Keyword: wolves

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  • Great Lakes and Wyoming wolves at risk of delisting from Endangered Species Act

    09/27/2016 4:46:28 AM PDT · by SJackson · 20 replies
    Capital Times ^ | Sep 25, 2016 | PATRICIA RANDOLPH
    “This is not a biological issue. It is a political issue…we want wolves gone.” ~ Statements made at the Sen. Tom Tiffany/Rep. Adam Jarchow Sept. 15 Great Lakes Wolf Summit The actions and legislation of this U.S. Congress make me realize that hunters think that wilderness is a federally financed shooting range with roads leading across it from all directions, dogs fighting bears and wolves, forests emptied using steel-jaw traps, and living animals lined up for target practice. Until the 90 percent of us who do not kill wildlife realize that “hunting” has morphed from a way to gather food...
  • Dogs descended from wolf pack on Yangtze river

    09/04/2009 2:58:00 AM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies · 1,533+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Sep 2, 2009 | Unknown
    Today's dogs are all descended from a pack of wolves tamed 16,000 years ago on the shores of the Yangtze river, according to new research. It was previously known that the birthplace of the dog was eastern Asia but historians were not able to be more precise than that. However, now researchers have made a number of new discoveries about the history of man's best friend - including that the dog appeared about 16,000 years ago south of the Yangtze river in China. It has also been discovered that even though the dog has a single geographical origin it descends...
  • Scientists pinpoint origins of little dogs

    02/24/2010 1:00:41 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 34 replies · 1,256+ views
    msnbc ^ | 2-24-10 | Jennifer Viegas
    Small dogs the world over can all trace their ancestry back to the Middle East, where the first diminutive canines emerged more than 12,000 years ago. A new study, which appears in BMC Biology, focused on a single gene responsible for size in dogs. Researchers found that the version of the gene IGF1 that is a major determinant of small size in dogs probably originated as a result of domestication of the Middle Eastern gray wolf, which also happens to be smaller than many other wolves. In terms of which came first, big dogs or small dogs, the answer is...
  • Dog domestication likely started in N. Africa

    08/03/2009 6:19:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies · 944+ views
    Discovery ^ | Aug 3, 2009 | Jennifer Viegas
    A Basenji is a dog breed indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa. Humans might have first domesticated dogs from wolves in Africa, with Egypt being one possibility, since wolves are native to that region. Modern humans originated in Africa, and now it looks like man's best friend first emerged there too. An extensive genetic study on the ancestry of African village dogs points to a Eurasian possibly North African origin for the domestication of dogs. Prior research concluded that dogs likely originated in East Asia. However, this latest study, the most thorough investigation ever on the ancestry of African village...
  • Have humans made dogs STUPID? Pets are 'lazy thinkers' compared to wild wolves and [tr]

    09/16/2015 5:24:45 AM PDT · by C19fan · 74 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 16, 2015 | Richard Gray
    They may be man's best friend, but dogs have little to thank humans for it seems. Research suggests the domesticated pets can't solve problems as well as their wild cousins because living with us has made them 'incapable of thinking for themselves.' In tests, experts presented a 'puzzle box' containing food to a group of dogs, and a group of wolves and while the wolves were capable of breaking inside, the dogs looked to humans for help.
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • Canine Copycats Can Mirror Other Dogs' Emotions (Dogs Read Feelings)

    12/23/2015 11:27:24 AM PST · by goldstategop · 17 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12/23/2015 | Helen Briggs
    Dogs can copy each other's expressions in a split-second just like people, showing signs of basic empathy, according to Italian researchers. Mimicking each other's facial expressions is a human habit, which helps people to get along. Dogs do the same to bond with other dogs, scientists report in the journal, Royal Society Open Science. They think dogs may be showing a basic built-in form of empathy, enabling them to pick up on emotions. And the phenomenon may have emerged in our canine companions during the process of domestication, say scientists from the Natural History Museum, University of Pisa.
  • Dogs Mimic Each Other’s Expressions, Too

