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Keyword: trojanwar

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  • Archaeologists Excavate for Archaic Greek City of Tenea

    05/25/2014 12:03:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thu, May 22, 2014 | unattributed
    Excavations could reveal much about a little-explored archaic Greek settlement. It was in July 1984 when rescue excavations conducted by Dr. Elena Korka, now Director of the Ephorate of Private Archaeological Collections and Antiquity Shops, turned up an ancient sarcophagus of the Greek early archaic period near the town of Chiliomodi in Greece. The sarcophagus contained a female skeleton along with offerings. The interior of the sarcophagus slab was adorned with a composition consisting of two lions of monumental character. It was a remarkable find. But this was not altogether surprising, as archaeologists and historians believed that somewhere in the...
  • The Greek Age of Bronze -- Middle Helmets

    Outside the Greek mainland and Aegean Island a possible representation of Achaean warriors equipped with boar tusks helmets is from an Egyptian papyrus fragments from Tell el-Amarna, home of Amenhotep III's son, dated around 1350 BC (*2). In this papyrus some warriors are depicted with conical pale-yellow helmets which remaind in general design the typical Aegean boar tusks helmet. This identification is strengthened by the find of a piece of boar’s tusk, with perforations for attaching it to a leather frame, during excavations at Qantir, the site of the Ramesside capital Pi-ramesse in the eastern delta. It appears likely that...
  • Excavations in Ancient Tegea

    12/04/2009 1:40:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 630+ views
    ana-mpa.gr ^ | Friday, December 4, 2009 | unattributed
    The first stage of a five-year (2009-2013) excavation project in Ancient Tegea, near Tripolis, has been completed by an international team of archaeologists led by the Norwegian Institute in Athens in Collaboration with the Greek culture ministry's 38th Ephoria for Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities and 25th Ephoria of Byzantine Antiquities. The area of excavation is a field located to the west of the theatre and the Basilica of Thyrsos, where magnetometer survey 2003-2004 documented the probable location of a major north-south street and a stoa bordering the agora... Tegea was a settlement in ancient Greece, and it is also a...
  • Ancient Palace's Painted Floors Display Bronze-Age Creativity

    01/06/2014 7:43:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 06, 2014 | Denise Chow
    Emily Catherine Egan, a doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, studied the floor of the Throne Room at the Palace of Nestor, one of the best-preserved palaces of Mycenaean Greece, a civilization from the late Bronze Age. She found that the floors of the palace, located in the present-day Greek town of Pylos, were made of plaster, and were often painted with grids of bright patterns or marine animals. The creative decorations show how ancient Mycenaean artists used floors — together with painted ceilings and walls — to impress palace visitors, Egan said. "Mycenaean palatial floor paintings...
  • Papyrus Reveals New Clues to Ancient World (New Sophocles, Lucian: More)

    04/28/2005 12:55:52 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies · 1,041+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | April 25, 2005 | James Owen
    Classical Greek and Roman literature is being read for the first time in 2,000 years thanks to new technology. The previously illegible texts are among a hoard of papyrus manuscripts. Scholars say the rediscovered writings will provide a fascinating new window into the ancient world. Salvaged from an ancient garbage dump in Egypt, the collection is kept at Oxford University in England. Known as the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, the collection includes writings by great classical Greek authors such as Homer, Sophocles, and Euripides. Using a technique called multi-spectral imaging, researchers have uncovered texts that include • parts of a lost tragedy...
  • Spat between Angela Merkel and Vladimir Putin over German treasure

    06/21/2013 1:21:10 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 84 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 6-21-13
    A dispute over ancient German treasure looted by Soviet troops at the end of the Second World War has overshadowed a visit by Angela Merkel to Russia.
  • Dig Unearths Mycenaean 'Homeric Capital'

    04/17/2002 6:28:25 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 268+ views
    IOL ^ | 4-16-2002
    Dig unearths Mycenaean 'Homeric capital' April 16 2002 at 06:35PM Athens, Greece - An archaeologist thinks he may have found the ancient Mycenaean capital of Salamis, the island where one of the greatest recorded battles of antiquity took place. Archaeologist Yannos Lolos said on Tuesday that he found two buildings and uncovered several small hamlets scattered around the ancient acropolis of old Salamis, now known as Kanakia. The ancient town is on the south-western part of the island, located in the Saronic Gulf. Lolos, assistant professor of archaeology at the University of Ioannina in northern Greece, has been digging at...
  • Greece. They found the palace belonging to one of the Heroes of the Iliad? [Egyptian artifact, 2006]

