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Keyword: writing

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  • No Documents in Obama Library? No Mystery There.

    10/13/2017 7:11:54 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 78 replies
    American Thinker.com ^ | October 13, 2017 | Jack Cashill
    The Fox News headline sums up the issue at hand: "No Obama documents in Obama library? Historians puzzled by Chicago center plans." The article continues, "The Obama Foundation is taking an unconventional approach to the presidential center and library being planned in Chicago. It's opting to host a digital archive of President Barack Obama's records, but not keep his hard-copy manuscripts and letters and other documents onsite." The Chicago Tribune broke the story that, to this point, has attracted no major media attention. Its headline raises much the same question Fox News did: "Without archives on site, how will Obama...
  • SRJC professor channels own adversity, and her students’, into writing

    09/08/2017 3:52:10 PM PDT · by rey · 13 replies
    Press Democrat ^ | 8 Sept 2017
    Leslie Mancillas believes everyone has a story worth telling. The Santa Rosa Junior College professor and author has worked with her students over the past few years capturing their stories of hardship, hope and triumph in anthologies. Gearing up for her latest student compilation, Mancillas finds herself reflecting about surviving childhood abuse in a memoir she hopes to finish next summer. Her mother beat her and two siblings while hooked on amphetamines and barbiturates, Mancillas said, which had been prescribed for weight loss and sleep. The amphetamines gave her mother — a petite hospital nurse — super strength, she said....
  • Promised Land Lost

    05/30/2017 5:22:52 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 23 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 30, 2017 | Salena Zito
    FORT MADISON, IOWA -- Only ghosts and shadows haunt the empty halls of Sheaffer Pens, the onetime giant pen manufacturer on H Street. Its locked doors and worn brick stand like weary sentinels along the banks of the Mississippi in this struggling southeast Iowa river-and-railroad town. Rust weeps through the paint on the window frames; the once magnificent illuminated-letters sign with the trademark white dot that faced Illinois is gone, no longer serving as a gatekeeper for its fortress of employees. At its peak, it employed more than 2,500 people in a town of 14,000; nearly everyone here had someone...
  • Emirati Teenager Soon to Publish Second Novel

    03/27/2017 10:55:39 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    Gulf News ^ | March 25, 2017 | Sarvy Geranpayeh
    14-year-old on a mission to change perceptions about young ArabsA 14-year-old Emirati girl’s love for books has led her to write novels, a move she hopes will inspire other young Arabs to work towards reaching their full potential and changing the world’s perception of young Arabs’ capabilities. Aisha Al Naqbi’s first book Blue Moon was published in April last year when she was just 13 and she has just finished the draft for her second book and is well on her way to plotting her third novel. At first glance, Al Naqbi seems like every other teenager but it takes...
  • Cursive Writing Is Coming Back to Schools

    03/05/2017 8:55:48 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 47 replies
    KCRA ^ | Mar 5, 2017
    Alabama and Louisiana passed laws in 2016 mandating cursive proficiency in public schoolsCursive writing is looping back into style in schools across the country after a generation of students raised on keyboarding, texting and printing out letters longhand. Alabama and Louisiana passed laws in 2016 mandating cursive proficiency in public schools, the latest of 14 states to require cursive. And last fall, the 1.1 million-student New York City school system encouraged teaching cursive to students in the third grade. Penmanship proponents contend writing words in a single line is just a faster way of taking notes. Others say students...
  • College Writing Center Declares American Grammar A ‘Racist,’ ‘Unjust Language Structure’

    02/20/2017 1:37:04 PM PST · by ColdOne · 119 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | 2/20/17 | Rob Shimshock
    An “antiracist” poster in a college writing center insists American grammar is “racist” and an “unjust language structure,” promising to prioritize rhetoric over “grammatical ‘correctness.'” The poster, written by the director, staff, and tutors of the University of Washington, Tacoma’s Writing Center, states “racism is the normal condition of things,” declaring that it permeates rules, systems, expectations, in courses, school and society. “Linguistic and writing research has shown clearly for many decades that there is no inherent ‘standard’ of English,” proclaims the writing center’s statement. “Language is constantly changing. These two facts make it very difficult to justify placing people...
  • College Writing Center Declares American Grammar A 'Racist,' 'Unjust Language Structure'

