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Keyword: xinjiang

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  • Ancient nomads spread earliest domestic grains along Silk Road, study finds

    04/05/2014 8:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 1, 2014 | Gerry Everding
    Charred grains of barley, millet and wheat deposited nearly 5,000 years ago at campsites in the high plains of Kazakhstan show that nomadic sheepherders played a surprisingly important role in the early spread of domesticated crops throughout a mountainous east-west corridor along the historic Silk Road... "Ancient wheat and broomcorn millet, recovered in nomadic campsites in Kazakhstan, show that prehistoric herders in Central Eurasia had incorporated both regional crops into their economy and rituals nearly 5,000 years ago, pushing back the chronology of interaction along the territory of the 'Silk Road' more than 2,000 years," Frachetti said... ...several strains of...
  • Kushan Empire (ca. 2nd century B.C.–3rd century A.D.)

    07/21/2013 10:08:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Metropolitan Museum of Art ^ | circa 2013 | MMA
    Under the rule of the Kushans, northwest India and adjoining regions participated both in seagoing trade and in commerce along the Silk Road to China. The name Kushan derives from the Chinese term Guishang, used in historical writings to describe one branch of the Yuezhi—a loose confederation of Indo-European people who had been living in northwestern China until they were driven west by another group, the Xiongnu, in 176–160 B.C. The Yuezhi reached Bactria (northwest Afghanistan and Tajikistan) around 135 B.C. Kujula Kadphises united the disparate tribes in the first century B.C. Gradually wresting control of the area from the...
  • New Indo-European Language Discovered

    06/21/2012 5:14:04 PM PDT · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | 6-19-2012 | John Shanks
    A linguistics researcher at the Macquarie University in Australia has discovered that the language, known as Burushaski, which is spoken by about 90,000 people who reside in a remote area of Pakistan, is Indo-European in origin. Prof Ilija Casule’s discovery, which has now been verified by a number of the world’s top linguists, has excited linguistics experts around the world. An entire issue of the eminent international linguistics journal the Journal of Indo-European Studies is devoted to a discussion of his findings later this month. More than fifty eminent linguists have tried over many years to determine the genetic relationship...
  • Cultural heritage: Takht Bhai offers a glimpse of life under Kanishka {Kushan Empire}

    04/02/2012 4:33:51 AM PDT · by Cronos · 5 replies
    The Tribune ^ | 10 Mar 2012 | Mahwish Qayyam
    A visit to Takht Bhai offers the chance to explore ruins dating back to the time of Kanishka, a Kushan emperor, famous for his military, political and spiritual feats.Buddhists offered prayers at the site and left statues to mark their gratitude once their wishes had been fulfilled, said Dr Shah Nazar Khan, from the Directorate of Archeology and Museums, K-P, while speaking to The Express Tribune. People visited the place in the final stages of life to meditate.Since the site is situated on top of a hill, it escaped the devastation wrought by successive invasions and is still well preserved,...
  • Unearthed cities in Southern Siberia could rewrite Aryan history

    10/04/2010 7:10:56 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 26 replies · 1+ views
    Sify News ^ | Sify News
    A new study has suggested that recently unearthed cities in Southern Siberia could rewrite Aryan history-as they are believed to be the original home of the Aryans. Twenty of the spiral-shaped settlements, believed to be the original home of the Aryan people, have been identified, and there are about 50 more suspected sites. They all lie buried in a region more than 640km long near Russia's border with Kazakhstan. The cities are apparently 3500-4000 years ago and are about the same size as several of the city-states of ancient Greece. If archaeologists confirm the cities as Aryan, they could be...
  • Folk wanderings in "the Heartland"

    07/07/2009 7:51:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 698+ views
    Gene Expression ScienceBlog ^ | Tuesday, July 7, 2009 | Razib
    Herodotus tells us of the Scythians, who ravaged the Middle East and Europe. The Romans later defeated Sarmatians on the plains of Pannonia. Even further back in history we know of the Indo-Aryan Mittani in Syria, while there are hints of a relationship between nomadic societies on the steppe of Eurasia and later settled populations in Eastern Europe, Iran & India. Because of the lack of literacy in most of the world before 500 B.C. we must rely on archaeology to connect the vaguest of these dots... Standard physical anthropological methods did yield results which suggested that populations of European...
  • Fragments Of The Tocharian