    07/30/2010 3:23:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 3+ views
    Terra Antiquae 'blog ^ | March 2006 | Jose Luis Santos Fernandez
    Foto: (1) The central palace complex from a 3,200-year-old settlement on the island of Salamis, near Athens, Greece, is shown in an undated handout picture provided by excavator Yiannis Lolos. Lolos said on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 that he believes he has found the seat of the mythical King Ajax of Salamis, one of the heroes of the Trojan War. The hilltop site overlooks a small natural harbor. (AP Photo) (2) Hieroglyphs spelling the name of Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II appear at the bottom of a bronze piece from an ancient mail shirt, in this undated handout picture provided by...
  • Engineers To Help Find Homer's Itacha

    03/27/2007 3:15:17 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 476+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 3-26-2007 | Derek Gatopoulos
    Engineers to help find Homer's IthacaDerek Gatopoulous, Associated Press Writer Mon Mar 26, 11:02 PM ET ATHENS, Greece - A geological engineering company said Monday it has agreed to help in an archaeological project to find the island of Ithaca, homeland of Homer's legendary hero Odysseus. It has long been thought that the island of Ithaki in the Ionian Sea was the island Homer used as a setting for the epic poem "The Odyssey," in which the king Odysseus makes a perilous 10-year journey home from the Trojan War. But amateur British archaeologist Robert Bittlestone believes the Ithaca of Homer...
  • Ancient Eclipse Found in "The Odyssey," Scientists Say

    06/23/2008 5:36:32 PM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 261+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 6-23-2008 | Richard A. Lovett
    Ancient Eclipse Found in "The Odyssey," Scientists SayRichard A. Lovett for National Geographic NewsJune 23, 2008 "The sun has perished out of heaven, and an evil mist has overspread the world." With those words in The Odyssey, Homer laid down not a prophecy of doom but a description of a real-world total solar eclipse, scientific sleuths announced today. It has been known for decades that there was only one such eclipse during the time period Homer wrote about in the ancient Greek poem—on April 16, 1178 B.C. The blackout even occurred at noon, as described in the epic poem. But...
  • Scientists calculate the exact date of the Trojan horse using eclipse in Homer

    06/24/2008 11:49:01 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies · 109+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 6/24/08 | Roger Highfield
    The exact date when the Greeks used the Trojan horse to raze the city of Troy has been pinpointed for the first time using an eclipse mentioned in the stories of Homer, it was claimed today. # The truth about an epic tale of love, war and greed Scientists have calculated that the horse was used in 1188 BC, ten years before Homer in his Odyssey describes the return of a warrior to his wife on the day the "sun is blotted out of the sky". The legend of the fall of Troy is mentioned in Virgil and Homer's poems...
  • An epic battle on Homer's gender

    07/02/2006 7:46:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies · 2,586+ views
    The Australian ^ | July 03, 2006 | Dalya Alberge (The London Times)
    Historian and linguist Andrew Dalby is challenging the accepted gender of one of the most influential writers of all time -- the poet who created the Greek epics The Iliad and The Odyssey in the seventh century BC. Dr Dalby said: "There is no direct evidence of the poet's identity and therefore no justification for the customary assumption that the two epics were composed by a man." Women have a long tradition worldwide as makers of oral literature, he said, citing Sappho, the best-known female poet of ancient Greece, and Enheduanna, the woman mentioned on a Sumerian tablet who thus...
  • Where Did The Etruscans Come From?

