Keyword: wolves

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  • Woman Treed by Wolves Waits for Authorities to Allow Rescue

    08/20/2018 4:56:54 AM PDT · by marktwain · 62 replies
    Ammoland ^ | 16 August, 2018 | Dean Weingarten
    On 12 July, 2018, a salmon researcher was treed by a pack of wolves in a Washington state wilderness area. She tried pepper spray and yelling, but the pack surrounded her and she climbed a tree. She later climbed down, only to find the wolves still there. She scrambled back up the tree and called for rescue, about 12:30 p.m. From capitalpress.com: Washington wildlife managers initially opposed sending a helicopter or a search-and-rescue team to save a woman treed by wolves in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, according to recordings and summaries of emergency calls obtained Tuesday.The Department of Natural Resources...
  • Wolves Attack Wisconsin With Washington’s Help

    07/28/2018 5:33:15 AM PDT · by reaganaut1 · 45 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | July 27, 2018 | Cori Petersen
    When the Trump administration announced a plan last week to overhaul the Endangered Species Act, the frantic reactions were illustrated with pictures of humpback whales and baby bald eagles. But a much better way to understand what Republicans have in mind is to consider Wisconsin’s wolf problem. Paul and Judy Canik raise bighorn and hair sheep near the small town of Butternut. Their herd has grown to about 400, each sheep worth around $1,500. Guarding the prized flock are nine Spanish mastiffs, worth $2,500 apiece. While checking on their animals two years ago, the Caniks found that 17 pregnant ewes...
  • Washington state wildlife officials resisted sending copter, sheriff to save woman treed by wolves

    07/22/2018 7:35:02 AM PDT · by george76 · 71 replies
    Capital Press ^ | July 18, 2018 | Don Jenkins
    Recordings and summaries of emergency calls show Washington wildlife officials at first objected to an air rescue of a woman treed by wolves, or help from the Okanogan County sheriff. Washington wildlife managers initially opposed sending a helicopter or a search-and-rescue team to save a woman treed by wolves in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, according to recordings and summaries of emergency calls. ... Notes from a call between DNR dispatcher Jill Jones and a wildlife officer summarized WDFW’s position, and her position, shortly before the helicopter launched. “No helicopter. Federally listed species. 3 WDFW personnel saying so,” according to DNR’s...
  • Cattle producer says wolves cause breeding problems ( Washington )

    06/17/2018 8:42:02 AM PDT · by george76 · 17 replies
    Chewelah Independent) ^ | June 6, 2018 | Brandon Hansen
    A troubling trend has occurred for ranchers in NE Washington ... cattle are experiencing breeding issues since the migration of wolves to the area... the rate of female cows .. that didn’t become pregnant has increased from five percent to about 20 percent. A cow must raise a calf every summer for the rancher to recoup costs ... Diamond M also has a winter range to cut costs, but when wolves came into the area about a decade ago, they’ve seen their cattle attacked ... Texas A&M University agreed with the open cow side effect from wolves, and an Eastern...
  • Clever Dog Narrowly Escapes From Hunting Wolf Pack

    02/21/2018 4:20:23 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    UPI ^ | 2/20
    An Italian man captured video of a dog's lucky escape when a pack of wolves appeared and attempted to make it into a meal. Paolo Forconi posted a video to Facebook showing the scene he witnessed in Aubruzzo, Italy, when a wolf pack showed up in the area and started chasing a small dog. The video shows the wolves surround and chase the dog, managing to bite it two times, but the smaller canine makes a narrow escape by jumping through an opening in a nearby fence. The opening proves to small for the wolves to follow. Forconi said wolf...
  • Wolf Shot in Self Defense: Department Recommends Warning Shots

    11/12/2017 6:01:19 AM PST · by marktwain · 74 replies
    Ammoland ^ | 10 November, 2017 | Dean Weingarten
    On 27 October, 2017, an Oregon elk hunter found himself being stalked by three wolves. One of the wolves charged directly at him, in spite of his yelling in an attempt to scare it off.  The hunter fired at the charging wolf, believing his life was in danger.The wolf was killed, and the other two wolves ran into cover at the shot.  The hunter initially thought the animal might have been a coyote, but examination by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) revealed it was an 83 lb female wolf.From bluemanountaineagle.com: Further investigation at the site of...
  • Wolves ate hiker after her frantic phone call, coroner says