    01/30/2008 8:39:28 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 354+ views
    Salon.com ^ | 1-30-2008
    Fragments of the Tocharian Between 1902 and 1914 the German Ethnological Institute sent repeated expeditions into the great Taklamakan desert of Central Asia, in search of ancient manuscripts that had survived destruction due to the arid climate of the Tarim Basin. One expedition brought back fragments of a manuscript written in a hitherto unknown language but employing a familiar North Indian script. Later dubbed Tocharian A, the language was deciphered by two linguists at Germany's Gottingen University, Emil Siel and Wilhem Siegling. The parchment turned out to be part of the Maitreyasamiti-Nataka, a Sanskrit Buddhist work in the Mahayana canon...
  • Tocharians

    07/26/2006 1:11:31 PM PDT · by blam · 136 replies · 9,945+ views
    Answers.com ^ | unknown
    Tocharians The Tocharians were the easternmost speakers of an Indo-European language in antiquity, inhabiting the Tarim basin in what is now Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, northwestern People's Republic of China. Their unique culture spanned from the 1st millennium BCE to the end of the 1st millennium CE. Their language is called Tocharian. Archaeology The Tarim mummies suggest that precursors of these easternmost speakers of an Indo-European language may have lived in the region of the Tarim Basin from around 1800 BCE until finally they were assimilated by Uyghur Turks in the 9th century CE. "Tocharian donors", possibly the "Knights with...
  • Burushaski

    11/06/2004 10:34:09 PM PST · by Ptarmigan · 10 replies · 427+ views
    Burushaski is a language spoken in northern Pakistan and Kashmir. It is spoken by 40,000 to 50,000 people. It has no known relatives and some believe it maybe a remnant of a prehistoric language. Burushaski is like Ainu and Basque, language isolate with no known relatives. Language Museum Burushaski: An Extraordinary Language in the Karakoram MountainsWikipedia-Burushaski
  • LINGUISTICS: Early Date for the Birth of Indo-European Languages

    11/28/2003 10:24:23 AM PST · by Lessismore · 36 replies · 3,431+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-11-28 | Michael Balter
    Ever since British jurist Sir William Jones noted in 1786 that there are marked similarities between diverse languages such as Greek, Sanskrit, and Celtic, linguists have assumed that most of the languages of Europe and the Indian subcontinent derive from a single ancient tongue. But researchers have fiercely debated just when and where this mother tongue was first spoken. Now a bold new study asserts that the common root of the 144 so-called Indo-European languages, which also include English and all the Germanic, Slavic, and Romance languages, is very ancient indeed. In this week's issue of Nature, evolutionary biologist Russell...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Ancient mummies found buried with world's oldest cheese

    03/01/2014 3:15:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 29 replies
    L. A. Times ^ | 2-28-2014 | Jean Harris
    For some cheese lovers, the older and stinkier the cheese, the better. Well, what about a cheese that's been aging for 3,600 years? Yellow lumps, believed to be the world's oldest cheese, were found on mummies buried in the Taklamakan Desert in northwestern China. The cheese, which was found during archaeological excavations that took place between 2002 and 2004, dates to as early as 1615 BC. The cheese was found on the necks and chests of the mummies. The multiple layers of cowhide the mummies were buried in, and the dry, salty desert helped preserve the cheese....
  • Giant Chinese dustball circles the Earth

    07/21/2009 6:54:33 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 35 replies · 920+ views
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | July 21, 2009 | Malcolm Moore
    A giant Chinese dustball weighing hundreds of thousands of tons circled the world at high altitude in under two weeks, scientists have shown. A group of Chinese and Japanese scientists claimed that the dustball, which weighed 800,000 tons, was kicked up during a storm in 2007 in the Taklamakan desert. The desert, which is roughly the size of France, lies in China's far-Western Xinjiang province, and is fringed by mountains on three sides, including the Pamir mountains on the border with Afghanistan and the Karakoram range, an extension of the Himalayas. The dust ball was formed when a wind storm...
  • Fresco pieced together after 1,400 years in desert [ Taklamakan Dandanulike ]

    07/20/2006 8:06:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 245+ views
    People's Daily Online ^ | July 20, 2006 | Xinhua
    [I]n the heart of the Taklamakan... [t]he fresco of Buddhist tales was painted on the earthen walls of the Dandanulike Temple in the south of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Discovered in 30 pieces by a Sino-Japanese archaeology group in October 2002, it is believed to date back to the Tang Dynasty of the late seventh century... [E]xperts believe parts had been stolen and some taken by a Swiss botanist in the 1920s, as his name card and a dozen sheets of a German language newspaper were found at the site. The remainder had been damaged by wind and sand,...
  • Xinjiang unrest: China raises death toll to 50