    08/06/2005 9:08:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies · 2,066+ views
    Etruscology website ^ | June 2002 | Dieter H. Steinbauer
    Nevertheless, after more than a century of research, the linguistic relationship between Lemnian and Etruscan -- despite the scanty material -- is nowadays established to a large extent as an undeniable fact. The phonemic systems can not be set to coincide completely, yet it is significant that apart from the already mentioned four vowel system parallels exist in the consonant inventory, too. There are two varieties of s (here written s and sh) and no indications of the voiced plosives b, d, g, while next to each other are to be found in both languages t and th (no aspirate...
  • The Warriors Of Paros

    12/19/2004 11:52:54 AM PST · by blam · 10 replies · 573+ views
    Hellenic News ^ | 12-19-2004 | Foteini Zafeiropoulou/Anagnostis Agelarakis
    The Warriors of ParosEarliest Polyandria (Soldiers' burials) found in Greece offer clues to the rise of Classical Greek City-States and Phalangeal War Tactics. by Foteini Zafeiropoulou and Anagnostis Agelarakis Soldiers' bones in urns-evidence of a forgotten battle fought around 730 BC. Did these men perish on their island home of Paros, at the center of the Aegean Sea, or in some distant land? The loss of so many, at least 120 men, was certainly a catastrophe for the community, but their families and compatriots honored them, putting the cremated remains into large vases two of which were decorated with scenes...
  • Quarry, Setting and Team Marks: The Carian Connection

    10/08/2004 3:20:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 499+ views
    University of Leiden (Netherlands) ^ | 1998 | (about) Sheldon Lee Gosline
    In this paper, the author proposes some specific attributions for signs deriving from the Carian or another West-Anatolian script found on in situ blocks from standing walls: quarry, block positioning, or team marks. The proposals are based on data from three distant yet related sites where such marks have been preserved, among which the Khnum temple terrace on Elephantine. In time, however, the quarry marks at Elephantine do not correspond with the other two sites. Therefore, the author proposes that the terrace was built several hundred years earlier than the Graeco-Roman Period to which the terrace is usually dated, or...
  • Archaeologist Links Ancient Palace, Ajax

    03/29/2006 5:35:29 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 8 replies · 148+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 3/29/06 | Nicholas Paphitis - ap
    ATHENS, Greece - Among the ruins of a 3,200-year-old palace near Athens, researchers are piecing together the story of legendary Greek warrior-king Ajax, hero of the Trojan War. Archaeologist Yiannis Lolos found remains of the palace while hiking on the island of Salamis in 1999, and has led excavations there for the past six years. Now, he's confident he's found the site where Ajax ruled, which has also provided evidence to support a theory that residents of the Mycenean island kingdom fled to Cyprus after the king's death. "This was Ajax' capital," excavation leader Lolos, professor of archaeology at Ioannina...
  • Helen Of Troy Existed?

    10/18/2005 11:08:43 AM PDT · by blam · 108 replies · 2,602+ views
    The Discovery Channel ^ | 10-18-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Helen of Troy Existed? By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery NewsWas a Queen of Sparta Helen of Troy? Oct. 17, 2005— Helen of Troy, described in the epic poem The Iliad, was based on a real woman, according to a new book that weaves history, archaeology and myth to recreate the famous ancient Greek beauty's life. According to the new theory proposed by Bettany Hughes, Helen's mythological character was inspired by a wealthy Bronze Age leader from the southern mainland of Greece. Hughes, a former Oxford University scholar who has conducted research in the Balkans, Greece, and Asia Minor, was unavailable for...
  • Bulgarian Archaeologists Uncover Treasure Of Thousands Of Golden Ornaments

    08/17/2005 4:37:50 PM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 959+ views
    Canadian Press ^ | 8-17-2005
    Bulgarian archeologists uncover treasure of thousands of golden ornaments Canadian Press Wednesday, August 17, 2005 SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) - Archeologists working a dig in central Bulgaria have unearthed some 15,000 miniature rings and other gold ornaments that date to the end of the third millennium BC - a find they say matches the famous treasure of Troy, scholars announced Wednesday. The 4,100- to 4,200-year-old golden ornaments have been gradually unearthed over the past year from an ancient tomb near the central village of Dabene, 120 kilometres east of the capital, Sofia, according to Prof. Vasil Nikolov, the consultant on the...
  • Laocoön and His Son

    08/28/2004 4:07:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 821+ views
    Vatican Museums ^ | circa 2000 | Mary Ann Sullivan
    One of the major discoveries of the Italian Renaissance, this sculptural grouping was found in Rome in 1506 in the ruins of Titus' palace. It depicts an event in Vergil's Aeneid (Book 2). The Trojan priest Laocoön was strangled by sea snakes, sent by the gods who favored the Greeks, while he was sacrificing at the altar of Neptune. Because Laocoön had tried to warn the Trojan citizens of the danger of bringing in the wooden horse, he incurred the wrath of the gods.
  • Research To Investigate Links Between Ancient Greeks And Modern Science Fiction

