Free Republic 4th Qtr 2020 Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $25,585
29%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 29% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: youngerdryas

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Ancient human settlement was obliterated by a COMET that exploded in Earth's atmosphere and sent fragments of molten glass 'hot enough to melt cars' flying to the ground 12,800 years ago

    03/10/2020 10:32:32 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 83 replies
    DailyMail ^ | 10 March 2020 | Ian Randall
    The event destroyed a village found in the Abu Hureyra dig site in Syria... The impact is also believed to have contributed to the extinction of many large animals, including mammoths as well as North American horses and camels. Experts believe the explosion helped bring about the demise of the North American Clovis culture and usher in an episode of climatic cooling. The Abu Hureyra site is located on the edge of a vast region known as the Younger Dryas Boundary (YDB) strewnfield, which incorporates around 30 sites across Europe, the Americas and parts of the Middle East. The strewnfield...
  • Did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of ice-age animals?

    10/25/2019 1:17:29 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 67 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 25, 2019 | by Carol J.g. Ward, University of South Carolina
    A controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans is gaining traction from research sites around the world. The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis, controversial from the time it was presented in 2007, proposes that an asteroid or comet hit the Earth about 12,800 years ago causing a period of extreme cooling that contributed to extinctions of more than 35 species of megafauna including giant sloths, sabre-tooth cats, mastodons and mammoths. It also coincides with a serious decline in early...
  • space Here's More Evidence That Earth Got Hit by Something Huge 12,800 Years Ago

    10/07/2019 9:42:49 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 113 replies
    gizmodo uk ^ | 06 Oct 2019 at 6:00AM | George Dvorsky on
    Along with locations in North and South America, Greenland, Western Europe, and the Middle East, we can now add southern Africa to the list of places where scientists have uncovered evidence of a calamitous event that happened 12,800 years ago. This evidence of a 12,800-year-old platinum spike in Africa is the first to be found on the continent, and it’s yet further evidence in support of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis. According to this theory, either a comet or asteroid struck Earth during the Pleistocene, triggering an impact winter that saw temperatures plummet around the globe. The associated loss of...
  • Bye, Bye Beringia (8,000 Year Old Site In Florida)

    08/11/2003 7:26:47 PM PDT · by blam · 133 replies · 9,427+ views
    Explore North ^ | 8-12-2003 | Bill Jones
    Bye Bye, Beringia Anthropology and Archaeology of The Americas by Bill Jones One might think that Archeology sites throughout the World have produced many datable human remains. Nothing could be further from the truth. Ancient human remains have so rarely been found that these singular findings could not be connected to others to form chronologies about human evolution. The scarcity of human remains to be analyzed has prevented the sciences of Anthropology and Archaeology from forming conclusions about the cultural levels of ancient humans. We try to measure the culture of a people in terms of the totality of their...
  • Vintage Skulls

    02/22/2003 9:06:38 AM PST · by blam · 140 replies · 4,437+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | March/April 2003 | Colleen P. Popson
    VINTAGE SKULLS Researcher Silvia Gonzalez examines a 13,000-year-old skull. (Liverpool John Moores University) The oldest human remains found in the Americas were recently "discovered" in the storeroom of Mexico's National Museum of Anthropology. Found in central Mexico in 1959, the five skulls were radiocarbon dated by a team of researchers from the United Kingdom and Mexico and found to be 13,000 years old. They pre-date the Clovis culture by a couple thousand years, adding to the growing evidence against the Clovis-first model for the first peopling of the Americas. Of additional significance is the shape of the skulls, which are...
  • The First Americans May Have Come By Water

    12/10/2001 7:30:51 PM PST · by blam · 73 replies · 2,654+ views
    The First Americans May Have Come by Water by E. James Dixon If the foragers who created Clovis culture walked into North America, they had to pass through the long-described “ice-free corridor.” But a growing body of evidence indicates that pathway between the great glaciers of the last Ice Age was closed — in fact, the way south may have been blocked until centuries after the dawn of Clovis. If the first Americans could not walk into the New World, how did they get there? Coastal or ocean routes navigated by watercraft are the most likely explanation. No reliably dated ...
  • Calico: A 200,000-year Old Site In The Americas?