    09/26/2014 4:54:11 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 8 replies
    BBC ^ | 26 September 2014
    26 September 2014 Last updated at 02:31 Xinjiang unrest: China raises death toll to 50 Fifty people died in violence on Sunday in Xinjiang, Chinese state media said, in what police called a "serious terrorist attack". Earlier this week state media reported the incident in Luntai county but gave the death toll as two. On Thursday a state news portal said 40 "rioters", six civilians and four police officers were killed. No reason was given for the delay in reporting. Violence has been escalating in Xinjiang in recent months. The region in China's far west is home to the Muslim...
  • 3000 year old trousers discovered in Chinese grave oldest ever found

    06/12/2014 10:39:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    phys.org ^ | Jun 03, 2014 | by Bob Yirka
    (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working in the ancient Yanghai graveyard in China's Tarim Basin has uncovered what appears to be the earliest example of trouser wearing. The research team has published a paper in the journal Quaternary International describing the pants and why they were likely developed to assist with riding horses. The Tarim Basin in western China is host to the famous Yanghai tombs, a large ancient burial ground that dates back thousands of years—thus far over 500 individual gravesites have been excavated. In this latest find, two adult males (believed to be herders and warriors) both approximately...
  • These Are The World's Oldest Pants

    05/31/2014 6:44:58 AM PDT · by blam · 33 replies
    BI ^ | 5-31-2014 | Bruce Bower
    Bruce BowerMay 31, 2014, 7:14 AM The oldest known trousers, including this roughly 3,000-year-old pair with woven leg decorations, belonged to nomadic horsemen in Central Asia. Two men whose remains were recently excavated from tombs in western China put their pants on one leg at a time, just like the rest of us. But these nomadic herders did so between 3,300 and 3,000 years ago, making their trousers the oldest known examples of this innovative apparel, a new study finds. With straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch, the ancient wool trousers resemble modern riding pants, says a team led by...
  • Redheaded Tocharian Mummies of the Uyghir Area, China

    12/06/2012 3:35:36 PM PST · by Renfield · 39 replies
    Frontiers of Anthropology ^ | 11-28-2012 | Dale Drinnon
    ~~~snip~~~ hey did a DNA test on the Cherchen man (the 3800 year old 6'6 tall dark blonde mummy and the oldest mummy found), and the beauty of Loulan (the red hair mummy), and both of these mummies contained East Asian Mongoloid DNA. Even the Chinese scientist were astonished. The Mongoloid component of the Tocharians are not from Han Chinese or pre Han Chinese, but most likely from Altaic types of Mongoloids such as Uyghurs, Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, and Mongolians. This obviously indicates that the Tocharians were already mixed for quite a few generations, since they looked mostly Caucasian. Very interesting....
  • Mystery of the Chinese mummy’s travel ban

    02/05/2011 1:25:40 PM PST · by The Comedian · 37 replies · 1+ views
    Sloppyunruh ^ | Feb. 5, 2011 | Aggregator
    China’s first contact with the West dates back to 200BC when China’s emperor Wu Di wanted to establish an alliance with the West against the marauding Huns, then based in Mongolia. However, the discovery of the mummies suggests that Caucasians were settled in a part of China thousands of years before Wu Di: the notion that they arrived in Xinjiang before the first East Asians is truly explosive. Xinjiang is dominated by the Uighurs, who resent what they see as intrusion by the Han Chinese. The tensions which have spilled over into violent clashes in recent years. Whatever the reason...
  • Xinjiang discovery provides intriguing DNA link

    05/01/2010 4:55:38 AM PDT · by Palter · 11 replies · 539+ views
    English.news.cn ^ | 28 April 2010 | Mu Xuequan
    The DNA of some 4,000 year-old bodies unearthed five years ago in Xinjiang, in northwest China, provides scientific evidence of early intermingling between people of European and Asian origin. Zhou Hui, a professor of life science and her team discovered that some of the earliest inhabitants of the Tarim Basin in the Taklamakan Desert were of European and Siberian descent. The basin, where hundreds of well-preserved mummies have been found since the 1980s, has attracted great attention from scientists worldwide. Professor Victor Mair of Pennsylvania University claimed in 2006, "From around 1800 B.C. the earliest mummies in the Tarim Basin...
  • The Mystery Behind the 5,000 Year Old Tarim Mummies