    06/08/2005 11:28:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies · 737+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2005-06-08
    New research into the Ancient Greeks shows their knowledge of travel inspired early forms of fantasy and science fiction writing.There is a long tradition of fantasy in Greek literature that begins with Odysseus' fantastic travels in Homer's Odyssey. Dr Karen Ni-Mheallaigh, at the University of Liverpool's School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, is exploring fantasy in ancient literature, examining theories of modern science fiction writing and how these can be applied to texts from the ancient world. Dr Ni-Mheallaigh is looking at the work of 2nd century AD writer, Lucian of Samosata, who wrote True Histories, a travel narrative that...
  • The Linear B Tablets and Mycenaean Social, Political, and Economic Organization

    08/29/2004 8:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1,656+ views
    Lesson 25, The Prehistoric Archaeology of the Aegean ^ | Revised: Friday, March 18, 2000 | Trustees of Dartmouth College
    KO-RE-TE, PO-RO-KO-RE-TE [koreter, prokoreter] -- Such officials are known at both Knossos and Pylos. The titles bear a suspiciously close resemblance to the Latin terms curator and procurator ("guardian" and "manager, imperial officer/governor" respectively). The Linear B evidence suggests that the koreter was a local official in charge of one of the sixteen major administrative units within the Pylian kingdom, and the prokoreter was evidently his deputy.
  • Non-Attic Characters

    07/18/2004 6:43:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 951+ views
    University of California, Irvine, Thesaurus Linguae Graecae ^ | September 7 2003 (rev 9-28-2003) | Nick Nicholas
    The first character is the sampi, as it was used (briefly) in the Ionic alphabet as a sibilant. The first question to answer is whether it should be separated from the numerical sampi at all... The second question is what the phonetic value of sampi was... Jeffery (1990:39)... also suspects that sampi was originally borrowed from Carian, and used to express the Carian sibilant in loanwords... In the pre-Hellenic language of Lemnos (possibly related to Etruscan), it is used, but Jeffery has no idea what it sounded like. In the older inscriptions of the non-Hellenic language of Phrygia (related...
  • Inscription in Carian and Greek

    07/17/2004 6:20:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,150+ views
    Anistoriton ^ | 27 Dec. 1997 | (editors)
    On 8/9 November 1997 the Swiss newspaper Neue Zurcher Zeitung reported that German and Turks archaeologists, who conducted excavations at the ancient site of Kaunos on Asia Minor coast just across the Greek island of Rhodes, unearthed an inscription in two scripts. The top part is inscribed in the Carian language and the same text is repeated in the lower part in classical Greek. The inscription is a resolution of the city of Kaunos to honor two Athenians, one of whom is Nikokles of Lycekleous a fairly know person and contemporary of Demosthenes. Thus, the stone was safely dated to...
  • The Argonaut Epos and Bronze Age Economic History

    08/25/2004 10:30:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 759+ views
    Economics Department, City College of New York ^ | Revised May 14, 1999 | Morris Silver
    The island group of the northeast Aegean (Lemnos, Lesbos, Chios, and others) was the cradle of the culture which created the prehistoric cities of Polichne on Lemnos and Therme on Lesbos, both of which may be considered the earliest urban centres in Europe. Their origins can be traced back as far as the end of the fourth millennium B.C.. ... The origins of these "urban" settlements, at least in the case of Poliochne, may be traced back much further than the time of the founding of Troy. ... Troy with its long-lived occupation, is but a small fortified village...
  • So Who Is Buried in Midas's Tomb?

