University professor of human genetics who set up a company called Oxford Ancestors to research people’s...
  • Viking jewelry unearthed in Denmark

    07/28/2013 5:33:56 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 19 replies
    Fox News ^ | June 26, 2013 | By Owen Jarus
    Several pieces of Viking jewelry, some of which contain gold, have been uncovered at a farm site in Denmark that dates as far back as 1,300 years. Although the Vikings have a popular reputation as being raiders, they were also farmers, traders and explorers, and the craftsmanship seen in this jewelry demonstrates their artistic skills. Archaeologists working with volunteers used metal detectors to find the jewelry in different spots throughout a farmstead on Zealand, the largest island in Denmark. The remains of the site, which is now called Vestervang, date from the late seventh to the early 11th centuries.
  • Viking gold discovered by amateur with metal detector in Co Down

    06/27/2013 8:28:41 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 26 replies
    belfast Telegraph ^ | 27 June 2013
    Viking gold ingot which was found at Brickland, Co. Down and dates to the later ninth/tenth century. Sean Barden/Armagh County Museum A rare piece of Viking gold dating back more than a thousand years was discovered by an amateur with a metal detector in Northern Ireland, it was revealed. Tom Crawford was pursuing his hobby in farmland in Co Down last year when he found the small but precious ingot, which may have been used as currency during the 9th and 10th centuries. It is one of only a few nuggets known from Ireland, experts said. Mr Crawford also uncovered...
  • Biggest Viking exhibition in 20 years opens – and this time they're angry

    06/23/2013 5:12:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday, June 19, 2013 | Maev Kennedy
    All around the hull of the longest Viking warship ever found there are swords and battle axes, many bearing the scars of long and bloody use, in an exhibition opening in Copenhagen that will smash decades of good public relations for the Vikings as mild-mannered traders and farmers... The exhibition, simply called Viking, which will be opened at the National Museum by Queen Margrethe of Denmark on Thursday, and to the public on Saturday, will sail on to to London next year to launch the British Museum's new exhibition space. In contrast to recent exhibitions, which have concentrated on the...
  • The First Vikings

    06/18/2013 7:31:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Monday, June 10, 2013 | Andrew Curry
    According to historians, the Viking Age began on June 8, A.D. 793, at an island monastery off the coast of northern England. A contemporary chronicle recorded the moment with a brief entry: "The ravages of heathen men miserably destroyed God’s church on Lindisfarne, with plunder and slaughter." ...In the centuries that followed, the Vikings' vessels carried them deep into Russia and as far south as Constantinople, Sicily, and possibly even North Africa. They organized flotillas capable of carrying warriors across vast distances, and terrorized the English, Irish, and French coasts with lightning-fast raids. Exploratory voyages to the west took them...
  • Dealing with the doldrums on a Viking voyage

    05/18/2013 11:41:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | April 23, 2013 | Hanne Jakobsen
    Maybe it was a teenager engaged in a Viking version of tagging a school desk. In any case, someone took out his knife, bent down and traced the outline of his foot on the deck of the Gokstad Ship. Today, 1,100 years later, researcher and storage manager Hanne Lovise Aannestad shows us a couple of deck planks that are among her favourite artefacts at the Museum of Cultural History in Oslo... The Gokstad Ship was excavated in the late 1800s and is a permanent feature of the Viking Ship Museum at Bygdøy in Oslo. For about a decade, from 890...
  • Danish teenager makes rare Viking-era find with metal detector

    05/17/2013 4:30:09 PM PDT · by Doogle · 26 replies
    FOX NEWS ^ | 05/16/13 | AP via FOX
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark – Danish museum officials say that an archaeological dig last year has revealed 365 items from the Viking era, including 60 rare coins. Danish National Museum spokesman Jens Christian Moesgaard says the coins have a distinctive cross motif attributed to Norse King Harald Bluetooth, who is believed to have brought Christianity to Norway and Denmark. Sixteen-year-old Michael Stokbro Larsen found the coins and other items with a metal detector in a field in northern Denmark.
  • Northern lights - "If you had to be reborn anywhere in the world, you would want to be a Viking"

    02/04/2013 12:44:50 PM PST · by WesternCulture · 29 replies
    The Economist ^ | 02-02-2013 | Adrian Wooldridge
    THIRTY YEARS AGO Margaret Thatcher turned Britain into the world’s leading centre of “thinking the unthinkable”. Today that distinction has passed to Sweden. The streets of Stockholm are awash with the blood of sacred cows. The think-tanks are brimful of new ideas. The erstwhile champion of the “third way” is now pursuing a far more interesting brand of politics. Sweden has reduced public spending as a proportion of GDP from 67% in 1993 to 49% today. It could soon have a smaller state than Britain. It has also cut the top marginal tax rate by 27 percentage points since 1983,...
  • Seal diet provides clue to disappearance of Norse from Greenland

    11/21/2012 5:18:33 AM PST · by Renfield · 33 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11-2012
    Greenland’s Viking settlers, the Norse, disappeared suddenly and mysteriously from Greenland about 500 years ago. Natural disasters, climate change and the inability to adapt have all been proposed as theories to explain their disappearance. But now a Danish-Canadian research team has demonstrated the Norse society did not die out due to an inability to adapt to the Greenlandic diet: an isotopic analysis of their bones shows they ate plenty of seals.“Our analysis shows that the Norse in Greenland ate lots of food from the sea, especially seals,” says Jan Heinemeier, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University. “Our analysis shows...
  • Should we keep the Vikings' stolen goods?

    11/10/2012 7:20:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | Wednesday, November 7, 2012 | Maj Bach Madsen
    The National Museum of Denmark regularly receives objects that appear to be stolen goods from the Viking Age. Shouldn't these objects be returned to their original owners? Ranvaik's golden chest was made in Ireland or Scotland toward the end of the eighth century and originates from a church or a monastery. "Ranvaik owns this shrine" the inscription on the bottom reads, as a strong indication that it later came to belong to a noble Viking lady named Ranvaik. Archaeologists believe that the shrine, which can be admired at the Danish National Museum, is stolen property from the Viking Age. "Viking...