    08/31/2009 2:18:47 PM PDT · by BGHater · 28 replies · 2,209+ views
    Environmental Graffiti ^ | 31 Aug 2009 | EG
    A Tarim Basin mummy photographed circa 1910 Photo: Aurel Stein The door creaked open, and there in the gloom of the newly opened room, perfectly preserved despite the passing of thousands of years, a red-haired mummy with Caucasian features stared back. It was a life-changing moment for archaeologist Professor Victor Mair, and ten years on it still gave him chills. Mair had stumbled upon the recently discovered corpses of a man and his family in a museum in the Chinese city of Ürümqi, but the shock waves of the find would be felt far and wide. The 3000-year-old Cherchen...
  • White Masters in the deserts of China?

    03/11/2009 5:30:22 PM PDT · by BGHater · 11 replies · 867+ views
    Philip Coppens ^ | 11 Mar 2009 | Philip Coppens
    The discovery of Caucasoid mummies in China shows that East and West might have been meeting since the Bronze Age. Do they validate some of the ancient legends? Cherchen Man mummy Christopher Columbus is said to have been the first who broke down the barrier that was the Atlantic Ocean, that body of water that separated two continents. But no such barriers – whether natural or ideological – existed between Europe and the East – one could travel over land. Nevertheless, the discovery of Caucasoid mummies has provided not only indisputable evidence that Europeans travelled very far East, it has...
  • Mummies stir political row in China [Caucasian Mummies?]

    11/19/2008 2:13:56 PM PST · by MyTwoCopperCoins · 16 replies · 1,347+ views
    The Times of India ^ | 20 Nov 2008, 0001 hrs IST | The Times of India
    URUMQI (China): An exhibit in the museum in Urumqui gives the government's unambiguous take on the history of this border region: "Xinjiang has been an inalienable part of the territory of China," says one prominent sign. But walk upstairs and the ancient corpses on display seem to tell a different story. One called the Loulan Beauty lies on her back with her shoulder-length hair matted down her high cheekbones and long nose the most obvious signs that she is not what one thinks of as Chinese. The Loulan Beauty is one of more than 200 remarkably well-preserved mummies discovered in...
  • Mystery Mummy (National Geographic, 9:00PM EST tonight - Ancient Caucasian Mummies Found In China)

    12/02/2007 5:07:55 PM PST · by blam · 53 replies · 3,103+ views
    Mystery Mummy A National Geographic Special about the mysterious 4,000 year old Caucasian Mummies found in China will air on The National Geographic Channel at 9:00PM EST tonight. Click here to see a short video on the subject.The DirecTV satellite channel number is 276. I have a number of books on this subject and will monitor this thread through-out the movie and discuss it with anyone who desires.
  • China Striving For (Caucasian) Mummy Identification (2,800-YO)

    12/24/2006 4:43:09 PM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 1,830+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 12-24-2006 | Xinhua
    China striving for mummy identification URUMQI, China, Dec. 24 (UPI) -- A group of Chinese scientists are attempting to identify a 2,800-year-old mummy of an apparent Caucasian man found in an ancient tomb. The well-preserved mummy, that experts said is likely of a shaman in China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, has been under examination since being found in 2003, the Chinese news agency Xinhua reported. Especially intriguing to the scientists was the presence of a sack of marijuana leaves that archaeologists found buried with the leather-coat bound mummy. "From his outfit and the marijuana leaves, which have been confirmed by...
  • On The Presence Of Non-Chinese At Anyang

    08/16/2006 9:16:37 AM PDT · by blam · 70 replies · 10,821+ views
    Sino-Platonic Papers ^ | 4-2004 | Kim Haynes
    On the Presence of Non-Chinese at Anyang by Kim Hayes It has now become clear that finds of chariot remains, metal knives and axes of northern provenance, and bronze mirrors of western provenance in the tombs of Anyang indicate that the Shang had at least indirect contact with people who were familiar with these things. Who were these people? Where did they live? When did they arrive? Following the discovery of the Tarim Mummies, we now know that the population of the earliest attested cultures of what is present-day Xinjiang were of northwestern or western derivation. According to the craniometric...
  • Genetic testing reveals awkward truth about Xinjiang’s famous mummies (Caucasian)