    12/24/2001 10:12:01 PM PST · by a_Turk · 9 replies · 630+ views
    NYT ^ | 12/25/2001 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Refinements of radiocarbon dates appear to rob the monumental tomb at Gordion of its claim to having been the final resting place of the illustrious King Midas, researchers reported last week in the journal Science. American and European scientists analyzed the effects of the sun's cycles on amounts of radioactivity absorbed from year to year, as recorded in tree rings. They said the research had given archaeologists and historians a more precise chronology for the Middle East and Aegean regions in the Bronze and Iron Ages. One of the researchers, Dr. Peter I. Kuniholm, an archaeologist at Cornell University, said ...
  • Is an Eclipse Described in the Odyssey (and does it date the return of Odysseus to Penelope)

    07/08/2011 11:33:43 AM PDT · by wildbill · 41 replies
    “Now when did Odysseus return to Penelope? The date is given with a precision most unusual in epic poetry.” "Because the lines describing the alleged eclipse are considered suspect, we shall use other passages in the Odyssey to shed some light on the issue, without assuming an eclipse. Given an interpretation of certain passages in the Odyssey as describing astronomical phenomena, we will look for dates in which the phenomena match. We shall find that the most likely day matching these other phenomena is 16 April 1178 B.C., suggesting there may be corroborating information in the epic for the eclipse...
  • Unlocking the Power of Myth

    08/12/2005 8:50:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 523+ views
    Humanities, Volume 26/Number 3 ^ | May/June 2005 | Victor Wishna
    No one knows exactly why the Trojan War was waged, when it took place, or whether it took place at all. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have unearthed no wreckage of a giant wooden horse, no statues of Helen, no physical evidence that a warrior named Achilles ever existed.
  • The Truth About An Epic Tale Of Love, War And Greed (Troy)

    03/25/2004 12:03:11 PM PST · by blam · 17 replies · 1,304+ views
    The truth about an epic tale of love, war and greed (Filed: 24/03/2004) The legend of Troy has an enduring grip on the imagination. Aidan Laverty talks to the scientists who say they have proved that a siege really took place It's one of the greatest stories ever; the tale of a war fought over the love of Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world. Now as Hollywood breathes fresh life into the myth, archaeologists have uncovered new evidence from the site of Troy that brings us closer than ever to the truth behind this ancient legend. City scan:...
  • Incredible, Epic Genes: Dating The Iliad

    03/01/2013 8:35:53 AM PST · by STD · 8 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 02/28/2013 | Noah Wiener
    Epic Genes: Dating The Iliad This 3-inch-high bronze statue from Crete, dating to the early seventh century B.C.E., depicts a young boy and a blind musician. According to ancient tradition, Homer was a blind poet. J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
  • Ancient city of Troy rebranded itself after war

    12/24/2012 4:27:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Tuesday, December 18, 2012 | derived from Journal of Archaeological Sciences
    Even ancient cities knew about rebranding. Troy was destroyed by war about 3200 years ago -- an event that may have inspired Homer to write the Iliad, 400 years later. But the famous city rose again, reinventing itself to fit a new political landscape. Troy lies in north-west Turkey and has been studied for decades. Pottery made before the war has a distinct Trojan style but after the war its style is typical of the Balkans. This led archaeologists to believe that the locals had been forced out and replaced by populations from overseas. But when Peter Grave at the...
  • Amazon Warrior Women

    08/04/2004 8:51:53 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 5,400+ views
    PBS ^ | Current | PBS
    Amazon Warrior WomenThis painting on a Greek vase depicts an Amazon woman warrior on horseback engaged in battle.Amazons in myth: History's first mention of a race of warrior women comes in Homer's ILIAD, an account of the Trojan War, probably written in the 8th to the 7th century B.C. Homer's Amazons, a race of fierce women who mated with vanquished male foes and kept only the female children they bore, were believed to occupy the area around the Black Sea. Amazon women also crop up in other Greek myths. One of the labors of Hercules, for example, required him to...
  • 5,000-year-old Venus figure found in Canakkale

    10/02/2009 8:11:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 1,344+ views
    Today's Zaman ^ | Friday, September 25, 2009 | unattributed
    A 5,000-year-old Venus figure and a seal have been found in an excavation. A 5,000-year-old Venus figure has been found as part of an excavation being carried out in Çanakkale's Ezine district. The excavation began in the field three weeks ago in cooperation with Germany's University of Tübingen. Assistant Professor Rüstem Aslan, who is vice head of the excavation, told the Anatolia news agency that the aim of the dig is to find settlements outside Troy from the Bronze Age. Some interesting findings have been unearthed during the excavation, Aslan said. "We found a 5,000-year-old Venus figure, which used to...
  • Rare Cuneiform Script Found on Island of Malta