    12/27/2015 12:35:34 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 13 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 12-22-15 | Rachel Nuwer
    This week, millions of people around the world will no doubt experience rapid mimicry-an involuntary, split-second mirroring of another person's facial expressions-as they exchange smiles over gifts, good meals and holiday traditions. This phenomenon, observed in humans and many other primates, is considered a basic building block of our ability to feel empathy. "When your companion or friend smiles, you don't know why exactly, but you immediately react with the same smile to him or her," says Elisabetta Palagi, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Pisa in Italy. "It’s an extremely important phenomenon, because through this mimicry you can...
  • Dogs can read human emotions, study finds (only other species shown to be capable of this)

    01/13/2016 5:26:46 PM PST · by presidio9 · 135 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 13 Jan 2016 | Sophie Jamieson
    Dogs really are man's best friend, it seems, as researchers have shown they can recognise emotions in humans by combining information from different senses. They are the only creatures outside of humans who have been observed to have that ability. -SNIP- "Our study shows that dogs have the ability to integrate two different sources of sensory information into a coherent perception of emotion in both humans and dogs. "To do so requires a system of internal categorisation of emotional states. This cognitive ability has until now only been evidenced in primates and the capacity to do this across species only...
  • Bond between man and dog is closer than you thought how canines hearts are in sync with ours

    04/28/2016 7:28:11 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 53 replies
    News Corp Australia Network ^ | April 27, 2016 | Sue Dunlevy
    THE bond between man and dog is so close their hearts actually beat in sync when they are together an astounding new study shows. The heart rates of owners and their dogs become lower when they are in close proximity an experiment that saw heart monitors strapped to dogs and their owners found. The discovery shows dogs have a fundamental role to play in lowering stress says sports scientist Dr Craig Duncan. And canine scientist Mia Cobb says owning a dog can do more than just lower your heart rate. They even recover more quickly from a heart attack, she...
  • Experts: Dogs originated in ancient Asia

    02/17/2004 2:20:26 PM PST · by presidio9 · 38 replies · 410+ views
    AP ^ | Tuesday, February 17, 2004
    <p>From Yorkshire terriers the size of a teacup to Irish wolfhounds near the size of a small pony, all dogs originated from a single species, probably an East Asian wolf seeking the warmth of the human hearth and an easy meal.</p>
  • 'Golden jackals' of East Africa are actually 'golden wolves'

    07/30/2015 10:32:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-30-2015 | Provided by: Cell Press
    A golden jackal (Canis anthus) from Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Based on genomic results, the researchers suggest this animal be referred to as the African golden wolf, which is distinct from the Eurasian golden jackal (Canis aureus). Credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson ======================================================================================================================= Despite their remarkably similar appearance, the "golden jackals" of East Africa and Eurasia are actually two entirely different species. The discovery, based on DNA evidence and reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 30, increases the overall biodiversity of the Canidaethe group including dogs, wolves, foxes, and jackalsfrom 35 living species to 36. "This...
  • Have humans made dogs STUPID? Pets are 'lazy thinkers' compared to wild wolves

    09/16/2015 6:45:14 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 63 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 16 September 2015 | RICHARD GRAY
    They may be man's best friend, but dogs have little to thank humans for it seems. Research suggests the domesticated pets can't solve problems as well as their wild cousins because living with us has made them 'incapable of thinking for themselves.' In tests, experts presented a 'puzzle box' containing food to a group of dogs, and a group of wolves and while the wolves were capable of breaking inside, the dogs looked to humans for help.
  • Living with humans has taught dogs morals, say scientists

    08/21/2008 6:11:16 AM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 63 replies · 183+ views
    The Daily Mail UK ^ | 21st August 2008 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Dogs are becoming more intelligent and are even learning morals from human contact, scientists claim. They say the fact that dogs' play rarely escalates into a fight shows the animals abide by social rules. During one study, dogs which held up a paw were rewarded with a food treat. When a lone dog was asked to raise its paw but received no treat, the researchers found it begged for up to 30 minutes. But when they tested two dogs together but rewarded only one, the dog which missed out soon stopped playing the game. Dr Friederike Range, of the University...
  • Dogs Make Us Human

    03/26/2002 10:29:27 AM PST · by blam · 124 replies · 747+ views
    Australian Museum ^ | 3-25-2002 | Heidi De Wald
    Dogs make us human By Heidi De Wald Monday, 25 Mar, 2002 About 48% of Australian households own dogs. But can you imagine a world without dogs. And would we be the same if they were not here? Would human beings have developed in very different ways had our best friends not been by our sides? A recent study suggests that the domestication of dogs mutually led to profound changes in the biological and behavioural evolution of both species. It has long been known that the first species domesticated by humans was the wolf. In essence, we made wolves into...
  • Otago Researchers Sequence Kuri Dog Genomes