    09/27/2017 10:40:37 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 67 replies
    San Jose Mercury-News ^ | September 27, 2017 | By COSTAS KANTOURIS
    THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) — A missing British hiker whose dismembered, fleshless remains were found in the hills of northern Greece was probably attacked by wolves while walking alone on a remote path, then torn apart and devoured, a Greek coroner said after an autopsy Wednesday. Coroner Nikos Kifnidis told the Associated Press that both the woman’s thigh bones had been cracked open by bites and large sections of her body are still missing. He said a veterinarian at Wednesday’s autopsy in the town of Komotini confirmed that no dog or jackal could have administered such bites.
  • Excerpt: How the Myth of "Harmless" Wolves was Created

    06/24/2017 6:14:38 AM PDT · by marktwain · 48 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 13 June, 2017 | Dean Weingarten
    Valerius Geist is a Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science at the University of Calgary, Canada.  He believed in the myth of the "Harmless" wolf until he personally experienced evidence to the contrary, four years after he retired.  In this heavily documented paper, written in 2010, He explores how the mythology came to be. From wolfeducationinternational.com: Valerius Geist November 26th 2010 The effects of thousands of impoverished trappers and wolf bounties in northern Alberta early in the 20the century on predators, and its relation to the myth of the harmless wolf. Dear Colleagues, I have been digging into historical literature in...
  • A 3-year-old boy tried to feed a wolf some pizza. She bit off part of his arm

    06/19/2017 12:15:29 AM PDT · by blueplum · 19 replies
    Miami Herald ^ | 18 June 2017 2:12pm | Amelia Dickson
    THURSTON COUNTY, WASHINGTON A female wolf that bit off part of a 3-year-old Thurston County boy’s arm in April has been relocated to an out-of-state wildlife sanctuary, along with her pups and her Alaskan malamute mate. {snip} “She’s not aggressive in a mean way,” Miracle said. “She just liked food.” He believes that the boy was trying to feed Cheyenne a piece of pizza when he was attacked. {snip}He said he gave Angel, Zoe and Lakota to Wolf Haven “because they really wanted them.” But why breed wolf-dogs? Miracle said he had one as a boy, and it was a...
  • The Damage Wolves Are Inflicting On America: Part 4b – Big Wolf Lies

    05/26/2017 12:03:19 PM PDT · by Twotone · 40 replies
    Bowhunting.net ^ | May 15, 2017 | Toby Bridges
    If you live within the reddish or pinkish shaded areas of the corridor shown on the accompanying map … you just might be among the first to feel the bite of the United Nations’ pipedream known as Agenda 21. What this map shows is one Agenda 21 installment of The Wildlands Network, known as the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative. This is a collaborative effort of more than a hundred environmental groups, organizations and related agencies. One of those “radical” agencies just happens to be MT Fish, Wildlife and Parks which is listed as a collaborating partner of this plan...
  • Wolf hunting could return to Minnesota, Wisconsin

    05/08/2017 11:04:29 AM PDT · by SJackson · 10 replies
    Fox 9 ^ | 5-8-17
    Gray wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan could find themselves in the crosshairs of hunters as soon as this fall. A ruling is expected soon from the same appeals court that recently lifted protections for wolves in Wyoming. Officials say that whether Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan can hold wolf seasons this fall would depend in part on how soon the court rules. Meanwhile, wolf-hunting supporters in Congress aren't giving up even though a Minnesota representative was instrumental in killing an effort that would have allowed the three Midwest states to resume wolf hunting.
  • Parisians told not to fear roaming wolves as 'they only eat four-legged animals

    01/17/2017 5:22:44 PM PST · by Gamecock · 32 replies
    Mirror ^ | 1/17/2017 | Stephen Jones
    Parisians are frightened that the endangered beasts are now within howling distance of the capital and can't be stopped. French people have been told not to fear wolves roaming Paris streets - as "they only eat four-legged animals". Parisians are frightened that the endangered beasts - which have fought back from near extinction in the 1930s - are now within howling distance of the capital. Indeed the discovery of paw prints, messy droppings and late-night howls from wolves - a distant relative of the domestic pet dog - are reported to be a now frequent occurrence in the city's suburbs.
  • Great Lakes and Wyoming wolves at risk of delisting from Endangered Species Act

    09/27/2016 4:46:28 AM PDT · by SJackson · 20 replies
    Capital Times ^ | Sep 25, 2016 | PATRICIA RANDOLPH
    “This is not a biological issue. It is a political issue…we want wolves gone.” ~ Statements made at the Sen. Tom Tiffany/Rep. Adam Jarchow Sept. 15 Great Lakes Wolf Summit The actions and legislation of this U.S. Congress make me realize that hunters think that wilderness is a federally financed shooting range with roads leading across it from all directions, dogs fighting bears and wolves, forests emptied using steel-jaw traps, and living animals lined up for target practice. Until the 90 percent of us who do not kill wildlife realize that “hunting” has morphed from a way to gather food...
  • Dogs descended from wolf pack on Yangtze river

    09/04/2009 2:58:00 AM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies · 1,533+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Sep 2, 2009 | Unknown
    Today's dogs are all descended from a pack of wolves tamed 16,000 years ago on the shores of the Yangtze river, according to new research. It was previously known that the birthplace of the dog was eastern Asia but historians were not able to be more precise than that. However, now researchers have made a number of new discoveries about the history of man's best friend - including that the dog appeared about 16,000 years ago south of the Yangtze river in China. It has also been discovered that even though the dog has a single geographical origin it descends...
  • Scientists pinpoint origins of little dogs

    02/24/2010 1:00:41 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 34 replies · 1,256+ views
    msnbc ^ | 2-24-10 | Jennifer Viegas
    Small dogs the world over can all trace their ancestry back to the Middle East, where the first diminutive canines emerged more than 12,000 years ago. A new study, which appears in BMC Biology, focused on a single gene responsible for size in dogs. Researchers found that the version of the gene IGF1 that is a major determinant of small size in dogs probably originated as a result of domestication of the Middle Eastern gray wolf, which also happens to be smaller than many other wolves. In terms of which came first, big dogs or small dogs, the answer is...
  • Dog domestication likely started in N. Africa

    08/03/2009 6:19:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies · 944+ views
    Discovery ^ | Aug 3, 2009 | Jennifer Viegas
    A Basenji is a dog breed indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa. Humans might have first domesticated dogs from wolves in Africa, with Egypt being one possibility, since wolves are native to that region. Modern humans originated in Africa, and now it looks like man's best friend first emerged there too. An extensive genetic study on the ancestry of African village dogs points to a Eurasian — possibly North African — origin for the domestication of dogs. Prior research concluded that dogs likely originated in East Asia. However, this latest study, the most thorough investigation ever on the ancestry of African village...
  • Have humans made dogs STUPID? Pets are 'lazy thinkers' compared to wild wolves and [tr]

    09/16/2015 5:24:45 AM PDT · by C19fan · 74 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 16, 2015 | Richard Gray
    They may be man's best friend, but dogs have little to thank humans for it seems. Research suggests the domesticated pets can't solve problems as well as their wild cousins because living with us has made them 'incapable of thinking for themselves.' In tests, experts presented a 'puzzle box' containing food to a group of dogs, and a group of wolves and while the wolves were capable of breaking inside, the dogs looked to humans for help.
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • Canine Copycats Can Mirror Other Dogs' Emotions (Dogs Read Feelings)

    12/23/2015 11:27:24 AM PST · by goldstategop · 17 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12/23/2015 | Helen Briggs
    Dogs can copy each other's expressions in a split-second just like people, showing signs of basic empathy, according to Italian researchers. Mimicking each other's facial expressions is a human habit, which helps people to get along. Dogs do the same to bond with other dogs, scientists report in the journal, Royal Society Open Science. They think dogs may be showing a basic built-in form of empathy, enabling them to pick up on emotions. And the phenomenon may have emerged in our canine companions during the process of domestication, say scientists from the Natural History Museum, University of Pisa.
  • Dogs Mimic Each Other’s Expressions, Too

    12/27/2015 12:35:34 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 13 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 12-22-15 | Rachel Nuwer
    This week, millions of people around the world will no doubt experience rapid mimicry-an involuntary, split-second mirroring of another person's facial expressions-as they exchange smiles over gifts, good meals and holiday traditions. This phenomenon, observed in humans and many other primates, is considered a basic building block of our ability to feel empathy. "When your companion or friend smiles, you don't know why exactly, but you immediately react with the same smile to him or her," says Elisabetta Palagi, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Pisa in Italy. "It’s an extremely important phenomenon, because through this mimicry you can...