    12/24/2011 9:27:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, December 22, 2011 | Vol. 5 December 2011
    A small-sized find in an ancient megalithic temple stirs the imagination. Excavations among what many scholars consider to be the world's oldest monumental buildings on the island of Malta continue to unveil surprises and raise new questions about the significance of these megalithic structures and the people who built them. Not least is the latest find -- a small but rare, crescent-moon shaped agate stone featuring a 13th-century B.C.E. cuneiform inscription, the likes of which would normally be found much farther west in Mesopotamia. Led by palaeontology professor Alberto Cazzella of the University of Rome "La Sapienza", the archaeological team...
  • Lost city found in Turkey: It is older than Troy

    09/27/2011 6:16:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies · 1+ views
    National Turk ^ | Monday, September 26, 2011 | unattributed
    A group of scientists and archeologists from Canakkale (Dardanelles) University have found traces of a lost city, older than famed Troy, now buried under the waters of Dardanelles strait. Led by associate professor Rustem Aslan, the archeology team made a surface survey in the vicinity of Erenkoy, Canakkale on the shore. The team has found ceramics and pottery, what led them to ponder a mound could be nearby. A research on the found pottery showed that the items belonged to an 7000 years old ancient city. The team has intensified the research and discovered first signs of the lost city...
  • Bulgarian Archaeology Finds Said to Rewrite History of Black Sea Sailing

    09/14/2011 2:56:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Novinite ^ | Monday, September 12, 2011 | Sofia News Agency
    Massive ancient stone anchors were found by divers participating in an archaeological expedition near the southern Bulgarian Black Sea town of Sozopol. The expedition, led by deputy director of Bulgaria's National Historical Museum Dr Ivan Hristov, found the precious artifacts west of the Sts. Cyricus and Julitta island. The 200-kg beautifully ornamented anchors have two holes in them -- one for the anchor rope and another one for a wooden stick. They were used for 150-200-ton ships that transported mainly wheat, but also dried and salted fish, skins, timber and metals from what now is Bulgaria's coast. The anchors' shape...
  • Was Troy a Metropolis? Homer Isn't Talking

    10/21/2002 10:13:37 PM PDT · by LostTribe · 20 replies · 440+ views
    New York Times ^ | October 22, 2002 | John Noble Wilford
    Was Troy a Metropolis? Homer Isn't Talking By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD new Trojan War has broken out. In the warrior roles of Achilles and Hector are two respected professors on the same German university faculty who could not differ more fully and vehemently over what to make of the ruins at the presumed site in western Turkey of the legendary siege in the 13th century B.C. immortalized by Homer. One adversary, an archaeologist who has directed excavations there since 1988, contends that he has found telling evidence of Troy as a much larger and more important city than previously thought....
  • The War that Killed Achilles by Caroline Alexander [reviews]

    12/23/2010 8:35:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 1+ views
    The Guardian, New York Times ^ | October 13, 2009 -- December 18, 2010 | Tom Holland, Vera Rule, Steve Coates, Dwight Garner
    ...In the earliest days of their history, so the Greeks recorded, a city in Asia by the name of Troy had been besieged by their ancestors for 10 long years, captured, and burnt to the ground. Why? Responsibility for the conflict was pinned on Paris, a Trojan prince whose abduction of Helen, the fabulously beautiful daughter of the king of the gods, had set in train a truly calamitous sequence of events. Not only Troy had ended up obliterated, but so, too, had the age of heroes. War had consumed the world. No wonder, then, that the Greeks should have...
  • Project Troia -- Bronze Age Troy Just Keeps on Growing

    10/08/2010 6:04:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Heritage Key ^ | Monday, October 4, 2010 | Ann Wuyts
    German archaeologists have made new discoveries at modern day Hisarlik, northwest Turkey -- ancient Troy. The finds further confirm the area occupied during the Bronze Age was not limited to the citadel; Troy VI and VII were much larger than originally thought. The three year research project at Troy -- lead by Prof. Ernst Pernicka, from the University of Tubingen's Institute of Pre- and Early History -- sees scholars focus on the analysis and publication of materials found since the university started excavations at the site in 1988... smaller excavations... in combination with geophysical surveying and the drilling of test...
  • Geologists Show Homer Got It Right

    01/29/2003 4:58:53 PM PST · by blam · 27 replies · 732+ views
    Nature ^ | 1-29-2003 | Philip Ball
    Geologists show Homer got it rightTrojan geography in Homer's Iliad matches sediment record of Dardanelles coastline. 29 January 2003 PHILIP BALL The ruins of Troy now perch on the edge of a plateau overlooking a river flood plain. © Uni. of Oxford Homer knew his geography, say US researchers. The ancient Greek writer's description of the war fought around Troy is consistent with a new reconstruction of the way the region looked about three millennia ago1. In his Iliad, Homer recounts how the city of Troy was besieged and finally conquered by the army of the Spartan king Menelaus, who...
  • Search Locates Homer's Ithaca

    09/29/2005 1:52:09 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 1,005+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-29-2005
    Search 'locates' Homer's Ithaca An amateur British archaeologist says he has located Ithaca, the homeland of Homer's legendary hero Odysseus. Robert Bittlestone - backed by two experts - claims the rocky island depicted in The Odyssey is part of Greek tourist destination Cephalonia. He used satellite imagery to match the area's landscape with descriptions in the poem about the return of the man behind the wooden horse of Troy. Many experts had stated Homer was referring to the island of Ithaki. They had explained geographical inconsistencies in The Odyssey by suggesting that Homer lived much later than the events portrayed...
  • Odyssey's End? The Search for Ancient Ithaca

    04/02/2006 9:48:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 269+ views
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | Fergus M. Bordewich, Photographs by Jeffrey Aaronson
    Scholars have long agreed that ancient and modern Zachynthos are one and the same. Similarly, ancient Same was certainly the main body of modern Cephalonia, where a large town named Sami still exists. But modern Ithaca—a few miles east of Cephalonia—was hardly "the farthest out to sea," and its mountainous topography doesn't fit Homer's "lying low" description. (Bittlestone believes ancient Doulichion became modern Ithaca after refugees came there following an earthquake or other disaster and changed its name.) "The old explanations just felt unsatisfactory," says Bittlestone. "I kept wondering, was there possibly a radical new solution to this?" Back home...
  • Greek Archaeologists Claim They Discovered Odysseus' Palace

    08/25/2010 5:05:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Novinite ^ | August 24, 2010 | unattributed
    Greek archaeologists have claimed they have found the palace of Odysseus during excavations on the Ithaca island in the Ionian Sea. On Tuesday, the archaeologist, Thanasis Papadopulos, who has been leading the excavation team on Odysseus' home island for 16 years, said that he knew the right place of the remains since 2006. "We found the ruins of a three-level palace with a staircase carved into the rock," Papadopulos said, adding that they also found a well, dating back to 13th century BC, when the Trojan War is believed to have taken place. According to the archaeologist, the discoveries are...
  • Has the Sarcophagus of Paris, Prince of Troy, Been Found?

    07/16/2010 4:20:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | Friday, July 16, 2010 | editors
    Archaeological excavations at the ancient city of Parion in northwest Turkey have revealed the sarcophagus of an ancient warrior. The sarcophagus contains an inscription of a warrior pictured saying goodbye to his family as he leaves for war. It is believed that the sarcophagus could belong to Paris, the prince of Troy who triggered the Trojan War. Excavators made this discovery in the necropolis of the ancient city located in the Turkish province of Canakkale, located close to Troy. After the initial discovery of Parion in 2005, archaeologists have uncovered many artifacts such as gold crowns and sarcophagi that shed...
  • Ancient Greek town from where ships were launched for Troy unearthed

    07/16/2010 4:28:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Sify.com ^ | June 30, 2010 | ANI
    Archeologists have found an ancient underground town in Kyparissia in Greece during a local construction work. According to Katerina Nikolas, a columnist for helium.com, recently some local road works were being carried out near a swimming pool in the city and something unusual caused them to stop their work immediately. It appeared that an ancient underground town had been discovered on the site, which archeologists are now excavating. Interestingly some parts of the ancient town are higher than the depths of the swimming pool nearby, meaning that when the land was purchased and the swimming pool built, the owner must...
  • Ancient Chronography, Eratosthenes and the Dating of the Fall of Troy [abstract]

    07/14/2010 5:28:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Centuries of Darkness website ^ | April 2009 | Nikos Kokkinos
    Through close scrutiny of the surviving fragments of ancient chronography, it is possible to work out the way Eratosthenes, in his lost Chronographiai (ca. 220 BC), arrived at his date for the Fall of Troy (1183 BC) -- a 'universal' reference point in antiquity. By combining new information from Manetho, with Timaeus, Ctesias, Herodotus and other sources, he devised a compromise chronology for the Greek past: 'high' enough to satisfy Hellenistic cultural interests, and 'low' enough to satisfy Alexandrian critical scholarship.What was reckoned originally to be an event of the 10th century BC, and later raised as far as the...
  • Diggers discover Phoenician army complex in Cyprus [ Trojan War connection ]

    06/18/2010 6:00:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 331+ views
    Reuters Life! via Yahoo! ^ | Friday, June 18, 2010 | Michele Kambas, ed Paul Casciato
    Archaeologists in Cyprus have discovered what could be the remains of a garrison used by Phoenician soldiers in an ancient city founded by a hero of the Trojan war. Buildings overlooking a previously discovered Phoenician complex more than 2,000 years old were found at the ancient city of Idalion, the island's Antiquities department said on Friday. The complex, linked by a tower, were found to discover metal weapons, inscriptions and pieces of a bronze shield. "The complex may have been used by the soldiers who guarded the tower," the department said in a news release. Idalion was founded by Chalcanor,...
  • Could museum's gold be from ancient Troy?

    02/02/2010 8:50:18 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 461+ views
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | Sunday, January 31, 2010 | Tom Avril
    The scientist had traveled from Germany to examine the ancient items that lay before him on the University of Pennsylvania laboratory table, and he was dazzled. Earrings with cascades of golden leaves. Brooches adorned with tightly coiled spirals. A necklace strung with hundreds of gold ringlets and beads. The jewelry bore a striking resemblance to objects from one of the world's great collections - a controversial treasure unearthed long ago from the fabled city of Troy... The 24 pieces had been purchased from a Philadelphia antiquities dealer more than 40 years ago, and came with no documentation of their origin....
  • Archaeologists find suspected Trojan war-era couple

    09/22/2009 12:57:53 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 66 replies · 1,795+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 9/22/09 | Reuters
    ANKARA (Reuters) – Archaeologists in the ancient city of Troy in Turkey have found the remains of a man and a woman believed to have died in 1,200 B.C., the time of the legendary war chronicled by Homer, a leading German professor said on Tuesday. Ernst Pernicka, a University of Tubingen professor of archaeometry who is leading excavations on the site in northwestern Turkey, said the bodies were found near a defense line within the city built in the late Bronze age. The discovery could add to evidence that Troy's lower area was bigger in the late Bronze Age than...
  • Archaeology meets mythology in Mycenean Pylos (King Nestor)

    09/11/2009 6:02:06 AM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies · 1,295+ views
    Science Codex ^ | Sep 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Close-up of palace walls. Credit: University of Missouri-St.Louis Pylos drain. Credit: University of Missouri-St Louis Clearing thick brush from a mound at his archaeological dig site in Pylos, Greece, Michael Cosmopoulos found a real-life palace dating back to the mythical Trojan War. The palace is from the Mycenaean period (1600-1100 B.C.), famous for such mythical sagas as the Trojan War. It is thought to sit within one of the capital cities of King Nestor, a personality featured in the legends of the war. "We are thrilled, excited and fascinated at the prospect of continuing its excavation," said Cosmopoulos, the Hellenic...
  • Trojan arrows and unique seals from Perperikon stand out in archaeological summer '08

    11/03/2008 7:04:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 334+ views
    Bulgarian News ^ | October 27, 2008 | Veneta Pavlova, Daniela Konstantinova, bnr.bg
    The place acted as a cult site as early as the end of 5 and the early 4 millennium BC. Researchers have come across finds from the second millennium BC and there is evidence the city prospered during Thracian times in Antiquity. An Episcopal center was set up here in the Middle Ages. At a press conference in Sofia Nikolay Ovcharov showed unique finds originating from different periods in the history of Perperikon. The oldest one is dated to the Trojan War, the archeologist contends. "It is a sword with a broken handle from 12-13 c. BC. It is made...