    04/19/2005 9:08:48 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 8,454+ views
    Khaleej Times ^ | 4-19-2005
    Genetic testing reveals awkward truth about Xinjiang’s famous mummiesM (AFP) 19 April 2005 URUMQI, China - After years of controversy and political intrigue, archaeologists using genetic testing have proven that Caucasians roamed China’s Tarim Basin 1,000 years before East Asian people arrived. The research, which the Chinese government has appeared to have delayed making public out of concerns of fueling Uighur Muslim separatism in its western-most Xinjiang region, is based on a cache of ancient dried-out corpses that have been found around the Tarim Basin in recent decades. “It is unfortunate that the issue has been so politicized because it...
  • The Sand Dune Forgotten By Time (Caucasian Mummies In China - More )

    03/19/2005 3:48:39 PM PST · by blam · 67 replies · 5,922+ views
    China.Org ^ | 3-19-2005
    The Sand Dune Forgotten by Time Archaeologists working in the extreme desert terrain of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region have moved a step closer to unraveling the mystery of a 40-century-old civilization. They unearthed 163 tombs containing mummies during their ongoing and long excavation at the mysterious Xiaohe tomb complex. And it's all thanks to the translation of a diary kept by a Swedish explorer more than 70 years ago. "We have found more than 30 coffins containing mummies," said Idelisi Abuduresule, head of the Xinjiang Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute and the excavation team. The complex is believed to...
  • China Unearths Ancient Caucasian Tombs

    10/24/2004 12:43:53 PM PDT · by blam · 125 replies · 8,832+ views
    China unearths ancient Caucasian tombs AFP October 25, 2004 BEIJING: Chinese archaeologists have started unearthing hundreds of tombs in an arid north-western region once home to a mysterious civilization that most likely was Caucasian, state media said Sunday. The researchers have begun work at Xiaohe, near the Lop Nur desert in Xinjiang region, where an estimated 1000 tombs await excavation, according to Xinhua news agency. Their findings could help shed light on one of the greatest current archaeological riddles and answer the question of how this isolated culture ended up thousands of kilometres from the nearest Caucasian community. The tombs,...
  • Ancient European Remains Discovered In Qinghai (China)

    07/06/2004 11:02:03 AM PDT · by blam · 133 replies · 9,308+ views
    Ancient European remains discovered in Qinghai www.chinaview.cn 2004-07-06 15:32:53 XINING, July 6 (Xinhuanet) -- Archeologists confirmed that the human skeletons discovered this May in northwest China's Qinghai Province belonged to three Europeans who lived in China over 1,900 years ago. "The physical characteristics of the bones showed it is a typical European race," said Wang Minghui, an expert with the archeological institute under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. The skeletons were spotted at Zhongchuan Town of the province's eastern most Minhe Hui and Tu Autonomous County. Since 2002, archeologists have unearthed nine tombs of Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD)...
  • The Curse Of The Red-Headed Mummy

    12/12/2003 9:21:21 PM PST · by blam · 40 replies · 12,596+ views
    The Birdman.org ^ | 5-18-2001 | Heather Pringle
    THE CURSE OF THE RED-HEADED MUMMY5-18-2001 by Heather Pringle Until he first encountered the mummies of Xinjiang, Victor Mair was known mainly as a brilliant, if eccentric, translator of obscure Chinese texts, a fine sinologist with a few controversial ideas about the origins of Chinese culture, and a scathing critic prone to penning stern reviews of sloppy scholarship. Mair's pronouncements on the striking resemblance between some characters inscribed on the Dead Sea Scrolls and early Chinese symbols were intensely debated by researchers. His magnum opus on the origins of Chinese writing, a work he had been toiling away at for...
  • China Discovers Cross-Border Tunnels Leading to Xinjiang, North Korea

    08/26/2014 6:12:51 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 16 replies
    The Diplomat ^ | August 26, 2014 | Shannon Tiezzi
    China Discovers Cross-Border Tunnels Leading to Xinjiang, North Korea Images from a Chinese satellite show cross-border tunnels in sensitive regions. By Shannon Tiezzi August 26, 2014 In April 2013, China launched Gaofen-1, its first high-definition earth observation satellite (Gaofen-2 was launched just last week, on August 19). This week, China’s National Space Administration reported that Gaofen-1 had captured images showing “dozens of cross-border tunnels” in northwest Xinjiang and along the China-North Korea border. It’s unclear exactly what the tunnels are used for, but Chinese media tied their existence to previous reports on illegal China-North Korea border crossings, as well as...
  • 73 militants killed in air strikes, clash (Pakistan)