    12/17/2001 2:22:22 PM PST · by blam · 164 replies · 13,626+ views
    ASA On Line ^ | unknown
    Calico: A 200,000-year old site in the Americas? New World archaeological sites inferred to be even slightly older than the 11.5 ka Clovis complexes have been controversial; so claims for a 200 ka site in North America have heretofore been treated with substantial disdain. But the acceptance of Monte Verde and Diring may soon change that. The classic "ancient site" in the New World is "Calico," located in the Central Mojave Desert of California (Shlemon and Budinger, 1990). Two issues have dogged acceptance of Calico by mainstream archaeologists: (1) the authenticity of the artifacts; are they truly the product of ...
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 36 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...
  • America 'discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe'

    02/28/2012 7:44:29 PM PST · by Theoria · 51 replies · 5+ views
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | 28 Feb 2012 | David Keys
    New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World. A remarkable series of several dozen European-style stone tools, dating back between 19,000 and 26,000 years, have been discovered at six locations along the US east coast. Three of the sites are on the Delmarva Peninsular in Maryland, discovered by archaeologist Dr Darrin Lowery of the University of Delaware. One is in Pennsylvania and another in Virginia. A sixth was discovered by scallop-dredging fishermen on the seabed 60...
  • Americas Settled 15,000 Years Ago, Study Says

    03/13/2008 2:12:58 PM PDT · by blam · 50 replies · 1,270+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 3-13-2008 | Stefan Lovgren
    Americas Settled 15,000 Years Ago, Study Says Stefan Lovgren for National Geographic NewsMarch 13, 2008 A consensus is emerging in the highly contentious debate over the colonization of the Americas, according to a study that says the bulk of the region wasn't settled until as late as 15,000 years ago. Researchers analyzed both archaeological and genetic evidence from several dozen sites throughout the Americas and eastern Asia for the paper. "In the past archaeologists haven't paid too much attention to molecular genetic evidence," said lead author Ted Goebel, an archaeologist at Texas A&M University in College Station. "We have brought...
  • Does Skull Prove That The First Americans Came From Europe?

    11/24/2007 11:28:47 AM PST · by blam · 90 replies · 930+ views
    UTexas.edu ^ | 12-03-2002 | Steve Conner
    Does skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe? By Steve Connor Science Editor 03 December 2002 Scientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and...
  • Constructing The Solutrean Solution

    08/28/2007 11:34:31 AM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 1,063+ views
    Clovis In The Southeast.Net (Smithsonian) ^ | 8-28-2007 | Dennis Stanford - Bruce Bradley
    Constructing the Solutrean Solution Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley Smithsonian Institution University of Exeter At the 1999 Clovis and Beyond Conference held in Santa Fe, we presented a hypothesis, now known as the "Solutrean Solution", to explain the origin of Clovis technology. The hypothesis is based on the fact that there is little commonality between Clovis and Northeast Asian technologies on the one hand, while on the other, there are many technological traits shared between Clovis and the Solutrean culture of Paleolithic Europe. In the past, scholars have rejected the idea of a historical connection between the two cultures because...
  • Experts doubt Clovis people were first in Americas

    02/23/2007 9:34:17 AM PST · by george76 · 100 replies · 1,975+ views
    yahoo...Reuters ^ | Feb 22 | Will Dunham
    The Clovis people, known for their distinctive spear points, likely were not the first humans in the Americas, according to research placing their presence as more recent than previously believed. Using advanced radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers writing in the journal Science on Thursday said the Clovis people, hunters of large Ice Age animals like mammoths and mastodons, dated from about 13,100 to 12,900 years ago. That would make the Clovis culture, known from artifacts discovered at various sites including the town of Clovis, New Mexico, both younger and shorter-lived than previously thought. Previous estimates had dated the culture to about...
  • Penon Woman

    12/17/2006 4:21:22 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 1,763+ views
    Penon WomanPenon WomanScientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and Oxford's Research Laboratory of Archaeology have dated the skull to about 13,000 years old, making it...
  • Archaeologist says Va. bolsters claim on how people got to America [ Solutrean ]

    05/10/2006 10:09:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 598+ views
    Richmond Times-Dispatch ^ | May 11, 2006 | A.J. Hostetler
    The Smithsonian archaeologist pursuing the contentious claim that ancient Europeans fleeing the Ice Age settled in America says artifacts unearthed in the Chesapeake Bay region support his theory. Smithsonian Institution curator of archaeology Dennis Stanford argues that about 18,000 years ago, Solutrean hunters from the coasts of France, Spain and Portugal followed seals and other marine mammals for their fur, food and fuel across a partially frozen north Atlantic Ocean to the New World... "Pre-Clovis is a fact in North and South America," archaeologist Michael Collins of the University of Texas at Austin said this year at a symposium on...
  • Stone Age Columbus

    12/15/2005 7:19:43 AM PST · by ASA Vet · 24 replies · 1,914+ views
    BBC ^ | Dec 15, 2005 | BBC programme summary
    Who were the first people in North America? From where did they come? How did they arrive? The prehistory of the Americas has been widely studied. Over 70 years a consensus became so established that dissenters felt uneasy challenging it. Yet in 2001, genetics, anthropology and a few shards of flint combined to overturn the accepted facts and to push back one of the greatest technological changes that the Americas have ever seen by over five millennia. The accepted version of the first Americans starts with a flint spearhead unearthed at Clovis, New Mexico, in 1933. Dated by the mammoth...
  • The Solutrean Solution--Did Some Ancient Americans Come from Europe?

    09/24/2004 7:31:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 2,961+ views
    Clovis and Beyond ^ | 1999 | Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley
    Years of research in eastern Asia and Alaska have produced little evidence of any historical or technological connection between the Asian Paleolithic (Stone Age) and Clovis peoples. Also, the southeastern United States has produced more Clovis sites than the West, and a few radiocarbon dates suggest some of them may predate those in the western states. If correct, that hardly fits the notion that Clovis technology originated in northeast Asia or Alaska. Over the years, various scholars have noted similarities between Clovis projectile points and "Solutrean" points, the product of a Paleolithic culture on the north coast of Spain between...
  • Island Hopping To A New World

    02/18/2004 2:24:06 PM PST · by Fedora · 28 replies · 1,037+ views
    U.S. News ^ | 2/23/2004 | Alex Markels
    Special Report 2/23/04 Island Hopping To A New World The first Americans may have arrived not on foot but by boat from Asia, even Europe By Alex Markels Digging in a dank limestone cave in Canada's Queen Charlotte Islands last summer, 21-year-old Christina Heaton hardly noticed the triangular piece of chipped stone she'd unearthed in a pile of muddy debris. But as her scientist father, Timothy, sifted through the muck, he realized she'd struck pay dirt. "Oh my God!" he yelled to her and the team of other researchers scouring the remote site off the coast of British Columbia. "It's...
  • Iberia, Not Siberia

    12/21/2003 9:48:22 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 3,482+ views
    Team Atlantis ^ | 12-6-2000 | Michael A Arbuthnot
    IBERIA, NOT SIBERIA?A Look at the Evidence Supporting a Late Pleistocene Migration to the New World from Europe Michael A. Arbuthnot ANT 5152 Paleoindian Archaeology Dr. Michael Faught December 6th, 2000 Perhaps the most provocative question facing North American paleo-archaeologists is the origin of the Clovis complex. Traditional models have placed Clovis origins in Asia, though one controversial theory contends that Clovis progenitors may have migrated from Iberia (Spain, France, and Portugal). This theory suggests that the descendants of an Upper Pleistocene culture known as Solutrean were the first unquestionable inhabitants of the New World. The recent revitalization of a...
  • Rediscovering America. (The New World May Be 20,000 Years Older Than Experts Thought)

    12/10/2003 1:30:57 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 2,783+ views
    Blue Corn Comics (?) ^ | Charles W, Petit
    Rediscovering AmericaThe New World may be 20,000 years older than experts thought BY CHARLES W. PETIT Late in the afternoon last May 17, a tired archaeological team neared the end of a 14-hour day winching muck to the deck of a Canadian Coast Guard vessel. It was in water 170 feet deep in Juan Perez Sound, half a mile offshore among British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands. For four days, team members had fruitlessly sieved undersea mud and gravel. Then, in the slanting light of sunset, a deckhand drew from the goop a triangular blade of dark basalt. Its sharp edge...