    02/20/2017 11:47:53 AM PST · by Zakeet · 60 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | February 20, 2017 | Rob Shimshock
    University of Washington Tacoma - An "antiracist" poster in a college writing center insists American grammar is "racist" and an "unjust language structure," promising to prioritize rhetoric over "grammatical 'correctness.'" The poster, written by the director, staff, and tutors of the University of Washington, Tacoma's Writing Center, states "racism is the normal condition of things," declaring that it permeates rules, systems, expectations, in courses, school and society. "Linguistic and writing research has shown clearly for many decades that there is no inherent 'standard' of English," proclaims the writing center's statement. "Language is constantly changing. These two facts make it very...
  • Zhou Youguang, Architect Of A Bridge Between Languages, Dies At 111

    Zhou Youguang, the inventor of a system to convert Chinese characters into words with the Roman alphabet, died Saturday at the age of 111. Since his system was introduced nearly six decades ago, few innovations have done more to boost literacy rates in China and bridge the divide between the country and the West. Pinyin, which was adopted by China in 1958, gave readers unfamiliar with Chinese characters a crucial tool to understand how to pronounce them. These characters do not readily disclose information on how to say them aloud — but with such a system as Pinyin, those characters...
  • Code hidden in Stone Age art may be the root of human writing

    11/12/2016 9:06:16 AM PST · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    New Science ^ | 11/9/2016 | Alison George
    cave paintings Spot the signs: geometric forms can be found in paintings, as at Marsoulas in France Philippe Blanchot / hemis.fr / Hemis/AFP By Alison George When she first saw the necklace, Genevieve von Petzinger feared the trip halfway around the globe to the French village of Les Eyzies-de-Tayac had been in vain. The dozens of ancient deer teeth laid out before her, each one pierced like a bead, looked roughly the same. It was only when she flipped one over that the hairs on the back of her neck stood up. On the reverse were three etched symbols: a...
  • Oldest Egyptian writing on papyrus displayed for first time

    07/14/2016 3:35:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 7/14/16 | AFP
    Cairo (AFP) - The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is showcasing for the first time the earliest writing from ancient Egypt found on papyrus, detailing work on the Great Pyramid of Giza, antiquities officials said Thursday. The papyri were discovered near Wadi el-Jarf port, 25 kilometres (15 miles) south of the Gulf of Suez town of Zafarana, the antiquities ministry said. The find by a French-Egyptian team unearths papers telling of the daily lives of port workers who transported huge limestone blocks to Cairo during King Khufu's rule to build the Great Pyramid, intended to be his burial structure. One document...
  • The Unsolved Mystery of Mr. (Charles) Dickens

    06/28/2016 3:39:07 PM PDT · by NYer · 22 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | June 27, 2016 | SEAN FITZPATRICK
    June 9, 1870. Charles Dickens sat writing at his desk. He had been laboring more than was his custom on his latest book. Though the story was progressing well, Mr. Dickens was not feeling well. His left hand clawed at the air. His left foot dragged on the ground. And though he had recently retired from public performances with a final reading from Pickwick, his pen scarcely ceased its scratching. A profound and perplexing mystery was unfolding beneath that pen and Mr. Dickens’ knew it well. If only his readers might know it as well.It had been five years...
  • Discovery of 410 wooden tablets gives glimpse into life of London's first Romans (ed)

    06/01/2016 7:41:27 PM PDT · by Ray76 · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Jun 1, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    An archaeological dig has turned up the earliest known handwritten documents in Britain among hundreds of Roman waxed writing tablets. Some 410 wooden tablets have been discovered, 87 of which have been deciphered to reveal names, events, business and legal dealings and evidence of someone practising writing the alphabet and numerals. With only 19 legible tablets previously known from London, the find from the first decades of Roman rule in Britain provides a wealth of new information about the city's earliest Romans.
  • EPA Administrator: ‘We Rock’ at Writing Rules