    05/22/2014 4:13:07 AM PDT · by csvset · 1 replies
    DAWN ^ | May 22, 2014 | Pazir Gul
    MIRAMSHAH: At least 73 suspected local and foreign militants were killed in a series of pre-dawn air strikes on hideouts and bases in North Waziristan and in a later clash following an attack on security personnel. An army major and three other security personnel died in the clash. The targets of the air strikes were strongholds of the Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement (Etim) — a militant outfit comprising largely Turkic-speaking militants from Uzbekistan and Uighurs from China’s north-western autonomous region of Xinjiang, a security official said. China has blamed Etim, which also uses the name of Turkistan Islamic Party, for...
  • Dozens Injured in Blast in Capital of China's Xinjiang Region

    04/30/2014 9:45:12 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 36 replies
    WSJ ^ | April 30, 2014 | James T. Areddy
    Dozens Injured in Blast in Capital of China's Xinjiang Region At Least 50 Injured in Explosion at Train Station, Local Media Report By James T. Areddy Updated April 30, 2014 10:03 a.m. ET A blast injured dozens Wednesday evening at a train station in the capital city of northwestern China's Xinjiang region, where President Xi Jinping traveled this week with a pledge to strike hard at terrorists. The explosion occurred at 7 p.m. and ambulances were rushing injured to the hospital, the People's Daily official government newspaper said in a post on its verified social media feed. The newspaper later...
  • Made in China...wine that may soon rival the best of Bordeaux

    05/25/2008 12:25:42 PM PDT · by DogBarkTree · 33 replies · 110+ views
    scotsman.com ^ | William Lyons and Nathalie Thomas
    BORDEAUX, Burgundy… Xinjiang. The world's wine map may have to be significantly re-drawn with figures showing more than a glass is being raised to China. Such is the pace of wine consumption in China that last year the country produced more than 700 million bottles with new statistics showing that production will outstrip Australia's by 2009. Supermarket chain Morrisons has already added two wines ADVERTISEMENT from the north-west of China to its portfolio, while London fine wine merchants Berry Brothers & Rudd (BBR) has predicted that, by 2058, China will have all the essential ingredients to make fine wine to...
  • Uighur leader: “We have plans for many attacks in China”

    03/18/2014 3:21:57 AM PDT · by blueplum · 19 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 18, 2014 5:45 am EDT | Terrence McCoy
    Traditionally, the Uighur separatists aren’t the sort to seek attention. Dwelling primarily in the mountains of Xinjiang Province in northwest China, they don’t maintain an active social media presence like the Taliban or al-Qaeda. They almost never post videos boasting of exploits. But over the last two weeks, amid so-far unsubstantiated speculation the Uighurs had some involvement in the disappearance of MH370, the Turkic-speaking Muslim group has gained greater international notoriety than perhaps ever before. :snip: The Uighur emergence began on March 1 when a group of them wielding knives stormed a train station in southern China and stabbed to...
  • Chinese Airline Passengers Demonstrate "Let's Roll" To Terrorist Hijackers

    07/03/2012 6:10:49 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 18 replies
    IBD Editorials ^ | July 3, 2012 | Editor
    Terrorism: Six hijackers were in for a surprise last week when they tried to commandeer a Tianjin Airlines jet bound for Urumqi, China. The passengers overpowered the gang, apparently killing two, and averted disaster. Seems "let's roll" translates very well into Chinese. In this case, the language was Uighur, the language of China's restive western state of Xinjiang, where an Islamic separatist movement with some links to al-Qaida has been active. Last Friday, in the city of Hotan, six ethnic Uighurs aged 26 to 30, rose from their seats after takeoff, three in front and three in back, and tried...
  • Q&A: China's restive far west

    10/30/2013 7:03:04 PM PDT · by TexGrill · 1 replies
    CNN ^ | 10/31/2013 | Katie Hunt
    Hong Kong (CNN) -- A connection to Xinjiang, a restive autonomous region in northwestern China, has emerged in the investigation into the jeep that plowed into crowds in Tiananmen Square on Monday, killing five and injuring at least 40. The incident, which has been identified as a terrorist attack, was "carefully planned, organized and premeditated," police said Wednesday on their official Weibo account online. Tuesday, police circulated a notice to hotels in Beijing related to a "major incident" listing names that suggested suspects belonged to the Uyghur ethnic group that comes from Xinjiang. The region has a long history of...
  • China's west erupts in violence 2nd time in 3 days

    06/28/2013 11:06:12 AM PDT · by mojito · 10 replies
    AP ^ | 6/28/2013 | Didi Tang and Gillian Wong
    BEIJING (AP) -- A tense minority region in China's far west erupted in violence Friday for the second time in three days, barely hours after the government called the earlier unrest a "terrorist attack" and raised the death toll to 35. State media gave few details in a brief dispatch about Friday's unrest, saying it was "a violent attack" that took place on a pedestrian street in Hotan, a city in Xinjiang, a region that has seen China's minority Uighurs clash with the ethnic Han majority. No details on casualties were released.
  • Red China’s Economic Strategies for Central Asia: Building Roads to Afghan Strategic Resources

    09/25/2012 10:46:49 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 7 replies
    Jamestown Foundation Eurasia Daily Monitor ^ | 9/21/2012 | Zabikhulla S. Saipov
    Recent Chinese diplomatic maneuvers in Central Asia, both bilateral and multilateral, show that Beijing’s strategy treats the region as a corridor for reaching resource bases in Afghanistan, the Middle East and Africa. Central Asia is thus part of China’s broader blueprint of securing strategic resources and supplies to feed its developing economy (Z. Saipov, China Oil & Gas Monitor, Week 21, Issue 396, News Base, May 31, p. 3–4). Hu Jintao (L) and Islam Karimov Illustratively, Chinese Vice Premier Hui Liangyu’s two-week official tour of Congo, Tanzania, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan on September 1–13 (English.sina.com, September 6) supports the premise that...
  • Amnesty slams China for Uighur crackdown three years after riots

    07/05/2012 12:03:48 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 9 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Jul 5, 2012 2:15am EDT | (Reporting by Sui-Lee Wee; Editing by Ron Popeski)
    China has detained and intimidated dozens of ethnic Uighurs in the far western region of Xinjiang for speaking out on rights abuses following riots in the regional capital three years ago, Amnesty International said. In July 2009, the capital city of Urumqi was rocked by violence between majority Han Chinese and minority Uighurs that killed nearly 200 people. Many of the Muslim Uighurs, who speak a Turkic language and call Xinjiang home, chafe at Beijing's rule. Since then, China has executed nine people it accused of instigating the riots, detained and prosecuted hundreds and ramped up spending on security, according...
  • RedChina: Insurgency in Xinjiang Complicates Chinese-Pakistani Relations

    04/22/2012 12:23:49 AM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 5 replies
    China typically exercises caution when making public statements about terrorist attacks in Xinjiang. When China blames attacks on Pakistan-based terrorist organizations, such as the possibly defunct East Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM), it risks adding tensions to the Sino-Pakistani “all-weather” friendship. [1] However, when China blames attacks on local Uyghurs it is tantamount to an admission that its policies in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region have not created a “harmonious society.” Zhou Yongkang (left), member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC), shakes hands with a local Uygur farmer...
  • Uyghur Unrest in Xinjiang Shakes Sino-Pakistani Relations

    08/26/2011 11:35:34 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 9 replies
    AFPC Terrrorism Monitor ^ | 8/19/2011 | Raffaello Pantucci
    It has been a difficult summer for Red China’s restive western province Xinjiang. A series of incidents characterized as terrorism have struck two of the province’s cities, causing death, destruction and ethnic tension. This picture was further complicated when the government of the city of Kashgar published a statement online that claimed at least one of the perpetrators had been trained in Pakistan (Xinhua, August 1). The allegation by Communist Chinese officials cast a shadow over Sino-Pakistani relations, a bilateral relationship that had been characterized in Kashgar just the month before by Pakistani Ambassador to China Masood Khan as “higher...
  • China Points to Pakistan in Xinjiang Attack

    08/01/2011 12:41:36 PM PDT · by La Enchiladita · 19 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | August 2, 2011 | Jason Dean
    China pointed a finger at Pakistan, one of its closest foreign partners, as it blamed one of two deadly attacks over the weekend in the northwestern Xinjiang region on Muslim extremists trained across the Pakistani border.‬ Police also "executed on the spot" two more suspected attackers in the city of Kashgar, according to a local government statement, while paramilitary police with shotguns and automatic weapons patrolled the streets to prevent further unrest. Local authorities said 20 people were killed in all in the attacks by knife-wielding members of the Uighur ethnic minority on Saturday and Sunday in the second week...
  • China blames extremists for Xinjiang attack(trained in Pakistan?)

    08/01/2011 7:02:25 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 11 replies
    NHK ^ | 08/01/11
    China blames extremists for Xinjiang attack China says a group led by militants trained in Pakistan was behind Sunday's attack in Kashgar in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region. In a statement on the Internet, the government in Kashgar says a suspect detained after the attack told police that the leaders of their group belong to a separatist organization called the "East Turkistan Islamic Movement." They reportedly learned how to make explosives in Pakistan before carrying out Sunday's attack. On Sunday night, a group of attackers stabbed people on the streets of Kashgar, killing 6 people and injured 15. Five suspects...
  • Deadly Violence Hits Xinjiang (China's War With Islam)

    07/31/2011 9:25:52 AM PDT · by PGR88 · 4 replies
    South China Morning Post ^ | July 31, 2011 | Agence France Presse
    Knife-wielding attackers killed 10 people in ChinaÂ’s Xinjiang region and another four were shot dead by police as a wave of violence swept the ethnically-torn area, state media and officials said on Sunday. The unrest occurred in the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar in two separate attacks, and local residents said on Sunday the city centre was under lockdown, with security forces patrolling the streets. Xinjiang has seen several outbreaks of ethnic violence in recent years as the mainly Muslim Uyghur minority bridles under what it regards as oppression by the government and the unwanted immigration of ethnic Han...
  • Attacks in China's Xinjiang, 13 dead

    07/31/2011 5:50:22 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 10 replies
    NHK ^ | 07/31/11
    Attacks in China's Xinjiang, 13 dead In China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on Saturday night, two men brandishing knives attacked passers-by, killing 6 people. At least 6 others were killed in explosions that occurred near the area just before the incident. China's state-run Xinhua news agency says the 2 men jumped into a truck in Kashgar city. Then they drove into a crowd of people. The pair stabbed 6 people to death. One of the attackers died while being captured. Xinhua says that about an hour before the attack, 2 explosions occurred near the scene, one from a minivan, which...
  • Blast in China's Kashgar kills at least 3: reports (back-to-back attacks on Sat & Sun)

    07/31/2011 4:01:17 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 8 replies
    Reuters ^ | 07/31/11 | Terril Yue Jones
    Blast in China's Kashgar kills at least 3: reports By Terril Yue Jones BEIJING | Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:25am EDT (Reuters) - An explosion rocked the far-west Chinese city of Kashgar Sunday, killing at least three people including a policeman in the latest in a series of attacks in the region this month, the state-run news agency Xinhua reported. The explosion came about 16 hours after two other blasts were reported in Kashgar and eight people were killed in a knife attack in the city, in the restive Xinjiang region near Tajikistan. A group of Uighur exiles from the...
  • 18 Reported Dead in Xinjiang Violence

    China on Wednesday raised the death toll to 18 from a clash at a police station in the restive far western region of Xinjiang, saying that 14 "rioters" died along with two policemen and two hostages. Government officials previously said at least four people were killed in what they described as a terrorist attack but which the Germany-based exile group World Uyghur Congress said was an attack on peaceful protesters. The congress had said 20 Uighurs were killed - 14 beaten to death and 6 shot dead - and 70 arrested, when police opened fire on protesters, leading to fighting...
  • Armed men attack police station in China’s Xinjiang province, killing officers

    07/18/2011 5:18:27 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 39 replies
    WP ^ | 07/18/11 | Keith B. Richburg
    Armed men attack police station in China’s Xinjiang province, killing officers By Keith B. Richburg, Published: July 18 BEIJING —Attackers armed with Molotov cocktails and explosives stormed a police station in China’s restive Muslim province of Xinjiang on Monday, killing and wounding several police officers, taking hostages and setting the building on fire, according to a local official and a report from the state-run news agency Xinhua. Several attackers and some hostages were killed when police converged on the besieged police station, in the crowded “grand bazaar” area in the city of Hotan, and several bystanders in a nearby commercial...