    10/08/2015 1:55:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Thursday, October 8, 2015 | Ms Karen Greig
    The genetic heritage of New Zealand's first dog, the now extinct kuri, is being unravelled by University of Otago scientists using state-of-the-art ancient DNA analysis. University of Otago PhD student Karen Greig has sequenced the complete, or near complete, mitochondrial genomes of 14 kuri represented by bones recovered from Wairau Bar, one on New Zealand's earliest and most important archaeological sites. Kuri were smallish dogs about the size of cocker spaniels and were brought to New Zealand from East Polynesia in the colonising canoes that arrived in the early fourteenth century AD. They were the only domesticated animal to be...
  • Dogs bred from wolves helped humans take over from Neanderthal rivals in Europe 40,000 years ago

    03/01/2015 5:42:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 25 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 1, 2015 | Dan Bloom
    It's thousands of years since mankind won dominance over nature, and we're still pretty proud. But a top researcher says we've been giving ourselves too much credit - because we were helped by our oldest friends. Humans paired up with dogs as early as 40,000 BC, it is claimed, giving us such an advantage in hunting that it prompted the wipeout of our Neanderthal rivals.
  • Dogs 'Can Trace Origins To Central Asia'

    10/21/2015 2:37:41 PM PDT · by blam · 51 replies
    BBC ^ | 10-20-2015 | Paul Rincon
    By Paul Rincon 20 October 2015 Dogs may have become man's best friend in Central Asia, according to the study Today's dogs can trace their origins to Central Asia, according to one of the most comprehensive genetic surveys yet. Dogs are the most diverse animal on the planet - a legacy of thousands of years of selective breeding by humans. But they derive from wild wolves that were gradually tamed and inducted into human hunting groups - perhaps near Mongolia or Nepal. The findings come from an analysis of DNA from thousands of pooches, and are published in PNAS journal....
  • Biologist Drake helps answer key question in canine history [Dog Domestication]

    02/06/2015 11:03:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Skidmore College ^ | February 5, 2015 | press release (via Archaeology)
    When did dogs first become domesticated? A sophisticated new 3D fossil analysis by biologists Abby Grace Drake, visiting assistant professor of biology at Skidmore, and Michael Coquerelle of the University Rey Juan Carlos contradicts the suggested domestication of dogs during the late Paleolithic era (about 30,000 years ago), and reestablishes the date of domestication to around 15,000 years ago... Whether dogs were domesticated during the Paleolithic era, when humans were hunter-gatherers, or the Neolithic era, when humans began to form permanent settlements and take up farming, is a subject of ongoing scientific debate. Original fossil finds placed dog domestication in...
  • Dogs have been man's best friend 'for 40,000 years'

    05/21/2015 10:15:08 AM PDT · by C19fan · 66 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | May 21, 2015 | Staff
    Dogs have been man's best friend for up to 40,000 years, suggests new research. The study shows dogs' special relationship with humans might date back 27,000 to 40,000 years. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, come from genomic analysis of an ancient Taimyr wolf bone.
  • Fossils reveal felines drove 40 species of canines to extinction after arriving in North [tr]

    08/13/2015 6:14:53 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | August 13, 2015 | Jack Millner
    You may think your dog has an irrational hatred of cats, but their instinct to chase felines out of their territory might be more reasonable than you think. Fossils have revealed the two species have a rocky past after the introduction of cats to the Americas had a devastating effect on the continent's species of wild dogs. In fact, it is thought that competition from cats caused up to 40 species of dog to become extinct in the region millions of years ago.
  • Reading An Ancient Bond In The Look Of Puppy Love

    03/06/2016 5:39:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    University of Alberta ^ | March 1, 2016 | Geoff McMaster
    The irresistible gaze of "puppy-dog eyes" has roots in thousands of years of human evolution alongside domesticated dogs, says anthropologist Robert Losey. Anyone who owns a dog is familiar with the "gaze" -- that hypnotic, imploring stare that demands reciprocation. It can seem to hold a world of mystery and longing, or just pure bafflement at what makes humans tick. It turns out that the look of mutual recognition between human and dog reflects thousands of years of evolution, a bond programmed into our very body chemistry. Last spring a research team in Japan discovered that both species release a...
  • The Big Search to Find Out Where Dogs Come From

    01/20/2016 7:14:50 AM PST · by C19fan · 49 replies
    NY Times ^ | January 18, 2016 | James Gorman
    Before humans milked cows, herded goats or raised hogs, before they invented agriculture, or written language, before they had permanent homes, and most certainly before they had cats, they had dogs. Or dogs had them, depending on how you view the human-canine arrangement. But scientists are still debating exactly when and where the ancient bond originated. And a large new study being run out of the University of Oxford here, with collaborators around the world, may soon provide some answers.
  • Ancient Humans, Dogs Hunted Mastodon in Florida: Early Dogs Helped Humans Hunt Mammoths

    05/16/2016 2:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Discovery News ^ | May 13, 2016 | Jennifer Viegas
    The geology of the site, as well as pollen and algae finds, suggest that the hunter-gatherers encountered the mastodon next to a small pond that both humans and animals used as a water source, the researchers believe. Waters said that the prehistoric "people knew how to find game, fresh water and materials for making tools. These people were well adapted to this environment. The site is a slam-dunk pre-Clovis site with unequivocal artifacts, clear stratigraphy and thorough dating." Another research team previously excavated the site and found what they believed were dog remains, so dogs "would most likely have been...
  • Humans May Have Domesticated Dogs Twice in Both Asia and Europe, New Study Shows

    06/02/2016 9:27:19 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    Humans may have domesticated dogs two separate times, taming wolves both in Europe and Asia thousands of years ago, according to new research. A major international research project may have cleared some of the controversy surrounding the origins of man's best friend, which has until now remained a mystery with two primary hypotheses. The first holds that humans domesticated dogs for the first time in Europe more than 15,000 years ago.
  • Dogs were domesticated TWICE: Canines became man's best friend in Europe and Central Asia [tr]

    06/02/2016 12:18:06 PM PDT · by C19fan · 20 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 2, 2016 | Russ Swan and Shivali Best
    They may be man's best friend, but the question of where domestic dogs originated has long remained a mystery. Some argue that humans first domesticated wolves in Europe, while others claim this happened in Central Asia. Now, a new paper suggests that both these claims may be right, and that dogs were domesticated not once, but twice.
  • Stunning Images of Wolf Pack taking down an Elk

    02/26/2016 8:10:29 AM PST · by w1n1 · 50 replies
    Cal Sportsman ^ | 2/26/2016 | J Hoffman
    For a nature photographer, capturing a scene of epic predation is akin to winning the lottery. Yes, it isn't pretty. But it depicts the real and very much raw struggle to survive that takes place daily in the animal world. A professional photographer Christopher Martin was touring Banff National Park, when he happened to come across an elk uneasily moving back and forth across a railway overpass, he knew he was in for a scene that portrays real-world wild life struggle for survival. See the rest of the story here.
  • More wolf releases planned for west of Heber-Overgaard

    02/23/2016 11:30:09 AM PST · by Jeff Chandler · 9 replies
    Mogollon Rim News ^ | February 19, 2016 | Barbara Samples
    "There's not a cowboy in this room that couldn't qualify for disability. We want to work. You're making us dependent upon the federal government for compensation. Our best direction to make a living is now in the form of compensation from the federal government. At the end of the day the only way money is generated is harvest the animal you grow. You're choppin' the legs out from under us. If we could make a living with wolves, there would still be wolves here. Not just cattle...elk and deer bring in money to the economy. But the wolf doesn't contribute....
  • Dog has been man's best friend for 33,000 years, DNA study finds

    12/16/2015 6:04:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 15, 2015 | Staff
    Man's best friend came about after generations of wolves scavenged alongside humans more than 33,000 years ago in south east Asia, according to new research. Dogs became self-domesticated as they slowly evolved from wolves who joined humans in the hunt, according to the first study of dog genomes. And it shows that the first domesticated dogs came about 33,000 years ago and migrated to Europe, rather than descending from domesticated European wolves 10,000 years ago as had previously been thought.
  • Deal approved to protect grizzly bear habitat in Montana ( Donald Molloy )

    10/10/2015 11:13:51 AM PDT · by george76 · 74 replies
    Reuters ^ | 10-10-2015 | Laura Zuckerman
    A U.S. judge on Friday approved a deal between conservationists and Montana officials to restrict road-building and logging in roughly 22,000 acres of state forest lands that make up core habitat for federally protected grizzlies. The agreement resolves a lawsuit brought by conservationists after the state had sought to open 37,000 acres , mostly in the Stillwater State Forest, to timber harvesting despite what environmentalists said would be the destruction of prime grizzly bear territory. ... U.S. District Judge Donald W. Molloy in a decision last year found the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service violated the Endangered Species Act by...
  • Northwoods dog owners remember dog killed by wolves

    10/05/2015 11:01:19 AM PDT · by SJackson · 65 replies
    WJFW ^ | 09/30/2015
    BOULDER JUNCTION - People often feel like their pets are members of their family. Teri Winter and Jimmy Dean Van Rossum felt that way about their dog Bella. Earlier this week, Bella was killed by wolves. The only thing they found of Bella was blood and fur. "They didn't even leave a bone, we can't find her collar," says Winter. On Monday night, Van Rossum let Bella out to go to the bathroom at his home in Boulder Junction. She never came back. "She was in her woods, her yard, going to the bathroom," Winter says. That's when wolves got...
  • He Watched Wolves Attack And Kill His Livestock, Could Do Nothing Because Of A Fed Court Ruling

    10/05/2015 11:58:54 AM PDT · by SJackson · 133 replies
    Off the Grid News ^ | June 5, 2015 | Daniel Jennings
    Gray wolves are killing cattle and family pets in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin, and all residents can do is stand by and watch thanks to a federal judges ruling. In December, US District Judge Beryl Howell overturned the Obama administrations decision to take the gray wolf in the Great Lakes states off the endangered species list, The Detroit Free Press reported. Howells action effectively banned hunting and trapping of wolves in those states. Farmer Miles Kuschel watched a pack of six wolves surround his cattle on Easter, but decided not to shoot because of the ruling. When he came back,...
  • First Wolf Pack in 91 Years Photographed in Northern California

    08/20/2015 2:10:39 PM PDT · by Lurkina.n.Learnin · 21 replies
    Lostcoasr Outpost ^ | 8/20/2015 | Ryan Burns
    Scientists are calling it an ecological breakthrough: Two adult wolves and five cubs were recently photographed in Siskiyou County, the first known wolves in California since 1924 (with the exception of the famous wandering OR7, who wound up settling in Southern Oregon).
  • Family Tree of Dogs and Wolves Is Found to Split Earlier Than Thought

    05/21/2015 10:13:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    New York Times ^ | MAY 21, 2015 | JAMES GORMAN
    The ancestors of modern wolves and dogs split into different evolutionary lineages 27,000 to 40,000 years ago, much earlier than some other research has suggested, scientists reported Thursday. The new finding is based on a bone fragment found on the Taimyr Peninsula in Siberia several years ago. When scientists studied the bone and reconstructed its genome the first time that had been done for an ancient wolf, or any kind of ancient carnivore they found it was a new species that lived 35,000 years ago. Based on the differences between the genome of the new species, called the...
  • Planned Parenthood Abortion Business Listed as Safe Haven for Moms to Surrender Their Newborn Baby

    05/21/2015 5:02:46 PM PDT · by Morgana · 15 replies
    life news ^ | May 21, 2015 | Sarah Zagorski
    Vermont has a new Safe Haven law, which means that parents can hand over an infant to an employee at any fire station, health facility or hospital, with absolutely no questions asked. However, apparently Planned Parenthood is considered a safe place for infants in Vermont. In an advertisement from Planned Parenthood of Northern New England, the abortion business announced, Vermont has a new safe haven law. This means that rather than abandoning your newborn, you can bring your baby to a safe place where he or she will be carried for. All Planned Parenthood health centers in Vermont are safe...
  • A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia

    04/16/2014 4:39:12 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 23 replies
    Most children, Asher Svidensky says, are a little intimidated by golden eagles. Kazakh boys in western Mongolia start learning how to use the huge birds to hunt for foxes and hares at the age of 13, when the eagles sit heavily on their undeveloped arms. Svidensky, a photographer and travel writer, shot five boys learning the skill - and he also photographed Ashol-Pan
  • Washington state wolf population grows by 30 percent

    03/07/2015 2:13:15 PM PST · by george76 · 31 replies
    ap ^ | March 7, 2015
    Washington's wolf population grew by more than 30 percent last year and formed four new packs. ... The state also found there are now 16 wolf packs and at least five successful breeding pairs.
  • Moose Collaring Continues Despite Calf Deaths

    02/25/2015 7:00:30 PM PST · by TurboZamboni · 29 replies
    Pioneer Press ^ | 2-23-15 | John Myers
    DULUTH, Minn. -- Minnesota wildlife researchers will keep trying to collar and study newborn moose calves in 2015 even though things haven't gone well during the first two years of the effort. Last May and June, researchers put GPS collars on 25 calves just hours after they were born. But 19 of them either were abandoned by their mothers and had to be rescued, or their collars fell off or stopped working, leaving only six calves to be studied. By August, those six had been eaten by predators, mostly wolves. "It's frustrating. But we need to persevere," said Glenn DelGiudice,...
  • Wolf on dog attacks increase (WI)

    01/28/2015 4:46:12 AM PST · by SJackson · 32 replies
    Channel 3000 ^ | 1-27-15
    Wildlife experts say the number of dogs attacked by wolves is up TOWN OF BREED, Wis. - Wildlife experts say wolves have killed or seriously injured six dogs in Wisconsin this month. That's double the highest number for January in recent years. Two dogs have been killed in Oconto County. Department of Natural Resources wildlife supervisor Jeff Pritzl says the spike in incidents doesn't necessarily reflect any changes wolf population or behavior. Pritzl told WLUK-TV that more people are out hunting coyotes, bobcats, and rabbits with their dogs because of the milder winter. Pritzl said the peak time for wolf-related...
  • Grizzly bear-human conflicts increase in Wyoming in 2014

    01/23/2015 8:23:35 AM PST · by george76 · 32 replies
    Casper Star-Tribune ^ | January 23, 2015 | BOB MOEN
    Grizzly bears were the leading category among the 385 total conflicts between humans and large carnivores in Wyoming last year. Black bears were second with 134 conflicts, followed by wolves (64) and mountain lions (23). ... grizzly bears continue to expand their range. "They've far exceeded the expected geographic recovery distribution ... The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is expected to decide this year whether it will lift protections for some 1,000 grizzlies that scientists say live in the Yellowstone region of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. Removal of the protections would transfer jurisdiction over grizzlies to states
  • Wolves are better than dogs at COUNTING: Wild canines identify the number of items more often

    12/23/2014 6:13:25 AM PST · by C19fan · 16 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 22, 2014 | Richard Gray
    After living alongside humans for thousands of years, it would be nice to think that a bit of our mental agility has rubbed off on dogs. However, it seems that domestic dogs are actually less intellectually capable than the wild relatives they were bred from. Animal psychologists have found that wolves are able to count far better than domestic dogs - and it's because dogs have become used to relying on us to help them.
  • Court order puts Great Lakes wolves back on endangered species list

    12/22/2014 6:38:57 PM PST · by SJackson · 27 replies
    Duluth News ^ | Dec 19, 2014 | John Myers
    Wolves across the Great Lakes region are back under full protection of the federal Endangered Species Act as a result of a ruling by a federal judge Friday in Washington. Judge Beryl A. Howell sided with animal rights groups in a 111-page decision stating the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service went too far in removing federal protections for wolves in nine Great Lakes states in 2012. The judge ruled that wolves in the Great Lakes states be immediately placed under the protections of the governments 1978 ruling to protect the animals, which had been hunted, trapped and harassed to near...
  • Who Will Rescue the Lost Sheep of the Lonely Revolution?

    11/06/2014 7:22:05 PM PST · by ebb tide · 11 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | November 6, 2014 | Anthony Esolen
    Forgive me, Lord, if I use your words for an admonitory parable. You said to the Pharisees, What man among you, having a hundred sheep, and learning that one of them has wandered into the wilderness, will not leave the ninety nine and go after the lost sheep? And when he has found it, will he not call his friends and say, Rejoice with me, for I have found the sheep that was lost? That is why you came among us, to call sinners back to the fold. Not to pet and stroke them for being sinners, because that is...
  • The Making of a Mexico-to-Canada Wolf Corridor

    10/13/2014 10:30:36 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 1 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 10/13/14 | W.R. McAfee
    Part 1: Mexican wolves can devastate a ranch economically in ways not readily apparent or understood by the public The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is delisting and relinquishing management of their imported Canadian gray wolves back to state wildlife officials while simultaneously proposing new rules1 to save the Mexican gray wolf. These proposals include: Keeping the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) on the endangered list as a subspecies. A conundrum. The Mexican wolf is a gray wolf that breeds with other gray wolves and is not a subspecies. A grizzly and a black bear are subspecies.
  • ( DC ) Judge Reinstates Protections for Wyoming Wolves

    09/24/2014 7:01:34 PM PDT · by george76 · 8 replies
    ap ^ | Sep 24, 2014
    Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead issued a statement Tuesday saying that he expects the state to seek a stay of Jacksons decision. He said the state will seek an emergency rule from the Fish and Wildlife Service to allow continued state wolf management. ... Wyoming took over wolf management in late 2012 after the federal government ruled that wolves no longer needed protection under the federal Endangered Species Act.
  • A Gay Christians Journey: And God Save Judy Garland -

    08/13/2014 1:58:06 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 13 replies
    Red Letter "Christians" ^ | 7/26/14 | Brian McLaren
    Theres a kind of unique club in the world called friends of Tony and Peggy Campolo. Im a grateful member of that group.... I prayed about it and said yes, which led to my meeting Randy Eddy-McCain and the beautiful church he served. What neither Randy, Peggy, nor I knew was that about four months later, one of my sons would be coming out. When he did, I kept thinking, Thank God my son didnt have to worry that his coming out would in any way hurt my work and reputation. Thank God Randy and Peggy invited me and I...
  • Mexican Gray Wolf Hearings In New Mexico, Arizona Expected To Draw Hundreds

    08/10/2014 8:35:23 PM PDT · by george76 · 28 replies
    KRWG ^ | August 8, 2014 | Center for Biological Diversity
    Large turnouts are expected at two upcoming public hearings on proposed changes to the Mexican wolf management plan, including expansion of the wolf-management areas in Arizona and New Mexico. The hearings, Aug. 11 in Pinetop, Ariz., and Aug. 13 in Truth or Consequences, N.M., will be the final opportunity for verbal testimony on proposed changes to management of the endangered Mexican gray wolf population in the two states. Public hearings last year in Albuquerque and Pinetop drew a total of around 1,000 people, most of whom were not allotted time to speak. ... The Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to...
  • Saudi Farmer Kills Two Wolves, Hangs Them in Public

    07/21/2014 4:02:15 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 23 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Monday, July 21, 2014
    A Saudi farmer seeking revenge for the loss of his sheep chased two wolves for most of the day and killed them before hanging their bodies on a sign board in the area. Qayed Al Mutairi said he was determined to kill the two wolves after they devoured 18 of his sheep over the past few weeks. He told Sabq daily that he chased the two predators to the mountains by his four-wheel vehicle most of the day and shot them. Mutairi then hanged the two animals at a signboard so other farmers and people will see them. This is...
  • Craig Medred: Headphones prevent hiker from hearing wolf attack his dog

    06/27/2014 10:32:46 AM PDT · by skeptoid · 32 replies
    Anchorage Daily News ^ | June 26, 2014 | Craig Medred
    While little Mosca the Jack Russell terrier was being noisily killed by wolves earlier this month in Chugach State Park just above Anchorage, the dog's owner was hiking along a trail to Wolverine Peak unaware of what was going on because he was wearing headphones.
  • Ariz. bill allowing ranchers to kill wolves also vetoed

    04/25/2014 7:54:58 PM PDT · by george76 · 38 replies
    Arizona Daily Sun, ^ | April 23, 2014
    Gov. Jan Brewer will not give ranchers and their employees permission to kill endangered Mexican gray wolves on federal lands. The measure vetoed Tuesday was crafted by Sen. Gail Griffin, R-Hereford. She has been a vocal foe of the program by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reintroduce the wolves into sections of Arizona and New Mexico, saying they are endangering not only cattle but also pets and children. SB1211 would have spelled out that ranchers could take a wolf legalese for killing that was killing, wounding or biting livestock. It also would have legalized a guard...