    05/11/2016 5:05:32 PM PDT · by StCloudMoose · 32 replies
    cns news ^ | May 9, 2016 | By Penny Starr
    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy said Friday that the EPA is very good at making rules requiring individuals, businesses and state and local governments to comply with laws related to “protecting” the environment. “If anybody knows anything about EPA and writing rules--we rock at it,” McCarthy said at the Climate Action 2016 summit held last week in Washington, D.C. "We do them legally. We do them on the basis of sound science. And while there is a pause, there’s no pause in the action in the United States towards renewable energy and energy efficiency. We are going in...
  • Legislation would require cursive writing in schools

    03/26/2016 1:26:32 PM PDT · by SandRat · 56 replies
    Sierra Vista Herald ^ | Howard Fischer, Capitol Media Services
    PHOENIX — Insisting it's good from everything from civics to brain development, state lawmakers want to require students to know how to read and write in cursive. Legislation on the desk of Gov. Doug Ducey would mandate that schools include cursive reading and writing in their curriculum. Specifically, students would have to show by the end of fifth grade they are "able to create readable documents through legible cursive handwriting.'' But, unlike a requirement that students know how to read by the end of the third grade, there is nothing in the law that says students who can't display that...
  • These Are the 100 Most-Read Female Writers in College Classes

    02/25/2016 12:44:36 PM PST · by C19fan · 48 replies
    Time ^ | February 25, 2016 | David Johnson
    Toni Morrison and Jane Austen are among the most-read female writers on college campuses, a new TIME analysis found.
  • The Earliest Known Abecedary

    10/24/2015 5:58:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    A flake of limestone (ostracon) inscribed with an ancient Egyptian word list of the fifteenth century BC turns out to be the world's oldest known abecedary. The words have been arranged according to their initial sounds, and the order followed here is one that is still known today. This discovery by Ben Haring (Leiden University) with funding from Free Competition Humanities has been published in the October issue of the 'Journal of Near Eastern Studies'. The order is not the ABC of modern western alphabets, but Halaham (HLHM), the order known from the Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Arabian and Classical Ethiopian...
  • Pat Buchanan puts the horse before the cart

    08/31/2015 6:58:29 PM PDT · by CharlesOConnell · 12 replies
    Vanity | 8/31/2015 | Charles O'Connell
     Patrick Buchanan is usually a great writer. He must have had Scrooge's indigestion when he was writing today about the consequences to the GOP of impotently voting against Obama's Iran Deal…he thinks their veto response will demonstrate whether or not the Repubs can govern. "You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!" Charles Dickens, "Christmas Carol"  Buchanan goes off on a tangent about Nixon in China after the ChiComs had killed so many Yanks in...
  • Nostalgia is overrated

    02/13/2015 8:12:33 AM PST · by Academiadotorg · 31 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | February 12, 2015 | Malcolm A. Kline
    Nostalgia is overrated, a Harvard psychologist says. “The bad-dominates-good phenomenon is multiplied by a second source of bias, sometimes called the illusion of the good old days,” Harvard psychology professor Steven Pinker said at a forum sponsored by the Cato Institute last November. “People always pine for a golden age.” “They’re nostalgic about an era in which life was simpler and more predictable.” And Dr. Pinker has some cold water to throw at them, metaphorically speaking, of course. “When I told people that I was writing a book on why writing is so bad and how we might improve it,...
  • Calling all Christian writers!

    01/14/2015 2:06:56 PM PST · by binowski · 40 replies
    The Deseret News National Edition fills a void in the American media landscape through rigorous journalism for family- and faith-oriented audiences. Representing more than half of all U.S. news readers, this segment is consistently underserved by newsrooms that either overlook or do not report on readers' core values.
  • What English Pet Peeves do You Love to Hate?

    09/08/2014 6:29:29 AM PDT · by PeteePie · 179 replies
    OneHourSelfPub.com ^ | Sep 4, 2014 | Dave Bricker
    Discus­sions of English Language pet peeves pro­vide an enter­tain­ing forum for the expres­sion of ire. In fact, if a “pet” is some­thing we cher­ish, and a “peeve” is some­thing that annoys us, “pet peeves” are what we love to hate. Here’s a col­lec­tion of com­mon English solecisms—guaranteed not to lit­er­ally blow your mind: